The East Carolinian, December 7, 1982






Bhz
(Earolmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tuesday, December 7, 1982
Greenville, N.C
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Chairman Of Trustees Steps Down From Post
ECU NEWS BUREAU Pholo
Futrell Stepping Down
Unanimous Vote Gives $600
ByGREGRIDEOUT
Ashley B. 1 utrell. Chairman of
the ECU Board o Trustees since
August of 1981, resigned from his
post Saturday, citing personal
reasons tor his decision. C. Ralph
Kinsey, the ice chairman, was
automatical!) appointed to fill the
remainder ol Futrell's term, which
expires June 30, 1983.
Futrell has been a trustee since
1969. when Gov. Bob Scott ap-
pointed him to fill a vacancy. He
was reelected chairman in August of
1982.
"The future of East Carolina is
important to all oi us futrell said
in tendering his resignation. "If we
must fight for recognition, then let
us be ready to do battle. The
greatness we see ahead will only be
stilled by the lack of greatness in the
hearts of those in command. As you
bleed purple and sweat gold, let
each drop be an element of
challenge and not a token of ac-
complishment
Futrell was himself at the head of
this battle for recognition. In 1964
he was elected to the North Carolina
State Senate, and during his six year
stay there, he fought a number of
wars for ECU. Among them were
the creation of the medical school
and the seeking of university status
for ECU.
In 1969 Gov. Bob Scott offered
Futrell a seat on the N.C. Board of
Education, which he declined. But
when a seat on ECU's Board of
Trustees opened up, he accepted.
Futrell, who is publisher of the
Washington Daily News, was in-
strumental in the university's search
for a new chancellor following Dr.
Thomas Brewer's resignation in
September of 1981. He supported
Dr. John Howell's appointment to
the chancellorship last January.
"As I look back over almost 14
years Futrell said, "there have
been ups and downs, many happy
moments and some trying ones, but
there have been tew dull ones
futrell's resignation was accepted
by the board oi trustees, and a mo-
tion was passed to "express deep ap-
preciation to Mr. Futrell for his
many years of service to Fast
Carolina University and the board
of trustees
The new chairman, C. Ralph
Kinsey. is a Charlotte attorney and a
1964 graduate of ECU. He was a
member of the board from 1972-73,
and has been serving his present
term since 1978.
Kinsey praised futrell tor his
"exemplary service" to the universi-
ty. "Ashley Futrell has been a
devoted missionary and spokesman
for this university and its mission to
serve the people
Futrell said yesterday that he
wished Kinsey well and cautioned
him that there is still a lot left to be
done at ECU. Futrell said the
university has too often been the
target of unwarranted criticism and
that it has the potential tor
greatness.
futrell expects the board to re-
appoint Kinsey when his term ends
in June.
Chancellor John M Howell
thanked futrell tor the great deal ot
support he had given him since
becoming chancellor "I regret his
leaving he said.
A motion by trustee C lifton
Moore was passed moving lames H
Maynard to the position ol vice
chairman. Maynard is a Raleigh
resident and president and chairman
ol the board ol Golden (
Corp. Mavnard is a 1965 gradt
ot ECU.
SGA Funds Escort Service
B PATRICK O'NEILL
Muff Wrilrr
The SGA cleared the wa tor a
new campus escort service called
"Pirate Walk" to begin on schedule
this January.
In a unanimous vote, the SGA
voted to appropriate S6X) in initial
funds, requested b the Student
Resident Life Association, to begin
the project.
Atter hearing a descriptive over-
view ol the proposal bv SRA Escort
Committee head Paul Sumreil and a
recommendation ol the protect b
SGA President Eric Henderson, the
appropriations request tor "the
SGA-SRA escort service" was in-
troduced on the Moor by legislator
John Greer and quieklv won ap-
proval. Henderson and Sumreil
have boih been active in the pnic(
from its inception. The othei
members of the SRA Escortom-
mittee and SRA President Iot
Russo have also worked deligentl)
on the project.
Essentially Pirate Walk is to pro-
vide an atter dark escort service to
students walking from one on-
campus location to another. Sumreil
also noted that off-campus sorority
houses would be included in the ser-
vice.
Sumreil said that Pirate Walk,
which is scheduled to begin Jan. 17,
the week after spring classes begin,
will be coordinated through a
special telephone line which pro-
spective escortees would use.
Sumreil said the group had re-
quested the number 757-WALK,
but they still weren't sure if it was
available.
"We're dividing the campus into
regions Sumreil said. Each region
will have a central location. "The
shortest time it's going to take for
the escort to get to the girl is our
mam concern Sumreil added. The
three locations will be West Cam-
pus. Central Campus, and College
Hill. Sumreil also added that all of
the women's and co-ed dorms
would each have a dorm coor-
dinator who would hei'p in the
dispatching Ot escorts.
ccording to Sumreil, all potental
irters would go through a securi-
ty check thai included being checked
out bv the State Bureau ot ln-
vestigatu �n r ;omputer tiles.
Attei a ival, the escorter
would be pui on a permanent time
schedule, and issued an "escort
badge" which they would be re-
quired to show betore the escort
began. A person using the special
phone numbei would be told in ad-
vance the name of the escorter who
was assigned to the walk. The
escorter would also be required to
check back with the special operator
after the escort is completed.
In his address to the SGA,
Henderson said that Pirate Walk
was a modified version of a similar
service being provided at UNC-
Chapel Hill. He pointed out room
224 in Mendenhall would probably
be used as the headquarters for the
new service.
The S600 appropriation will be
used for several purposes. Approx-
imately SI00 would be needed for
phone installation. Additional
funds would be provided to fund
three staff positions for director,
assistant director and
secretarytreasurer. The Pirate
Walk director will receive SlOO per
semester while the assitant directoi
and secretarytreasurer will get $75
each per semester.
Sumreil said that because of the
small salary they would be looking
for people who felt a strong per-
sonal dedication to the project.
Other funds will also be needed for
a major promotional campaign
which will begin during the first
week of the spring semester. Accor-
See SGA. Page 5
SRA Kscort C ommittee head Paul Sumreil Biex fln - "o�� �� Stanley leabv
of Ihe SC.A I he leK.sla.�rs -ppropri.led funding Jr.h� " CamPUS 'dt � service to members
inJanuarv. m ��� �he service b a unanimouv w ik . .
�aiuinous vote. I nv-sstem is set to begin
Law Board Approves Charns
By PATRICK O'NUii -4�M MM�3
uncer-
iX'lron
Motor Vehicles Division Lists
Names For Draft Registration
B PATRICK O'NEILL
Slgff Wnlrr
Ihe North Carolina Division ot
Motor Vehicles has agreed to supply
the Selective Service System with
close to a quarter million names of
North Carolina men between the
ages ol IK and 22 to aid the SSS in
their efforts to identify men who
have failed to register for the
military draft.
According to the department's
deputy commissioner, Bill Perry,
the state's driver license file is a
"complete public record" and was
made available to the SSS at their
request.
"They (SSS) are paying us $4,000
for this information Perry told
The Last Carolinian during a
telephone interview from his
Raleigh office. The $4,000 payment
was for the purpose of recouping
the cost to the NC-DMV of process-
ing the names on their computers.
Babara Mann, a counselor with
the Raleigh-based Draft Informa-
tion Service which provides counsel-
ing for draft-age men, said she saw
no illegalities involved in the NC-
DMV decision, but that she was
"dismayed" by it.
"We're dismayed that this is go
ing to be done, especially with the
current status of litigation related to
draft registration Mann said.
She was referring to last month's
District Court case in California
which declared former President
Carter's 1980 draft registration law
invalid on technical grounds. The
California judge, Terry Hatten Jr
also dismissed failure-to-register
charges against David Wayte on the
grounds that the federal government
had selectively prosecuted him.
Perry noted that the transfer of
names to the SSS was completed this
weekend. He added that the deci-
sion to comply with the SSS request
was made personally by N.C. Com-
missioner of Motor Vehicles R.W.
Wilkins.
Mann believes that the NC-DMV
decision to supply the names to SSS
will put "even more pressure" on
the individuals who are undecided
about registration and those who
conscientiously have chosen not to
register. D1S is opposed to both
draft registration and the military
draft.
Dean Bearden Appointed To
Newly-Created Position As
Assistant To The Chancellor
By (,RK(. HIDEOUT
Nf tdilor
ECU School of Business Dean
James Bearden was named yester-
day to the newly-created post of
assistant to the chancellor for public
service, according to Chancellor
John M. How ell. Bearden, who is
stepping down as dean to assume
the role of director of the Branch
Banking and Trust Company Center
for Management and Development,
will begin work at his additional
position immediately.
The new job was suggested to the
administration by the Southern
Association of Colleges and Schools
during a visit this fall. The associa-
tion was here for reaccredidation of
the univerisity.
Bearden's new role will involve
coordinating the activities of ECU's
public service programs, such as the
Regional Development Center and
the Institute for Coastal and Marine
Resources.
Howell said that before the new
position was created, public service
projects were under two separate
departments � Institutional Ad-
vancement and Planning, and
Academic Affairs.
Bearden, who is out of town, was
unavailable for comment. His office
confirmed the appointment.
Bearden has been on the ECU
faculty since 1959 and became dean
of the business school in 1968. He
will assume the directorship of the
management center fulltime in
January.
ECU NIWS IU1EAU Photo
Bearden To Fill New Post
B PATRICK O'NEII f
SI.ft Wriler
UNC law school graduate Mex
C harns has been granted a license to
practice law in North Carolina en
ding a six month period ol
tainty and struggle tor the
native.
The N.C. Board of La
aminers V ednesdav rev�r
� , " ,tc'scu an
earlier decision by three ot
members and ruled that Charns was
morally fit to practice law.
Charns, 26. who spent approx-
imately 2 weeks in federal prison
last summer for a civil disobedience
conviction, was initially denied his
license by a three-member morals
panal which found that he didn't
possess the "character and general
fitness requisite for an attorney
The panel originally said that
Charns did not have the moral
character needed "to be entitled to
the high regard and confidence of
the public
"I feel ecstatic Charns said
minutes after receiving the news of
the board's reversal. "It's been six
long months
Charns was arrested along with
three other students last March 27
for "impeding traffic" during a
demonstration at fort Bragg
military base in Fayetteville, N.C.
He was protesting the training of
1000 El Salvadorean soldiers in the
United States who were then being
trained at the base.
"I followed my conscience and
took a stand against what my coun-
try is doing in El Salvador Charns
told The East Carolinian in an Oc-
tober interview when he first receiv-
ed news of his denial.
During the waiting period for
Wednesday's appeal to the full
board, Charns' case gained
statewide attention as numerous
newspapers throughout the state
gave him editorial support.
Kenneth S. Broun, dean of the
UNC law school, and former ECU
Catholic chaplain Father Charles
MulHolland were two of the six
people who gave character witness
testimony in Charns' behalf during
the three hour closed hearing.
Charns himself also took the stand.
In its concluding notice to Charns
the board said it was satisfied that
Charns did possess "good moral
character and that he is entitled to
the high regard and confidence of
the public and possesses the
qualifications of character and
general fitness requisite for any at-
law m the
torne and counselor ol
state ol North Carolina '
Robert S. Mahler, an attornev
who works with Charns m tne
Durham law offices ot Loflin and
ofun and represented him m the
hearing, said that the hearins
ell and Ale answered hi
lions well
"I don't think there was anv
d'Pute at all about his moral fitness
Man
ei �.i i
to be a lawver
the hearing
"The tull hoard realized
three-member panel had m ega
justification tor denying
C harns said
me.
went
ques-
ts hams said he is
terested in pra
civil rights law tor
North Carolina.
espev ta �
enm

due
Campus Studs Highlight
New Buccaneer Calendar
very sexy.
That's how u ��
Buccaneer editor L
Coleman describee ,k
ri- rr.068 the Men of ECU
isa
Calendar which will hi.
D. 13. "I think ,h Campus on
-I. be very .msed-W�men here
The calendar, which � im-
printed and sold bv the vearL "g
E�' ia.es, exanVpXfe
While there have been other
calendars teatunng ECU students
this is the first produced by a cam-
pus organization.
"We needed some way to make
money for the Buccaneer besides
student fees, and this seemed like a
good idea Coleman explained.
"It's definitely sexist she said
of the calendar which will feature 17
East Carolina men. "It was design-
ed totally with girls in mind
Coleman said that 4,000 copies of
the calendar are being printed and
will sell for $4. She added that
anyone who places an order before
next week will receive a one dollar
discount.
According to Coleman, the 17
men featured in the calendar were
selected from more than 60 ap-
plicants. The calendar covers 14
months, from December 1982
through January 1984. One man
will be used for each month, with
three on the cover.
The judging took place in early
November and was conducted by a
panel of eight women representing
various campus organizations. Ap-
plicants were judged on a scale of
one to ten in 14 categories ranging
from smile to charm to body and
looks. "Looks was the primary
criteria, though Coleman said.
"When 1 looked at the guys, I
judged them on personality and
then"total appearance said -Xnita
Jng- a tinman nurs,nc
Steve"an:n,eOMhe,Ude
teve Deal, who �,� he "M,
April was her favonte
He was a ten "
On their applications
ere asked such
majot
asci
Vtr
contestant
s and what
the men
�he,r,av�rn7ghrrP:rn,asvha'
SPIVS ���'��-p.
sMfnena ua8Pend"m "�. .�
�he experience?Z� d� � �n
stage again in mv
The calendar
girl on
life
Mitch Perkins ZeViJ�1 b
art ma,or mELT-T"? commercial
1 an excellent
"So
art major. "Mitch
job Coleman commented
many of the guys look like thev sten
ped out of GQ. Like I said fif
it's very sexy.
said before.
The Inside
Announcements
Just The Way It Is
Entertainment
Sports
2
4
7
10
The East Carolinian deeply
regrets the omission of page 5 in
last Thursday's issue. The error
was due to technical difficulties.
The stories that were lost are
reprinted in their entirety on page
t






r
THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 7, 1982
V

I
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
l� you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcement column,
please type it on an announcement
form and send it to The East
Carolinian in care of the produc
tion manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
oHice in the Publications Building
Flyers and handwritten copy on
odd sized paper cannot be ac
cepted.
There is no charge tor an
nouncements. but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you want
and suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column (or publicity
The deadline tor announcements
is 3 p m Monday tor the Tuesday
paper and 3 pm Wednesdayy tor
the Thursday paper No an
nouncements received after these
deadlines will be printed
This space is available to all
campus organizations and depart
ments.
ZETABETA
TAU
All members be at the front of
Aycock Dorm at 5 00 to be in
tiated The dress is very casual
Be sure to wear pledge pins
Jerseys will be m Monday
BILL OF
RIGHTS DAY
On Wednesday. December 15. in
the Willis Building on First Street
on the ECU campus, citizens ana
professional groups will observe
Bill of Rights Day The
ceremonies are scheduled to begin
at 7 IS p m
Featured speakers include ECU
Chancellor John M Howell who
will be concerned with "Humar
Rights on the International
Scene Dr Gene D Lanier,
Chairman of the North Carolina
Library Associations intellectual
Freedom Committee arid recipient
of the 1982 Hugh M Hefner First
Amendment Award m Education,
speaking on "intellectual
Freedom update 1982 ana
Gene Puckett, editor of The
Biblical Record discussing "The
Separation of Church and State "
The general public � cordially
mvitea to participate in this an
nual affair sponsored this year by
the Greenville ana Pitt N C. Civil
Liberties union the League of
Women Voters, the ECU Depart
ments of Community Health
Library Science, and Politica'
Science, ana Deita Sigma Theta
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines. There are 33
units per line Each letter, punc
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end of line if word
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac-
cepted over the phone. We
eserve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
75C per line or traction of a line.
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lower case letters.
Return u, MHH HOKI offire (noi UNI
( UKN IMAN ffiirl In 2 p.m. Mundat brfi.fr
lurda pap, i and vkrdnesda brfnrr I hursdm
puhlii jtiiin
Name
Address.
CityState.
Ntr. -lines
.Zip.
.Phone.
at 75C per line $.
.No. insertions.
.encloseu.
T
fl
impukiptg
ITALIAN BUTT
LASAGNA
AND
SPAGHETTI
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
Wyt Qerlte BrMd $"QQ
EVERY WEDS.
with all you
can eat soap
aad salad
$3.99
FRIDAY ONLY
ALL YOU CAN EAT!
FLOUNDER DINNER
WOMEN'S SOCCER
There is a manaatory meeting
tor all Women's Soccer Club
players at 5 00 p m Tuesday
December 7. on the upper level
lobby at MSC Any woman who is
interested in playing on the learn
is invited to come also
WZMB
Listen in to WZMB S contem
porary gospel show every Sunday
morning trom 6 to 10 a m For
your favorite gospel artists ana
hght'n up
OPEN HOUSE
The Regional Development In
slitute ana the Rural Education
Institute will host an open house in
celebration ot the Christmas
season Thursday December 9
from 10 00 a.m until 6 00 p m
Faculty, staff, students, col
leagues, and friends A the In
stitutes are invited to drop by the
Willis Building during the hours of
the open house
C.A.D.P.
A reminder All members
please come by Erwm office room
306 and cast your vote for presi
dent Nominations are posted in
room 303 Erwm Hall Voting ends
at 3 00 p m Decembers.
PHI SIGMA
PI
Fourteen new brothers were n
tiated mto Phi Sigma Pi's Tau
chapter during the tall semester
pledge period Ricky Creech.
Sylvia Bittle, Sherne Western, Ken
Scruggs, Andy Johnson, Deryck
Jones, Kerry Rodabaugh. Mario
Harrell Clayman Norfleet. Jim
Lamb. Penny Boyette, Lloyd Gar
chner, Susan Tacker, ana Tammie
King Congratulations ana
welcome to the brotherhood of Phi
Sigma Pi.
S. R. A.
Escorts are needed for the
Escort Service Anyone interested
m bemg an escort please contact
your dorm director If you are a
dorm resident of if you live off
campus contact the SGA office
MARCHING PIRATES
Hawiaan Christmas Luau is
Tuesday, Dec 7 from 8 00 I 00 at
the American Legion Post (across
from the Beef Barn $1 tor Bano
Members ana 2 for guests accom
paniea by a bana member Check
the Marching Pirates Boara tor
more details Be there Aloha
PRISBEE
The team plays at the bottom of
the hill Tuesaay ana Thjrsday at
4 00 Club meetings are Monaay
nights at 8 00 in MSC room 248
SGA
SGA presently has the positions
ot W.nte Dorm Rep ana Graduate
Vice Pres unfilled If interested
tor applying, please pick up ap
plications m the Menoenhall SGA
office or contact Gma Lynch at
752 90S8
WOMENS SOCCER
CLUB
The ECU Womens Soccer Club
needs an advisor Would any facul
ty member or graduate student
that is interested please contact
Tonya Goldsmith at 756 44V1 or
Donna Zekonis at 752 9209
PHYE
AH students who plan to declare
physical education as a major dur
ing change of maior week for the
Fall Semester, should report to
Mmges Coliseum from 12:00 2:00
p m on Thursday, December 9,
for a motor and physical fitness
test Satisfactory performance on
this test is required as a pre
requisite for official admittance ot
the program
Any student with a medical con
dition that would contraindicate
participation in the testing pro
gram should contact Dr Israel at
757 6497 For more information
call the above number
S. A. B.
LET'S PARTY SAB We re hav
mg our Christmas Party
TONIGHT at Pam s house If you
don't know the way. meet at
mmges at 5 00 and bring your iunk
food And it's bring your own
beverage
SNOWSKI
Those skiers who want to take
Snowsknng for credit during Spr
mg Semester should add PHYE
CONGRATULATIONS
The Brothers, pledges and the
little sisters of the Kappa Sigma
Fraternity would like to extend a
warm welcome to the newest
brother in our Brotherhood, Geoff
Hudson We would like to also in
vite the ENTIRE ECU STUDENT
BODY to party with us down at the
Elbo Room with Santa Clause
Santa will be giving out door
prizes, so please come early and
be ready to have a Christmas
Blow out before begining to
prepare for those exams
BAPTIST STUDENT
UNION
HEY! Do you enjoy friendly
fellowship, good friends and food,
and a chance to be yourself in this
"rat race" environment at ECU?
Then come join us at the Baptist
Student Union where we have din
ners on Tuesdays at 5 30 for only
$1.75 PAUSE on Thursdays at
7 00 to allow us to take a break
after an almost fulfilling week,
ano lots ot people iust like you who
enjoy others. Call 752 4646 it you
nave any questions Bob Clyde
campus minister
FINANCIAL
AID
The annual Student Financial
Aid meeting will be held on
Wednesday, December 8 at 3 00
p m. and at 400 p.m in Hendnx
Theatre All students who an
ticipate applying for financial aid
tor the 1983 84 schol year are
strongly urged to attend
CATHOLIC
NEWMAN CENTER
The Catholic Newman Center
would like to invite everyone to
join m with us for celebrating
Mass every Sunday in the Biology
Lecture Hall starting at 12 30 and
every Wednesday at 5 00 at the
Catholic Newman Center located
down at the bottom of College Hill
KSSPP fKNCH FRS �OU SLAW. TARTAF
SAUCE a HUSHPUPPIf s
5H0NEYS
S3M
264 By-Pass
Greenville, N.C
Bausch & Lomb
Soft Lenses
COMPLETE
Includes initial eye examination, lenses, care
kit, instructions and follow up visits for one
month. ECU student I.D. required.
99
00
The East Carolinian
Servtnit the campus commumv
am I9!f
Published every Tuesaay ana
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ng the summer
The East Carolinian is the of
ficial newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned,
operated, and published for ana
by the students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate: $20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU.
Greenville. N C
PILOT TRAINING
OPPORTUNITIES
vi
The Navy rr. sontly has several openings tor the
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NAVY PILOT II you quality, wc will Quarantec
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-US OIiumi
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NAVY PILOT PROGRAMS
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or call 1-800-662-7231
RIGHT
BROTHERS
BIKE SHOP
207 B East 5th St.
Open 11-7
6 days a week
752-6181
We carry
Univega, Kabuki,
Columbia and BMX
bikes. ALL at
very modest prices.
We also offer
Parts & Service
' 7 we don V have it
we'll get it
l383000008
OnOMETMC
�Y�CAWEOEH1�R
228 GREENVILLE BLVD.
TIPTON ANNEX
756-9404
Dr. Peter Holils
NOW LOOKING GOOD
COSTS LESS
&mmirz
for Christmas
A shop long known
for having those unique
& special gifts.
P.S. Order your personalized
fraternity & sorority
items bejore Dec. 15th.
Open 10:00-10:00 p.m.
4
r�A
!j����S�i��!C
ECU

p)K BUY BACK
BONANZA A
1
The Alamo
Resturant & Nightclub
Coming:
Wed Dec. 8th
BAND OF OZ
7:00-11:00
AT THE
U.B.E.

Dec. 9th
CATALINAS
band starts at 9
10-1:00 late night HAPPY HOUR
Friday, Dec. 10th
FANTASTIC SHAKERS
Hour;run- Wed. Sat. 5:30pm-10:00pm
� Sun. 5:30pm-9:00pm
Use the coupons you get when
you sell your textbooks for
COSH to purchase UBE Sportswear
20 OFF
for

w
OOK
arn
9
117 E FIFTH ST
GREENVILLE. N.C. 27834
U.B.E?
516 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE. N.C.
Use the coupons you get
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Bonanza ends Fri Dec. 18th
I
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'Martyrs Honored
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 7, J982
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Surff Writer
Approximately two
dozen ECU students
and faculty members
gathered last Thursday
evening at the Catholic
Newman Center for a
memorial service
honoring four U.S.
women missionaries
murdered in El
Salvador two years
ago.
The two-hour service
included a reflection on
the lives of the four
women and an over-
view of the situation in
El Salvador presented
by ECU Catholic Cam-
pus Minister Sr. Helen
Shondell. A series of
songs was performed
by a student musical
group and a documen-
tary film on the life of
Jean Donovan, one of
the murdered women,
was shown.
"On December 2,
1982 we commemorate
the second anniversary
of the assassination of
four U. S. women mis-
sionaries in El
Salvador Shondell
told the group during
her opening remarks.
"As we focus on these
women, let us not
overlook the thousands
and thousands of un-
named and faceless
martyrs of El
Salvador
Shondel added that
the number of people
killed in the last two
years in El Salvador
was estimated to be
35,000.
SGA Approves
Money For New
Escort Service
Three of the
murdered women, Ita
Ford, Maura Clark and
Dorothy Kazel, were
Catholic nuns doing
missionary work for
their U.S. orders.
ECU students Mike
Hamer, Theresa Dulski
and Jim Roberts along
with Greenville resident
Jeff Roberson provided
a musical acompani-
ment to the service.
Roberson sang a solo
entitled "Upbeat Blues
for Innocent Victims"
which he wrote about
the life of Donovan.
The Documentary en-
titled "Roses in
Decenber originally
shown on public televi-
sion, was also shown.
Shondell said she
organized the memorial
service because she did
not want the deaths of
the four women to be in
vain. "There's still a
great need for change
in U.S. policy toward
El Salvador in par-
ticular, and all of Cen-
tral America.
She added that she
wanted to call attention
to what actually hap-
pened to the four
women, to the hopes of
the poor people in El
Salvador and what
they're struggling for.
Similar services for
the four women were
conducted nationwide.
Shondell said that
because she works in
the church, she has
friends who are mis
sionaries and has been
to Honduras herself.
i
i
i
Continued From Page 1
ding to Sumrell, the
SRA will be conducting
most of the selection
work for potential
escorters and addi-
tional promotion funds
may come from an ap-
propriation to be ar-
ranged by Associate
Dean of Judiciary
James B. Maliory.
"I feel very happy
Russo said after the
SGA vote. "We're go-
ing to get this thing
underway and it will be
ready by Jan. 17. The
SRA and SGA have
worked together in see-
ing this need
"I'm glad it passed
Sumrell said. "We've
worked hardand
we're glad to see that
the SGA saw the need
for the service
Henderson was also
pleased and noted that
he had received a lot of
positive feedback from
ECU students on the
proposal. "There's not
as many attacks as peo-
ple think there are
Henderson said. "I'd
like to play that part
down But there are
many potential pro-
blems when students
walk alone or in dark
places, Henderson add-
ed. "This will help with
those problems. If
you're walking with
somebody, especially a
guy, you're less likely
to be attacked
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Taking Orders now
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Large selection of
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Also bouquets available
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Call Mrs. Tabor
ami i me � day or night:
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over $1,000 m Christmas Presents 1
including vacation for two C t
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This season get your jerseys at
H.L. Hodges Bonds Sporting
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m
Tuesday November 30 through Saturday!
December 4 we are offering free lettering 1
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i






2tt� iEaat (Earolbiian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, GmmM.
Mike Hughes, Managingwmm
WAVERLY MERRITT. DirevoroJ Advtnvng ClNDY PLEASANTS. Sports Editor
Robert Rucks, busm Manage Greg Rideout, n,� Editor
All AFRASHTEH, Crtdtt Managtr STEVE BACHNER, Enlerlainmtnl Editor
Stephanie Gr(xn. (wu ����� Juliana Fahrbach. ammm
Chip Gideons, rm,MirTnim�i�, Mike Davis, production Manager
December 7, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Ashley Futrell
Best Wishes For A Tireless Worker
"The future of East Carolina
University is important to all of us.
If we must fight for recognition,
then let us be ready to do battle. The
greatness we see ahead will only be
stilled by a lack of greatness in the
hearts of those in command. As you
bleed purple and sweat gold, let
each drop be an element of
challenge and not a token of ac-
complishment. May you serve living
humanity. "
With these words, ECU Board of
Trustees Chairman Ashley Futrell
announced his resignation Satur-
day. Perhaps his statement came as
a shock to some board members
present; but without a doubt, it sad-
dened the hearts of all those who
have worked with him.
It's far too easy to pin com-
plementary titles on a man who has
fought tooth-and-nail for nearly 14
years as a board member. Time and
time again, he has proven himself a
"great" and "worthy" man. But
shallow and overused titles cannot
begin to pay tribute to this
gentleman who has been a tireless
workhorse in the advancement and
expansion of East Carolina as a ma-
jor state university.
Since being appointed to the
board in 1969, after serving three
terms in the North Carolina Senate,
Futrell has seen ECU through many
of its most dramatic changes and
additions. He was instrumental,
both as senator and trustee, in the
fight for the nursing school, the
School of Medicine and in achieving
university status for ECC. Let
me say proudly Futrell asserted,
"that I was in the midst of every
legislative fight for this institution
And anyone familiar with ECU's
history during the past 10 to 20
i-Campus Forum
years knows the legislative struggles
the school has seen.
Nothing worthwhile comes easy;
certainly Mr. Futrell knows this �
if not before, he knows it now.
Nevertheless, he has worked ECU
through some of the most trying
times in her history. He has stood
by the university through thick and
thin, despite the many occasions
when vogue dictated otherwise.
Vice Chairman C. Ralph Kinsey
Jr who will replace Futrell as
chairman, spoke highly of his
predecessor at Saturday's meeting.
"He has filled the positions of vice
chairman and chairman in some of
the most significant times in the
history of the university, in terms of
growth and program expansion
change. His wisdom has been a stea-
dying influence for these many
years
Despite undergoing heart surgery
in July, Futrell assured the board
that health was not a factor in his
decision to resign. The fact is, he
cited no particular reasons in his
statement.
At this time, we wish to con-
gratulate and thank Ashley Futrell
for his many years of dedicated ser-
vice to East Carolina University. It
saddens us to see him resign, but
we, like the board members, accept
it "with deep appreciation" for his
tireless work.
We also wish the best of luck for
Mr. Kinsey, who has likewise pro-
ven himself a dedicated alumnus,
spokesman and trustee. Without a
doubt, he will be faced with many
of the same uphill battles as his
loyal predecessor. But hopefully,
the wisdom he has both seen and
shown in the past will continue to
make itself manifest in his work.
Fan Questions Andruzzi
First of all, I would like to say that I
am a loyal Lady Pirate basketball fan,
but 1 am beginning to wonder about he
validity of the reasons given to the press
for so many players quitting the team
(this year, last year and the year before
last).
Miss Andruzzi said, "Darlene would
not fulfill her responsibility and obliga-
tion as a studentathlete in our pro-
gram The News and Observer carried
the quote about Darlene Chaney, who
recently quit the team. I'm sure this will
tarnish Darlene's name and un-
justifiably so. This makes it sound like
Darlene was asked to leave the team, but
this wasn't the case at all. She quit as a
result of an argument with Coach An-
druzzi which took place at Tuesday's
practice. How will it look for coaches at
other schools to see that Darlene wasn't
performing as a studentathlete? 1 have
sympathy for Miss Chaney because I
know she loves basketball, and she did
love being a Pirate. I also know that she
performed as a studentathlete in my
eyes and in the eyes of a lot other people.
Then there's the case of Miss Jenkins
wanting to go to ODU; this makes me
wonder why she didn't do so to begin
with. After all, she was the most
valuable player in the state while in high
school. I'm sure she was offered a
scholarship to go there. The fact of the
matter is that Miss Jenkins and Miss
Hargett get couldn't get along with An-
druzzi. They even stated this to a
newspaper reporter. It's irrelevant where
they decide to go to school now, whether
it be ODU or elsewhere.
The list of people quitting over the last
three years would make up an impressive
starting Five for somebody, not to men-
tion a good bench. This list contains
three high school all-Americas (Chaney,
Jenkins and Fernill). The best of
recruiting could hardly replace these
people.
I think it's time the Lady Pirates' fans
be given an explanation. I know several
fans who would love to have this pro-
blem resolved. These girls who come
here and quit can't continue to be sub-
jected to the same treatment as the ones
listed above. Maybe the problem lies
elsewhere � that is, not in the girls who
quit but in the elements which made
them quit. After all, it's not like this is a
new problem.
I just hope that the problem can be
rectiFied and these girls who have quit
can go elsewhere and prove themselves
as the great people and athletes they
really are.
Lloyd Jordan
Senior, Accounting
Escort Service
The Society of Physics Students
would like to point out that we have
been providing a volunteer escort service
for the 1081 (astronomy lab) students
throughout the semester. The East
Carolinian had interviewed our faculty
adviser on the system in early October,
but for some reason, the information
never got into print. Obviously, the
editor never got word of it either.
The SGA proposal is a noble idea, but
as yet is only a proposal. Our service is
active, successful and cost-free. We will
continue the service as long as it is need-
ed. Hopefully, the SGA system will soon
be active. However, those lab students
needing an escort now can rely on the
SPS for help.
David Windsor, V.P.
Shawn Kelly, Sec.Treas.
Society of Physics Students
Editor's Note: We regret that we never
received the information about your
program. The purpose of the Dec. 2
editorial, however, was not to praise or
condemn whoever may have come up
with the idea first but to air our opinion
on what we feel is an excellent idea.
Nonetheless, we congratulate you on
your dedication to such a worthwhile
cause.
YOU HCARD MWAN, i'VE 60TAN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW
WITH A WAN WHO CLAMS TO HAVE RECEIVE JH6
FIRST ARTIFICIAL HEART
Evil, Subversive Messages
The Side Of Slim You Never Knew
Remember a few years back, when the
big new thing was to play your records
backwards to see if there were any subver-
sive or demonic messages? Well, being that
I somehow missed out on that craze, I
decided I'd try it out the other day
The first album I put on was Slim H hit-
man's Greatest Hits, a double-album from
everyone's favorite yodeling fool. Being a
firm believer in the sanctity of fine music, I
wasn't really expecting to hear anything
Little did I know what lay in store
Right there, in between the second and
third verses of "Red River Valley"
(actually, what I was playing was "yellaV
reviR deR"), I heard it � a subversive,
demonic, background yodeler droning out
his camouflaged message like a muttled
stevedore: "Don't do it he warned eeri-
ly. "Don't brush your teeth Pick your
nose in public K-Tel owes me money
Boxcar Willie is gay
At that point, I couldn't take any more.
If I'd let the record continue to spin, who
knows, I may have lost all faith in humani-
ty.
I quickly shoved the disc back into its
velour jacket and pulled out my Sing
Along With Mitch album, what 1 consider
to be Mitch Miller's finest effort. A quick
run through "This Old Man, He played
Three" revealed nothing, as did "Row,
Row, Row Your Boat; Yellow Rose of
Texas" and "Hit Me, Beat Me, Love Me,
Buy Me a Burger
Mike Hughes
Just The N ay Is
t I �
But just as I was about to lift the needle
from "How Much is that Doggy in the
Window having restored my faith in the
human race, I heard it again � only much
worse: "Sing along the low, evil voice
chanted. "Sing along, dammt C'mon,
you lazy asses, SING
I lowered my head in disgust. To think
that even Mitch had sunk to these
despicable depths was too much to bear
After regaining my composure with
some day-old bread brought back to life
with my bamboo steamer, I was ready to
continue my bitter search. It had already
been a trying experience, but I vowed to
move onward.
1 fumbled through my vast record collec-
tion for my Jim Morrison Christmas
album, Gold, Frankincense and Two Hits
of Myhr, but it was nowhere to be found.
Damn the luck!
Next on the test list was my .Stairway to
Heaven album by the Day of Discovery
singers. I put it on. and everything was
okay, until all of a sudden, dunng a two-
minute lead guitar lick, I heard another
voice � but unlike before, this time, it was
the devilish droning of a woman (a
soprano, I think). "Rn-rrrT she growled,
"My collar's too tight Ernest Angley's
behind in the ratings� How come we
can't dance when we sing this? I'm not
wearing anything under my chastity belt
rrrrrr
"Blasphemy! Blasphemy I screamed,
burying my head in my hands "Ah,
humanitv
Editor's Sole: Mike Hughes is a senior
from Swollen Colon, .V.C where he
works summers in the "stun line" at a
local slaughterhouse. He hopes one day to
use his degree in oriental music psychology
to open a chain of fishing bait shops in
Ahoskie.
Civil Disobedience: A History Of Success
Charns Admitted To Bar
By PAT O'NEILL
"If Alex Charns lacks the moral
character requisite of aspiring North
Carolina lawyers, then it would seem the
term 'moral character' itself is ill-
defined. "
Well, it seems the N.C. Board of Law
Examiners agreed with the above editorial
quote (and many others like it), because
Alex Charns is now a licensed attorney in
the state of North Carolina. He fought
hard and won because he was right.
It's important not to lose sight of the
reason why Charns had to go through what
he did � he spent two weeks in a federal
prison � and that he most assuredly does
possess the "moral character" requisite of
an attorney.
I was arrested with Alex Charns for
"impeding traffic I went to prison with
him. We clearly knew what might happen
to us for our act of civil disobedience. Alex
knew very well it might keep him out of the
bar. Nevertheless, we went through with
our plans. We did this because we knew the
risk we were taking was negligible com-
pared to the suffering of the people of El
Salvador. We knew that U.S. support of
the murderous ruling junta in that country
was an example of our nation's "lack of
moral character
Our nation is a great one, but I truly
believe that if it weren't for people of high
moral character who speak out against in-
justice, we would not be where we are to-
day.
Civil disobedience has been a precedent
in this country; it has helped change some
of the most oppressive laws and practices
ever seen. Perhaps one of the best-known
cases of civil disobedience was the Boston
Tea Party.
During another era of history, the law of
this land said women coundn't vote, but
women got together and fought for justice.
Some chained themselves to the Statue of
Liberty; many went to jail, but now, the
right to vote is theirs.
According to the U.S. Constitution,
black people used to count as three-fifths
of one human being; they couldn't eat,
drink or travel as they pleased � only as
they were allowed. But thousands of
blacks protested � went to jail for justice
� and the plight of the American black
has improved.
You see, the actions of Alex Charns are
nothing new; sure, his struggle for justice
is over, but the world is still full of people
who follow the status quo, who won't take
the risks. To me, it's good to know there
are still people who don't ignore the
world's many issues of injustice.
'Ope
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FOR MERCHJMNG,Of COURSEJE STILL LIKE TO KEEP UP
THE IMJ6E BUT 1 HAD TO ffi RIP OF THOSE ELVES YEARS AGO
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THE EAST CAROL IN1AN
DEC EMBER 7. 1982
-H-
wm
ges
'W
n vast record collec-
klornson Christmas
lu ease and Two Hits
jowhere to be found.
was my Stairway to
Day of Discovery
land everything was
dden, during a two-
. 1 heard another
fore, this time, it was
ot a woman (a
ittttt she growled,
t Ernest A-nley's
,S Ho come mass.
sing this. .1 I'm not
er mv chastitv belt
Ipnemy I screamed,
my hands "Ah,
Huzhes is a senior
V C where he
e "stun line" at a
He hopes one day to
tal music psychology
ishing bait shops in
ar
ms of Alex Charns are
jhis struggle for justice
id is still full of people
quo, who won't take
, good to know there
mo don't ignore the
Is of injustice.
TO KEEP UP
5 YEARS AgL
���
BE2
The Stories You Missed
'Operation Santa' Helps Disabled
�� EMILi CASEV
Staff Winer
The Mental Health Association in
1'itt Counts has begun theu annual
Operation Sianta I laus Drive which
collects gifts and mono to provide a
happs t'hnsimas for people living at
( aswrll Center for the mentallv retard
ed in kinslon and in Cherry Hospital in
Coldsboro
Birrula Orav. the eiecutive director
of the MHA. is especially enthusiastic
ahout ihe "tremendous support" the
projeci is receiving fiom ECU students
All fifteen of ECU'S residence halls are
lending their help to the protect, as are
a doen of the university's fraternities
and sororities
"We're very pleased with all the sup-
port we're getting from the campus
community (-ray said. "Students
from East Carolina have become more
mvoi.ed this year than every before
"Oc mi,in purpose is to provide
Christmas gifts for the patients at
Cherry Hospital and Ihe clients at
Caswell Center Gray told The East
Carolinian "There are no state funds
available for any gifts or Christmas
parties "
The Mental Health Association has
branches nationwide and is funded
through United Way and ihe contribu-
tions of members The MHA chapter in
Put County, which has more than 7?0
members, is "one of the largest
chapters in the state according to
Gray. North Carolina has 52 chapters
statewide.
The Operation Santa Claus Cam-
paign, which was first instituted in Pitt
County in 1958. has received much
praise for the joy it brings to people
who must spend their Christmas holi-
day in institutions, often without fami-
ly support or friends
Besides Caswell Center and Cherry
Hospital, Operation Santa Clause also
provides Christmas gifts to people in
'community based programs"
throughout Pitt County. These com-
munity based programs generally serve
people recently discharged from menial
health facilities as they are going
through the "dc-institutionaltzation
process" and readjusting to the outside
Proposal To Raise Age
For Drinking Endorsed
Bv fslKKkHMIIl
Siaf f W rim
On Monday Transportation
"wieiarv Andrew 1 "Drew" lewis
endorsed proposals made in the recent
lv released Presidential Commission on
Drunken Driving report that urged
nijics to raise the minimum drinking
age 10 21
National statistics have shown that
alcohol abuse is a contributing lactor in
more than hail of ihe 30,000 highwav
totalities lhal occur in the I nited States
ra.h sear
Ihis lactor has caused 18 states,
which had previously lowered their
minimum dunking age to 18. to recon-
sider and reverse their minimum age
U� back to ihe 20- and 21 sear old age
leveK
Lewis said he would support recom
mendationv b the commission calling
on s states, the District ot Columbia
and Puerto Rico ro raise the minimum
ajte on all alcohol products, including
reer and wine, to 2 I
Norcn Carotins, has a drinking age re-
rrment of 18 tor beer and wine pro-
ducts and 21 for liquor i urrentlv state
officials aie studving ihe possibility of
raising the minimum age on beer and
wine products
According to Breni Hackney, a
spokesperson in ijcn Hum's executive
" .e in Raleigh. Hum is in lavor of
raising North Carolina's minimum
drinking age tor wine and beer products
lo "al leasl Is) "
He hasn I fulls made up his mind
fet Hackney sanj but Hum has nor
ruled our rhe possibilnv of raising it to
20 or 21
Hum appointed a Governor's Task
Force on Drunken Drrwng last
rebruars whkh made a recommend
Eton to raise ihe age requirement lo 19
Although Hun' has not otficiallv
responded lo ihe ommision's conclu
sions Hjtkrvrv said lhal Hum "has
jeajv rnjoisej" wimr of rhe pto-
r�.sai- maJr hs :he UUl force
Or Jerrv LotMriMS. professor arvd
jsJtUtstfk't.1 inc ul.MM atnua
Prwf rmiA. mitcn a nnnter wl ijueMtofu
regardina live �ac issue and ihe problem
of alcohol abuse, in an interview with
The I si Carolinian
' Atcohol is alcohol said Loiterhot
referring lo ihe difference in North
Carolina's minimum age requirements
for beer and wine as compared to hard
liquor "Sixty percent of the alcohol
consumed in North Carolina is consum-
ed as beer and wine which is not con-
trolled by our ABC laws" he con-
tinued "That's part of our legacy of
misconstrued notions about booze "
"The problem we have in our culture
is much larger than just changing the
drinking age I otterhos said He add
ed lhal alcohol is important "in
American society, yet "we're extremely
contused about what appropriate or
responsible alcohol consumption
should be
Lotterhos pointed out that his
statistics show that 75 percent of the
students who drink at ECU say their
average age of "first consumption" of
alsohol is 14 9 years.
"If the law at age 18 is not working,
whv do we assume the law at age 21 will
work1" lotterhos said "If age works
is a deterrent lo consumption then why
is 14 9 the average age1 That's the ques-
tion we should ask
1 otterhos noted that the number-one
sause of death in the 16-to 21 year-old
age group was alcohol related traffic-
accidents and that raising the drinking
age reduced the rates of "alcohol
related negative consequences "
He said 40 percent of the drinking by
the I.VI" age group is done in the car
"The data is Py incontrovertible �
it's hard data, sou can't play with it "
Other factors which Lotterhos
discussed included some of the negative
aspects of raising the minimum age
"What dots this do to the value system
of our 16 ro 21 year-old population?"
Lotterhos said, referring to the person's
self-image while entering adulthood in
a society where he can vote for the
President and Tight in a war. but not be
trusted lo dnnk responsibly.
Lotterhos was also concerned that an
increase in the drinking age could also
cause an increase in the abuse of other
drugs
"We think we become more
masculine, more feminine, more seiy
� whatever we want to be � by drink-
ing alcohol Lotterhos said. "1 think
we tend to believe that if a little alcohol
is good, than a whole lot of alcohol is
better " He added that drinking is per-
cieved as "fun behavior" and
"drunkenness is acceptable in
American culture "
"I'm also aware that it's a very com
plicated issue Lotterhos added "I'm
arguing a counter point; perhaps we
need to work on some of the styles,
manners, attitudes and values we have
towards drinking in our society rather
than looking for magic answers in
terms of age changes "
"I would prefer to see dollars, time,
effort and energy spent toward evolving
positive educational activities relative
to alcohol use and abuse Lotterhos
said
world.
"They have done a superb job for a
number or years said Edith Blanton.
Cherry Hospital director of volunteer
services said of the local group. "We
can always depend on Pitt County to be
one of our most generous counties.
"We have many patients here that
would not be remembered at Christmas
lime if it were not for donations con-
tinued Blanton referring to the Opera-
tion Santa Claus Drive "We can
always depend on the Mental Health
Association to meet the needs of
Caswell residents during the Chnsuna
holidays added Val Carmine, an
employee at Caswell. Carmine is also a
director of volunteer services.
According to Gray, the Christmas
holiday season is a particularly difficult
and lonely time for institutionalized
mental health patients. "There are
many who have no living relatives,
some have been forgotten after years of
being in an institution; others have
families who are financially unabie to
provide for their loved one she said
"Holidays seem to make the
loneliness even more real and we try to
alleviate that as much as possible
Mrs. Zula Rouse of Greenville is the
Pitt County chairperson of this year's
Operation Santa Claus Drive. Mrs.
Gladys Howell. the wife of ECU
Chancellor John Howell. has
volunteered to be honorary chairperson
for the drive.
Various collection points for poeple
wishing to donate gifts have been set up
throughout the community.
The Mental Health Association re-
quests that donated gifts be "new"
because this may be the only package
some of the residents will receive
The suggestions for gifts vary from
jars of instant coffee and hair dryers to
table games and televisions Specific
gifts for women can include jewelry,
cosmetics, clothes, pantyhose and other
useful items. For men, sweaters, belts,
wallets, sponshirts and ties are sug-
gested gift ideas Toys, records and
record players can also be used for the
recreation and training programs.
Gray mentioned that individuals and
groups were welcome to join the
MHA's adoption program which is
geared toward "forgotten patients
those who have had no family member
contact in over three months Anyone
who wishes to participate is asked to
make an annual S26 donation so a
forgotten patient can receive 50 cents
each week of the year as spending
money.
Anyone wishing more information
regarding Operation Santa Claus or the
adoption program is asked to call the
Mental Health Association at 752-7448
or slop by their offices al 315 Evans St
Mall (Room 202) They ask thai all gifts
be in by December 7.
i
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
. Each of ttiaaa advartisad items it raquirad to bo roodtiy availabta for soio at or
bolow tho aOVarttaad prlco In aactt UP Stora. aicapt �� apocrtlcalry notod
In this ad
0
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT DEC. 11, AT AAP IN GREENVILLE. N C
Raises Urged
Gov. James B Hunt Jr said Monday
night that the N.C. Legislature should
lift the freeze on salary raises for
teachers and stale employees when it
meets in January. Hunt originally sup-
ported the freeze that has been in effect
since last summer
"Lifting lhal freeze should be at the
top of our list of priorities when you
legislators return to Raleigh next year
Hunt's statement came in wake of
reports that the pay freeze was harming
ihe UNC-CH School of Medicine as un
competitive salaies encouraged pro-
fessors to take jobs al higher paying
schools. The pay freeze could harm the
ECU medical school and other N C
public universities in general if
leachers' salaries fall significantly
below other schools
Hum noted that it is difficult to
maintain adequate funding in schools
during the current economic recession
but thai North Carolina must support
it's educational institutions to maintain
high standards and remain competitive
for industrial development
James Bcardcn. dean of the ECU
School of Business, said that the salary
freeze could hurt his department if
salaries are not allowed to increase
soon
"Our big problem is that you fall
behind and then you have to catch up
Bearden said referring to ihe pay scale
in comparison to other schools
He said that the business school has
not lost many faculty members yet
because of uncompetitive salaries due
to the freeze because other stales are
having similar problems He added that
they needed to keep salaries competitive
in order to keep good leachers and that
being unable to raise salaries in some
cases has hurt the school's efforts in
recruiting new teachers
�i now and Dae 11, taatrigl
rid�m .H national manufactur
ar "a canta-off coupon up to SO
tor doubt, thatr vaJcssj ONar good
on national manufacturors'
canta-off coupon only. (Food
ratallai coupons not accaptad.)
Cuatornar mutt purcnaaa cou-
pon product kn spaclfiad aiza.
Explrad coupons will not ba
nonorad. Ona coupon par cua-
tornar par Ham. No coupons ac-
captad tor fraa marcrtandlsa.
Offar doaa not apply to A4P or
othar storo coupons whathar
nkanutacturar la ntanttonad or
not Whan tha valua of tha cou-
pon axcaads SO or tha ratail of
tha rtajjfn, this offar la Hmftad to
tha ratail prtca.
CNp the Manufacturers' "Cents-Off"
Coupons from your mail, newspapers
and magazines. . . then bring them to
your A P Food Store!
Savings are Great with A&P's DOUBLE SAVINGS COUPONS!
�arcs COUPONtare p aooco total coupon j CEHTS OFF CENTS OFF 4T AP
COUPON A25' 25� 50
COUPON B18' 18' 36'
COUPON C 50 50 $1.00
COUPON D 75� 25 $100
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED FRESH
Fryer Leg Qtrs.

6 lbs. or
more
lb.
Student At AntUKlan Rally
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
An ICC student was among the par
ricipams in fast weekend's Urge ami
Man demonstration thai toot Disuse in
Vfcashington. D C . lo cewnotse wifh the
ku aJus titan's first rally m thr tiM
lion's sapstaJ in 37 years, which �ever
t�sd EUtt. an ECU drama aaajoe.
was w VVaaaaaujson. DC. loe the
Ibar.hajjjsing howsay. when he and
tome of his f nettd. decided to jean �
anii-kUan gathering in McPhenon
Park.
Thai decision thrust Ellis and his
companions into the midst of what
became, in his opinion, "a life
threatening" situation when violent
slashes broke out heiwern protesiori
and potjee
"The whole xira behind the ku klui
klan i which is basically white
supremacy � represents a threat lo
what our whotr country stands for
Liita taviat. r�stein uL iujiuii.
freedom of cavotce. the MB of guajhu �
our whole Constitution
Ellis denounced the vioktnot that
erupted and said he "totally disagreed"
with people who look advantage of the
situation and looted nearby stores-
He said that the violence occurred for
a number of reasons and that there
were a lot of varied interest groups,
most of which were peaceful rJlit
noted that people were very angry.
some because ihey were out of work
and others hecause they view ad the
Klan aa threat lo iheu sm-unly "There
was 4 iw of aau-SXcaaaa aiaiianwi
Oar tloftn the demonstrators were
taoiiimg saw 'Banana earn taw kaan aw
' ' stead- " Eika said.
"that a group can discriminate on the
basis of religion, race, national origin
or seaual preference � I feh they have
u be slopped
AoiP quality heavy western
GRAIN FED BEEF
Chuck Roast
-98
48
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN
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2
58
According lo I Ihs Iba
erupted when a group or ISO or atSO
Ellis voHiataerad to tarry a banner
wsth a group called the Ail Peoples
Congress which was not advotatina
violence or confrontation with police
"It defies moral decency Elba said.
Mwtcd off a Iwo-hsock area where the
throw bncksaad bottles al ponce, they
responded by firing tear gas laamiri
into the demonstration. Ellis sasd.
Congratulations
Wall
Graduating Seniors
cMEFARV
FLORIDA GROWN SWEET A JUICY
Tangelos 20
125
size
o
Don t leave Pirate A thletics
Behind When You Graduate
FLORIDA GROWN JUICYpT
Oranges
20 100
4r
N.C. GROWN FRESH
Groc,
i

FREE
?
JL GRADUATION PRESENT
At�VV
fzr
to you
from the ECU
ANN PAGE
REGULAR � RIPPLED
Potato Chips
89
-rareai � uuerT
v Savings y
8 oz.
twin
pack
SCHWEPPES
Club Soda - Tonic Water
Ginger Ale
CANADA DRY
Collins Mix - Wink mm n
7-Up - Diet 7-Up KW C
28-Oz. Bottle T,
nVe
?PIRATE CLUB
f
oV


All graduating seniors are entitled to receive
one years free membership in the ECU Pirate
Club. Simply fill out the form below and send
to:
ECU Educational Foundation
Pirate Club
Minges Coliseum
Greenville, N. C. 27834
or call (919) 757-6178
Pirate Club membership entitles you to
special privileges when you watch the Pirates
play.
PIRATE CLUB MEMBERSHIP '83
ANN PAGE
Margarine
iOO �
1 lb.
pkgs.
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SAVE 40 ON
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Only 5
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bag
69
Name .
Address
UntroKwmi
, OeC- 11 AT Amf�
"ITJJs
SUPER SAVER COUPON
Phone
I will graduate U December 1982
U May 1983
SAVE 200 ON
PILLSBURY PLUS
Cake Mixes
67 C
You Pay
Only
1ttti
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680
I
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You Pay
Only
SAVE 20 ON
JFG
Mayonnaise
59C
quart
l�
679
GOOD THBU SAX. OEC 11 AT asSP
UfatT ONE WITM COUPON AM) 750 OfflDER.
-CPI
SUPER SAVER COUPON
SAVE 20 ON
PEPPERONJ � SAUSAGE � CHEESE
Ann Page Pizza
You Pay
Only
10 ox.
P�
OOOO THRU SAT. OEC 11 AT AaVP
UtaTT ONE WITH CXXIPOH nsO T 50
681
SUPER SAVER COUPON
V-
SAVE 30 ON
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You Pay
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16.
89
�(
-�
-�





THE EAST CAROl INIAN
DEC EMBER 7, 1982
-�1
ges
!W
15 ast record collec-
lorrisoo Christmas
cense and Two Hits
here to be found.
as my Stairway to
Day of Discovery
ind eerythng was
Iden, during a two-
Ik, I heard another
ore. this time, it was
ot a woman (a
rrrTTT she growled,
k Ernest ArtftVey's
IS �o-sw come -��
sing this.I'm not
er mv chastity belt
nemy I screamed,
mv hands "Ah,
Hughes is a senior
m N.C, where he
te "stun line" at a
He hopes one day to
tal music psychology
I; king bait shops in
ar
ms of Alex Charns are
struggle for justice
i is still full of people
is quo, who won't take
good to know there
Jho don't ignore the
ot injustice.
ITOKEEPUP
3 YEARS AGO
h��

�2
The Stories You Missed
'Operation Santa9 Helps Disabled
�� EMIL CAS Y
Staff Writer
The Menial Health Association in
Put Countv has begun then annual
Operation Stanta Claus Drive which
collects gilts and mono to provide a
happv Christmas for people living at
Caswell Center for the mentallv retard
ed in kinsion and in Cherry Hospital in
CWdsboro
Bienda Cirav, the eieculive direcloi
o4 the MHA. is especially enthusiastic
about the "tremendous support" the
pioievi is receiving fiom ECl students
All fifteen of ECU'S residence halls are
lending their help to the project, as are
a doen oj the university's fraternities
and sororities
"We're very pleased with all the sup-
port we're getting from the campus
community Cray said "Students
from East Carolina have become more
invol.ed this year than every before
IK main purpose is to provide
Christmas gifts for the patients at
Cherry Hospital and the clients at
Caswell Center Gray told The East
Carolinian "There are no state funds
available for any gifts or Christmas
parties "
The Mental Health Association has
branches nationwide and is funded
through United Way and the contribu-
tions of members The MHA chapter in
Put County, which has more than 7?0
members, is "one of the largest
chapters in the state according to
Gray. North Carolina has 52 chapters
statewide
The Operation Santa Claus Cam-
paign, which was first instituted in Pitt
County in 1958, has received much
praise for the joy it brings to people
who must spend their Christmas holi-
day in institutions, often without fami-
ly support or friends.
Besides Caswell Center and Cherry
Hospital. Operation Santa Clause also
provides Christmas gifts to people in
'community based programs"
throughout Pitt County These com-
munity based programs generally serve
people recently discharged from menial
health facilities as they are going
through the "de-institutionaliulion
process" and readjusting to the outside
Proposal To Raise Age
For Drinking Endorsed
By PA1RK kOMil I
suf f V riler
On Monday Transporiai ion
�vrcretarv Andrew I "Drew" Lewis
endorsed proposals made in the reccnt-
lv released Presidential Commission on
Drunken Driving report (hat urged
suie? to raise (he minimum drinking
age to :i
National statistics have shown rhat
auohol abuse is a contributing (actor in
more than half ot ihe VI.000 highwav
fatalities that occur in (he I ruled Sidles
each vear
I hn factor has caused 18 sutes.
� hich had previously lowered (heir
minimum drinking age to 18. to recon-
sider and reverse (heir minimum age
u�s bask to the 20- and :i vear old age
levels
lewis said he would support recom
mendadons hs the commission calling
on U sijtcs. ihe Disinci of Columbia
and Puerto Rico to raise the minimum
ae on all alcohol products, including
beer and wine, to cl
North Carolina has a drinking age re
ii.rement of 18 tor beer and wine pro-
jects and Ti for liquor C urrentls state
o((ivi�. � studving the possibihts of
ra,Mng rhc jm age on beer and
wine products
According to Brent Hjcknes a
spokesperson :n dos Hunt's execudse
�� in Raleigh, Hunt is m favor of
raising North Carolina's minimum
drinking Age tor wine and beer products
to "at least 19 "
He hasn : fully made up his mind
vet Hacknes xaid, but Hunt has not
ruled out the posutMltf) of raising u 10
29 or 21
Hunt appointed a (overrun s Task
fore on D'unken Driving last
februarv which made a recommenda
don lo raise ihe age requirement 10 19
Although Han: has nor oflicaaS)
responded lo the cOmmoion s corwlu
�aoM Hacfcsstj Mad "tai Hum "has
a.eadt rnjortfd ' vcime of Ihe pro
p. a- mJe hs :he Uil gave
tr Irrrr I otlcrlfcaa. professes, and
a in i - kxU. ajsvajaal aau�
t �l�a rcrt a lAambcr �f quastmtM
regarding itvc age issue and ihe problem
of alcohol abuse, in an interview with
The Basal C aiobnian
kVcohert is alcohol said l.ottnhca
rctetring to ine dillcTence in North
Carolina's minimum age requirements
for beer and wine as compared to hard
liquor "Sixty percent of the alcohol
consumed in North Carolina is consum-
ed as beer and wine which is not con-
trolled by our ABC laws" he con-
tinued "That's part of our legacy of
misconstrued notions about booze "
"The problem we have in our culture
is much larger than just changing the
drinking age 1 oiterhos said He add
cd thai alcohol is important "in
American society, yet "we're extremely
confused about what appropriate or
responsible alcohol consumption
should be "
Lotterhos pointed out that his
statistics show that 75 percent of the
students who drink at ECU say their
average age of "first consumption" of
alcohol is 14 9 years
"If the law at age 18 is not working,
whs do we assume (he law at age 21 will
work7" Lotterhos said "If age works
as a deterrent (o consumption then why
is 14 9 the aserage age1 Thai's theques
tton we should ask "
I otterhos noted that the number-one
cause of death in the 16-to 2 year-old
age group was alcohol related traffic
accidents and that raising (he drinking
age reduced the rates of "alcohol
related negative consequences "
He said 40 percent of the drinking by
the 13-11 age group is done in the car
"The data is pretty incontrovertible �
us hard data, you can't play with it "
Other factors which Lotterhos
discussed included some of the negative
aspects of raising the minimum age
"What does this do to the value system
of our 18 to 21 year-old population?"
Lotterhos said, referring to the person's
self-image while entering adulthood in
a society where he can vole for the
President and fight in a war, but not be
trusted to dnnk responsibly.
Loiierhos was also concerned that an
increase in the drinking age could also
cause an increase in the abuse of other
drugs
"We think we become more
masculine, more feminine, more sexy
� whatever we want to be � by drink-
ing alcohol Lotterhos said "I think
we tend to believe that if a little alcohol
is good, than a whole lot of alcohol is
better " He added that dnnking is per
cieved as "fun behavior" and
"drunkenness is acceptable in
American culture "
"I'm also aware that it's a very com-
plicated issue Lotterhos added. "I'm
arguing a counter point: perhaps we
need to work on some of the styles,
manners, attitudes and values we have
towards dnnking in our society rather
than looking for magic answers in
terms of age changes "
"I would prefer to see dollars, time,
effort and energy spent toward evolving
positive educational activities relative
to alcohol use and abuse Lotterhos
said
world.
"They have done a superb job for a
number of years said Edith Blanton.
Cherry Hospital director of volunteer
services said of the local group. "We
can always depend on Pill County to be
one of our most generous counties
"We have many patients here thai
would not be remembered at Christmas
time if ii were not for donations con-
tinued Blanton referring lo the Opera-
tion Santa Claus Drive "We can
always depend on the Menial Health
Association to meet the needs of
Caswell residents during the Christmas
holidays added Val Carmine, an
employee at Caswell. Carmine is also a
director of volunteer services.
According to Gray, the Christmas
holiday season is a particularly difficult
and lonely time for institutionalized
mental health patient- "There are
many who have no living relatives,
some have been forgotten after years of
being in an institution, others have
families who are financially unable to
provide for their loved one she said.
"Holidays seem to make the
loneliness even more real and we try to
alleviate that as much as possible
Mrs. Zula Rouse of Greenville is the
Pitt County chairperson of this year's
Operation Santa Claus Drive. Mrs.
Gladys Howell, the wife of ECU
Chancellor John Howell, has
volunteered lo be honorary chairperson
for the drive.
Various collection points for poeple
wishing lo donate gifts have been set up
Ihroughoul (he community
The Menial Health Association re-
quests (hat donated gifts be "new"
because this may be the only package
some of the residents will receive.
The suggestions for gifts vary from
jars of instant coffee and hair dryers lo
(able games and televisions. Specific
gifts for women can include jewelry,
cosmetics, clothes, pantyhose and other
useful items. For men, sweaters, belts,
wallets, sponshirts and lies are sug-
gested gift ideas. Toys, records and
record players can also be used for the
recreation and training programs.
Gray mentioned thai individuals and
groups were welcome lo join the
MHA's adoption program which is
geared toward "forgotten patients
those who have had no family member
contact in over three months Anyone
who wishes to participate is asked to
make an annual $26 donation so a
forgotten patient can receive 50 cents
each week of ihe year as spending
money.
Anyone wishing more information
regarding Operation Santa Claus or the
adoption program is asked to call the
Mental Health Association al 752-7448
or stop by their offices at 315 Evans St
Mall (Room 202) They ask that all gifts
be in by December 7.
Raises Urged
Gov. James B. Hunt Jr said Monday
night that the N.C. Legislature should
lift the freeze on salary raises for
teachers and state employees when it
meets in January. Hunt originally sup-
ported the freeze that has been in effect
since last summer.
"lifting that freeze should be at the
top of our list of priorities when you
legislators return to Raleigh next year
Hunt's statement came in wake of
reports that the pay freeze was harming
the UNC-CH School of Medicine as un
competitive salaies encouraged pro-
fessors to take jobs at higher paying
schools. The pay freeze could harm the
ECU medjcal school and other NO
public universities in general if
teachers' salaries fall significantly
below other schools.
Hunt noted that it u difficult lo
maintain adequaie funding in schools
during the current economic recession
but that North Carolina must support
it's educational institutions to maintain
high standards and remain competitive
for industrial development.
James Beardcn. dean of the ECU
School of Business, said that the salary
freeze could hurt his department if
salaries are not allowed to increase
soon
"Our big problem is thai you fall
behind and then you have to catch up
Bearden said referring to the pay scale
in comparison lo other schools
He said that the business school has
not lost many faculty members yel
because of uncompetitive salaries due
lo the freeze because other slates are
having similar problems He added that
they needed (o keep salaries competitive
in order to keep good teachers and that
bang unable to raise salaries in some
cases has hurt the school's efforts in
recruiting new teachers.
Student At AntUKlan Rally
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
An ECU student was among ihe par
ticipanii in last weekend's Urge and
Man demonstration that look piace in
Washinjlon. P I to coincide wtih the
Ku k.lu� Man i firii rally is the aa
iKvti'i capital in 97 years, wftach ncvet
laod fcitii. an ECU draswa a�is.
was ua WassMgajsajaja. DC. lot isw
Thanksaiviac holiday, whea he and
some of hu (ntndi deexdad to join the
anu-sClan gathering in McPhenon
Park
Thai decision thrust Elks and hu
companions into ihe midst of what
became, in his opinion, "a life
threatening" situation when violent
clashes broke out between protestors
and police
"The whole idea behind ihe ku SChu
a. Ian a. which ii basically white
supremacy � represent a ihreai to
what our whole lountrv Hands few
b4 V- ' ��dons oi. laaavon.
Tiaagnai of estate, the awn of BtgHu �
our whole Const it ut ion
Elks denounced the vvottno thai
erupted and said he "lotaUy dtaaaraad"
�un people who took axtvaatagst of the
situation and looted nearby stores.
He sasd thai the violence occurred for
a number of reasons and that there
were a lor of varied interest groups,
most of which were peaceful Elks
noted that people were very aagry.
some because they were out of work
and others herauie they viewed ihe
Kian as threat to iheu m-uni, "There
was � lot of ipi Rriau
Owe iiofin ihe demonaireaor
fchmiimg
- em. mi
"thai a group can discriminate on the
basn of religion, race, national origin
or sexual preference � 1 fen they havt
lo be stooped "
According to t-IWi the
erupted when a group of ISO
violence or confrontation with poise.
"It defies moral decency Elks said.
throw brickj and boot at police, they
responded by firing tear gas canisters
into the demonstration. Elks said.
Congratulations
to all
Graduating Seniors
Don't leave Pirate A thletics
Behind When You Graduate


0
s
sJ
�&.
FREE
vv��o�
? GRADUATION PRESENT
to you
from the ECU
PIRATE CLUB
v
avaf
JP?rA
CO
All graduating seniors are entitled to receive
one years tree membership in the ECU Pirate
Club. Simply fill out the form below and send
to:
ECU Educational Foundation
Pirate Club
Minges Coliseum
Greenville, N. C. 27834
or call (919) 757-6178
Pirate Club membership entitles you to
special privileges when you watch the Pirates
play.
PIRATE CLUB MEMBERSHIP '83
A 0
Name .
Address
I1
A
Phone
I will graduate LJ December 1982
U May 1983
i
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I





I
g THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DEChMBER7. 1982
1
Alternatives To Prison Encouraged
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
Seventy-six percent
of the people who are
admitted to North
Carolina state prisons
have been sentenced for
non-violent crimes. Ac-
cording to the findings
of the "Citizens Com-
mission on Alternatives
to Incarceration"
report, many of these
non-violent offenders
should be given
"community-based
penalties" instead of
being sent to prison.
"As North
Carolina's prison
population expands
and the cost of in-
carcerating so many of-
fenders in state prisons
rises sharply, the state
should reassess its
policies that favor in-
carceration as a penal-
ty the report said.
"Community-based
penalities as an alter-
native to prison are
feasible for many non-
violent offenders
Some of the
community-based alter-
natives recommended
by the commission in-
clude restitution to the
victims of crime, a
reexamination of the
length of certain prison
sentences and sentenc-
ing of non-violent of-
fenders to community
service work.
"For government to
dismiss these proposals
as soft on crime would
be inaccurate and a
costly mistake, said
state Court of Appeals
Judge Willis P.
Whichard of Durham
who was the chairman
of the two-year study
commission.
Whichard, named to
the bench by Gov.
James B. Hunt Jr ad-
ded that the recommen-
dations made by the
study applied only to
non-violent offenders
and that the commis-
sion was not ad-
vocating soft treatment
of criminals.
The commission,
which is made up of
judges, attorneys,
legislators, former
prisoners and civic
leaders, released their
report at a time when
North Carolina's
prison population has
reached a record high.
The state's prison
population currently
stands at approximate-
ly 17,400 inmates,
while the state's
facilities are only
designed to hold 14,800
inmates. The Prison
and Jail Project, a
Durham-based
organization working
for alternatives to in-
carceration, claims
prison overcrowding
will cause "severe pro-
blems" to both inmates
and guards.
The Project is also
opposed to any addi-
tional prison construc-
tion. "Instead of con-
structing new prisons
said Leo Rubert, a staf-
fperson with the pro-
ject, "policy makers
should look very
carefully at alter-
natives Rubert added
that "there are many
prisoners for whom
alternatives would be
more appropriate
"We've got to
recognize that we can't
continue to construct
more prisons said
Delano Berry, an ECU
accounting lecturer and
former Department of
Corrections employee.
"It's going to bankrupt
us
Berry warned that
further prison con-
struction would have a
double negative impact
on society. He believed
the funds appropriated
for prison construction
could be better utilized
for altei natives and
that "society is going to
have to pay additional
costs from (increased)
crime "because prisons
are not rehabilitating
inmates
The Willis Commis-
sion report recom-
mended that ail people
convicted of misde-
meanors or non-violent
felonies such as
burglary or larceny be
sentenced to do com-
munity service work in-
stead of going to
prison.
A statewide
community-based
penalty program also
would be established to
plan alternatives to
prison. The program
would be designed on a
case-by-case basis.
" i he commission
realizes after two years
of research that the
state is really at a
crucial decision makipg
point Rubert said.
"It can either continue
past policies of increas-
ed prison construction,
high costs and severe
overcrowding pro-
blems, or it can change
its policies
Rubert noted North
Carolina had the
highest per-capita in-
carcertion rate in the
nation and that many
states were already
benefiting from the im-
plementation of prison
alternative programs.
During official
ceremonies last week,
Willis officially
presented a copy of the
commission's report to
Gov. Hunt who praised
the work of the com-
mission but told its
members not to expect
him to agree with all
their findings.
"My policy remains
the same: swift, certain
and severe punishment
for the criminal Hunt
said. "I will read this
report and analyze very
carefully whether these
recommendations meet
that test. If an alter-
native form of punish-
ment will best provide
that protection we
ought to use it.
"If prison will be
best to protect our peo-
ple, we should use
prison and build as
many as we have to
Hunt said.
In addition to Hunt,
the report will be
presented to Attorney
General Rufus L. Ed-
misten, Chief Justice
Joseph Branck of the
State Supreme Court
and Corrections
Secretary James C.
Woodard.
"The commission
has concluded that
North Carolina can
change its policies with
no risk to the public
safety Rubert said.
"Prison doesn't best
protect our people
because over 90 percent
of the people come
back to the communi-
ty where, she con-
tinued, ex-offenders
will be unable to adjust
or find adequate
employment and pro-
bably return to crime.
"The commission
has clearly identified
and researched a pro-
blem and has posed
possible solutions
concluded Rubert.
"It's the responsibility
of state officials to take
a close look at that, and
Hunt said he would do
that
$oco!id$
ishing everyone
a very happy and
musical Merry Christmas
Come on down and pick up an
album for a friend or
treat yourself
$8.98 LIST on SALE for $5.99 include:
Led Zepplin
Michael Jackson
John Cougar
Supertramp
Rod Sewart - UVE
2 Record Set
QUALITY
SHOE REPAIR
SAAD'S
SHOE RKPAIK
113 Grande Ave
7S6 1228
I
(No B.S. Jewelry
J Repair (Coston
CraftiBf - Fair
Prices
GvarMteed Work)
bvLESJEWFIIIVt
� 126 E. 5Ui SI.
J72S-2127 � 10-3
j TimsSat
f t r i�f fMs a�J tor n
i �( 14K cHata repair.
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN ASoanoH a amcun aeo
DEPEND ON. $�on mat's mode easier tv
the women of the Fleming Center Counseorare
available dav and night to support and under-
stand you Your safety, comfort and pnvocv are
assured Dy the coring staff of the Fleming rente
SERVICES � Tuesday � Saturday Aoortion Ap
pomtments � 1st & 2nd Trimester Abortions up N
18 Weeks � Free Pregnancy Tests � Very Earty
Pregnancy Tests � All Inclusive Fees � insurance
Accepted � CALL 781-5550 DAY OS NICHT �
Hearth care co jnseiing rur p rmti
ana educator, ror wo- ' "fc "����
ota ages CENTER
ABORTIONS UP
TO l 2th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM I It
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AT FURTHER EXPENSE
HIS 00 Pregnancy Tut aVrTti
Conuo- and Prottlem Preo.nari
Cy Counseling For lurlher inlor
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Number Will 1 � between :
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RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
� 17 West Morgan St
Raielgn N C
Foreigner
Lionel Richie
Lynyrd Skynrd
Poco
Ozzie Osbourne
2 Record Set
LIVE
We Perform
MIR A CLESU!
ATTENTION
BSN CLASS OF
'83
ARE YOU NEW IN THE JOB MARKET?
JUNIOR EXECS
ENJOT TOUR JOB AND SPARE TIME, TOO
SALARY
Starts 11) 200 S24 100 increasing annually to �� �0� V44 800 in
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College grads all degrees and degree leyels considered Recent
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mental and ph.ncal enams
BENEFITS
Club benefits deluding II hole golf courses, swimming pools,
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JOB
Positions are still available in the following areas Management
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Personnel Management
LOCATION
Immediate openings on both coasts �nJ the Gulf of Mexico � We
pay relocation expenses
NAVY OFFICER PROGRAMS
1001 Navaho Dr.
Raleigh, N.C. 27609
or call 1-800-662-7231
"N
COPIES
� Automatic front & back copies
�Automatic collation
�Automatic Xerox reductions
rm Air fore n,a� a
apecial prcwjra- for
BSNs. If Mlected
you can attar acllva
duly won mflor grmttu-
atkan without wiit.nj
far th reoulta of your
Stale Board. Ta quali-
fy you mul Hove an
overall )�� CPA.
After coaxolealonlngj.
you'll attend a Hwe
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autOr Air r-orce facility.
Ifa an excellent way to
prepare for the oldo
range of axporiencei
you'll rujve a� an Air
Force nuru officer.
For exore Inf or aval ton,
contact
PRINTING
�Fine quality stationery
�Business cards
�Brochures, promotional aids
�Commercial art & design
TYPING �sistance
�Word processing capabilities!
�Computerized typesetting
�Professional resumes
AIM HIGH
y
earrings, belt
buckles, and
strips
by
fimi di N
cumber buns,
sashes, floppy
bows by
Kennetti Gordon
wallets, scarfs,
pins, socks
J.G. Hook
also new
arrivals
from Pendleton.
Cricketer
also introducing I
a new perfum
� Gauloise
rta r4-�
C.cHEBER
FORBES
EVANS MALL
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
Two locations to better serve you III!
Downtown:
(Next to ECU)
In the Georgetown Shops
758-2400
9-7 MF
9-2 Sat.
Pitt Plaza:
Next to Record Bar
756-8550
9-9 MF
9-4 Sat.
9intiiUMiis;iitHtiimTiMUMH�mt�B4ii�fii4iEitiitn(n,i.Miii!t!iHiiiunniMiHniiMnimuHHfMHiiMniiiNnMn.HiinMinuiniinuiMMniniiiiniiMMiiiiiniMifiii'iiHiiMiiiiMHiiifiiih ;in�
I IS YOUR CAR READY FOR
THAT BIG TRIP HOME?
WE CAN GET YOU THERE!
� r
Fkut?e �
SEBVJCJ
teTpoint
Check
ol 4-CVlinder
wsvr
4.88
C0WP,eW
MM�
Coggins Car Care S
756-5244
HilllimilimiiMIJilllililllnillflltltliillltlli!
Wf MHVICf NATIONAL ACCOUNTS
TIRECENTEP
iiiiiiiiiiiimiiHimmiiiiiiiniiMmniiiii
nifiiitifi inffiM tin ii i iffffnnnifri 11 hvvii
PHI KAPPA TAU
would like to thank the
following sponsors for their
participation in
ii �?fl?!t I
E � � 2 j
"fjiaa P HP otpHHIl fl!TO
np?????m
I Eiii�tt2
hi
t iff inw
T
Ah
?fc
c
T
Pantana Bobs
For Heads Only
Taco Cid
Crow's Nest
U.B.E.
Happy Store
Western Steer Family Steakhouse
Backstage Hair Studio
Carolina East Cleaners
King Sandwich
Realty World
Clark Branch Realty
Jeffrey's Beer & Wine
Overton's Supermarket
fysttiP' Wwm
1
Bicvac
pos
Pizza Transit Authority
Papa Katz
Pharo's Fine Foods
Marathon
Tree House Restaurant
California Hair Design Center
Famous Pizza (10th Street)
Julian's Foreign Car Repair
Subway
Todd's Stereo Center
Southern Pride Car Wash
The Special Occasions Inc.
(formerly The Cheese House)
Margaux's
Sub Station II
Conora hilarious H me
Ricky
-Me
4HH�
villa i
Mereeui i
i i oeJoa �o4i4e Wrl "?4fJ9ol
Mi M Mm �� rr mtu
Htd-OoveLeckettdft.
, mrmimmwt!a)iwcti
�C
Sh
A
Ter
B MlkiJ
M.
"Then
thai a r
he faces tht
denial, am
ston an .
Will id '
time, tht �
exist a:
one thing
thr ugt
If, mdc
mer
to an
goerr,e
doesr �
strange � �
prov (
V
end. The
thing ue
And more
pose
'
tion. �
Per"a"
deed. phiJ
they can be
dying V
WOU -
that pr
ee' perl
sure
Undei
of C ej
H'x exp
tier
in a son I
the fnght
The
��;�� ,
Corel
appe)
p.m.
Leeii
The
are
and
ll ii
757-





ifR
IK
No B.S. Jewelry
Repair (Custom
CnftiBf � Fair
Prices
Guaranteed Work)
bLES JEWELRY
i� 120 E. 5th St.
J72S-2127-10-S
j lues. -Sat.
j Brin� ?�� �� for t&
oHMKcHaifiropairt.
.TH
KBOtmOH a difficult dect
that's "node easier bv
g entei Counselors, are
jhl ' support and undef-
i tort and pfvacv ore
w
as Atxv i
V-
' � estei Atwticms up fc
ess � Very Eoftv
live I �s � insurance
5560 DAY Ofi NIGHT �
THE FLEMING
CENTER

ABORTIONS UP
12th WEEK
Of- PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 l�
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
'mmnci Test Birth
Ana Problem Preonan
, r. ling For further tnfor
.ill 133 0S35 (Toll Free
:5� between �
i V jno i P W AtPkflayJ
RALEIGH WOVEN S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
1 � An' Morqjn St
Ri'elgh N C
accessories
earrings, belt
buckles, and
strips
by . . .
Mi mi di
cumber buns,
sashes, floppy
bows by
hennetti Gordon
wallets, scarjs,
pins, socks
J.G. Hook
also new
arrivals
from Pendleton,
Cricketeer
$?
rs�
also introducing
a new perfume
� Gauloise
rfcVi fl
&K9
Z WEBER
TORBES
JANS MALL
WNTOWN GREENVILLE
TAU
the
their
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3
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gtlffTrti glHHHf!
"ransit Authority
atz
s Fine Foods
ion
louse Restaurant
rnia Hair Design Center
js Pizza (10th Street)
's Foreign Car Repair
y
Stereo Center
ern Pride Car Wash
ecial Occasions Inc.
lerly The Cheese House
lux's
Nation II
1'ions to tt�e
I events:
tme � Ricky Walbrvm
ha Dinner � Mark Rosenborg
Dinner � Jamas JeNnsen
(contest
�man Whiftineton
i ortno� PTA rlgu)
v Lockett (in Subway Sub j
ke Marlon (Western Sililin
THE EAST CAROL INIAN
Entertainment
DECEMBER 7, 1982 Page 7
Shadow Box'
A Successful
Term Finale
By MIKE HUGHES
Managing 1 .In r
"There are Jive different stages
that a person will go through when
he J aces the J act oj his own death:
denial, anger, bargaining, depres-
sion and acceptance. These stages
will last for different periods of
time; they will replace each other or
exist at times side by side hut the
one thing that usually persists
through all these stages is hope. "
t. Kubler-Ross, M.D.
If, indeed, the modern entertain-
ment industry no longer pays heed
to any of the taboos which once
governed theatre � and it really
doesn't � it has, nevertheless,
strangely kept one subject in the
proverbial closet: death.
Ah, death the inevitable. The
end. The terrifying end. 1 he one
thing we all hae in common
And more importantly for the pur-
poses of this review, the subject of a
fascinating ECU Playhouse produc-
tion, The Shadow Box.
Perhaps it would be all too easy to
dwell on the psychological and, in-
deed, philosophical ramifications (if
they can be called that) of death and
dying. And if space allowed. I
would surely hae a heydey. But it
that philosophizing should come at
the expense of comment on the ex-
cellent performances that would
surely be a travesty.
Under the outstanding direction
of Cedric Winchell, The Shadow
Box explores three terminally-ill pa-
tients living out the rest of their days
in a sort of hospice and dealing with
the frightening reality ol death.
They come from diverse
backgrounds; their outlooks on the
awaiting inevitabilities vary. In fact,
it is doubtless whether each even
knows of the other's existence.
Nonetheless, they seem somehow
bound together by a transcendent
wisdom, a common love of life, a
genuine acceptance of death. They
are, at the same time, alone and
together.
Dick St. George, who played a
middle-aged husband and father,
gave an excellent (Yes, I know that
word stinks, but it was excellent),
stirring performance, uniquely cap-
tivating both interest and intrigue.
Perhaps his role best exemplifies the
irony of terminal illness: how those
faced with the prospect of death
gradually gain acceptance of their
own plight, while for those left
behind, dying remains the ultimate
fright.
For his wife, Maggie, played by
Susan Netznik, death proves an in-
surmountable opponent. Her con-
cerns, although heartfelt and very
real, are worldly. Her biggest worry,
in her husband's waning days, is
how to tell their son, Steve (played
by "guitarist" Jeff Benningofen),
that his father is dying. Both mother
and son are wonderful.
In Cottage Two, next door and
yet somehow a world away, lives
dies another middle-aged man.
Seemingly disillusioned by his past
with a nymphomaniac wife
(Catherine Rhea), his present with a
live-in homosexual prostitutecon-
fidante (Robert John Willie) and his
tuture (with who knows whom),
Brian (played by Gregory Watkins)
See SHADOW, Page 8
POto By G�v PATTERSON
Robert John Willie and Catherine Rhea in The Shadow Box. Monday marked the final performance of a successful ran.
Eagles' Ex A Soporific Singer
Don Henley
Can't .Stand Still
As lead singer and drummer for
the Eagles, Don Henley has built a
solid following that will probably
SIW-
Coretta Scott King Due On Campus In January
Coretta Scott King, wife of the late civil rights activist Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr will
appear in Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix Theatre on Monday, January 31, at 8
p.m. Her appearance is under the sponsorship of the Department of University Unions
Lecture Series Committee and is being held in conjunction with the Black Arts Festival.
The subject of the lecture will be "The Living Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr Tickets
are on sale at the Central Ticket Office at $2.50 for students, $3.50 for faculty and staff,
and $5 for the public. Tickets may be purchased in groups of 20 or more for $3.50 each.
All tickets sold at the door will be $5. For more information concerning the lecture, call
757-6611, ext. 266, between the hours of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
remain solid until the end of his
career. The Eagles were perhaps the
most popular American band of the
Seventies, with countless platinum
albums and sold-out tours each time
out. But they were a studio band,
finely tuned and slickly produced.
Many critics panned their concerts,
and labeled their recording as New
Bubblegum, bland and uninspired.
I don't know it 1 agree with them
about the Eagles, but if they feel the
same way about Don Henley's
album, I'm with them. Most likely,
I'll be lynched, but this album is
boring What a waste of vinyl.
Many, many people will listen to it
over and over, but some people's
idea of a good time is a cup of cocoa
and a game of whist. Bring on the
marshmallows.
Linda Ronstadt
Get Closer
Poor Linda. She's had her heart
broken by every man she ever knew.
Or so it would seem, according to
her usually woeful records. Get
Closer continues in much the same
vein, but with a strong rhythm and
blues treatment. Five R&B greats,
including my favorite, Billy Joe
Royal's T Knew You When' makes
Linda Gets Her Heart Broken;
George's Destroyers Deliver;
Didley Lends Helping Hand
this her best album in a long time.
Old pals Lmnv. lou Harris and Dolly
Parton are aion�i gr . the nde.
There's even a duet with James
Taylor a la 'Mockingbird
ElektraAsylum mainstay sidemen
Russ Kunkel and Danny Kortchmar
are tops as usual, as is Peter Asher's
producing. One day Linda will find
a man to treat her right, (take heed,
Jerry Brown) but I'd rather she
didn't just yet.
George Thorogood and
The Destroyers
Bad to the Bone
Now, here's a band. Since hitting
the music scene a few years ago,
George Thorogood has assaulted
rock 'n' roll like a hurricane. He's
rougn, tough, and knows the stuff.
Rock 'n' roll is, essentially, an an-
them to teenage anarchy. Elvis scan-
dalized the nation with his gyrations
and pink jackets. Little Richard is
sull one ol the moi bizarre people
in the world. They were rock 'n'
roll. George Thorogood is rock "n'
roll. The listen-to-this-and-jump
quality of the early rock pioneers is
reborn in his distortion-heavy, fran-
tic playing. The grit in his voice is
the shading of the message. And the
message is a group of tunes by the
Isley Brothers, Jimmy Reed, John
Lee Hooker, Chuck Berry, and
Thorogood himself. The Destroyers
are the consumate East Coast party
band, greatly enhanced by the addi-
tion of saxphonist Hank Crawford.
This album is a must for all keg par-
ties, beach trips, and happy hours.
Catch the MTV video of 'Bad to the
Bone' if for no other reason than an
appearanace by one of Thorogood's
idols, the great Bo Didley.
� Zack Perkinson
Domestic Squabble
Who Fighting To The Finish
By STEV E POND
Rolling Sioae
LOS ANGELES � The Who wrapped up the first leg
of their North American tour in Phoenix, Arizona, on
Halloween night, playing an oldies-laden, two-and-a-
half-hour show to a packed stadium of cheering, shov-
ing teenagers. The performance was not remarkably dif-
ferent from the twenty-four that had preceded it, and on
the following day, the band members, who had begun
squabbling and bickering, reutnred home to London for
what one entourage member called a "major rest
The group will return to the U.S. for another thirteen
or fourteen concerts beginning November 27th in Orlan-
do, Florida. A live cable-television broadcast similar to
the Rolling Stones' show last year is planned for the se-
cond leg of the tour. A live album and a TV special may
also be in the offing.
The tour's First leg attracted more than a million fans
and yielded a box-ofFice gross of close to $17 million.
Just about every indoor arena show sold out, and most
of the larger outdoor stadium dates either did the same
or came within a few thousand seats of capacity.
Outdoor-attendance Figures ranged from the approx-
imately 55,000 who saw the band in San Diego's Jack
Murphy Stadium to the tour-topping 93,000 who came
to the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on the afternoon
of October 29th (a school day, much to the chagrin of
the Los Angeles school board).
On the West Coast swing, at least, the Who didn't
create as much hoopla as the Stones had last year; while
the Stones played two shows at the L.A. Coliseum and
another two in San Francisco's Candlestick Park, the
Who settled for one outdoor and one indoor show in
Oakland and a single date in Los Angeles (where their
backstage visitors included Bruce Springsteen, Pat
Benatar, Jack Nicholson and Francis Coppola).
Music
"There's a bit of a crush down front. If everyone
would just shuffle back a bit, it would help out an-
nounced Roger Daltrey near the beginning of the First
Oakland show and for the most part, the crowd com-
plied. Unlike the New York area shows, the security
problems on the West Coast were relatively minor. At
the outdoor shows, some fans still had to be lifted over
the stage-front barricades by security personnel, but
nothing approached the level that had caused the Sew
York Post to brand the group's first Shea Stadium show
a "riot
Appearing with opening acts that were alternately
challenging (the Clash and T-Bone Burnett in Oakland
and L.A.) and predictable (Loverboy and John Cougar
in San Diego), the Who had their share of problems as
the tour leg neared its end. In Portland, Oregon,
Daltrey walked offstage halfway through the set, com-
plaining of sound problems; the problem was corrected,
and Daltrey came back onstage after the impromptu
fifteen-minute intermission.
And at the Oakland Coliseum (an indoor arena, and
the second Bay Area concert), fans were treated to a
touch of old-style Peter Townshend pyrotechnics. Dur-
ing "Won't Get Fooled Again he knocked his guitar
See WHO'S, Page 9

T
i






8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 7, 1982
'Shadow Box'
Rendered
Successfully
Continued From Page 7
contends daily with both the physical and emo-
tional traumas of dying. His true-to-life perfor-
mance (no pun intended, whatsoever) was truly
mciteful, instilling in the audience a sense of
common empathy, of sadness, even of hope.
Still, somewhere above that hope looms
tragedy death � it may come slow or fast, but
the anguish remains constant. Perhaps that
anguish is no more evident than in Cottage
Three, where an aging woman (Hazel Stapleton)
suffers tremendous pains from sunrise to sunset.
She has struck a pseudo-bargain with the In-
finite, her "one last request" as it were.
However, her sole reason for not letting go has
been a crumbled dream all along.
And as her daughternurse Agnes (Allison
Thompson) watches her mother deteriorate both
physicallv and mentally, she is overcome by an
impending sense of guilt. The realization that she
has only prolonged the suffering by playing
along with what has become a cosmic joke proves
too much for her.
Up to this point, one might think the play is
merely a loosly-strung series of unrelated events.
Not at all. The dying characters are in constant
interaction with The Interviewer (Paul B. Jar-
rett), a sort of omnipotent, all-knowing voice
whose questions and comments to the characters
coincide with the doubts and fears the audience
feels. A dramatic deice, yes, but a unique unify-
ing tool as well.
To omit Gregory Buch (scenery designer).
David F. Downing (lighting) and Patrice Alex-
ander (costumes) would be entirely unfair, for
without their fabulous-yet-subtle efforts, the
play's success would be in jeopardy.
In summation. I must apologize for the unen-
ding references above to "excellence" and its
ihesauratic companions. It's a shame the word
has taken on such cliched connotations
because the pla was truly excellent.
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Praised by oil reviews and reoders'
The Hell You Say
By Charles Edwards (ECTC 35)
Bestquahty hardback Illustrated
Autographed Available at Student Store and
Book Barn (12.95) or (13.95) Mailed
anywhere from:
Old Sparta Press Box 6363, Raliegh, NC
27628 Third printing in first year!
Fun stories including ECTC ECC & ECU
and others you'll know or wish you had.
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1 4 Rail Pitk
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W
neck agaoi
he wheeled �
guitar into the
first dose of
dience went
been perl
"Baba -
compammen
when !
about to wan
instrumen: i
quick change
As us
argument
be just � I
road "P-
anothe'
Roger Da
txaminer
the man
U bet
that Da
Townsiend I
alcohol, ana
ed the �
desc t .
Roge- b
er
Roger -
"1
don't like
true 1 :
it's j.
great B
band s pa 1
forward 1
eoUe i
desr;
"II -
1 'vt .
natu-e
must -
oursee W ei
our j
Torn
his ba: .
thougl e w
People are p
this tour
histor sm
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OLD Pi
ion c
Qu
s
I
-
f





A
A
i
f
I
-?IHLgASIROLINIAN DECEMBER 7,
'Shadow Box'
Rendered
Successfully
( ontinut'd From Page 7
contends daily with both the physical and emo-
tional traumas of dying. His true-to-life perfor-
mance (no pun intended, whatsoever) was truly
inciteful, instilling in the audience a sense of
common empathy, of sadness, even of hope.
Still, somewhere above that hope looms
tragedy death � it may come slow or fast, but
the anguish remains constant. Perhaps that
anguish is no more evident than in Cottage
Three, where an aging woman (Hazel Stapleton)
suffers tremendous pains from sunrise to sunset.
She has struck a pseudo-bargain with the In-
finite, her "one last request" as it were.
However, her sole reason for not letting go has
been a crumbled dream all along.
And as her daughternurse Agnes (Allison
Thompson) watches her mother deteriorate both
physically and mentally, she is overcome by an
impending sense of guilt. The realization that she
has only prolonged the suffering by playing
along with what has become a cosmic joke proves
too much for her.
Up to this point, one might think the play is
merely a loosly-strung series of unrelated events.
Not at all. The dying characters are in constant
interaction with The Interviewer (Paul B. Jar-
rett), a sort of omnipotent, all-knowing voice
whose questions and comments to the characters
coincide with the doubts and fears the audience
feels. A dramatic device, yes, but a unique unify-
ing tool as well.
To omit Gregory Buch (scenery designer).
David F. Downing (lighting) and Patrice Alex-
ander (costumes) would be entirely unfair, for
without their fabulous-yet-subtle efforts, the
play's success would be in jeopardy.
In summation. I must apologize for the unen-
ding references above to "excellence" and its
thesauratic companions. It's a shame the word
has taken on such chched connotations
because the pla was truly excellent.
1982
PLAZA SHELL
COMPLETE
er m AUTOMOTIVE
SHELL service
6!0 Greenville Blvd
756 3023 �24 HRS.
24 hour Towing Service
t-Haul Rentals
Available
The Gifts Students, Faculty Families
And Friends will all enjoy'
Proised by all reviews and readers'
The Hell You Say
By Charles Edwards (E K '35)
Best quality hardback Illustrated
Autographed Available at Student Store and
Book Barn (12.95) or (13.95) Mailed
anywhere from;
Old Sparta Press Box 6363, Rahegh, NC
27628 Third printing in first year!
Fun stories including ECTC ECC & ECU
and others you'll know or wish you had.
LAUTARES JEWELERS, INC.
Protest �onaI Jewelers
Established 1912
Resetting Repairing and Custom
Design All Work Done on
Premises 4I4 Evans street ijjpj
Registered Jewelers Cert d Gemolog.sts
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I QUALITY
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j Guaranteed I
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I
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7.2S Oi. -Feei-Te.i
ffe If -reel !���
PUSS N Boots Macaroni & Cheese
Ml Mb. � JO. OH mm , ,� .� R ,��
i-quid Wisk �) Edon Toilet Tissue
12 0: Large
Jeno's
Pizza
Why Piy M 29
w
neck aga.r ij)
he wheeled
guitar into the
first dose of
diencc ent i
been perl -�
"Baba O Ril
compan.r i
when rowi
about "
instrumer.
quick, j: .
As ua
argumer.
be jjusl �'
road
ano'vhe
Roger Da
t xaminer
the n
When
thai Da
Tov
aJcoho.
ed the roa
descr.
Rogc
ver t I
Roger -
"1
don't lil
true I :
i afc .
grea: B c
band-
forward I I
despc
-r
I've I
nate
n .
ourser.e. v
ou-
-
his ba -
thought the 1
Peopie
this tour
histor -V
numbei
new
B
Ribs
are
now
available
all
hrs
OLD Pi
BrUj
1011 c
Qu
� ���






eef Chunk Bone In
;
- �
11

9
4 ft.
oilet Tissue

I

m
v
Who's Final Days Spent Playing Games
( ontinued From Pane 7
neck against an amplifier; when the amp broke,
he wheeled around and began smashing the
guitar into the top ot the amps It was the tour's
first dose ot onstage destruction, and the au-
dience went into hysterics But the Who have
been performing "Won't Gel Fooled Again
"Baba O'Riley" and "S ho Ate You" to the ac-
companiment oi prerecording backing tapes, and
when lownshend realized that the tape wasn't
about to wait foi him to finish demolishing his
instrument, he cut his hashing short and made a
quick change ol ae
As usual, the band also began to air its
arguments in public 1 he hottest issue seemed to
be just whs the group was bidding farewell to the
road. "Petei vis one thing one minute and
another thing the next griped a disgruntled
Roger Daltre to the m Angeles Herald-
t xaminer "You don't know where you are with
the man
When the tour started, the prevailing stoi �j
that Daltre) had called a halt to touring to keep
lownshend from killing himsell with drugs and
alcohol, and that Pete himself vehemently dislik-
ed the road But within a month, lownshend was
describing his reasons differently "The idea ol
Roger b � up the band to save m life is
erv noble and all that, but it's a load ol crap.
Roger was incredibly supportive, but it didn't go
hat extent
he W ho are stopping because 1
ad Id :ik that's quite
eall like he hand that's what
1 he Who on the road I think is
great. But everybody is so enthused about the
band's past, and that prevents us from nuning
forward 1 feel that 1 haven't been allowed to
evolve at ail for a g, long, long time, and I'm
despei it it.
"it - no; the road and it's not performing that
I've g ' ai . iment with it's the froen
nature ol the band Rogei savs that the Who
must stop before ve become a parody ol
ourselves Well, I think we've been parodying
ourselves for a long, long time
lownshend was similarly disenchanted with
his band when he told the os Angeles limes he
thought the Who had "peaked a long time ago
e putting tar too much importance on
r he said, "in terms ot rock
s de from the fad that we sell large
ol tickets, we are fairly insignificant
and Daltrey were hardly talking to each other,
and the singer was vocal when the os Angeles
Herald-t.xaminer approached him between
shows. "This has been one ol the most miserable
tours of my life he said. "Maybe 1 shouldn't be
saying this, because then I'll start going on like
(Pete) does, but it just hasn't been an enjoyable
tour. 1 mean, we've been playing well, but it
hasn't been happyI'll tell you. Pete is a total
enigma at the moment
But two nights later, things were looking more
cordial, at least onstage, finishing "Young Man
Blues" with some fancy bits of singing. Daltrey
brought a broad gnu iii lownshend's face, and
the guitarist reached out to pat him on the back
as fie walked bv, Daltre) turned, and the two
shared a quick handshake before lurching into
" I w ist and Shout
A tew such moments will likely be preserved
Win) producei Glyn Johns has recorded every
show so tar and is said to be planning a live dou
ble aiubm (the band's last inconcert 1 P was
170's live at I eeds)
I he band also videotaped shows in Detroit,
New York ity, 1 os Angeles. San Francisco, San
Diego and Seattle, with plans reportedly being

bak'
,i c e
i
diaii netwoi k tele i
In the meantime. I h ,et i :
conclude with i broad
show is slated to star' �
tune on Dei 1 7th and will h �� �
ol the same pa
Stones' show last Dee. I i be I
on radio stations,
a six and a-haif-l
band's histoi �
Film Explores Mennonite Philosophy
don't like th
true. 1 d
it's all about
1NDIANAPOI IS
(AP) � The people
behind the tilm The
Height aren't looking
to set Hollywood on
tire with their tale ol
young M e n n o n i t e s
coming ol age in the
Vietnam era, but thev
hope it will stimulate
thought in churches,
schools and civic au
diences.
1 he movie involves
tour high school
youths, including the
son ot a Mennonite
minister, and how they
deal with dating, drink
ing, goals in life, dnf
ting apart from then
friends and the draft
Mennonites, one ol
America's historic
"peace" churches, op-
pose active military ser-
vi ce and excessive
lifestyles and, like Bap
lists, teach that baptism
should come only at an
age ol decision.
"It's really a kind ol
coming-of-age film
said producer Ron
Byler. "It revolve-
around more than just
the whole draft issue. It
reallv is a look at how
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If It doesn't tick, tock to u�
values and ethics aie
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It is based on a
novel, also titled I he
H eight, by Joel Kauff
mann, a Mennonite
who served as associate
producer ot the nun ie.
"Peace is a broadei
issue than conflict
overseas he savs
"It's how you live youi
life, searching foi that
consistency
Produced b Sisters
and Brothers Inc a
Mennonite firm based
in Harrisonburg, Va
the movie was stun in
north-central Indiana
using mostl Men
nonite cast and crew
In the stor, the main
character, a young man
who could avoid the
drat' In f to col-
lege, decider instead to
register as a conscien-
tious objector and per
form service in a
hospital
One ol the pro
tagonist's ; ompanions
takes a student deter
men! I he othei. who
has somewhat
wishv washy, enlists,
partly because he
doesn't know wha
do with his life, and is
reported missing in
tion.
I hat makes foi a
"kind ol irony"
lists, portraying
their " . stance"
as less dangerous than
ng into service
Kauff mann says. "We
did not make it as a
propaganda film. Oui
hope is that it reall
stimulates thought
Keith Miller ol
Kokomo took a month
off trom his duties as
edit 01 and general
manager of the
H vardounu "v a -
1
liaison
By lei
pleted film �
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Opens December lOth at a theatre near you.
r





1 Ht I S 1 i KiIM
Sports
DkC I Mhi k
.
Basketball Teams Win Clutch Games
La
H i INm I'll - sms margin At one point, the Pirates
built a seven point lead, but the
w ' irward lohnn Bulldogs retaliated, and trailed by
ly points, the only two points, 42 40. at the halt
tiisi victor In the second half, Sam ford
i lying to aw 87 SI jumped out to a three point lead
Sa ' ' rd I niversity this and then went ahead b si. making
the score, 68 62, w I � 08 remain-
I he Pirates came from behind ing
�een minu at's when Peartree and Robm-
hei
Rob
��s
Sopl B . w
rd 1 or, son made then moves to put the
rial Pirate? ahead
I dw . lade 12 o! 15 held
ind I �f six free throws
askets to to s . i ints, while Wright ad
ead bdwards made ded 17 Green hit 14, Peartree 'id
m " 1:18 eft to 11 and Robinson, 10.
83-78 ! dwa d 1 he Pirates shot 56 1 percent
�a asn I
onl clutch trom the tlooi. while Samloid
a game. finished with a 56.9 shooting
Sop ird Bruce Peartree percental ime
� one ol two free San barely 'bounded
� i � �. " f P rates a I t, I , 12 . with I dwards pulling
it v � toro s the Pirai
Rick M a three point play I throw line, 1I hit
i ead to two 23 ol 32, while Samtord made 15 ol
With 43 s ' Sam ford's 2 1
1 I la shot ai "1 he' playing very,
LCI e abl ed vei I ai Hai di aid
� ey' i e
pla ing Aeil m
nd He
iree, -
W
i .
1
K
s
� .
� ��
tard
h
iii
I M �
leased w it h
M .
Hanks) played
Harrison aia he wa
the team's performance and was
happy foi the players tor two
reasons, "Number one. we won on
the ioad against a very good ball
'earn, phis we had
rt a -
bet uum it a
Ml' h I I H I I'i
leamsi a
lomev. onnm
1
:
I

we eame
�it i oniv con
the se�
-��
i �
i(i
Pho'o Ov 6A8 Pfi - -
fI forwardhark- (,rten (top) puts up jumper in the lane; 1 oraim
hosier (bottomI dries during earlier I ady Pirate contest.
Why Chaney Quit The Squad
BvIM)N PI f s is
W a-
U A

. ru hiding he
nd, Va
: it 1
ii I'd
Ihursday, Head i Ca , : - ,
: fatement say it M
"Dai iid not
� iv and �
eas '
: the Nai
! asi basketb
nil nei nepl
i as ,i attended
l,n,et : 'Ui program had a tot on her mind
I net reasons foi rhat's whei
had nothing to do curred betweei Chanev and Ai
� i
lesday, she
ement rx
academics. "It was something druzzi "I was
think c
up
1 didn'
nd. I: as a spi
Darlenehanev decided to leave the I adv
Photo by GARY PATTERSON
Pirate team last week.
ol the moment thing. I didn't talk to
anybod) about it, including the
coach. 1 thought I could handle it
Ills sell .
"When she said something to me. I
know, I shouldn't have blown up like
that. It was a mistake, and 1 regret
it
Chaney Added thai hei decision
tor leaving was not because ol
Coach Andruzzi. "Since I made it
through last year, 1 fell like 1 could
make it 1 his year I knew what to
expect, and I felt like 1 could handle
it. She's a tough coach, a discipline
coach, but she is a good coach
Andruzzi said she had no idea
that Chaney was having family pro-
blems. "Instead oi coming to us,
she tried to handle things herself
she said. "She showed a great lack
of respect tor me and 1 won't
tolerate that. I have an obligation to
this school and to this program, and
the players have certain rules thev
must abide by. Our door is always
open to listen it they have a pro
Mem
I ast week, Chaney said returning
home was all she could think about.
"I've jus( been thinking about my
family she said. " I know it's hard
tor my sister right now, and I
haven't spent any time with mv
family since my father died.
(Chanev father died trom cancer
last year).
"I guess all that wishing made me
act ttic way 1 did 1 didn't listen to
her while 1 was taikmg. I was hurt
mey said she
� �� - ball -
i v e i t. 1
think I made 11
ny lite w hen I quit Now, I think 1
sho iid ked i
N' mv .hanev a .
d id
I tl it ' basl
� � ?ol
Plans to tran; I vever, are
not in the making. "1 would I
anywhere else she said, "and I
wouldn't wan: to play ball
anybody else either
Chanev. aonverse All-America
in high school, has accepted what
she has done, and said she hopes
others will understand what promp-
ted her actions now
"I understand what I've put the
tans through she said. "It's
strange, you realize things after you
do it, rattier than thinking before
vou do it
Bv KhA BOI ION
court j
6 2
1(1 head ach Cat Iruzzi B tl tl i P
celebrated her 30th birthday m fine tour
on Saturda , � the 1 Ad:
P ates defeated 'he Si Peter's Col I
the
11k helped offset the Pirates
Pirates' 1 hui I ehl loss to N (umpei ��
State. The Woltpack v
-c '�' pite a 24-1 I w traij
pon ne Foster a
20-point, 11 Mary
Dei
i � Lady Pi hurl
ire the N Mate by th
an: sop'
Da: len . . ' V �
the ' EC!
squad '
membi
In Saturday
Lady Pira

V 2 of 14 f
I
i
I l
� ��

Si P
'

ed with 22 �.
ly. Debbie Anderson ha ime-
high total of 1 1 rebounds
I he Il starters scored all 81 ol
the lady Pirate points. I he other
iteer o1 the starting sqtrad were
I ' � Mr S ��� ts anJ ft re
b iunds are I i uske, 10 :
Delpl Ma
� ��
Pirate Cagers Prepare To
Battle 18th-Ranked Wolf pack
Jody Schulz
In Blue-Gray
! he I l I men's basketba
a i ist ACC opj -nen:
lay
North Cai
2-1, I
i facel i I
State
� ee ! �
.
:t quite well it seems
Now 2-0, N.( State fias so
100 ts Ol more in its first
' ' � VV pack, who hai
evei scored more than 70 points
year, beat Western Carolina.
100-66, and North Carolina A I
mo i
I eading the Pack is guard Sidney
I owe. a 6-1, 195-pound trom
Washington, DC 1 owe scored 16
points in State's last game, and is
averaging 11 points per game
already this season. But 1 owe's real
talent lies in his ability to assisi. He
already has 13.5 assists m two
games, with nine in the game against
the ;1 dint with 6.8 1


I
rebounds McQuee


Loren
ai d �
N.Y is also expected i
W ednes
u " is � a
� " � Piratt
C ind Pleasants
J ook Inside
Last Carolina University defen-
sive end Jody Schulz has been
selected to play in the annuai Blue
Citay All-Star Came, set for
Christmas Day in Birmingham, Ala.
I he honot is the second foi
Schulz as tar as all-star games is
concerned. He was earlier picked to
play in the Japan Bowl, to be held
Jan Yokohama, Japan.
Schulz, along with ECU offensive
guard lorn Carries, was selected to
the LC AC Division I All-Star team
Schulz was also named to the first
team All-South Independent
I he Blue-Gray game will be
televised over CBS, starting at 12
noon on Dec. 25.
N. A& 1 l as! year, 1 owe shat-
tered State's career assist record, ac
cumulating 491 assists after only his
thud year.
Another guard setting the pace is
seniot Dereck Whittenburg. l his
veat, Whittenburg is averaging 21
points per game to lead the Pack in
scoring.
Averaging 13 4 points per game last
season. Whntenbuig's long range
shooting and leaping skills led him
to several ACC honors.
One detinue advantage State has
over the Pirates is sie. Enter Thurl
Bailey and Coell McQueen. Bailev.
a 6-11, 214 pound forward, was the
Pack's leading scorer last year with
a 13.7 game point average, and led
the Wolfpack? "Pray
coach i riarhe Harrison
're p t
eli. In fact, Stau -
Playing better than .
because they've go-
exceptional talent on th
Harrison said the Pa -
nig real loose this v.
!uo gifted guards
leaders. "They piav very in-
telligent he sa d
In order to be competitive -
State. Harrison said the P
ff �o d, quit. a feM
Defensively, we've got to j
"andC�Z!
and eliminate then:
We ve got to limit thei
shot it we possibh t
"Offensively, wC � . v
every single time We doi .
to get mto a helte, I
ottnrme0"
Now M, the Pi,
road ahead of them. Aft
ate game, the Pirat w, , '
the Bayou C lassie m i .
��e l7-lT(Fcu tfalttC
ana New MS�Utnwest
Grambling sVatef S' l!e'
rneet SouThweSern I � "
Rt i- vls(-rti 1 ouisiana
'W"g He711- dT abo" �
� -I th'rk ,iC'K h'
td,n san iio weh "

11
Ch
be
heal
7 'hi







THE fcAST CAROLINIAN
ames
pcd to a quick
� m o minutes
- came back vith
k. - in the middle
. i 20-12 lead
tie hot hand at
and the Lady
ol the ke
a ; 26 lead at
bs Hooks
a stea b Mabr
a ' St Peter's
- a ere forced
44 with I c L
e i ad) Pirates
V � ex
e sometimes
because
lose instead
'Bui we mo -
J took
' ei squad is
' recent
ave been
the
New York,
- a the N C
ill contributed to
on. On top of
around
the oppor-
! ad Pirates
See I m . pa;e 11
. .
t � (
?
!S II I
-ft 4 '�
1 4-
pare To
id Wolfpack
6.8 for
per rj
I
li
KOueen.
t on
what
t
- �
in one
'he Pack are play-
and have
to ere as
la very smart, in-
��- ainst
Alii
feu thu
fcontr , c
I , � tie said
eliminate them h()
lmit ' ,
� "icui to iust one
ii we i11 j n
(ffenj musJ
ngle tin We don't �
kelterge!
Pe too big and experienced
nEnetthem,ontrolthctem
Pirates have a tough
fiem. After the (
Hjejthe Pirates wiU travel to
J- wssicin latavette la
1 �� ew Mexico State
H State), and w, ;
louthwesten, Louisiana
P�pite havmg to make a few
DECEMBER 7, 1982
11
Lady Pirates Defeat Peahens
Cont'd from page 10
with the victory over
the Peahens.
ECU converted on 43
percent of their ball
possessions, the best
percentage of the year
so far. While scoring
on 33 of their 77
possessions, the Lady
Pirates shot 62 percent
from the field.
"We have to be very
proud of our girls com-
ing back from our first
road trip up North and
playing one of the big-
gest games of the year
against 14th ranked
N.C. State stated
Andruzzi.
"We played in front
of one of the biggest
crowds of the year.
State jumped out to an
early lead, but we came
back with guts and
determination
In the contest with
N.C. State, the Lady
Pirates were led by
Foster's 24 points and
Denkler's 20 points and
11 rebounds.
The ECU coaching
staff awards "Rat Of
The Game" honors
after each contest, with
the award going to the
player who exemplifies
all the qualities of a rat
- quick and tenacious.
"Rat Of The Game"
honors went to Denkler
and Mabry for the
N.C. State game.
Mabry, the 5-4 guard
from Rocky Mount,
leads the Lady Pirates
in assists (17), steals
(11), and hustle. The
freshman jumping-jack
forced several N.C.
State turnovers while
guarding one of the
best guards in the coun-
try in Angie Arm-
strong.
For the St. Peter's
game, the award went
to Hooks and Truske.
Truske played the en-
tire 40 minutes and
Hooks played with a
dislocated finger.
"Fran is the type of
individual we are proud
to have on this team
commented Andruzzi.
"Against State, she
came to the bench with
her finger hanging
down, trainer Liz
White puts it back in,
and the kid is back in
there within a minute
Denkler continues to
be the team leader of
the Lady Pirates. Her
32 points against St.
Peter's marked the 38th
straight game in which
she has scored in dou-
ble figures. Denkler is
currently averaging
26.2 points-per-game
and nine rebounds.
The Lady Pirates
now have a 2-0 record
at home and a 3-2
record overall.
A bright spot already
this year, as in previous
years, has been the
committment of the
fans.
"I'm very pleased
with the crowds we've
had the last few
games responded
Andruzzi. "Our fans
have been tremendous
and very supportive of
this team. We carried a
couple of hundred peo-
ple to State and that's a
compliment to our
�'
rattf
it's
the fun
place to eat
Best Pizza
in town. Honest!
(l LUNCH BUFFET
Daily ll-2pms289
3 EVENING BUFFET
i Mon.& Tues. 5-8om 2"
VIDEOGAME CONTEST 3!
every Wed. & Thurs. 7-10pm
? prizes for all winners (
iWed Thurs. 9:00 Current Movies
"jvFri.JSat. 7-9
Open daily 11:00am � 11:00pm
10th ' Cotanche
758-6121
NOT
THE U S U A L . . . i n
Christmas china, teddy
bears, candles, teddy
DvaiS. greeting cards, teddy bears, gift wrap,
teddy bears, swings, teddy bears, decorations, teddy bears,
bafej gifts. iedd bears Located in the 600�roup of
The Gazebo Ar,in9,on B,vd shops
Hours: MonFri. 10a.m9p.m.
Sat. 10 a.m6p.m.
A SHOP FOR ALL SEASONS
Ohe Qtuebo
614 ARLINGTON BLVD � GREENVILLE. N.C. 27834
1919) 766-0771
girls, our community
and our school
The Lady Pirates'
next game is at home
on Saturday night
against Appalachian
State.
When asked about
the Lady Apps, An-
druzzi stated, "They
are big and they have a
good scoring punch
from Kay Hampton
and Susan Cameron. 1
think you'll see a good
game Saturday
Saturday night is
WRQR-Radio High
School Night. WRQR
of Farmville (94.3 FM)
is sponsoring High
School Night Saturday
as students 18 and
under will be admitted
for SI. Albums, movie
passes, food and video
game tokens will be
given away during the
game.
Tipoff is set for 7:30.
IOET
Attention Christmas Shoppers
Men's IZOD Sweaters$17.95
We have old fashioned ear mutts and C.B. Jackets
Golf Balls, including 1 S-pack top Hireonly $15.95
We also have the largest selection
of SKI EQUIPMENT and APPAREL
in eastern N.C.
IZOD Lacoste Shirts
in sizes remaining,
medium & largeonly $12.00
Large selection of
� IZOD down filled jackets.
GORDON FULP
GOLF, TENNIS and SKI SHOP
Located at Greenville Country Club, off Memorial Dr.
Open 7 days a week
inn
123 E. 5th Str.
immiiiinmiiiiiiiiinf
752-7483
TUESDAY
PIZZA BUFFET � $2.79 all you can eat 5-9
LADIES' NITE with Kenny Shore
Ladies admitted free � free draft for the ladies.
WEDNESDAY
SALAD BAR SPECIAL � $2.15 all you can eat 5-9
THURSDAY
SPAGHETTI SPECIAL � $2.49 all you can eat 5-9
COMING FRI. & SAT. � LAHN & LOFTON









































MEW CMflSTMAS SPECIAL PBC�S
FKDIA NOW TILL CUJ3STMA9
AllCm 4HL11M
" � 70t 11-00 TIL.
'We have T-Shirts on sale
niiiiimnn�nmimm�'i��TTTT






































Items and Prices
Effective Wed Dec 8,
thru Wed. Dec 15. 1982
Copygri! 1982
Kroge- Sa� on
Quai'i, Rights Reser�ec!
Nonp Sold
Dealers
600 Greenville Blvd Greenville
Open 8 a.m. to Midnight
Open Sunday 9am to 9 p m
ADVE�TSED tem POLICY
Eacn o tnese adert sed 'tems 5 �.
Quirwl io te -eao t �.a �: � �o'
saie n eac Kroge' Sa on �icec
as specica" noted .i this �j � e
do run out o' a" 'tem � � ?�
you yo�jr cno'ce o a com&arac e
tem rn available 'e'ec 'e
same sa. gs o� a 'a ncnec wti
ent.t.e �Ou to Du'case "��e
adve sed lajnn a' 'he ader� 5e
pi :e iri - 3C aa,s

f�
-7g W

��7�
FROM THE DELI
ALL WHITE MEAT
Gourmet
Turkey Breast
$369
KROGER
Lb.
Beer1
SAVE
20
2 Lowfat Milk
$465
Gai I
KROGER FRESH
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12-Oz.
Cans
V2-Gal
Jug
Orange Juice
99
MELLO VELLO
Coca-Cola
AUNT JEMIMA
ASSORTED VARIETIES
FROZEN
16-Oz
Btls.
PLUS
DEPOSITS
DEL MONTE
Catsup
24-Oz
BtL
89
10-02.
Box
kStokelyi
STOKELY
Fruit
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KROGER
Peanut
Butter
$419
8-oz.
Jar
COST CUTTER
Paper Towels
17-Ct.
Can
Jumbo
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49
is:sic
V v
v
v QOLOEN RIPE
Bananas
99
VAC PAC
COUNTRY BRAND
Sliced Bacon
ik
j
ftMl
Lb.
M





12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 7,
1982


Swim Team Drops Dual Contest
By ED NICKLAS
M.ff Hrilrr
T he ECU swimming
team showed great im-
provement over last
year's meet with N.C.
State, but neverthless,
the Pirates lost both
meets to the Wolfpack
Saturday.
The men and women
were defeated 79-34
and 68-45, respectively.
Head coach Rick
Kobe, despte the im-
provement, felt the
team as a whole was
lackluster as a result of
the Thanksgiving vaca-
tion layoff. "We had a
bad meet he said.
"We've had four good
ones, but we were flat
for State. We scored
more points than last
vear, but if you're
looking for something
good, that's about it.
"I don't know
whether it was the kids
going home for
Thanksgiving, finals,
the end of the term or
what. State didn't swim
well either
Although the team
did not compete up to
par, it did improve
drastically over last
year's meet with State.
The women, for exam-
ple, doubled their score
while participating in
four less events this
year. Last season, The
Lady Pirates scored 28
points in 17 events.
This year, the women
scored 28 points in just
13 events.
The Lady Bucs'
200-yard medley team
of Luanne Peura, Kaky
Wilson, Nancy James
and Nan George was
outstanding, finishing
first by just barely
"touching out" the
State relay team.
Also placing first in
the meet were Nan
George in the 50-yard
freestysle, Kaky
Wilson in the 100-yard
breaststroke, and the
800-yard freestyle relay
team of Nancy Rogers,
Nancy Ludwig, James
and George. In addi-
tion, Ludwig qualified
for the nationals with
her time in the 100-yard
fly.
In an exciting race,
the men's 400-medley
relay team gallantly at-
tempted to upset State,
but were edged out by
Pirate Club Offers Membership
To ECU Graduating Seniors
one-hundredths of a se
cond.
Individual first place
finishes were obtained
by Stan Williams in the
100-yard freestyle and
Kevin Richards in the
200-yard backstroke.
In diving, Scott
Eagle flew high,
finishing second on
both boards.
According to Kobe,
the team will par-
ticipate next in the
Holiday Training Pro-
gram on Dec. 26 in
North Palm Beach,
Fla. "We're looking
forward to going down
to Florida. The swim-
mers will be putting in
16,000 to 20,000 meters
a day plus weights.
We're going to come
back ready
The Pirates next
meet will be against
Classifieds
PERSONAL
HEY FRED. I wanna party with
you! I remember when I had my
first gin-and-tonic and that's all
I remember' Don't you hate it (or
mar B and W was wild! Thanks,
your co-Alpha Sig Alchic, FRED
OY.
JCB It'll be a blue XMas without
you. I hope Harry doesn't get too
lonely. I love you, your HILLBIL-
LY.
EUNICE: You remind me of an
elephant's ss. You're always
high, and you always stink. Love,
ED
ROOMMATE
WANTED
11 utilities RIVER BLUFF apts.
Cell 7H-I71S.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share Apt. 1 mile from campus M0
VI ��� Call ist-Mtt.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share apartment. MOM per month
11 utilities. Available Jan. I. Call
Karen at 7J4-7S11. Non-smoker,
serious student preferred.
1 FEMALE ROOMMATES
wanted Ml per month plus ll
utilities. Pets ok 7M-S114.
ROOMMATE WANTED 1 or 1
preferably female 1 block off cam
pus 7M-4W7.
SERVICES
FEMALE ROOMMATES wanted
to share large house near campus.
Call 1SS-MS7 after 500 p.m.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED 1 or 1 females to share
apartment close lo campus Ml.11
mo. plus 11 utilities. Call 7MM�
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
for net semester, non smoker.
By STEVE DEAR
Sllft V-rilci
The ECU Educa-
tional Foudation,
known as the Pirate
Club, is once again of-
fering a free basic
membership to all
graduating seniors.
A basic membership
in the Pirate Club en-
titles one to receive the
Purple Report, the
Pirate Club's monthly
newsletter, decals, a
certificate and a
membership card.
The Pirate Club is a
private corporation
whose primary respon-
sibility is to raise the
funds for all athletic
scholarships. "We're
giving the student a
means to get an educa-
tion through a scholar-
ship donation in ex-
change for his donating
his athletic ability to
the university said
Richard Dupree, ex-
ecutive director of the
Pirate Club.
Over the next five
years the Pirate Club
hopes to expand its
membership from its
current level of 1,800
members to 5,000, ac-
cording to Dupree.
"The next five years
will be very important
to ECU athletics he
said. Almost 50 percent
of the Pirate Club
members are alumni.
The Pirate Club has
between 45 and 50
chapters in many
states.
Navy On Jan. 15. pr.��r.b.V Chris�.n 75 rent plus
1,1ATTIC
&
PROFESSIONAL Typist wants to
type at home Reasonable rates;
7So-34o.
PROFESSIONAL Typing service-
experience, quality work, IBM
typewriter. Call Lanie Shive.
75 5301 or OaiJoiner 7M 101
TYPING TERM papers, resumes,
thesis, etc. Call 751711.
TYPING: TERM PAPERS,
THESIS, etc Call 757 1M1 before
? 00 p.m.
BUSINESS TUTOR Ex Grad stu
dent and business instructor will
tutor most business classes. Get
help before FINAL EXAMS. Call
WMBBj m 75 5177 after 5 p.m.
ENGLISH TUDOR HELP with
writing, re-writing and editing
papers. Also proofreading and typ-
ing Call 7S7-W07 after 5.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST: Great
service. Reasonable rates. Call
between 1 and � p.m 757-1170.
NEEO HELP PREPARING for
your Spanish final? Tutoring
available on all tljrels. Call
757 11M.
WANTED
PROCESS MAIL AT HOME!
M0.00 per hundred. No experience.
Part- or full-time. Start im-
mediately. Details, send self-
addressed, stamped envelope
Haiku Distributors, 115 Waipalani
Rd, Haiku. HI U7M.
HELP WANTED: Assistant buyer
position open for assistant ladies'
sportswear buyer. Must have good
feel for fashion and the ability to
handle heavy paperwork ����
pedient manner fmeerieeco ?
retail preferred Good salary and
opportunity tor advancement
Send resume to P O Box lf7,
Greenville. N C 170M
FOR SALE
1 FISHER SPEAKERS model 510s
would like to trade tor cassette
deck Call 7S-0�77 or The East
Carolinian 75714 and leave
message for Gee Johnson
FOR SALE 170 HONDA 1M XL
DIRT OR STREET BIKE Call
7S0-V7O0 Men Thor.
NICE GRAY ANO WHITE RAB
BIT FUR JACKET FOR SALE M5
CALL ISt-HO.
WATERBEOS and Bedding one
half off! DON'T pay retail! �
have complete waferbeds as low
as tl� tS Also bedding sets as low
as �7� S Come by Factory Mat
tress and Watertoed Outlet 710
Greenville Blvd next to
Carolines 155-Ml
AVAILABLE JAN 1 btdraon
duplex near campus CM 355 ��-
after 5
FOR SALE l�0 Coacwmen '�
jl foot Trailer h� A�r Kormi
Oeck and is underpinned on io� on
Ayden Trailer Park Call '� Bel
FOR RENT Georgetown Ap M
of Jan 1 Can '53 J of '5 Ml
FOR SALE Durst color eaOarget
SIMM can after 1 niiiar
TWIN SIZE bed wtt ociick -
and metal frame G xi'iw C4
FRAN Fritigerald 75 :�
FURNISHED BEOB.OO lot one
Accross from college Pncn�
7M1M5
MOVING' MUST vale Faoxw
guitar good condition u� i
bag chair rust color �soati � M
items, clothes pic'urei M �c ��
bike, can 7M H05
FOR SALE YAMAHA OeSMCi
Guitar with case Eice'ien' cona
tion $115 Phone 7SJ H01
lV
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Pizza JLcui
Greenville's Best Pizzas Are
Now Being Delivered!
Most delivery pizzas lack in
true quality and have 'hidden'
delivery costs in the price-
PIZZA INN has changed
all that!
We sell our delivery
pizzas at Menu Prices!
No Surcharge. We also
give FREE Drinks with
our large ana giant
pizzas. TRY US TODAY!
CALL 753-6266 Greenville Blvd.
(i
Located 1 mile past
Hasting's Ford on
10th St. extension
Tuesday, Wednesday
& Thursday
POPCORN
SHRIMP
$295
French Fries or Baked Potattf,
Tossed salad may be substituted
tor Slaw35c extra
'Zc&coc&c rtuxtstito
Live and in concert at the ATTIC on DEC. 7th. Admission is
�3.91 for the General Public M.91 for the first 400 ECU
students. Wear your VZMB T-SHIRT AND RECEIVE
YOl R FAVORITE BEVERAGE FREE!
The door is open at 8:30pm. Come on out and hear your
favorite Doors tunes performed by the Back Doors.
WZMB will receive partial proceeds from the concert in the
form of a grant from the ATTIC
HAMSTER
& At
ERBIL SPECIAL
Starts Sat. Dec. 4th
Hamster or Gerbil food, wood shavings
and water bottle.
PKT
VILLAGE
ALLFORs18"
plus 1 FREE Hamster or Gerbil
Complete line of small animal supplies
tmmmmmmmmmammmmmissmssmmmsmmsmmmimmmmsmm
8

Pepsi taste
it's caffeine free!
REGULAR
Anytxx can make a cateine
freecota, but there's only one
wt posittvety Pep�i taste
Awilabio) In regctar or
moor I
SUGAR FRH
1H SAVE SO V� 1 ��1 On any muft-pac or 2 ft. YjtTzA � bom o� aoo Iroo Pop ftoo logutar or wgar ��� i i I 1 i i I I I 1 !
HAIR GALLERY
236 Greenville Blvd.
(Behind Tipon Annex)
335-2076
Holiday Special
Haircuts
$coo
The Shoe Outlet
201 West 9th Street
NAME BRANDS at
DISCOUNT PRICES
50-75
Off Regular Price
Men's & Ladies' SHOES
Dingo BOOtS
Hanover
Name Brand Leather Clogs
S4.95-S10.95
Ladies' Dress & Western Boots
S10-S27.95
"FAMOUS MAKER
SHOES AT SUPER LOW
DISCOUNT PRICES

Next door to
EVANS SEAFOOD
ar Landing Seafood
Restaurant
1M Airport Road Greerwille. N.C.
ALL YOU
CAN EAT
t
I
Tues Wed & Thurs.
I Shrimp
Oysters �"cM-n"
Flounder E 9
TrOUt Only J
I
FnftCJtFrtM0�
!
���� trnrm
1W Airport Road f �i, N.C.
75841327
Helhfttatfte
�ft, SocmowbyendMy
'VVV , A Vx
Vx
Bartquet Facttttos Available 758-0327
Vvxv
I
' .
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mimt MMwe�majii





Title
The East Carolinian, December 7, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 07, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.236
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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