The East Carolinian, December 2, 1982






2foe
(Earnlmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Thursday, December 2, 1982
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 10,000
SRA Favors Dorm Changes
By ED MCKLAS
Sufi rticr
The Residence Life Committee by
a unanimous vote decided Tuesday
in favor of a revised Residence Life
proposal that would make certain
dorms coeducational and other
dorms all-male. Vice Chancellor for
Student Affairs Elmer Meyer will
make the final decision along with
Associate Dean of Residence Life
Carolyn Fulghum before the
semester concludes.
After the SRA had rejected most
aspects of the old proposal a few
weeks ago, the committee decided to
limit the changes to making Garrett
all-male, Jones coed with females
on the second and third floors and
adding 40 more females to Belk.
The committee vote on the revised
proposal was unanimous, with one
member abstaining.
At a SRA meeting yesterday,
Fulghum, who is a non-voting
member of the committee, reported
to the students the concerns the
committee considered before
voting. According to Fulghum, a
primary concern of the committee
was how the new space available
would be dealt with.
In addition, the committee con-
sidered the need for more male
students on West Campus. The
committee took into consideration
security factors, how the ad-
ministration would work with the
coeducational system, the petition
by Garrett displaying their disap-
proval of the proposal and the ef-
fects the changes would have on the
handicapped students.
Fulghum mentioned that Slay is
the only dorm that has facilities for
the handicapped. In turn, the com-
mittee took into consideration that
Garrett is partially accessable to
handicapped students.
Concerning Jones Hall, Fulghum
said, "I know SRA voted against
Jones being coed but there has to be
a place to put the girls who are left
over from the spaces taken in Gar-
rett.
"We could end up with all males
or all females in Jones. We hope
that it will not end up that
way.
We'll just have to take a chance
Fulghum said that the committee
considered the student's and the ad-
ministration's viewpoints before
they voted. "We will try to look at
all aspects before making a final
decision
Fulghum said there was a good
chance that the final decision could
be the same as the committee's vote.
Danny White, President of Cen-
tral Campus Area Residence Coun-
cil and a voting member of the
Committee, agrees with Fulghum.
"The faculty was totally concerned
with how the students felt and what
would bet suit the students
SGA Appropriation Funds Running Short
By BOB MORGAN
Miff Wnicr
The SGA has appropriated
$134,044 in student tees to campus
organizations for the 1982-1983
school year. Almost $7000 remain in
the treasury to be appropriated bet-
ween now and the end of the 82-83
school year.
More than 90 percent of the total
appropriations were made by last
year's legislature. This has not left
much money for organizations who
have requested money this fall or
will need to next semester.
David Cook, chairman of the ap-
propriations committee, says that
the committee has received over
$20,000 in requests for funds. So
far, only a little more than $2,000
has been approved by the
legislature.
The appropriations made last
year were part of a new annual
budgeting process that makes the
fiscal year for the SGA from Julv 1
to June 30. The $6,834 remaining
for 1982-1983 will be appropriated
next semester to be used for the pre-
sent school year. However, groups
may already start applying for funds
for the 1983-1984 school year. Much
of next year's funds will be ap-
propriated next semester.
An issue raised in the legislature
has been the large amounts that
were appropriated to a few groups
by last year's legislature. The largest
amount, to the School of Music,
was $26,000, or 21 percent of the
budget.
SGA President Eric Henderson
does not think that a few groups
should get such a large portion of
the money. He said the total ap-
propriations to 30 groups who
received less than $3,000 each makes
up just nine percent of the total
budget. "It's not fair that just two
or three groups should get the ma-
jority of money said Henderson.
In October, the SGA summer
legislature presented a resolution to
the new legislature asking to recon-
sider last year's appropriations. The
reason for this, according to
Henderson, was because too much
was appropriated last year and there
was not enough money for the
groups who would need it now. The
summer SGA is made up of Hender-
son, vice-president Bob Mills and
treasurer Becky Talley.
Acting on this request, the
legislature approved a 10 percent
across the board cut in last year's
appropriations. This allowed ap-
proximately $9,000 left to be ap-
propriated this fall and next spring.
One group that has felt the affects
of the low funds is SOULS, a cam-
pus minority organization. This fall,
the group requested a $7,000 ap-
propriation to support its budget
and received just $700.
SOULS president Barbara Battle
was critical of the SGA's handling
of the money. "They weren't able to
give us hardly enough to get by
because they had allotted too much
to other organizations Battle said.
"I don't think it was fair because
the burden of their mistake has been
placed on our shoulders
Cook, appropriations chairman,
explained that the committee is try-
ing to help as many groups as possi-
ble rather than just a few.
"Everybody's trying to be careful so
we don't have the same problem as
last year Cook said. "It's hard to
please everybody when vou only
have $9,000 to begin with
He feels that a lack of com-
munication caused some groups to
not be aware of the importance in
asking early for large sums of
money. With the new budgeting
process that began last year, many
groups were not aware of when and
how to submit requests.
"I think the annual budgeting is
excellent said Cook, "but we have
to make the groups aware of how we
are doing it. To solve this, the com-
mittee is preparing a booklet that
will explain how to follow the pro-
cedures. "We hope it will be ready-
in time for next year's appropria-
tions
Next semester, the legislature will
be faced with the same type of re-
quests that have used up most of
this year's money.
Battle hopes for a more balanced
appropriation this year.
Secretary Lewis Endorses Proposals
Raise In Drinking Age Recommended
B PATRICK O'NEILL
Miff Whirr
On Monday Transportation
Secretary Andrew L. "Drew" Lewis
endorsed proposals made in the
recently released Presidential Com-
mission on Drunken Driving report
that urged states to raise the
minimum drinking age to 21.
National statistics show that
alcohol abuse is a contributing fac-
tor in more than half of the 50,000
highway fatalities that occur in the
United States each year.
This factor has caused 18 states.
Hunt Wants To
Stop Freeze On
Professor 'sPay
By DARRYL BROWN
Gov. James B. Hunt Jr. said
Monday night that the N.C.
Legislature should lift the freeze on
salary raises for teachers and state
employees when it meets in January.
Hunt originally supported the freeze
that has been in effect since last
summer.
"Lifting that freeze should be at
the top of our list of priorities when
you legislators return to Raleigh
next year Hunt told a group of
senators and house members at the
Northeastern North Carolina
Legislative Caucus.
Hunt's statement came in wake of
reports that the pay freeze was har-
ming the UNC-CH School of
Medicine as uncompetitive salaies
encouraged professors to take jobs
at higher paying schools. The pay
freeze could harm the ECU medical
school and other N.C. public
universities in general if teachers'
salaries fall significantly below
other schools.
Hunt noted that it is difficult to
maintain adequate funding in
See HUNT, Page 5
which had previously lowered their
minimum drinking age to 18, to
reconsider and reverse their
minimum age laws back to the 20-
and 21-year-old age levels.
Lewis said he would support
recommendations by the commis-
sion calling on 35 states, the District
of Columbia and Puerto Rico to
raise the minimum age on all
alcohol products, including beer
and wine, to 21.
North Carolina has a drinking age
requirement of 18 for beer and wine
products and 21 for liquor. Current-
ly state officials are studying the
possibility of raising the minimum
age on beer and wine products.
According to Brent Hackney, a
spokesperson in Gov. Hunt's ex-
ecutive office in Raleigh, Hunt is in
favor of raising North Carolina's
minimum drinking age for wine and
beer products to "at least 19
"He hasn't fully made up his
mind yet Hackney said, but Hunt
has not ruled out the possibility of
raising it to 20 or 21.
Hunt appointed a Governor's
Task Force on Drunken Driving last
February which made a recommen-
dation to raise the age requirement
to 19. Although Hunt has not of-
ficially responded to the commi-
sion's conclusions, Hackney said
that Hunt "has already endorsed"
some of the proposals made by the
task force.
Dr. Jerry Lotterhos, professor
and director of the ECU Alcohol
Abuse Program, raised a number of
questions regarding the age issue
and the problem of alcohol abuse,
in an interview with The East
Carolinian.
"Alcohol is alcohol said Lot-
terhos referring to the difference in
North Carolina's minimum age re-
quirements for beer and wine as
compared to hard liquor. "Sixty
percent of the alcohol consumed in
North Carolina is consumed as beer
and wine which is not controlled by
our ABC laws" he continued.
"That's part of our legacy of
misconstrued notions about
booze
"The problem we have in our
culture is much larger than just
changing the drinking age Lot-
terhos said. He added that alcohol is
important "in American society, yet
"we're extremely confused about
what appropriate or responsible
alcohol consumption should be
Lotterhos pointed out that his
statistics show that 75 percent of the
students who drink at ECU say their
average age of "first consumption"
of alcohol is 14.9 years.
"If the law at age 18 is not work-
ing, why do we assume the law at
age 21 will work?" Lotterhos said.
"If age works as a deterrent to con-
sumption then why is 14.9 the
average age? That's the question we
See AGE LIMIT, Page 5
Shakespeare And Friends
Mwto By STANLRY LKAHV
High Fashion
Pfcvto By STAMLCV LSABV
DeeDee Wall was one of the models in "Images a fashion show
sponsored byhi OmeKa sororitv. The show took place Wright Auditorium
and was held to raise money for the cancer society.
Scholarship Set Up For
Outstanding Ambassador
STEVE DBA!
� �
The past presidents of the ECU
Alumni Association announced this
week the establishment of a
"leadership scholarship" to be
awarded annually to a rising senior
in the ranks of the ECU am-
bassadors. The scholarship will
cover in-state tuition and fees for
one year.
The ambassadors are a campus
service organization made up of 92
student volunteers. It was establish-
ed in the fall of 1980.
The scholarship is the first project
undertaken by the Past Presidents
Club, a recently begun organization
made up of former presidents of the
ECU Alumni Association.
"Through this scholarship we are
expressing our deep appreciation for
the vast amount of volunteer service
that the ECU Ambassadors con-
tribute to the progress and welfare
of ECU said Phil Dixon, im-
mediate past president of the ECU
Alumni Association.
"We're really excited about
this said Cindy Kittrell, alumni
field director and advisor to the
ECU Ambassadors.
In an interview with The East
Carolinian, Kitrell stressed the im-
portance of the services the ECU
Ambassadors provide for the
university. The ambassadors serve
as official hosts at university social
gatherings.
Kitrell noted this year's
Homecoming activities as an exam-
ple of the ambassadors' volunteer
work. They served refreshments,
ushered guests and worked in the
chancellor and press boxes in
Fickien Stadium during the football
games.
The ambassadors also help in the
recruitment and orientation of pro-
spective ECU students. They act as
tour guides of campus tours and
discuss ECU at recruitment pro-
grams conducted in several eastern
states.
At this fall's annual national
"Telefund" the ambassadors
helped raise over $45,000 for the
Annual Alumni Fund by coor-
dinating nearly 200 volunteers, of
whom many were ambassadors.
They request donations from alum-
ni who have moved out of the
Greenville area.
According to Kitrell, the recipient
of the scholarship will be selected
next semester. "We haven't set any
specifics yet, we have just set the
guidelines she concluded.
'Operation Santa Claus9
Kicks Off A nnual Drive
By EMILY CASEY
Stiff Wruei
Elizabethan Music and period costumes brought to life a traditional Renaissance Christmas at the Madrigal Din-
ner held in Mendenhall. The annual event is put on by the Mendenhall Student Center.
The Mental Health Association in
Pitt County has begun their annual
Operation Stanta Claus Drive which
collects gifts and money to provide a
happy Christmas for people living at
Caswell Center for the mentally
retarded in Kinston and in Cherry
Hospital in Goldsboro.
Brenda Gray, the executive direc-
tor of the MHA, is especially en-
thusiastic about the "tremendous
support" the project is receiving
from ECU students. All fifteen of
ECU's residence halls are lending
their help to the project, as are a
dozen of the university's fraternities
and sororities.
"We're very pleased with all the
support we're getting from the cam-
pus community Gray said.
"Students from East Carolina have
become more involved this year
than every before
"Our main purpose is to provide
Christmas gifts for the patients at
Cherry Hospital and the clients at
Caswell Center Gray told The
East Carolinian. "There are no state
funds available for any gifts or
Christmas parties
The Mental Health Association
has branches nationwide and is
funded through United Way and the
contributions of members. The
MHA chapter in Pitt County, which
has more than 750 members, is "one
of the largest chapters in the state
according to Gray. North Carolina
has 52 chapters statewide.
The Operation Santa Claus Cam-
paign, which was first instituted in
Pitt County in 1958, has received
much praise for the joy it brings to
people who must spend their
Christmas holiday in institutions,
often without family support or
friends.
See DISABLED, Page 5

k
�VJte1y4.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 2, 1982
Announcements
MARCHING PIRATES
Hawiaan Christmas Luau is
Tuesday. Dec 7 from 8 00 l 00 at
the American Legion Post (across
trom the Beet Barn$1 tor Band
Members and $2 for guests accom
panied by a band member Check
the Marching Pirates Board tor
more details Be there Aloha
FOUNDATION
CARE
The Social Work 1000 students ot
ECU will be sponsoring a lecture
this evening, December 2, on
Foundation Care The lecture is an
educational audiovisual presenta
tion on the concepts and purpose ot
this extra special care to the pro
foundly mentally retarded in
North Carolina There is no charge
and the lecture is open to the
public The lecture will be held
tonight in the Belk Building at 7 00
p m
C.A.D.P.
A reminder All members
please come by Erwm ortice room
306 and cast your vote tor presi
dent Nominations are posted in
room 303 Erwm Hail Voting ends
at 3 00 p m December B
WOMENS SOCCER
CLUB
The ECU Womens Soccer Club
needs an advisor Would any tacul
ty member or graduate student
that is interested please contact
Tonya Goldsmith a' '56 4691 or
Donna Zekoms a' 752 9209
SENIOR SHOW
Mary Duggan ano Teresa Grit
fin will be having their Senior
Show in Textile Design December
4 11. Reception will be Dec 4 from
7 00 9 00 p m at the Art and
Camera Gallery
ATTENTION
"There comes a time when the
operation of the machine becomes
so odious, makes you so sick at
heart that you have to throw your
body upon the gears and upon the
wheels and you've got to make it
stop " Mario Savio, Berkeley
University. 1964
S600 billion per year is presently
being spent on the arms race while
every year 1 billion people live
below the poverty threshold, 500
million people are malnourished,
600 million adults are illiterate,
and millions ot infants die from
starvation and inadequate nutri
tion We are suffering from a
global insanity You can help to
change these distorted priorities
by lOimng the activities of the
Greenville Peace Committee on
Friday nights at 6 30 p m at 610
South Elm St For information call
758 4906
BAPTIST CHURCH
There is a bus route tor students
who wish to attend Sunday service
at Sycamore Hill Baptist Church
The bus leaves the church and
goes into the campus from W 5th
St by Cotton, Fleming and other
dorms at 10 40 am swinging back
on 5th going to main campus in
back of dorms and swinging by
Delk Dorm it leaves and goes
across campus to dorms on South
Side (ot campus) no later than
10 50 am arriving at church at
11 00
GAMMA BETA
PHI
Our las' meeting ot the semester
will be held on Thursday Dec . 2 in
room 244 MSC at 7 00 p m Many
Subiects concerning Spring opera
tions will be brought up. so plan to
attend
ECCEA
ECU Cooperative Educational
Association will have its next
meeting on Thursday December 2
at 4 00 p m m 306 Rawi We'll be
planning the Christmas party so
make plans to attend All in
teres'ed persons are welcome
LET'S MAKE
A
DEAL.
ON
SHIRTS & SWEATERS
P'A GOLF A .(. -46-3389
It's a
CHAMPAGNE JAM
LADIES

invites you ladies to
hax call the "bubbly"
you can drink A Rll-
between 10-11 p.m.
Don't miss the TOAST
at 10:00
ai
"The Four Seasons"
Restaurant & Lounge
301 Evans Str. Mall
(Corner ot 3rd & Evans
m basement of Minges Bldg.)
ATTENTION
BSN CLASS OF
'83
The Air f . �s a
special p )t a ' tr -
BSNs. If s- rt�'
you can enter active
duty soon after gradu-
ation without waiting
for the results of yout
Mate Boards. To quali-
fy you rist havi jn
overall 1.0 GPA.
After commissioning,
you'll at'end a five
tnortti internship at a
major ir F-urce facility.
It's an excellent way to
prt.irtre for the wide
i an:j�- of experiences
you'll have as an Air
Force nurse officer.
For more Informtion,
contact:
AIM HIGH
A
w
PHYE
All students who plan to declare
physical education a a major our
mg change of major weak for the
Fan Semester, should report to
Minges Coliseum from 12 00 2 00
p m. on Thursday, December �,
tor a motor and physical fitness
test Satisfactory performance on
this test is required as a pre-
requisite for official admittance ot
the program.
Any student with a medical con
dition that would contraindlcate
participation in the testing pro
gram should contact Dr. Israel at
757 647. For more information
call the above number
EL SALVADOR
Four women missionaries were
murdered in El Salvador on Dec,
2, 1980. They died while serving
the poor On Thursday we will
remember them with a memorial
service at the ECU Catholic
Newman Center at 7:00 p.m.
Sister Hfappy will be the feature
speaker and a document about
"Roses in December" the lite of
Jean Donovan, one of the slain
women, will be shown. Music will
also be performed For more in
formation call 752 4216.
FALL GRADUATES
Remember to pick up your cap
and gown from the Student Supply
Store, East Carolina University
before leaving school.
These keepsake gowns art yours
to keep, providing the graduation
fee has been paid For those
receiving the Masters Degree the
tee pays tor your cap and gown,
but there is an extra fee of S11.75
for your hood
UNITARIAN
The Unitarian universaiists win
be meeting this Sunday at 10 00
a m at the Planters Bank ECU
Baptist Campus minister Robert
Clyde will be the featured speaker
CATHOLIC
NEWMAN CENTER
The Catholic Newman Center
would like to invite everyone to
ioln in with us for celebrating
Mass every Sunday in the Biology
Lecture Hall starting at 1230 and
every Wednesday at 5 00 at the
Catholic Newman Center located
down at the bottom of College Hill
BAPTIST STUDENT
UNION
HEY! Do you enjoy friendly
fellowship, good triends and food,
and a chance to be yourself in this
"rat race" environment at ECU?
Then come join us at the Baptist
Student Union where we have din
ners on Tuesdays at 5 30 for only
1 75 PAUSE on Thursdays at
7:00 to allow us to take a break
after an almost fulfilling week.
and lots of people just like you who
enjoy others. Call 752 4646 if you
riavt any questions Bob Clyde
campus minister
WZMB
Keith Mitchill hosts the Electric
Rainbow Show on WZMB Satur
day from midnight to 400 am
and Sunday from midnight to 3 00
a m This week the album special
Saturday is from Oily Oiibourne
and his latest "Speak ot the
Devil Sunday its brand new Zep
plin with "Koda Album specials
start at 2 00 am Let us all jam
together on ECU'S Jammingest
WZMB 91 3
SNOWSKI
Those skiers who want to take
Snowskiing tor credit during Spr
ing Semester should add PHYE
1000 or PHYE 1150 or PHYE 1151
during Drop Add On Campus
classes n conditioning precede a
spring break trip Snowshoe, WV
for the finest skiing in the south
Contact Jo Saunders at 757 6000 tor
further information about the ski
program and ski tor credit or go
non credit
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form af right or
use a separate sheef of paper if
you need more lines. There are 33
units per line. Each letter, punc
tuafion mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
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doesn't fit. No ads will be ac
cepted over the phone. We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
75C per line or fraction of a line.
Please prim legibly! Use capital and
lower case letters.
Rr'ur Mr ill BOAKII ffkr Hurt rVHl
( AKOl IMAN ffkrl h : p m M,nd�. Maw
Tnrs�la pap and Virdi-rsdn brlorr I Uawattf
ptihlHidlliin.
Name
Address.
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Phone.
at 75C per line $.
.No insertions.
.enclosed



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IP�1�1!
Stu
On M
Transrxirtatd
dorsed pro
Presidential
Drunken Drl
raise the mini
lr. North L
The G
Drunken Dn
mendation U
FINANCIAL
AID
The annual Student Financial
Aid meeting will be held on
Wednesday, December I at 3 00
p m and at 4:00 p m in Hendrix
Theatre All students who an
ticipate applying for financial aid
for the 19t314 schoi year are
strongly urged to attend
PHI ALPHA
THETA
The ECU History Society proud
ly presents Dr Todd Savitt ot the
ECU School of Medicine with an
informative talk and slide presen
tation entitiled "Ressurrection
and Dissection" Deiimmas of
Anatomists Through the Ages The
program will be held Thursday.
December 2. m BB 103 begmmg at
8 30 p m Light refreshments will
be served following the program
Everyone is invited to attend
SOCIAL WORK
AND CORRECTIONS
MAJORS
if you have an overall GPA of 3 0
or above, and a 3 2 in your Correc
tions classes, you are eligible tor
membership m Alpha Phi Sigma,
our Chapter of the National
Criminal Justice Honor Society
Don't miss our next meeting, Dec
2, at 4 30 p m at the Ramada Inn
For more information, contact
Mr Weber m the Social Work ot
fice
OPEN HOUSE
The Regional Development in
stitute and the Rural Education
Institute will host an open house in
celebration ot the Christmas
season Thursday. December �
from 10 00 a m until 6 00 p m
Faculty, staff, students, coi
leagues, and friends ot the In
stitutes are invited to drop by the
Willis Building during the hours of
Ma ooen notice
ZETABETATAU
Zeta Beta Tau would like to
welcome everyone back to ECU
We hope your holiday was ex
uberant ana exciting! All ZBT
members mat would like to go
house looking are to meet to front
of Aycock Dorm at 4 45 Thursday
Dec 2nd Plans for our upcoming
social win be d.scusseo at our
mee'ing
GYMNASTICS
The iRS department ,s pro
viding a supervised per,od tor
recreational free use of the gym
nasties room located in Memona,
Gym Each Tuesday arxj Thurs
day n.ght from 7 30 9 00 Trie area
s open tor tree exercse use ot �he
matted area as wen as supervision
and direction on some appara'us
ATIME
FOQLOT
v
-V
and a time
when every message
and every momento
is cherished
Jw
for the finest in
wedding stationery
come to
Morgan Printers, Inc
211 West 9th Street
Greenville, X.C. 27834
4 752-5151
PILOT TRAINING
OPPORTUNITIES
FLY HAVY
The Navy presently has several openings for the
most exciting and challenging job in the world �
NAVY PILOT. If you qualify, we will guarantee
you a seat in the most prestigious flight school
anwhere. At the completion of training you will
fly the Navy's high performance aircraf
Qualifications are
� Bachelors degree
� Less than 28' 2 years old
� 2020 uncorrected vision
� Excellent health
� U.S. Citizen
If you thank you can qualify, and would 1 � �-
earn a starting salary of $18,000 with $28.00O-f in
tour years, send a letter of qualifications '
NAVY PILOT PROGRAMS
1001 Navaho Dr.
Raleigh, N. C. 27609
or call 1 800 662 7231


WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN ABCnoN:aaifficutdeo-
DEPEN D ON. sion that s moae eas�e� Dv
the women ofthefiemmg Center Ccxjnseiors are
available day ana night lo support ana onaer
stand you Your safety comtort ana prvocv are
assured by the caring staf of the Fleming Oente
SERVICES: � Tuesday - Saturaav ADortion Ap-
pomtmenfsB 1st & 2a Tnrnestef Aoortions up Ic
18 Weeks � free fegnane Tests � very Ear,
Pregnancy Tests � aji inclusive cees � nsurance
Accepted � CALL 764-5550 DAY O NIGHT �
Healthcare counseling tljc ri c� ji�.i
ana eaucaton to, wo THE FLEMING
men at 3, ages CENTER
The Kasl Carolinian
.��-
- !
p01 so ever, "uesc�- I
-s-�, � � aca
,ea' jione'i Aeo"so'
� Eas' Card "�a S " -
. -p -�� � I Eas'
Ca' � - ' � � �
oe-a'eo a"d r '
� tent Ol Eas' Ca' -a
Subicr.pt.on Rate i30�J �
The Eas' Caroitman ott.ee
are located in the 0d Sou
Building on the campu ot ECU
Greenville N C
POSTMASTE6 Se-c a-
ltaWJM � '�� I M " - -
O'O Soutn B� a "J ECU Gree
. - - -
Telephone '5' �1� �3�" tX
JUxm im
ft im n g 'he a
P�rr
and tauw i
r.u tortlrol
I
It's
the fun
place to eat
LUNCH BUFFET
Daily ll-2pms289
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Mon.&Tues. 5-8pm 2"
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every Wed. & Thurs. 7-10pm
prizes for all winners (
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"lFri.Sat. 7-9 'faWk
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ADMISSION 1.00
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THE
CHRISTMAS PLACE
TO BE
�tlll���IHT
����������������
123 E. 5th Str.
752-7483
Thursday
Spaghetti Special �!� all you can eat 5-9
Friday
HAPPY HOUR 4-7 Free Horsd'Oeuvres
and Dollar Specials
Friday & Saturday Night
Chaz Lahn andJ.K. Lofton
Sunday
Lasagna Special 2" all you can eat 5-9
Monday
mm Pizza & Pasta �2" all you can eat 5-9
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Mall Christmas Hours Monday Saturday 10 am 10 pm
Santa Photo Hours Monday Friday 12-8 pm
Saturday 10:30 am 8 pm
CAROLINA CAST
CCNTRC
264 By Pass on Hwy 11. Greenville
I Mm





Students Voice Opinions On Drinking Age
THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 2, 1982
Phone.
enclosed
r�1��T
� �
. .
On Monday Secretary of
Transportation "Drew" Lewis en-
dorsed proposals made by a
Presidential Commission on
Drunken Driving urging states to
raise the minimum drinking to 21.
In North Carolina a similar study,
The Governors Task Force on
Drunken Driving, made a recom-
mendation to N.C. Gov. James B.
Hunt Jr. to raise the states
minimum drinking age for beer and
wine products to "at least 19" and
possibly to 20 or 21.
Students were asked to comment
on whether or not they would be in
favor of a change in the minimum
drinking in North Carolina. These
are their responses:
lr I a! C arolinian
� �. tw
I is
i � pi.on Rate 120 yearly
Eas' Carolinian oHicei
. a'ea in 'he Old South
a "W on the campus ot ECU
He N C
: - address
' -1 E as' Caroim.an.
a ECU Green
lit ohone r$7 6366 636' 530
DAVID RHODES, JUNIOR � "Right off
hand I'd say ll would be better to raise the
age. It would solve some of the problems of
the drunk driver on the highways, but it
wouldn't solve all the problems. What we
need more than a raised drinking age is a bet-
ter awareness of how alcohol should be us-
ed
rHERESA GALLAGHER, JUNIOR �
"I'm probably in favor of raising the age.
because I think by age 21 people are more
responsible. I know kids now that are 12 and
13 who drink, so I don't know if raising the
age will make any difference. They may still
be able to get beer, but it would be harder for
them to have contacts with 21-year-olds who
JERRY SIMMONS. JUNIOR � "I think
raising the age is a good idea actually.
Parents let their kids drink and the go out
and cause accidents on the highways. There's
no control
VANESSA THOMPSON. FRESHMAN �
"I don't drink and I do think the age should
be raised because right now many 18 to 20
year-olds are not drinking responsibly
would by it for them
Interviews conducted by Patrick O'Neill. Photos by Stanley Leary.
TUCSDW DEC. 7 JDMlSSiONi.OO
BACK ,6 POftJUR demand!
l, SPONSORED BY : &OOK BARN. U e�. &j&.
Wg�TS DEU&Mr, SOftUJAV, PNARO'S, AITK,
TBEC House, wappv sroRE, utuav usr
EL roao,PEP5l, PBtfJGCUPfe, wjOGt
RbCoRDBAR, MR GArTi's,DoMiMo'S,
Sftsers voas, sub sta jr
Cmic-Rl-a.
ft U6U� cwlV
wmm

m
eat
Best Pizza
n own, Honest!
I
I
m
I
SSH
'reek Jerseys are great
Christmas gifts for your favorite guy
or gal.
This season get your jerseys at
H.L. Hodges Bonds Sporting
Goods. We hav a large selection of
jerseys in every color imaginable.
m
38
Si
35
rV
Tuesday November 30 through Saturday
December 4 we are offering free lettering
with the purchase of a jersey at $10.95
3XE
���������������
ATTIC ATTIC
752-7303
THURSDAY
LADIES LIGHT NIGHT
l��Adm For Ladies
40CBev. Till 9:30
50c Bev. Till 10:30
60c Bev. Till 11:30
FRI.&SAT.
COM 2AKI
� ���I
SUNDAY
Maxx Warrior
?not
2tL
muti &f SWOP, 6kiw Ce�giigS
ATTIC
&
Ko�cccy ouxtt
Live and in concert at the ATTIC on DEC. 7th. Admission is
�3.91 for the General Public M.91 for the first 400 ECl
students. Wear your WZMB T-SHIRT AND RECEIVE
YOUR FAVORITE BEVERAGE FREE!
The door is open at 8:30pm. Come on out and hear our
favorite Doors tunes performed by the Back Doors.
WZMB will receive partial proceeds from the concert in the
form of a grant from the ATTIC.
Movies
XK BiaianavuiaaniaaumiaaaaBBaniaaaaBaaBBaaiaBaaBaaaaaBaaBaaavaaBaaiaBaaaBaaaaBa
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I
I
I
I
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I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
FREE LETTERING
w purchase of greek jersey
at MO95
BRING THIS COUPON
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
10 pm
IA �AST
ITR�
Wnen it comes to the food at "Taco
Bell there's really only one school
of thought. What a difference!
To begin with, your orders made
up fresh from the best ingredients.
That's different. And ifs all served
up piping hot to be sure you get all of
the delicious flavor. That's different.
You also get served fast, which
means that our schedule will keep
you on yours. That's different.
And you get it all at the terrific
Taco BelL price. That's really different.
Plus, where else do you find food
with deliciously different names like
Taco Supreme Burrito Suprema
and Enchirito.? Each one a far cry
fromThe usual fast food fare (not to
mention whatever that is they serve
in the cafeteria).
So cut out the coupon, then cut
out for Taco Bell and see for your-
self what a difference we make.
JSS1
Pizza Transit Authority
When it comes to pizza, pta comes to you.
757-1955
.?ii
double your favorite
topping free
Order any 2 or more toppings and double
any one of them free (includes cheese.)
i
Offer good thru Dec. 8th
one discount par poa
Pi
I
in
PLEASE PRESENT THIS
COUPON WHEN OKDlKt.SC
LIMIT: ONE COUPON
PEKPEKSON
PEM
THIS COLPON GOOD POM A
Free Taco
With ThePurchase Of One Pa'Regular Prick
Crisp corn tortilla. Fresh ground beef. Lettuce and real cheddar cheese.
IHCOABEIili
(2O0D ONLY AT 3D E. Greenvile Boulevard Greenrik
OTGOOD�TTH
ANY OTHEK OFFOL
OFFER EXPIKES
JAN. 2,12
� . �

n�mMMMMae . r�awm





Students Voice Opinions On Drinking Age
On MnnHcw C �r tt . "
THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 2. 1982
Phone
.enclosed
! 1
1 1 i
t
1

- �
I 1 1 ii 1
On Monday Secretary of
Transportation "Drew" Lewis en-
dorsed proposals made by a
Presidential Commission on
Drunken Driving urging states to
raise the minimum drinking to 21.
In North Carolina a similar study,
The Governors Task Force on
Drunken Driving, made a recom-
mendation to N.C. Gov. James B.
Hunt Jr. to raise the states
minimum drinking age for beer and
wine products to "at least 19" and
possibly to 20 or 21.
Students were asked to comment
on whether or not they would be in
favor of a change in the minimum
drinking in North Carolina. These
are their responses:
hast C arolinian
ty and
k aaentic
- I s �
� �
� and
it
fc cMjnRa'e 420 yearly
Eas' Carolinian offices
ca�ea m the Old Sooth
o 'q on "he a-npus ot ECU
.ie N C
� . - � - MM) W
ri a a. E C' � ee p
lieonone f1 6366 ftie"1 630
DAVID RHODES, JUNIOR � "Right off
hand I'd say it would be better to raise the
age. It would solve some of the problems of
the drunk driver on the highways, but it
wouldn't solve ali the problems. What we
need more than a raised drinking age is a bet-
ter awareness of how alcohol should be us-
ed
IHERESA GALLAGHER, JUNIOR -
"I'm probably in favor of raising the age,
because I think by age 21 people are more
responsible. I know kids now thai are 12 and
13 who drink, so I don't know if raising the
age will make any difference. They may stiU
be able to gel beer, but it would be harder for
them to have contacts with 21-year-olds who
JERRY SIMMONS. JUNIOR � "I think
raising the age is a good idea actually.
Parents iet their kids drink and the go out
and cause accidents on (he highways. There's
no control
- .��WAV.WWV.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V � �
gmmmmmmmmm
VANESSA THOMPSON, FRESHMAN �
"I don't drink and I do think the age should
be raised because right now many 18 to 20
year-olds are not drinking responsibly
would by il for them
Interviews conducted by Patrick O'Neill. Photos by Stanley Leary.
TUCSOAV DEC. 7 ADWS5ION I
BACkr,BrY PORJLAR demand!
SPONSORED BY : BOOK 6ARM,ue�.
MBMcT s DEU&Mr, SoeUAV, PwaSO'S, Arncj
TREE Moose, uapiv store, mwJ out
�LToeo,PEP5l, PEKiUGCUPPBe, UOOGt
RfcCoRD HAR, MR GATTi'S,Domino's,
Sft7Ts Moos sue sta n
CWIC-RIA
Mb
FOR U6W5 OWlY
:W:
i
eat
Ht.1 Pizza
iwn. Honest!
"TP ,
1

I
i
I

'reek Jerseys are great
Christmas gifts for your favorite guy
or gal.
This season get your jerseys at
H.L. Hodges Bonds Sporting
Goods. We have a large selection of
jerseys in every color imaginable.
I
ss
rv
9
Tuesday November 30 through Saturday 1
December 4 we are offering free lettering
with the purchase of a jersey at M0.95
1
1111
XL
ATTIC ATTIC i
752-7303
THURSDAY
LADIES LIGHT NIGHT
$1�� Adm For Ladies
40CBev. Till 9:30
50c Bev. Till 10:30
60c Bev. Till 11:30
FRI.&SAT.
C12CY im
��� �
SUNDAY
Haaiirr�rTrrTTt
IWV
Maxx Warrior
Silk
MMSri'S SUIT SHOP, 66 W C0B�IWS
ATTIC
&
sygv&oet&
Live and in concert at the ATTIC on DEC. 7th. Admission is
3.91 for the General Public M.91 for the first 400 ECU
students. Wear your WZMB T-SHIRT AND RECEIVE
YOUR FAVORITE BEVERAGE FREE!
The door is open at 8:30pm. Come on out and hear your
favorite Doors tunes performed by the Back Doors.
WZMB will receive partial proceeds from the concert in the
form of a grant from the ATTIC.
�:
jk MaaaaaMBBaaaiaw �� mb ai aabfl ibb hb aim aaaaaiflBaaiBiamBaaaaaaBaaaaBflBa
E
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i
i
i
I
I
I
I
i
i
l
l
I
I
I
l
FREE LETTERING
w purchase of greek jersey
at MO95
BRING THISCOUPON
I
I
I
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
WrSen it comes to the food at Taco
Bell there's really only one school
of thought. What a difference!
To begin with, your orders made
up fresh from the best ingredients.
That's different. And its all served
up piping hot to be sure you get all of
the delicious flavor. That's different.
You also get served fast, which
means that our schedule will keep
you on yours. That's different.
And you get it all at the terrific
Taco BelL price. That's really different.
Plus, where else do you find food
with deliciously different names like
Taco Supreme Burrito Supreme,
and Enchirito.? Each one a far cry
from'the usual fast food fare (not to
mention whatever that is they serve
in the cafeteria).
So cut out the coupon, then cut
out for Taco Bell and see for your-
self what a difference we make.
gsissr
pm
IA CAST
TR�
TWO GREAT VEUUERyMEN
Pizza Transit Authority
When it comes to pizza, PTA comes to you.
757-1955
IDI
k
double your favorite u
topping free
Order any 2 or more toppings and double
any one of them free (includes cheese.)
i�
Offer t,ood thru Dec. 8th
One discount per pizza
�?
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
J
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THIS COUPON GOOD POM A
1
PLEASE PRESENT THIS
COUPON WHEN ORDER!SC
UNIT: ONE COUPON
PERPEKSON
Free Taco
mmm WlTHTHEPURCHASEOFONEATREGULAR PRICE.
Criap com tortilla. Fresh ground beef. Lettuce and real cheddar cheese.
IHCOhBEUli
GOOD ONLY AT 319 E. Greenville Boulevard Greeovile
SOT GOOD 1TH
4.W OTHER OfTER
OfTER EXPIRES
JAN. 2. 1982
- - x � lf?�f '
flj





Stye iEast Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, 0 Manager
Mike Hughes, ntumtmrom
WAVERLY MERRIIT, BncMr� MmU� ClNDY PLEASANTS, Sports Editor
Robert Rucks, mmhmi Greg Rideout, ,�, td,ior
AL 1 Ah RASH TEH, rriffr fHiliMJI STEVE BACHNER, Entertainment Editor
Stephanie Groon, cmwm � Juliana Fahrbach. style Editor
Chip Gideons, r�mcf&�rvae� Mike Davis, production Manager
December 2. 182
Opinion
Page 4
Escort Service
Campus' Best Idea In Years
It's a shame that many of the
women on campus don't feel safe
walking alone at night. It's a shame
they're afraid. Of course, this is by
no means to say that their fears
aren't justified. On the contrary;
the number of rapes, attempted
rapes and other assaults on campus
� despite the relatively low number
of reported incidents � should
make us all a little leery.
In the first place, it's unfortunate
that the aggravated assaults and ver-
bal harrassments occur at all. But
unfortunate as they may be, they
are a fact of life.
However, thanks to the efforts of
a handful of dedicated students, the
fears and concerns so common on
campus now may soon be a thing of
the past.
A proposed escort service,
organized as a roundabout network
system, is tentatively scheduled to
be put into practice early next
semester. Naturally, the purpose of
the service is-both to decrease the
number of assaults on campus and
to provide ECU's female popula-
tion � or at least those who wish to
use it � with the opportunity to
walk on campus at night.
Perhaps, this is the best proposal
ECU students have seen in the past
few years. Eric Henderson deserves
congratulations. Assault has long
been a tremendous concern of
students and faculty alike. And it
would seem this is the first logical
attempt made at terminating the
problem.
Of course, no proposal is without
flaw. As with most others, all the
kinks and details have yet to be
worked out. Yet, the initiative has
been taken, and those would-be
flaws are being corrected one by one
� i.e escort applicant screening,
switchboard operation, etc.
Likewise, it is highly unlikely that
an escort service � no matter how
good � will put a virtual end to the
assaults and harrassments on cam-
pus. But its theoretical and actual
benefits � as shown in similar in-
stitutions using escort services �
are sure to affect a decrease in the
number of incidents.
We encourage the concerned men
of ECU to volunteer and the con-
cerned women of ECU to make use
of the system. Your cooperation is
necessary if nighttime safety on
campus is to become a reality.
I COULONrSTAMP IT H�KtfTMAKINGA POOL 0FM�,
PAY AFTER W Wffl7HCCaVSWMPBKr?�BKPB8P
ANP 7H6NIH6ARP W W&r�MXM0�A WM
�Campus Forum
Transit Mixup Cleared
In reference to the recent article in The
East Carolinian regarding transportation
for wheelchair students, a clarification is
perhaps needed. There may have been an
implication that the SGA Transit Office
was not fulfilling its responsibility of pro-
viding an adequate transportation service
for wheelchair students. I would like to
state unequivocally that this is not the case.
The SGA Transit Office, under the
leadership of Bill Hilhard, does not have
the daily responsibility of transporting
wheelchair students. This is a function of
the Office of Handicapped Student Ser-
vices. The Transit Office provides the
financial resources for the operation and
maintenance of the van but is not responsi-
ble for its schedule or the required number
of drivers hired each semester.
Bill Hilliard has worked positively with
my office in every way possible. He is sen-
sitive and responsible to my needs, and I
could not ask for more cooperation from
him.
C.C. Rowe, Coordinator,
Handicapped Student Services
O'Neill A Pinko?
The constant whining of East Carolina's
radical spokesperson, Patrick O'Neill,
never ceases to amaze me. This rebel in
search of any anti-governmental cause is
like a cancer on our free society � in the
long run, far worse than any possible
nuclear exchange about which he speaks so
eloquently.
Like it or not, we live in a nuclear age,
with such weapons needed to insure our
cherished democracy from communist ex-
pansionism. The fact that atomic weapons
have not been used since WW II
underscores the commitment of the United
States to use our nuclear arsenal as a deter-
rent only. Any such hopes for a nuclear
freeze are false ones at best. Not only
would it be unverifiable, but the Soviets,
with their decided nuclear advantage,
would be even more likely to launch a
strategic first strike on America.
I am not an advocate of the use of
nuclear force, but I believe the best in-
surance against one day "living" under a
communist regime is a top-notch defensive
capability now. It is an unfortunate cir-
cumstance of our military buildup that cer-
tain social programs cannot receive as
much funding as some feel necessary.
Blaming as many of society's ills on our
defense buildup is biased; the United
States is able to feed the world and keep
the freedom. It is not ironic that because of
the Soviet Union's financial commitment
to arms for aggression the Russian people
go hungry.
Personally, I would rather die than kneel
to a Godless, communist ruler. Judging by
Patrick O'Neill's comments, he is just
yellow enough to welcome his comrades
from the U.S.S.R. to our shores with open
arms If it would avoid a nuclear attack.
Charles Shavitz
Senior, Business
College Press Service
AFTER KElEtotNi wmS9 HSWfc IE6. fttSEKT L6S, O? WN HfRO
Cornerstone Of ECU School Of Business
Dean James H. Bearden
By FIELDING Mill Y H
Some years ago, back in 1959, a promis-
ing graduate student came to ECU (ECC
then) to seek a master's degree in business;
he hailed from Marion, Alabama. He
taught a little as an instructor, stayed on
and became an assistant professor, then an
associate professor, a full professor all
in short order. His name is James Bearden,
Dean Bearden to thousands of ECU
business school graduates.
Dr. Bearden has served as dean of the
School of Business since 1968. He was ap-
pointed to that position when he was just
35 years old, an accomplishment in and of
itself.
Dr. Bearden's resume would run some
13 pages, and I shall not attempt in this
small space to expound on all of his
numerous and notable accomplishments.
But I do feel it noteworthy to mention a
few:
To begin. Dr. Bearden, along with other
dedicated faculty members, spearheaded
the drive for the establishment of the
Master of Business Administration degree.
Next, in preparation for the program's ac-
creditation, he obtained an individual
computer facility for the school. The ac-
creditation was granted to the MBA pro-
gram in 1976.
More recently, he was responsible for
the completion of a long series of depart-
mental modifications, including the addi-
tion of a B.S. degree in accounting and the
formation of the departments of
Marketing and Decision Sciences.
He established the East Carolina
Business Foundation, which supplements
the support of the business school's ac-
tivities. He was also instrumental in the
utilization of TV instruction and strongly
promoted the use of computers in the pro-
gram long before the present computer
rage. Since the beginning, he has had a
good working relationship with the univer-
sity administration which has been vital in
the success of the School of Business. By
stressing the importance of nationally-
competitive salaries and facilities, he has
gradually upgraded the quality of his
faculty, the end result being an excellent
faculty and staff, which are perhaps the
strongest assets of the school.
Dr. Bearden has served on 19 university
committees, six committees of the
American Assembly of Collegiate Schools
of Business and five committees of the
state of North Carolina, including the
Governor's Committee on Economics and
Environment. The dean has had statewide
recognition since.early in his career. In
1971, three years after his appointment as
dean, he was named "Tarheel of the
Week" by the Raleigh News and Observer.
In addition to his many academic ac-
tivities, he has also been a tireless worker
and contributor in civic and community af-
fairs. He served on the Greenville Board of
Education for nine years, the Pitt County
and
United Fund Board of Directors
the list goes on and on.
He has had numerous articles and
papers published on several topics. He has
published two books: Personal Selling:
Behavioral Science Headings and Cases
and The Environment oj Business:
Perspectives and Viewpoints.
Above and beyond all these ac-
complishments � formidable as they are
� one must look at the man aside trom the
resume material.
Dr. Bearden is an ECU loyalist who has
toiled tirelessly for this institution for 23
years. He has touched the lives of more
ECU students than any other man aside
from Leo Jenkins. Dean Bearden rose
through the ranks to his position, and
because of his long tenure and his closeness
to the community and the people of this
region, he has earned the affection and
respect of those that hold East Carolina
near and dear to their hearts.
As he steps down as dean of the business
school, we are fortunate that he will be
staying on with us as the director of the
Branch Banking and Trust Center for
Management Development.
The Dean could have easliy left at any
time during the past 23 years to go to the
private sector and double his salary. But he
has a devout and fierce dedication to the
education process � to teaching � and
most importantly, to this institution. We
wish him well in his upcoming job; we
know he will serve us well.
UA W A Wrench In Economy Works
By KEITH BRITTAIN
With the strike of 10,000 Canadian
Chrysler workers, the future off the major
car manufacturer "hangs in the balance
On Nov. 5, United Auto Workers
members decided to strike. "We'll show
those Americans how to strike they
chanted.
The walkout illustrates the UAW's lack
of concern for free enterprise. The union
has already cost 4,600 Americans their
jobs. David Healy, an analyst for the
brokerage firm Burnham-Lambert, has
evaluated the situation. He estimates that
for each week of the strike, Chrysler's pro-
fits are reduced by up to $15 million.
The strike is officially supported by
Douglas Fraser, president of the UAW.
Although he has termed it dangerous, he
has at no time condemned the act.
I'm always amazed at the rhetoric
employed by union leaders. They speak of
being concerned about workers' rights,
etc but don't believe it. They are only
concerned as to when their next Cadillac
payment is due. (The Cadillacs are paid for
by dues from union members.)
The main gripe of the Canadian workers
is that they make $2.50 less than Ford and
General Motors workers. In my opinion,
this is a small price considering that they
already make $20-plus per hour. How soon
they have forgotten that Chrysler had to
borrow $1.2 billion in 1979 to survive.
Thus, through unrealistic demands for
workers who are already overpaid, the
UAW has displayed its lack of concern for
saving jobs.
Lane Kirklanu, president of the AFL-
CIO, has two perpetual scapegoats for the
nation's problems: Reaganomics and the
Japanese. The Japanese supply the U.S.
auto manufacturers with something that is
needed to keep car prices down � com-
petition.
One major factor has attributed to the
poor economic health of the auto industry
and the U.S. economy in general � the
unions. Unions have strangled free enter-
prise over the past few years. At one time,
U.S. firms could pay for loathsome UAW
demands by passing the costs on to the
consumer. Because of high interest rates
and much-needed Japanese competition,
this is no longer possible. The UAW must
give in to concessions to save the American
car industry.
Chrysler actually spends millions of
dollars each year paying employees who do
work only for the UAW. Is it any wonder
that Chrysler has problems?
The unions are known to be controlled
by organized crime � the mafia. The use
of strongarm tactics has alienated many
people from the unions. As a result, union
membership is a fraction of what it was in
the 1950s.
Unionized firms simply cannot compete
with their non-union counterparts. The
unions have panicked in the last few years.
They have been caught bribing politicians
to vote against deregulation.
Through government regulations,
workers' rights are protected. Unions are
no longer needed. They will not listen to
Chrysler's and the U.S. economy's pleas to
loosen the "death grip" they now hold.
Yes, 1 believe that it's definitely time for
Douglas Fraser to worry about his
$100,000-per-year job.
Ring Entertainment' Brings
Korean Boxer's Tragic End
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Hours before he died, Korean light-
weight boxer Duk Koo Kim lay in a
hospital bed waiting for doctors to get the
okay from his grieving mother to pull the
plug on his life support system to let what
was left of him die.
Kim, 23, lapsed into a coma after suffer-
ing a cerebral hemmorhage during a World
Boxing Association championship fight
late last month.
Kim's skull was battered with a burrage
of punches for 14 rounds during his fight
with Ray "Boom Boom" Mancini. A final
crushing blow slammed against his head,
and Kim hit the canvas for the last time.
Another man has died, but boxing will
continue. True, violence is a fact of life in
many of the events we condone, but
nowhere is the violence more evident � the
letting of blood more visual � than in the
world of boxing. Boxing is legalized
assault; it is a non-sport.
The purpose � the only purpose � of
boxing is to inflict as much punishment,
beating and pain upon the opponent as is
humanly possible. As one sports writer
commented: the injuries (in boxing)
are not a side effect; they are a goal
Death is nothing new to the game.
"No matter what you get paid �
millions, maybe � it's a cheap price for
your life admitted a sorrowful Mancini.
"My family, my friends are all trying to
console me. They can't. I was the one in
the ring with him; I was the one who hit
him
Of course, part of Ray Mancini's obser-
vations are correct � no monetary pav-
ment can be worth death � and yes, it was
his hand that struck the deadly blow. But
the entire blame for Kim's untimely death
cannot be placed on his shoulders.
In many ways, we are all contributors to
the physical demise and ultimate death of
boxers like Kim. Seeing violence is what
the public wants. We support the ring
card. We turn on our televisions to watch
the match � blow by blow � and cheer on
to victory the man who has shown a
"better display" of violence. We patronize
this so-called sport, and as long as we do,
the show will go on.
Perhaps our condoning of violence on
the level of boxing says something about
human society as a whole. We see violence
everywhere in our daily lives. We see it
among our children, among each other and
among nations. It's high time the people of
our world learn to live, communicate and
seek "entertainment" from non-violent
activities.
Doctors initially said that Duk Koo
Kim's brain would never function again
and predicted to the world that death was
inevitable. They were right; Kim was dead
I must repeat again, "boxing is a non-
sport and I hope the plight of Kim, his
family and Mancini will be a lesson from
which we will all learn.
as
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I





THE HAST CAROLINIAN
Style
DECEMBER 2. 1982
Page 6
c
A
I
Campus Co-op
Students Exposed To 'Real' World
Photo By STAN LEAR Y
Co-operator Ingrid Webb displaying on-the-job prowess at her IBM job. Co-op again!
By MIKE HAMER
Staff W tiler
Jackie Boys is a senior in business administration and
management who will be graduating from ECU in the
fall of 1983. She has already been a management analyst
for the Department of the Navy in San Diego. In fact,
she was the project manager in charge of developing a
road plan for a new hazardous materials warehouse that
the Navy was building there. "It was really exciting
Jackie said, "because I was in on the corporate
knowledge for this facility. In fact she added, "they
call me every two weeks to ask me what to do
Howard Brown is a senior in Political Science who
will be graduating in the spring of '83. He has worked
for the National Labor Relations Board in Winston
Salem, N.C as "student assistant field examiner At
this job Howard would conduct investigations into com-
plaints made by employees wishing to file unfair labor
practice charges against their employers.
"It was a lot harder than school Howard said.
"Somebody would file a complaint and I would talk to
the employee and then I would contact that employee's
company. I had to research labor law much of the time.
When I had gathered all the evidence, the NLRB would
make a decision on the case
Howard was also involved with the NLRB as an ar-
bitrator and mediator in plants that were holding elec-
tions to get the unions in or out of the factories. The ar-
bitrator was responsible for seeing that the elections
were held fairly.
How did these two students get such responsible posi-
tions before they had even graduated from college0 Thev
did it through Cooperative Education.
Co-op gives undergraduate and graduate students a
chance to alternate periods of off-campus employment
with semesters of study in their field.
"I've had a whole different attitude toward school
work since I got back said Jackie, "and after being in
San Diego, it's neat to be back in Greenville
As everyone is aware, the job market for college
graduates is getting tighter and tighter, and more and
more employers are looking for graduates with ex-
perience. Howard Brown and Jackie Boys are pretty
confident about finding positions with the NLRB and
the Dept. of the Navy respectively because of their ex-
perience with those agencies. Besides that, they have
See CO-OP, Page 7
Capitol Punishment Scrutinized Once Again
By PATRICK O'NEILL
stiff Writer
"Capital punishment means that them without the
capital get the punishment
The above is an oft used quote of groups w ho oppose
capital punishment throughout the world. In seperate
interviews given to The East Carolinian late last year
Henry Schwarzchild head of the American Civil Liber-
ties Capital Punishment Project said capital punishment
is "fundamentally outrageous" and former United
States Attorney General Ramsey Clark said "How can
we teach anyone the value of life by taking another life
away?"
Despite the obviously strong objections to capital
punishment from the likes of Clark and Schwarzchild, it
appears that the.American people strongly favor its use
as a way to deter people from committing certain
crimes.
Over 35 states, including North Carolina, currently
have death penalty statutes on the books. In the most re-
cent election the voters in Massachusetts � a state con-
sidered one of the most progressive in the nation �
adopted a Constitutional Amendment allowing a death
penalty. Approximately 60 percent of the
Massachusetts voters approved the measure and in
many other states the pressure is on legislators to adopt
similar pro-capitai punishment legislation and amend-
ments.
"As you might expect, given the current political
climate, working to abolish the death penalty is
somewhat indirect said the Rev. Tony Clark-Saver,
the director of North Carolinians Against the Death
Penalty(NCADP), an educational group which also
provides support to all of North Carolina's 23 death
row inmates, their families and defense attorneys.
Clark-Saver, a Methodist minister who lives in
Asheville, told The East Carolinian in a telephone inter-
view that his group had no "current plan" to introduce
legislation to abolish the death penalty. "Right now
such legislation would not pass he added.
Groups such as NCADP and Amnesty Interational
(AI), the international human rights organization which
has chapters in North Carolina which specifically work
to abolish the death penalty, maintain a strong effort to
convince the American people and lawmakers that
capital punishment is not an effective answer to the pro-
blem of violent crime.
"Amnesty Interational sees the death penalty as a
human rights issue said AI's North Carolina death
penalty abolition coordinator Kin Hennis. "We feel the
right to life is the most important human right
Hennis noted that AI has as part of Its mandate, work
against the death penalty, but that its sole interest does
not lie specifically with death row cases in North
Carolina. "We work against torture and the death
penalty worldwide Hennis added.
Festive Greek Bash
Is The Real McCoy
In North Carolina Gov. James B. Hunt is on record
as favoring capital punishment only in the case of first
degree murder. "I believe that capital punishment is a
deterrent in most cases Hunt said during a survey in-
terview.
"T don't think it's a deterrent at all said Clark
Sayer. "There's simply no solid evidence at all that it's a
deterrent
Clark-Saver also believes that the death penaltv is
selectively imposed on minorities and the poor. "A high
number of the people on death row in North Carolina
and in the rest of the country have been represented by
court appointed attorneys he added.
Clark-Saver claims that these court appointed at-
torneys are often inexperienced young lawyers who are
often overworked and lack the resources to pursue their
cases to the fullest extent. "Essentially what it cor-
roborates is that just about everybody on death row is
poor
He also felt that the race of the capital offender is a
"clear-cut factor" in the imposition of the death penal-
ty. "Minorities are disproportionately represented on
-death row Clark-Saver said.
He noted that even after the 1972 and 1976 U.S.
Supreme Court decision which pointed out the
discriminatory nature of the death penalty in most
states, that it still continues to be imposed on a highly
discriminatory basis
"NCADP is simply in favor of abolishing the death
penalty in N.C. and ultimately everywhere said Clark-
Saver. But besides their educational work Clark-Saver
Music and dance are interlaced
with cooking and custom for a
sampling of Greek culture during
the Greek Festival at the New
Hanover County Museum
December 4 and 5, 1982.
The Greek Festival offers a varie-
ty of activity. The museum will
house a Greek pastry shop, curio
shop, and kiddie corner; samplings
of Greek food will be available
throughout the weekend. Music and
dance, cooking demonstrations and
religious ceremony are among
events scheduled on Saturday and
Sunday.
The Greek Festival is being
presented by New Hanover County
Museum in conjunction with St.
Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church
and Wilmington's Greek Communi-
ty. The Greek Festival is the third
annual ethnic holiday festival at the
New Hanover County Museum.
The festival is free and begins at
12 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 4 and 1
p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 5, 1982. The
Greek Festival is free.
The New Hanover County
Museum will also be sponsoring a
new exhibit concerned with Greek
Heritage.
Wilmington's Greek community
has been thriving for almost one
hundred years. Often arriving
directly from their homeland,
Wilmington Greeks included in their
luggage much of their native
culture.
Steeped with tradition and in-
fluence from the Mediterranean, the
Greek immigrant soon established a
new tradition, on symbolic of
American food service, the Greek-
American restaurant. Wilmington's
Greek-American restaurants have
been numerous and represent the
occupation frequently associated
with Greek-Americans. The Dixie,
Saffos and The Ambassador still stir
memories of good food and good
conversation in the minds of many
local folks as three of the scores of
Greek owned restaurants and sweet
shops in the Lower Cape Fear.
The new exhibit, Wilmington's
Greek Heritage will focus on the
traditions of the Greek Orthodox
Church and will examine the role
Greek businesses played in the local
community. Cooking, customs and
ceremony will be highlighted during
the weekend-long festival that coin-
cides with the exhibit opening.
The Eastern Carolina Collectors
Club is holding another in a series of
conventions for collectors of comic
books, science fiction, fantasy and
other related nostalgia items. For
the second show in a row, record
collectables will be featured.
The convention will be held Sun-
day, Dec. 5 at the Ramada Inn on
the 264 By Pass. The doors will
open at 10 a.m. and the show will
last till 5 p.m. As always, admission
is free to all interested parties.
The show attracts collectors and
dealers of comics and records from
all over Eastern North Carolina and
Virginia. For many it is a chance to
locate hard-to-find items. For
others, it's a chance to buy recent
books and records at a considerable
discount. Other items available in-
clude movie paraphernalia, gum
trading cards, and fantasy posters.
Starting as a comic book conven-
tion, the show now includes many
other areas of nostalgia and collec-
ting, but there are mostly comic
books to choose from, comic book
fans can find all their current wants.
Record collecting has been grow-
ing in the area with the establish-
ment of used record stores in Green-
ville. The show will offer a wide
selection of music from highly-
prized early records by popular
favorites like the Beatles or Elvis
Presley to bargain priced recent new
wave releases by artists like the
Clash or Elvis Costello. Fans of
soul, r'n'b, country, heavy metal,
and beach music will also find a
wide selection.
For more information about the
convention, call 752-6389 between 7
pm - 10 pm.
Area In Brief
After several months of negotia-
tions, the ECU Summer Theatre in
Greenville has just recently secured
the rights to produce four large-
scale Broadway musicals for its July
1983 season.
The popular summer theatre was
one of the first southeastern com-
panies granted permission to pro-
duce They're Playing Our Song
after its very successful run in New
York.
The other shows slated for pro-
duction are:
� Pippin (July 4-9) � a razzle-
dazzle romp that sings and dances
its way through the loves, wars and
politics of the Holy Roman Empire
of Charlemagne and his rowdy band
of characters.
� A Little Night Music (July 11-16)
� a Tony Award winner for Best
Musical set in turn-of-the-century
Sweden, features the enchanting
ballad "Send In The Clowns and
"The Glamorous Life
� No No Nanette (July 18-23) �
takes the audience by the hand and
leads it through the never-never-
land of the roaring twenties. This is
a big splashy musical in the grandest
tradition with loads of tap dancing
and sparkle.
� They're Playing Our Song (July
25-30) � a musical comedy master-
piece by Neil Simon and Marving
Hamlish. The New York Post
reviewed it as "fun, and full of
blithe good humor with hilarious
jokes. Absolutely beguiling
Season tickets are already
available. The Summer Theatre Box
Office is located in room 108 of the
Messick Theatre Arts Center (corner
of 5 th and Eastern streets in Green-
ville), and is open Monday-Friday
from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. For fur-
ther information call 757-6390.
siad NCADP also works extensively with the death row
prisoners themselves and with their families. "We have
members who regularly visit and correspond with death
row prisoners he added.
Currently there are over 1.000 people on death row in
the U.S a figure which. Clark-Saver claims, is the
highest in the history of this nation.
According to Clark-Saver a fact recently researched
shows that there is also a "tremendous disparity" bet-
ween the number of people sentenced to death for kill-
ing a white person versus those who kill a black.
"White persons who kill black people have no
statistical likelihood of ending up on death row
Clark-Saver said. "We simply don't regard a white per-
son killing a black person as a capital crime On the
other hand a black person killing a white person stands
an exceedingly high possibility of ending up w ith a death
sentence
Hennis' groups also responds to international cases,
where the death penalty is being imposed. His groups
coordinates "Urgent Action" letter writing and
telephone campaigns to any nation where an execution
is likely to Lake place. Recently. AI has fought against
executions in Chile, Egypt, Jamaica, and Taiwan.
NCADP also takes similar lobbying actions if a death
row inmate in North Carolina is neanng execution. Cur-
rently Yelma Barfield, North Carolina's only female on
death row. is the closest person to execution. Her appeal
options are running out. Clark-Saver said. He also said
that NCADP provides expert speakers to make presen-
tations on the subject of capital punishment.
Ilk
s,
t
�y STAN (.CAST
Music Duo Of Maxwell And Kendrick A t Coffeehouse
Pianist Ron Maxwell and singing cousin Leah Kendrick will appear this Friday and Saturday night at
the Coffeehouse, located in the basement of Mendenhall Student Center. The two are ECU students.
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World
the Nl KB as an ar-
at ere holding etec-
he factories. The ar-
ig thai the elections
oponsible poi
:j from collet0 They
duate students a
-campus employment
m ai d school
and after being in
tnville "
) market tor college
. mer, and more and
nates vith e
mc Bos are prett
with the NI RB and
it ol their ex-
that, the hae
n
� he death row
amities. "We hae
nd with death
in death rw m
claims s the
searched
arit" bet-
el foi kill-
i black,
pie hae no
death row
. gai d a hite per-
I me . On the
la white person stands
gliding up w tth a death
v international cases,
imposed. His groups
letter writing and
Ion where an execution
1 has iought against
;a. and Taiwan.
lying actions if a death
tearing execution. Cur-
onl) female on
on. Her appeal
11 also said
make presen-
m00
r
Pnoto Br STAN lEAR v
Rehouse
Saturday night at
ire FCT students.
I
I
Co-op Helps Many
THEE AST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1982
Continued From Page 6
been able to earn enough money through their
Co-op positions to finance their education.
cJSL Berry Rauscn is a recent graduate of
fcCU. She received an MA in International Rela-
tions. Co-op got her a job with the National
Aeronautics and Space Administration in 1980
Now she is the "Soviet Union and Eastern Euro-
pean Desk Officer and she is involved in the
coordination, negotiation, and implementation
of space cooperation agreements between U S
scientists and scientists from those Eastern Bloc
Countries.
"My advice to students said Rausch, "is to
get as much practical experience as you can
There are lots of people looking for jobs � lots
ot people with master's degrees. Even experience
through volunteer work would help
The Co-op office on campus is a Pandora's
box ot opportunity which is little known to the
college community.
Dr. Betsy Harper, Director of Co-op and Mrs
Jane Maier and Mrs. Carolyn Powell, the coor-
dinator education specialists are very caring
about the students and very enthusiastic about
the Co-op program.
"Co-op experience bridges the gap between the
work world and the classroom said Mrs.
Maier, "and it bridges the university to the com-
munity. It's also a service to the students in get-
ting financial help. Also, a large percentage of
students are being hired by a companv after they
have been co-oping f - the companv while in
school
Cooperative Education is a program which
suggests a different approach to the traditional
career-preparation pattern. In the Co-op pro-
gram, students may alternate periods of
academic study with periods of off-campus
employment. Co-op students work with their
faculty advisors and members of the Co-op staff
to make a plan that will integrate learning ex-
periences with opportunities to earn some cash.
Work experiences are appropriately related to
the educational and career objectives of the
students. Thus, the work place supports and ex-
pands classroom learning at both the
indergraduate and graduate levels.
The Co-op program also places people in part-
time work, hopefully in their major. Students
work 20 hours per week on the average, usually
at minimum wage. This program is called the
parallel program because students can work and
go to school simultaneously.
"Students in need of temporary work or part-
time work are urged to register with the Co-op
office because occasionally an employer will call
looking for seasonal help or for people to work
on projects that will last 6 to 8 weeks Mrs.
Powell said. "Occasionally we place students in
summer jobs but we have to emphasize the fact
that we are not a summer job clearing house.
Students who register with us need to let us know
ABORTIONS
I 2� wes terminations
App'ts. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1 SO0 321 057S
e� mmS
39 1
Gl C�mou!�o�l Fjlijutl
T Shirti, Sleeping
Backpacks. Camping Equip
mem. Steel Toed Shoes. Dishes
and Over 700 Oitterent New and
Used Items Cowboy Boots
13 95
ARMY-NAVY
STORE lit
ABORT IONS UP
TO ! 2th WEEK
OF- PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 1
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
Sinb - Piognancy Test Birth
and Problem Pregnan
V l nsdmgj. For lurther mtor
ii call 83? 0535 (Toll Free
MumtM I 800 221 258 I between �
A and 5PM Weekdays
H ALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh. N. C.
2704 E. 10th St.
758-1033
Buck's
Gulf
Complete
Automotive Service
24 hr. Towing Service
Jartran Rentals Available
HAVE A PROBLEM'
NEED INFORMATION?
REAL Crisis Intervention,
24 HOUR SERVICE
312 E. 10th Street
758 HELP Greenville. NC. 27834
CHEMISTRYPHYSICS
HATHENCINEERINC
MAJORS
The leading operator ol nuclear reactor it currently Mafclwe) y�mJ
men with strong science backgrounds U.S. Cltiiaw under 17 year
ot age with 2 1 OPA or better. E�ceile�t benefit, growth potential
and expected �,��� �alary in four year. Mwclaar Qualified Of-
ficer will be challenged by entire pe�trt�m ot management and
engineering Send reume to:
NAVY
Nuclear Program Officer
1001 Navaho Dr.
Raleigh, NC 27609
or calM-MO 62 7231
Jefferson Florist
Fridays Special
SWEETS FOR YOUR SWEETS
12 Sweetheart Roses
Tied with Godiva Chocolates
1720 West Fifth Street
Near Hospital
752-6195
$99S

if they just want summer work
The majority of Co-op students take part in
the alternating program where a student will
work for one semester, usually during their
junior year, and then return to ECU for one
semester. Then the student will work for one
more semester and after that will return to school
for hisher final semester before graduation.
Students from all disciplines are encouraged to
register for Co-op education. Dr. Harper ex-
plained, "We start with students' interests and
we take it from there
Dr. Harper also feels that liberal arts majors
have a good chance of finding Co-op positions.
"So many employers want persons with com-
munications skills � writing, speaking and
listening � the companies will train the students
in the application of these skill
A random sampling of federal agencies and
non-federal employers who use Co-op students
include the Department of the Navy, the Depart-
ment of Energy, the Social Security Administra-
tion, the General Accounting Office, the Na-
tional Labor Relations Board, Burroughs
Wellcome, IBM, Long Manufacturing, Midden-
dor fLane Gallery and the Spoletto Festival
Committee in Charleston, S.C.
There are several more employers whom I have
not mentioned here. Locations of Co-op posi-
tions stretch across the southern part of the coun-
try all the way to California and range up and
down the East Coast.
Salaries for the Federal Co-op positions range
from $10,235 GS-3 to $13,369 GS-5 yearly
depending on the student's experience and
academic status.
The Co-op office is located on the third floor
of the Rawl Building in Room 313. Their phone
number is 757-6979. "We'd like to start talking
to students as Freshmen said Dr. Harper. "We
could perhaps suggest some courses that a stu-
dent might take Prime employability is during
a student's junior year and the sophomore year is
a good time to register with Co-op.
"Students must have a 2.0 grade point average
to go through the Co-op program, and most
employers want at least a 2.5 GPA Mrs. Maier
explained.
Co-op placed about 400 students in job posi-
tions during the past year. If you're looking for a
way to get some experience in your field of study,
or if you haven't quite figured out where your
niche in the market -place lies, look into the Co-
op program. You'll meet some busy, caring
folks.
Keaton Blubbers In Tragedy; Late Show 'Harold & Maude'
Diane Keaton stars along with Albert Finney and Karen
Allen In Alan Parker's (Fame) bitter-sweet tragedy about
the effects of a divorce on an upper-middle class family.
Shoot the Moon. The film chronicles Finney and
Keaton's breakup through to the most outrageous and
shocking conclusion possible. Equally outrageous and
shocking is bizarre-io-extremes cult film Harold and
Maude, which stars the irreverent Ruth Gordon as an
elderh swinger on the prowl for oung meat. Shoot the
Moon shows Thursday at 7 p.m. and Krida and Saiur-
day at 5, 7:15 amd 9:30 p.m. Late show Harold and
Maude follows Shoot the Moon on Frida and Salurda
nights only at 12 p.m. Both films will be shown in
Mendenhall's Hendrix Theaire. Admission is by ID and
aetiit card for students and MSt membership for
faitiitv and staff.
QUALITY
SHOE REPAIR
SAAB'S
SHOK RKPAIR
113 Grande Ave.
7S8 1228
HAMSTER
&
GERBIL SPECIAt
Starts Sat. Dec. 4th PET
Hamster or Gerbtl food, wood shavings VILLAGE
and water bottle.
ALLFORM8"
plus 1 FREE Hamster or Gerbil
Complete line of small animal supplies
ATTENTION
BSN CLASS OF
�83
Tr�e Air Force ha �
peoal procfre for
BSN�. if wiCcted
yoti can enter active
CKitV oon after gradu-
ation - - vitrtout waiting
lor the retultt o your
State Board. To quali-
fy you mjlt haw. en
overall l.a. GPA.
After o�M.iii.onir5
you'll attend � five
aonth internahtp at a
motor Air Force facility,
t an escoJtent way to
prmpmrm for that �lde
range of laperiexti
you'll have as am Air
Force kutm eficar.
For eve ir� for aat ton.
contact
The Men of ECU calendars will be ar-
riving on campus Friday, December 10th.
The calender features seventeen of East
Carolina's hottest men as judged by a
panel of ECU's most descriminating
women. See for yourself. Order your
calendar at the Buccaneer office for 4"
from 2 to 4pm Monday thru Thursday.
For more information call 757-6501.
15
ECU DISCOUNT
on all prescription
eyeglasses
315 Park View Commons
Across from Doctors Park
Open 9 5:30
Mon. Fri.
752-1446
pucians
Student Coif Special
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201 West 9th Street
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I






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
DECEMBER 2. 1982
Page 8
Home Opener At Minges
Edwards, Peartree Pace Pirates
By KEN BOLTON
Assistant Spurts Ednor
The ECU Pirates, led by Johnny-
Edwards and Bruce Peartree, suc-
cessfully opened their home season
Wednesday night with a 96-62 vic-
tory over Christopher Newport.
Edwards scored 25 points and
grabbed 11 rebounds, while Pear-
tree also contributed 25 points, 16
coming in the second half.
The game featured a marked dif-
ference between the two halves.
In the first half, the Pirates shot
46.7 per-cent from the floor and
allowed the Captains some easy
shots on the inside. At halftime, the
Pirates had a 42-36 lead after falling
behind by three points with a little
over three minutes remaining.
ECU came out storming in the se-
cond half, however. The Pirates
scored the first five baskets and
limited Christopher Newport to on-
ly two points during the first six
minutes.
Edwards, a 6-6. 225-pound
freshman from Charlotte, was a
dominant force in the first half as he
scored 21 points on eight-for-nine
shooting from the field.
Peartree carried the bulk of the
scoring load for the Pirates in the se-
cond half, with many points coming
on strong moves to the basket.
Besides his eight field goals in 11
tries, Peartree was a perfect nine-
tor-nine from the free throw line.
Christopher Newport came into
the game with an obvious heiaht
disadvantage, and it became ap-
parent in the second half as the
Pirates didn't allow many second
shots. The Captains, who's tallest
starter was 6-4, were outrebounded
40-26.
After the game, ECU head coach
Charlie Harrison expressed disap-
pointment in the play of the Pirates,
even though ECU won by 34 points.
"I wasn't pleased with a lot of
things said Harrison. "We played
about 10 minutes of the type of
basketball we're capable of
Harrison stressed the fact that the
level of competition had nothing to
do with the team's attitude.
"A win is a win and a game is a
game he stated, "and that's the
way that we'll look at it every
time
Christopher Newport was led by-
guards Jimmy Dean and Mark
Clark. Dean was largely responsible
for the Captains' effort in the first
half, as he scored 10 points before
intermission. Both Dean and Clark
finished with 15 points, and
freshman Tim Strayhorn chipped in
13.
The closeness of the first half was
a combination of ECU missing
some easy shots and Christopher
Newport exploiting the Pirate
defense.
"We knew that if we executed we
could get it inside, but we didn't
take advantage of it commented
Harrison. "In the first half, our
guys were a step and a half slow get-
ting there to help out on defense
The Pirate defense forced a faster
pace in the second half, forcing 14
turnovers during the last 20
minutes.
"At halftime, I talked to them
about how you can't turn emotion
on and off and you can't turn effort
on and off said Harrison. "Our
press in the second half was much
more intense
For the game, the Pirates shot
63.3 per-cent from the field, and
84.2 per-cent from the free throw
line.
Besides Edwards and Peartree,
other Pirates turning in good games
were: Charles Green (13 points, 11
rebounds, 5 assists), Barry Wright
(10 points) and Curt Vanderhorst
(nine points, six rebounds).
The crowd of 2,500 really came
alive in the second half as the
Pirates began to widen their lead.
"I was pleased with the crowd,
especially the students responded
Harrison. "They were more patient
than 1 was
Harrison expressed concern over
the Pirates' upcoming schedule,
which doesn't show another ECU
home game until Dec. 28.
On Saturday, the Pirates travel to
Birmingham, Alabama to face Sam-
ford University. Next Wednesday,
ECU travels to Raleigh to face the
No. 15th ranked N.C. State
Wolf pack.
After these two road games, the
Pirates will head for Louisiana to
compete in the Bayou Classic, along
with New Mexico State, Grambling
State and Southwest Louisiana.
"Our next three games are of a
great degree of difficulty com-
mented Harrison. "Samford has
about the same amount of quickness
that we do, so we'd better strap our
belts on real tight
The Pirates will be attempting to
raise their record to 2-1 against
Stamford, with the game scheduled
for 8:30 p.m.
U ECU 96, C. Newport 62
ECU
Edwards
Gr�n
Robinson
Wright
Peart ret
Vanderhorst
Fox
Williams
Brown
Harris
Reicheneker
Toiah
NEWPORT
Stryhorn
Eurt
Dean
Clark
Griffin
Cobb
Daly
Harris
Schlegel
I otals
MP FC FT R A f PI
26 10-11 5-5 11 1 0 23
27 3 10 7-11 8 5 2 13
21 2-3 0-0 0 3 4 4
50 3.11 4-4 2 2 2 10
24 8 11 M : : 0 25
26 2-4 5-7 6 2 2 9
11 4-7 OO 1 0 1 8
110-00002
12 0-1 043 3 2 1 0
9 0-10-13 0 2 0
9 0-0 0-0 10 3 0
200 33-60 30-37 40 O
17
MP
22
34
38
36
II
13
17
FC FT
5-8
3
7-15
7-11
24
1-4
0-1
2-2
04)
R
3-6
0-1
12
1-1
13
0-0
2-3
0-0
0-0
0
3
4 !
3 1
2 1
3 :
i o i
o o 1
Pi
13
6
15
15
5
2
2
4
0
200 27-54 8-16 26 13 2 61
42 54-�
36 26-U
E Carotin
C Srwawt � � � r
PMtclvSTANLCV LI4IT
tZZZ �oZ!L "pX �T� " earn Wright takes the ball to the hoop against Christopher Newport
2.500
Wednesda night.
Lady Pirates Experience
Holiday In A Convent
Wright Comes Back Prepared
By MARK BRAND
ut. Sports Info. Iir
Right around the corner from
Rocco's Deli, in the heart of New
York's Staten Island in Annadale,
was the ECU women's basketball
team's Thanksgiving home this past
weekend.
The Presentation Sister House,
100-vears-old come 1984, has hosted
the Lady Pirates for the annual
turkey day feast the past three years
while they play Northeastern-based
competition. And while their main
work includes staffing Island
school, teaching campus ministry at
Villanova University, conducting
CCD classes in the parishes and
keeping house for 22 retired sister,
the sisters are never too busy to roll
out the welcome mat for the Lady
Pirates.
Sister Kathy Hollywood, forma-
tion director and recruiter for the
sisters, serves as host and number
one fan for the Lady Pirates.
Hollywood, a native Staten
Islander, was Cathy Andruzzi's
assistant coach when the two were
coaching at Wagner College. There
is a basketball goal just outside
which was erected a week after
Hollywood moved in just to keep
her there.
"We are quite happy to have the
kids every year says Hollywood.
"I'll never forget the first time they
came to our place. They made
themselves at home and even helped
in the kitchen
Granted, being in a convent for
the first time, not to mention living
in one for five days, could be a
shocking experience for a group of
Southern girls. But the atmosphere
is not stuffshirt.
"We are very conscious of the
girls coming from the south ad-
mitted Hollywood. "We are eager
to give them the opportunity to ex-
perience the sisters and hopefully it
would be a positive experience. We
let them have Thanksgiving dinner
with us. We share our values as
dedicated women in the church
Not only do the sisters share their
values with the Lady Pirates, but
they also remind them of their own.
"We hope they are organizing
their own values explained
Hollywood. "You can still enjoy
life and have fun while being into
what you're into, but not get caught
up. All the way around its a good
experience
For all-America Mary Denkler, a
four-year veteran of the house, the
experience is nothing new.
"I always attended Catholic
schools all my life says Denkler,
"so 1 really feel at home. My first
year on this trip we stayed in a hotel
See Bits, Page 10
ByJOHNTHORTON
SUff Writer
"When you talk about Barry
Wright, you're talking about a
player who loves to play said
ECU head basketball coach Charlie
Harrison.
Wright is a 6-5, 190 pound,
lightning-quick sophomore for-
ward. He hails from Portsmouth,
Va where as a player at LC. Nor-
com High School, he racked up a
total of 2,080 points in four years.
This statistic stands as a Tidewater
Region record.
In 1980-1981, Wright was a
freshman here at ECU. He started
23 of the 25 games he played that
year. He averaged 10.3 points a
game and led the team in steals with
31. Wright was named the team's
best defensive player at the end of
the season.
But after such a successful
season, Wright left school after his
freshman season for personal
reasons. During the ten-month
layoff, Wright had plenty of time to
sort out his feelings and decided to
return to ECU, much to everyone's
delight. "Not many players get a se-
cond chance Harrison said.
"Barry is lucky. I think he realizes
this
Since his return, Wright has
worked very hard to get back to
where he is now. "I thought I was
overdoing my workouts said
Wright, "But it's paying off now
He scored 16 points in the season
opener against Duke.
Yes, Wright is definitely back. He
is stronger than ever due to "lots of
mileage" and an isometric excercise
program.
In practice, we never stop runn-
ing said Wright. "We go as hard
as we can from one drill to the
next
As well as being as excellent ball-
handler and passer, Wright is pro-
bably the team's best defensive
player. But according to Harrison.
Wright is just one of a whole group
of talented young men on the Pirate
squad. "Barry, along with others, is
gifted Harrison said. "They
should be appreciated more. 1 ap-
preciate Barry's play and others
should too
Lady Bucs To Face Wolfpack
The Lady Pirates will face N.C.
State tonight � their only regular
season ACC opponent this year.
As demonstrated in the past, the
confrontation between the two ac-
complished teams should spark a
few fireworks.
One thing's for sure, head coach
Cathy Andruzzi sure isn't going to
take the Wolfpack lightly. "N.C.
State is very tough she said.
"They've had two very good games
and they're in the top 20. They have
some real experienced ball players
Two of those players are senior
Angie Armstrong and Philadelphia
native Linda Page. Page, a 5-10
sophomore who scored 102 points in
a high school game, leads the
Wolfpack in scoring with 18.5
points per game and in rebounding
with nine per contest.
Armstrong, a 5-5 guard, is
averaging 16.5 points per game, and
poses as a definite threat, according
to Andruzzi. "We'll have to concen-
trate on guard Angie Armstrong,
and prevent her from doing the
things she would like to do she
said.
Cindy Pleasants
A Look Inside
Lady Wolfpack coach Kay Yow,
a graduate of ECU, has accum-
mulated a 169-47 record during her
12 years at N.C. State, and has three
starters returning this season. The
head coach has established a reputa-
tion for building strong offensive
teams, and this year's squad is no
exception. "They are getting good
offense production from their
guards and post players Andruzzi
said. "It will be a tough assignment
for only our fourth game of the
season
Now 2-1, the Pirates will be tak-
ing a few offensive weapons of their
own to Reynolds Coliseum. All-
America forward Mary Denkler has
scored 79 points in just three games
to place her third on ECU's all-time
career list in scoring. Denkler has
racked up 1282 points, while Rosie
Thompson has 2300 points for first
place and Debbie Freeman precedes
Denkler with 1570 points.
"Mary is doing a very good job
offensively Andruzzi said.
"During the Fairfield game, she was
mutilated and constantly being
doubled and triple-teamed, but she
will scored 17 points
Another offensive standout this
season has been freshman Delphine
Mabry. The Rocky Mount native is
the Pirates' third leading scorer,
averaging seven points per game.
The 5-4 guard also averages 4.6 re-
bounds, and leads the team in steals
and assists with eight and 12, respec-
tively.
"Delphine is doing a super job
Andruzzi said. "She caused ten tur-
novers against Fairfield. She has
just played very poised against the
toughest assignments.
"We are looking forward to her
becoming more knowledgeable of
the game
The Lady Bucs will take on St.
Peter's College Saturday night, and
the Pirate head coach isn't an-
ticipating an easy bout with the
Peahens. "They have an excellent
ball club Andruzzi said. "The
were in the NCAA's last vear. and
were beaten by Old Dominion.
"We expect a tough game.
There's no doubt about that
Both games are scheduled to get
underway at 7:30 p.m.
The N.C. State-ECL women's
basketball game will air at 7:20 p.m.
tonight on WITN-FM � the
Pirates' Sports Network. Sports In-
formation Director Ken Smith will
be the host, giving complete play-
by-play coverage.
ECU Swim Team To Take On
'World-Class' NC State Squad
OAVB WIIXIAJaa
Swim Coach Rick Kobe
By EDWARD NICKLAS
Stifl Writer
The ECU Pirates swim team,
which has posted 3-1 (men) and
2-2(women) records thus far, will
compete against "world-class"
swimmers when they travel to
Raleigh tomorrow night to swim
against the North Carolina State
University Wolfpack.
N.C. State, which has not lost an
ACC championship in years, will
test swimming coach Rick Kobe's
ECU squad. According to Kobe,
N.C. State has some "world-class
kids" on their team. "Their girls
he said, "finished fifth in the coun-
try last year He added, "Both
their men and women beat us badly
last year
Kobe did feel, though, that his
ECU team is much improved. "We
plan to do a heckuva better job than
last year
The team has already set many
varsity records this season. For the
girls, Joanne McCulley has set
records in the 50 100- and 200-yard
breast stroke, and Nan George has
ECU Swimming
surpassed a previous mark in the
50-yard freestyle. The 400-yard
medley relay team of McCulley,
George, Lou Ann Peura and Kaky
Wilson has also set a varsity record.
The girls, who are a division-II
team, have already qualified nine
girls for the Nationals. According to
Kobe the women's swim team is
probably the best in ECU history.
The men, who this season have
already posted times ahead of last
year, are also impressive.
"Compared to last year Kobe
said, "we are also doing as well in
our relay times
The diving team, coached by
John Rose, has also had its share of
standouts. "Renee Seech Rose
commented, "has already qualified
to the Division-II Nationals on the
3-meter board
"Scott Eagle Rose continued,
"is our best male diver, however, he
is still looking to qualify for the
Division-I Nationals on both
boards
Rose seemed pleased with the
team's performance so far. "We
have either placed first or second in
the meets we've had In particular,
against James Madison, the team
placed first on the lower-board and
second on the 3-meter.
Also, Rose said, the team is work-
ing very hard and is the strongest
team ECU has had m five or six
years. "We are building up the pro-
gram Rose added. "We have a
good nucleus of recruits coming in
next year
After the meet against N.C. State,
the men and women's swim team
will travel to North Palm Beach,
Fla over Christmas vacation,
where they will condition themselves
in the Holiday Training Program.
The diving team will not go, but will
come back early to ECU to train.
Kobe, who feels that ECU will
have some rough meets in January,
is optimistic. "I am pleased with the
results he said. "We could easily
be 4-0, but the main thing is that we
are making the qualifying cuts
RALEICH
(UPU
Carolina Stat
coach Monte
nounced his r
Wednesday.
lack of Mjpp
athletic dc:
ticials
Kiffm
16-17 record
seasons w
Wolfpack an
his final ea
contract �
reports earl
da North
State Chancell
Poulton
again : ex'en
fin's contra
k � :
resignation
afternoon. (
"an extreme:
decision but
is nee
nounceme
a meeting fcx
fin and P
"Quite
support 1
tne atr i
was ir.
needs i
the
k ��
not :
from I
tor thai
for
future "
Tuesda)
said he �rai
one-year ex!
his contract
"All
is one m I
said, citing t
rl r.ae:
next sc
SCi CCe UM
11 a 1 f��
recru
ACC becau
battor aga.
and a
at DuKe
Kit
pired it
season I h
i n j u r �
Wolfpack
while pla j
ed that
ranked
Clemson.
Maryland
th�
AL
70J
iiiiiiiutmnuii
U!

"n "






I Ml 1 s I
f
es
Vk �
jred
ack
uad
Kit fin Announces
Resignation; Cites
Lack Of Support
RALEIGH, N c
(UPI) North
aroima State football
v oach Monte kit tin an
nounced his resignation
Wednesday, citing a
,k k ol support from
etK departmeni ol
tictais
compiled .1
� in three
th the
v � it and was in
his fma .1 '? his
contra 1 here t
repo
da) Nortl Ca
nst exi 1 K I
kittin annoui
res igna t io n a
afternoon, cal
"an extreme!) I
decision but on
ssar I
ncement came
a meeting betwe K
fin and Poulton
"Quit . the
ort I re
itl eti irtment
� J the :
am
K. 111 ;a ' tould
direc
trill be
in tlie
Florida and North
Carolina North
Carolina State won five
ol its six home games,
bin dropped foul Ol
five on the road and
�as outscored bs 150
pomis in Ms five
deteais
Rumors that kittin's
future as shak) began
in mid season and in-
creased following a
season ending loss to
Miami on No 20.
rhere were reports
Athletic Directoi Willis
Casey and m a n
m e m bers o 1 t h e
Wolf pack Club, the
school's athletic
tei organization,
ited a new coach
Many players public
l supported Kittin's
. appoint m e n t.
Poulton. howevei. said
he would make the
decision and met
with K1 f f i n several
- alter the season
Kit tin, 42. was f, n
his first season but
4-7 in 198 1
He was named in
Decembei 1979 to
ite Bo
Rein a eft to take
the head u hing
at 1 uisiana State and
died a month later in a
had plane crash
l8 A Bel �re coming to
NState, kiffin was
detensi e c oordinator
j tor
l " he
nbei
eturnine
1 I assistant head
at 1.1 nsas tor
three seasons, during
'l :h the R aor backs
mi s 1 His onh
1 oa hniL' posl
o t h ei
was ,
ki
against . lem
I
he .
at saw
included 2nd-
. I Penn State,
id, Miami ol
Nebraska
id . .1' ed
N'el iska in 1 s�f4
,iilei cai rung 1 hrc� let-
ters as a tackle He
plased Canadian foot
bail before his careei
was ended b an injury
and returned to the
� n h u s k e r s at
h man c oac h 1 n
1973 He moed up to
the varsity stafl two
vears later and was
named defensive coor-
dinator in K)i
Godfather's
&
Sneaker Sam Sez
SOCCER WINNERS
CROWNED
Soccer kicked its wa
to a close last week with
some very exciting
games Pi Kappa Phi
won the tratei nit "A"
division with Sigma Phi
Epsilon winning the
"H" division. In the
men's independent
division, Omni won a
close game over I he
Sensation. Jones Red
Devils edged out the
Slay Hippies in a don
ble shoot-out overtime
2 1. in the m en's
residence hall division.
1 he top sorority team
was Alpha Xi Delta,
and the I m stead
Jockettes, who were
undefeated all season
long, won the women's
residence hall div ision.
1 his set the stage foi
the a 11 - ca m pus
playoffs Alter beating
the Pi Kappa Phi team,
Jones Red Devils were
matched up against the
Omni I his proved to
be a tight match up,
with Omni hitting the
initial score late in the
first half. Jones came
back in the second halt
with two scores With
under two minutes to
plav. ()mm came very
close on a corner kick,
but it missed on a great
save by lett Ramey
Final score: Jones Red
Devils 2 Omni !
I he I instead locket
tes and Alph.i Xi Delta
met in the final ol the
women's all-campus
1 he I ocket tes w ei e
devastating in the way
they passed the ball and
moved down the held
Alpha Xi Delia scored
three goals but it prov
ed too little too late . a
I mstead tallied to a 5
v ictoi v
B(m sN K HERS
"SNATCH" Mill
ONCE AGAIN
I he co-rec v olley I
c h a m pionship was
plaved I uesday night
amidst a few spec
tators. I he two team
vving tor the honois ol
all campus 1 hampions
were the defending
, hamps, th Body Snat
chers, ag ainsl the
c hall en g ing l ea m .
ROM I I h 1 s
- ma s h 1 ng sped ac le
began al 00 p m and
ended after two well
I lay ed games Both
teams used strateg) and
power in placing then
spikes and dinks in the
0 pponen t' s couri
Although the lead alter
nated from point to
point m the beginning,
it was the Bi-dv Snat
chers led bv I 0111
( urry, Stan loy tie; .
and Shai ron Pen . w ho
helped keep 'heir team
in the lead k!( 1
fought bat k the spiking
attack with one 1 it their
own Bill Westburry,
Majoi rhorsden, and
Renee Massotti were
kev plav maker ol the
ROT 1 'earn I he
h went two games,
with the second game
1 unning into extra
points; 1N in, 16 14
1 he 1 inal � �utcome,
how �
the H � :
CO
lips f
veal in a

Ml �
i 1 inters
m
111 e v b a v
H - ad
K 11
tlie set ond '� made h
rhi the ?irs-
1 � � . �.
I : ; . : �
rimy I
. 1
I I M H VNDBAI I s
FAN! M I (
HNISH
I he team handball
finals were held this
week and they finished
with ,i tiare In the bl ��
men's independent rid
division final, the Wcd I ones
Hunters won in double Rothei :
overtime oei the Slam the . 1
mers Kappa Alpha
��� the Phi rauN
12 11 in the fraternity
:
! I by Bryan Ca kiiwi I Ks
trell, captured the on
rnity "B" divi- ru
In the men's all sport in I 1
cam Kappa com
amp hips si
in cnic seme
I he �
camp
H
�s U 1 M
hi I
NI) s
I
KOI 1
WE PAY Ir.W-F OIATE CASH FOR:
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I -L
WEDDING BANDS
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R )INS
Ci 'STVL
, Al .HLb
K
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40 EVANS ST. OPEN 9:30 5:30MON SAT
ha "on housesouthi PI ONF 752 "866
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pass inspection j
all sizes I
AVAILABLE j
Inquire at ' 'vans Seafood
IINIIIJIIimiliHIIIIIIIHIHillllllHIi-IIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlM
For mature
audiences
E.c.u. Campus
Call 757-6390

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When SH(she says, DW ME
Sh6i mearis adiamond
From300
LAUTARES JEWELERS. INC
Professional Jewelers
Registered Jewelers
Cer'ilied GemoloqisH
414 EVANS STREET
We do no! sell discount
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CAROLINA OPRY HOLSE
pt'M'iiK in concert
DELBERT
McCLINTON
with special guest THE BILL LYLERLY BAN
THURSDAY DECEMBER 2
Advance Ticket locations
Apple Records Record Bar Pitt Plaza
Western Pleasure, Carolina Opry House
Doors Open 7:30-8:15 For Advance Ticket Holders
Come out early and try to
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till 8:15, 50C till 9:00, 75C till 9:45
f-or further information call 758 3943
Presenting High Bias n and the Ultimate Tape Guarantee.
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10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 2. 1982
Classifieds
PERSONAL
THE POSTERS were good
Th�nks for cltaring the walls of
them The senior show will be even
better. Dec 4th 7 f p.m Art ana
Camera Gallery M Ouggan and
T Griffin
HEY SWEETHEART You'd bet
ter believe I like Keithas well as
Mr P1 He's one fine gentleman
Please call. PEACHES
ROOMMATE
WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATES wanted
to share large house near campus
Call 155 4057 after 500 p.nv
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED 1 Of females to share
apartment close to campus M3.33
mo plus I 3 utilities Call 7S1 $
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
tor next semester, non smoker,
preferably Christian 17S rent plus
1 : utilities RIVER BLUFF apts
Call 7S� S7IS
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share Apt 1 mile from campus MO
13 utilities Call 355 J0.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share apartment VM SO per month
13 utilities Available Jan I. Call
Karen at 757511 Non smoker,
serious student preferred
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share apt near campus need
bedroom furniture only rent MO a
month plus 13 utilities Deposit
required Call 7580419 ask for
Susan or Marsha
2 FEMALE ROOMMATES
wanted Sl per month plus V3
utilities Pets ok 75 511.
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL Typist wants to
type at home Reasonable rates
75 30
PROFESSIONAL Typing service
e�perience quality work IBM
typewriter Call Lame Shive
750 5301 or Gail Joiner 75 1042
TYPING TERM papers, resumes
thesis etc Call 752 733
TYPING: TERM PAPERS.
THESIS, etc Call 757 3t2 before
tjOO O.itr
BUSINESS TUTOR Ex Grad stu
dent and business instructor will
tutor most business classes. Get
help before FINAL EXAMS Call
754354 or 75 5377 after 5 p.m
ENGLISH TUDOR: HELP with
writing, re-wriftng and editing
papers Also proofreading and typ
ing. Call 757-0207 after 5.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST Great
service Reasonable rates. Call
between 3 and p.m 757 1371
WANTED
PROCESS MAIL AT HOME!
t30 00 per hundred No experience
Part or full time Start im
mediately Details, send self
addressed, stamped envelope
Haiku Distributors, 115 Waipalani
Rd , Haiku, HI v70�
HELP WANTED Assistant buyer
position open for assistant ladies'
sportswear buyer Must have good
feel tor fashion and the ability to
handle heavy paperwork in an ex
pedient manner Experience in
retail preferred. Good salary and
opportunity for advancement
Send resume to P.O. Box 17,
Greenville. N.C. 27S34.
get Cliffs Notes? They'll help you
understand what you read, anal
they give a great review. Than
you'll have more free time tor mat
I've got a cold bottle of Ripple
care to share?
BASHFUL: Every time I see you.
your head is buried in a book. Why
don't you go to the bookstore ana
get Cliffs NotesT They'll make
those tough tit assignments easier
to understand, and they'll give you
a great review. Throw down those
chains and come out with me! IN-
TERESTED.
YOU'RE FORGIVEN: I told you
to bring pina, but you brought
Cliffs Notes. Sorry it took me to
long to discover what a great idea
that was. Cliffs Notes made it easy
to review, and my test grade was
super. Let's do it again, and I'll br-
ing the piua but please try and
remember the Cliffs Notes.
ENLIGHTENED
FOR SALE
RIDES
RIDE NEEDED to Roanoke. Va
or surrounding area for Christmas
break Will be willing to share ex
penses Call Julie, at 752 1332
MISC.
SKI VERMONT FIVE-DAY ski
vacation to Smuggler Notch, VT
Jan. 2-7 Package deal for sis SO
includes Sday ski pass, slopeside
condos and college bash partte
For further into , contact BETH or
LISA at 75573 or 7 57 312
THIRSTY? COME quench that
winter thirst at Chill Thrill 12!
Dec 3, 300pmtopm
X MAS PRESENT Fugi Supreme
bicycle to be given away at the Phi
Kappa Tau House Come ex
penence the real thrill 3 00 p m
Dec 3
ERNESTINE The Grapes of
Wrath can be sour indeed! Why
don't you go to the bookstore and
2 FISHER SPEAKERS model Sit
would like to trade for cassette
deck Call 75177 or The East
Carolinian 7573 and leave
message for Geep Johnson.
FOR SALE: 171 HONDA 250 XL
DIRT OR STREET BIKE Call
750 �7�� Mon. Thur.
NICE GRAY AND WHITE RAft
BIT FUR JACKET FOR SALE MS
CALL 7M 3�4
WATERBEDS and bedding one
half off! DON'T pay retail! We
have complete waterbeds as low
as J14 5. Also bedding sets as low
as 57 95. Come by Factory Mat-
tress and Waterbed Outlet 7M
Greenville Blvd next to Sweet
Caroline's. 355 22
AVAILABLE JAN 1 2 bedroom
duplex near campus Call 355057
after $
FOR SALE 14 Coachman trailer
21 foot Trailer has Air, storms,
deck and is underpinned on lot on
Ayden Trailer Park Call 74 353
TECHNIOUES TURNTABLE,
Realistic 35W receiver both SIM.
ph 750 304
FOR RENT Georgetown Apt as
of Jan 1. Call 752415 or 754 271
S VOLKSWAGEN good cond SM
call 355 353 or 757 413.
FOR SALE Durst color enlarger
5100 00 call after 6 00 754 3127
Bucs Welcomed
Head (oach (harlie Harrison and his assistant,
Newport.
pivot) By STANLEY LEAHY
Tom Barrise, discuss game plan against Christopher
Cont'd From Page 8
and we ate Thanksgiv-
ing dinner in a
restaurant. Here it is a
lot better. We really
talk to the sisters
But for someone not
of the Catholic faith,
such as guard Fran
Hooks, the experience
serves as a persistent
reminder.
"It makes you think
and be thankful add-
ed Hooks.
"Everywhere you look
there's pictures and
statues of Jesus. I
became aware of my
values. The sisters sup-
port us too. Before our
game Friday a sister
said to me, 'I'll have to
spend all day on my
knees praying for you
guys "
Even though dignity
is maintained, there is
still room for levity.
Take for example sister
Concepta, the one the
players call "E.T
after the movie
character. She is no
larger than the movie
character and she walks
and talks exactly like
the real E.T.
Or take sister
Joseph, the portly
breakfast cook.
"She's the one who
can curse like a sailor it
you go into HER kit-
chen and she doesn't
want you in there
said senior Caren
Truske.
Indeed, Sister Joseph
will add spice to an
conversation. Upon
entering a conversation
Thursday night prior to
the Fairfield game, she
commented that she
had just lost five
dollars. She had not
been robbed, but had
lost the mone while
playing poker "I wa
calling about reserving
a gym lor practice
said Hollywood, "and
I could hear her in the
other room saving,
'give me three Sister
Joseph and the 'Dru
get along great because
their both Italian
Unfortunatelv. Sis
Joseph even predicted
ECU'S loss to Fairfield
on Friday evening
"Y'ou don't have a
chance she said.
"They're a bunch of
Jesuits
Amidst the levitv.
there still exists
realness of the povertv
and crime ot New York
City. The trip to Fa
field took the Lad
Pirates right through
the Bronx. The crime
just seem to be hanging
there in the smog. The
sister keep their doors
locked, but paradox-
ically, not tor safety
reasons, but to keep the
senile sisters from
wandering off down
the street.
"Our doors have
always been open
Hollywood added.
? .
SB . sssss.
AUDITIONS
"S3
&$�
i TT" fT -7
� -
CASTING NOTICE
Ve are auditioning for over 200 singers dancers, musicians, varietv artists and tech
nicians for The Old Countr " Busch Gaiden " 1983 Entertainment Season
The Old Country. America s most truly themed theme park will provide ou with a
paycheck and an opportunitv to polish and displav vour talents before an audience of over
� n million guests And if invaluable exposure and experience are not enough in them
selves, then we have more for ou' Free classes in all forms of dance, vocal instruction and
instrumental arranging are offered as a part of Busch Entertainment Corporation s
commitment to personal growth There is also the opportunity, to take part in choral
band azi and dance concerts and a fullv staged theatrical production produced bv the
empli ees themselves
So el youi act together and show it to us Then get reav to show it to the world
Audu
C
sity
Hall
1 .ii be available
Jhe
rOld
0USCM 6AHDCMV
WRilAMSDUAG VA
r�mim,
FAMOUS PIZZA
Dine in or Fast Free Delivery
Hot oven subs, Lasgna, Spaghetti, Hamburgers,
HAPPY HOUR 2-CLOSE
$225 pitcher 58C mugs
DAILY SPECIALS
Small Pepperoni Pizza $2"
NOT FOR DELIVERY 7585982
ADvE�T,SED 'TEM POLICY
Eac o these aaeMised items 19 '��
qu�d 10 be reaaiy available 'c
sae in each K'oge' Sav on eicep'
as spec'ca"v noted m this ad II �ve
10 'u" out o an item e will o"e'
�ou you' choice o' a comparab'e
tem r�en a�a'iabie 'ejecting the
same sa�nas or a 'acec hich
a entitle yOu 'o purchase the
ad.e't.sea 'tem at 'he adveM sed
; I p .thin 30 darS
Items and Prices
Effective Wed Nov 17.
thru Wed Nov 24. 1962
In Greenville
Cop grit '982
K'oge' Sa� n
Quani �, p a's Reserved
N -p s i Dealers
��
S
A
�A
m
v


$
ar- a0" "L
0s1

Lb.
IN THE DELI
RUSSER
WUNDER BAR
Bologna
$4 39
Begin At Kroger!
KROGER FRESH
Orange Juice
5
Goebe Beer
KROGER
GRADE A
Ui2oi. cans
Large Eggs
v2-Gal.
Ctn.
7
Doz.
65C
FRIDAY ONLY
ALL YOU CAN EAT!
FLOUNDER DINNER
CoKe
8A60Z. e,u
COUNTRY OVEN
Potato
Chips
KROGER ALL MEAT OR
All Beef
Wieners
12-Oz.
Pkg.
plus
on
8-Oz.
Bag
jf
KROGER
C0St Ch0Sread
KROGER
CREAMY C��� ml.
Cole Slaw Cream Cnecsc
Lb.
8-Oz.
Pkg.
I INClUOf S HKHCH FBKS COU SIAW. TAffTAS
tAuct i mmmmm
SHONEYo
Bypass Greenville, N.
600 Greenville Blvd Greenville
jOpen 8 a.m. to Midnight
Open Sunday 9am lo 9pm
Fresh
Sno White
mushrooms
Ub. cont
49
GOLD CREST
VIRGINIA OR
Spanish Peanuts
$449
2-Oz
Can
SPANISH
CANUT
12-Oz. �
Can �
-

t � "�
p MHH





Title
The East Carolinian, December 2, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 02, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.235
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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