The East Carolinian, November 30, 1982






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(Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.25
Tuesday, November 30,1982
Greenville, NX.
10 Pages
Circulation 10.000
Escort Service Tentative For Next Semester
B PATRICK O'NEILL
Muff Wrilrr
An escort ser ice for ECU
students who need to walk on cam-
pus after dark is tentatively schedul-
ed to begin in mid-January of next
year.
Student Government Association
President trie Henderson has
enlisted the help ol the Student
Residence Association in his efforts
to begin the escort service.
The SRA responded by setting up
an SRA Escort Committee which
has been working on the details of
the proposed service. According to
ECU student Paul Sumrell, who is
head of the SRA committee, the
final version of the committee's pro-
posals will go before the SRA's
governing board for approval
Thursday.
Sumrell noted that many of
ECU's women students "don't want
to go out at night" for fear of possi-
ble assault and rape. He also men-
tioned that there are a lot of dark
spots on campus where attacks have
already occured. He noted further
that the west area of campus was a
"target area" of the committee
because there are no male dorms in
that area. Sumrell said that verbal
harrassment is also a problem and
that many unreported attacks have
occurred on ECU's campus.
"I have a sister on campus, and I
would feel much better if she had an
escort and didn't have to walk
alone said SRA President Tory
Russo, who has worked closely with
the committee and Henderson on
the project.
Another committee member,
ECU math freshman Tommy Rob-
bins, noted that the escort service
would be helpful in alleviating stu-
dent's fears of walking alone at
night.
The service would work through a
switchboard operator who, when
called by a person needing an escort,
would in turn contact the student
volunteer who was on duty that
evening. The switchboard operator
would give the escort assignment to
the student living closest to the area
where the caller needed to be met.
According to Sumrell all students
wishing to volunteer to be escorts
would be asked to sign a waiver
form which would give the director
of the escort service the right to have
the students police records checked
before they could be accepted.
The director would also have ac-
cess to the disciplinary files of
Associate Dean for Student Life
James Mallory. Students would be
chosen based on a good record, and
those with infractions would be
eliminated from consideration.
"We want girls to feel safe
Russo said. "They're not going to
feel safe if we don't screen these
guys
Once approved the escort would
be issued an identification card and
possibly a badge which would be
presented by the escort to the
escortee.
The committee praised Hender-
son for his work on the project.
"He deserves a lot of credit Russo
said. "He got the ball rolling
"He came to us for help
Sumrell added. "We're just seeing it
through The ECU escort service
has been modeled after a similar ser-
vice currently being provided at
UNC-Chapel Hill.
An undetermined amount of
money, primarily for publicity and
the phone service, will be needed for
the project. Mallory's office has
pledged some financial support and
requests for additional funds could
be made before both the SRA and
the SGA.
Robbins noted that a major
"built in" factor of the service was
a chance to meet new people
Holiday Thefts Result In $7,000 Loss
By GREG RIDEOUT
News Editor
Scott Residence Hall and Scales
Field House were the sites of two
major break-ins during the
Thanksgiving holiday, with over
$7,000 worth of goods being stolen,
according to the ECU Department
of Public Safety.
As of Monday, 10 residents of
Scott dorm have reported items
stolen from their rooms, and the
university police are expecting more
break-ins and larcenies to be
reported before the week is over.
At Scales Field House, Head
Football Coach Ed Emory had
items stolen from his office valued
at over $600. Detective Captain Earl
Wiggins said items stolen from
Emory's office included: a portable
television, two tape recorders, a
clock with a calculator built in to it,
personal checks, a digital pen and a
digital clock. Ten dollars in change
was also stolen from his desk.
The break-ins at Scott dorm oc-
curred in eight separate rooms on
the first and fourth floors. Items
stolen included stereo equipment,
books, clothes, albums, a camera,
clocks, a typewriter and
photographic equipment. The total
value of all items stolen, given by
the victims, is $6,299.
Entrance to the rooms at Scott
dorm was apparently gained
through the transom, the panel
above the door that lets air circulate
through the room, authorities said.
There was no sign of forceable entry
at Scales Field House.
The Department of Public Safety
said their are no suspects in either
case at this time.
Assistant Director of Public Safe-
ty Francis Eddings said these break-
ins are a signifigant increase over
this time last year. In the month of
November in 1981 there were seven
reported breaking and enterings,
compared to the 10 reported in the
last two days.
Overall, Eddings said, crime on
campus is increasing. "We are
busier than ever before
Detective Lt. Gene McAbee said
the Scales Field House break-in is
only one of three that has occurred
in that area recently. The Pirates
Club and the computer center at
Minges Coliseum were also victimiz-
ed.
Salary Freeze Could Harm Med School
Photo By STANLEY LEARY
Where Are All The Dirty Ones
This student picks out a card or two to give to that special someome. The
Student Supplv Store provides cards for any occasion or message.
By DARRYL BROWN
The ECU School of Medicine has
had no departures of faculty
members because of the current
salary freeze on state employees, ac-
cording to Dean William E. Laupus.
At the state's only other public sup-
ported medical school, the Universi-
ty of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
according to Dr. Stuart Bondurant,
about a dozen faculty have recently
left the school listing the ban on pay
increases as a primary reason.
"It's a constraint; it robs a school
or university of dealing with special
individuals or situations said Dr.
Edwin Monroe, senior associate
dean of the ECU medical school, in
reference to the salary freeze. Ac-
cording to Monroe, none of the
faculty members who have left ECU
recently have cited the pay situation
as a reason.
Monroe emphasized a problem
that many schools are having, that
some people who were promoted
this year did not receive a pay in-
crease.
"We have had several individuals
who received promotions who were
caught in the freeze said Laupus
in an interview with The News and
Observer.
The UNC-CH medical school has
lost several faculty members as pay
scales have not continued to be com-
petitive with schools across the na-
tion. "It's a widespread problem,
said Bondurant, dean of the UNC-
CH School of Medicine in a similar
interview.
"Our salaries under ordinary cir-
cumstances are not competitive with
those in other medical schools
around the country (in the clinical
departments) he said. "When we
are subjected to the freeze, (the dif-
ference) widens very rapidly
The N.C. State Legislature last
summer froze salary increases from
state funds and other sources,
"including foundation money, col-
lected by or for any state depart-
ments, institutions, bureaus,
boards, commissions, persons, cor-
porations or agencies under any
general law of this state
Medical school faculty often
receive significant salary sup-
plements from these alternate
sources. Physicians in the medical
schools are among the highest paid
state employees in North Carolina.
Monroe said that though some
faculty members did not receive ex-
pected pay increases, no research or
study projects have had to be
postponed. He said he hopes the
budget freeze will not continue long
or the problem at UNC-CH could
extend to ECU.
Friendship Turns Holiday Blues Into Blessings
B PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Wnlfr
Many ECU students were able to
be with their families during
Thanksgiving. However, because of
jobs and long distances to travel
some students were unable to leave
Greenville and spend the break with
families.
A a result, many people decided
to have Thanksgiving dinner with
friends, while others opted for the
"pot-luck" method.
A few people decided to do
something special by inviting people
into their homes who otherwise
might have had a lonely Thanksgiv-
ing Day.
Cindy Conrad, an ECU nursing
student from Avington, Pa could
not find a ride home for the holiday
because she had a test in her
Wednesday class. She decided to
buy a turkey and ask as many peo-
ple as she could to have dinner with
her.
"I just started asking
everybody Conrad said. "I must
have asked at least 30 people
Conrad went downtown on
Wednesday night to do her
recruiting. She said she figured that
anyone downtown on the night
before Thanksgiving probably
would be staying in Greenville the
following day.
Her final dinner group ended up
to be only six people, but that didn't
stop them from finishing off a
12-pound bird. "I was really sur-
prised that that much trukey was
gone Conrad said. "Everything
got eaten up, and the cat got what
was left
She admitted to being a little ner-
vous because this was her first time
preparing a Thanksgiving dinner,
but Conrad said the venture was a
Security Office Stresses Prevention
And Names Anderson Special Officer
By STEVE DEAR
Stall Wtiicr
The Department of Public Safety has increased its
measures in crime prevention on campus this semester.
Public Safety Officer Clinton Anderson has been
assigned the additional duty of crime prevention officer.
Anderson is a 2V2 year veteran of the department.
In an interview with The East Carolinian, Anderson
stressed the best way to prevent theft is through the
utilization of locks. "People should lock their doors
even if they're gone for only a few minutes Anderson
said, "because, although their stereo, for example, may
not be stolen in those few minutes, small items with sen-
timental value or money may be stolen
Anderson said that theft of car batteries will increase
this winter. He suggests using a lock and chain to secure
the car hood and changing the locks inside the car in
order to insure maximum safety from theft. Many cars
can be unlocked using hangers, Anderson noted.
Aside from securing a lock on their bicycles, Ander-
son urges students to register their bicycle with the
Department of Public Safety. "All we ask is that you
register it with us in order to give us a chance if it is
stolen he added.
Anderson is conducting a session to instruct students
on property dentification in which he engraves a
number, usually each students driver's license number,
on the student's possessions, such as appliances, stereo
equipment, etc. He also asks that students keep their
own record of the serial numbers on their possessions.
Many stolen items can be found at pawn shops and may
be able to be returned to their owners if the serial
numbers have been recorded.
Anderson said that he has notified all the residence
halls of his lecture on property identification, yet Scott
Hall has been the only one to show an interest. Ander-
son said that only three residents of Scott dorm brought
items to him when he was there last week.
Anyone who would like more information on crime
prevention or who wishes to have his or her possessions
engraved is asked to contact Anderson at the Depart-
ment of Public Safety.
"We can prevent crime by taking away the oppor-
tunities for crime Anderson concluded.
Security sources have said that students should lock
the transom above their doorways, to prevent theft such
as that which occured at Scott dorm over the Thanksgiv-
ing break.
The Department of Public Safety also urges all
students, faculty and staff to call them if you have ques-
tions concerning crime prevention. Pamphlets are
available at the Department of Public Safety concerning
all aspects of crime and the prevention of it. The
building is located on Fifth Street across from the
Spilman building.
success and was enjoyed by all.
Laura Bollinger, formerly of Bay
Village, Ohio, and her roommate
Mary Beth Kiefer, originally from
Royal Oak, Mich both had to
work on Wednesday and couldn't
make the long drives to be home
with their families. Bollinger is a
librarian with Burroughs Welcome
and Kiefer is an occupational
therapist with Pitt County
Memorial Hospital.
They got together and decided to
cook a turkey and invite their
friends to bring the trimmings. "I
wanted to create a substitute for
family Bollinger said. "We in-
vited people who didn't have family
down here
Kiefer, who would have had a
14-hour trip by car if she went home
to Michigan, said she decided to
supply only the main dish and just
started inviting people to come
together and celebrate.
Kiefer is also a volunteer with a
treatment facility in Greenville that
helps women who are near their
release date from prison. Three of
the women living at the house had
no place to go for their Thanksgiv-
ing dinner so Kiefer and Bollinger
included them in their plans. "I
think it went really well Kiefer
said. "We had a very diversified
group.
Dr. Tom Syre, originally from
Stonybrook, N.Y and now a
departmental administrator with the
ECU's medical school in the
Department of Family Medicine,
also couldn't make it home for
turkey day. "My work does not
allow me the time to go up north
Syre said.
He got together with his brother,
Chris Syre, and their friend Ruth
Bischoff and decided it would be a
nice idea to have a dinner and invite
people who would be staying in
Greenville to come. "I thought that
some people would be lonely on a
day when people should be coming
together to celebrate and give
thanks Syre said.
Syre, who worships with the ECU
Catholic Newman Community,
started by inviting Newman
members who would not be going
home for Thanksgiving. Chris, who
is also an occupational therapist,
works at the Caswell Center, a
residential facility for the retarded
in Kinston. He decided to bring a
group of 10 of Caswell's residents to
have desert with the seven people
who had come for dinner. Bischoff,
who is a nursing administrator at
the hospital, helped with the meal
preparation.
"Institutionalized people general-
ly are lonely people � especially
around the holidays Tom Syre
said. "They tend to be a forgotten
people
According to Tom Syre, everyone
had a good time. "It was a lot of
fun he said. "We sang holiday
songs after the dinner
New York, New York
The Student Union Travel Committee sponsered a trip to the Big Apple over the Thanksgiving holiday. Over 129
students went on the annual event. Many saw this Manhattan skyline featuring the World Trade Center.
'
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 0. W2
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
It you or your organiiaTton
would like to have an em printed
m the announcement column
piease type it on an announcement
form ana send it to The East
Carolinian in care o the produc
tion managei
Announcement torms are
available at the East Carolinian
on , e in the Publications Building
Flyers ano handwritten copy on
odd s ieo paper cannot be �
cep'eo
There S ' �� J�'
nouncerm ���� tx ' H a i
ted " ' i � � I ' i '
gt ai antee ll 11 � loonce
mpr i tti ' � iv ig as yoo wani
and su99csi " ' - i 3 noT rel
s . , n this column for publicity
T "e deaane tor announcements
s nn v - �he Tuesday
p jno . n Mednesdayy tor
� � . � i. pacer no an
tments received rt'i i " 'Si
WZMB
Listen in to WZMB S contem
porary gospel show every Sunday
morning from 6 'o '0 a rn F 0
your tavor.te gospel artists '
light n up
HILLEL
tor ar
s otter
Miiiei There will be a Hanvk
?.an party on Dec 6th at 6 30
Anyone interested must call m ad
vance to make a reservation Call
Howard Upman at 752 9237 or
s �� Surker a' 752 7290 There
M be �� � arge tor Hiiiei
members and a good time should
be rtad by all � ets make mis a
gr t'tt1 sex ai!
SOCIAL WORK
AND CORRECTIONS
MAJORS
It you nave an overall GPA of 3 0
or above and a 3 2 in your Correc
tions classes, you are eligible tor
membership m Alpha Phi Sigma
our Chapter ot the National
Criminal Justice Honor Society
Don t miss our next meeting Dec
2 at i 30 p m at the Ramada inn
Fot more information, contact
Mr Weber in the Social Work ot
tice
KAPPA SIGMA
lie Brother
� trw pleC
or ades up arid
the Chr.s1 K
. II . ' -
e to re
ve the
?ady tor
a use the
Lv.ER'
ALL CAMPUS PARTY
PHI BETA LAMBDA
icio its
.s'mas
nbei i
PHI SIGMA PI
ph, Sigma Pi National Honor
t-raternity will sponsor a canned
toods drive tor the Salvation Army
on Thursday Dec 2 from 8 00
a m until 4 00 P m in tront ot the
S'udent Store Please help us to br
,ng a merner Chrismas '0 those in
need
FREE PLAY
The IHS department will otter
an opportunity tor tree play
volleyball and or Datimmton in
Mmges Coliseum on Dei. 3 and 10
torn 8 00 to 10 00 p m These dates
provide rare occasions tor tree
piay volleyball badminton ac
tivities on campus due to the busy
seouie ot activities on campus
due to the busy schedule ot ac
FRISBEE
The team plays at the bottom ot
the hill Tuesday and Thursday a'
4 00 Club meetings are Monday
nights at 8 00 in MSC room 248
AMBASSADORS
There will be a meeting ot the
ECU Ambassadors on Wednesday
December 1 it will begin a' S (K
p m m room 221 MSC Plans wil
be discussed lor our Chns'mai
protect and the induction
ceremony in Jan , 1983 We will
also be making nominations tor
Ambassador ot the Month Please
make plans to attend our last
General meeting ot 1982
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or
use a separate sheet ot paper if
you need more lines. There are 33
units per line. Each letter, punc
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end of line if word
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac
cepted over the phone. We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
75C per line or fraction of a line
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lower case letters.
tivities reflected
The equipment
will be provided
bodies and some
in our facilities
and supervision
AM you need are
interest
ZETA BETATAU
PSI CHI
u would - III
"e back to ECL1
noi.dav was e
ting! A'1 ZBT
AnL,ia like ' 9
meet in tront
� 4 j ' saa
r up m rtg
a s usst �
ALPHA EPSll-ON
DELTA
OPEN HOUSE
The Regional D � pmeni
. . ,nd rrx Rural Ed
�att s'uoe'
friends '
ur aged
1 so be a
�oen "
GYMNASTICS
The IRS department is pro
vidmg a supervised period tor
recreational tree use ot the gym
nasties room located in Memorial
Gvtn Each Tuesday and Thurs
day night from 6 30 9 00 The area
is open tor tree exerc se use ot the
� ittedareaasweliassupervis i
ano direction on some apparatus
AS.PA.
American Society ot Persona
Administration is proud to have
Dr Grossn.ckie as a speaker on
Dec 1 at 3 00 p m in Room 207
Rawi Dr Grossnickle is a
specialist m industrial
Psychology Come and get
I lers to help you m your future
ob
BAPTIST CHURCH
There is a bus route for studer's
who wish to attend Sunday service
at Sycamore Hill Baptist Church
The bus leaves the church and
goes into the campus from W 5th
S' ty Cotton Fleming, and other
dorms at 10 40 am swinging back
on 5th. going to main campus m
back ot dorms and swinging by
Belk Dorm It leaves and goes
across campus to dorms on South
Side (of campus! no later man
10 50 am. arriving at church at
11 00
C.A.D.P.
Campus Alcohol and Drug Pro
gram will meet today at 5 00 in
conference room 210. Erwm Hall
It you would like to increase your
awareness about alcohol and drug
use ano abuse please aitend the
meeting Any person with a dues
tion or problem concerning drug
and or alcohol use may call
757 6793. or stop by 'he office,
room 303. Erwm Hall, open 9 00 'o
5 00 weekdays
Krlurn
( XKOI
I ursda
puhlit aii
MIDI BOARD nffiir n�i UsT
NIW olticrl b 2 p.m Mundav twfiirr
paprr and V.rdneNd� hf'irr thurda
Job
i i I
i
PHYE
Ail students who plan to declare
physical education as a maior dur
,ng change of maior week tor the
Fall Semester, should report to
Minges Coliseum from 12 00 2 00
p m on Thursday. December 9.
tor a motor and physical fitness
test Satisfactory performance on
this test is required as a pre
requisite tor official admittance ot
the program
Any student with a medical con
d.tion that would contramdicate
participation in the testing pro
gram should contact Dr Israel at
757 6497 For more information
call 'he above number
CONCERT
On Nov 30, 1982 Student Council
for Exceptional Children will host
the Caswell Spirit Singers tor a
Chnstmas concert The concert
will begin a' 3 30 p m in
Audi'onum 244 Mendennail S'u
dent Center Everyone is invited
and welcome Come out and get
into the Christmas spirit early
PHI SIGMA
TAU
The Philosophy Club will be
hearing a presentation b Paul
R.gsbee on 'Sartre ano Ex.sten
t.ais.m on December l, at 7 00
Pm m BD313 Everyone in
terested in welcome to a"end
GAMMA BETA
PHI
Our las' mee'ing of the semes'er
will be held on Thursday, Dec 2 in
room 244 MSC at 7 00 p m Many
Subiec'S concerning Spring opera
aii be brought P St c'r '�
a"end
EL SALVADOR
Four women missionaries were
murdered in El Salvador on Dec.
2 1980 They died while serving
the poor On Thursday we will
remember them with a memorial
service a' 'he ECU Catholic
Newman Center a' 7 00 p m
Sister Htappy will be the feature
speaker ano a document abou'
Roses in December ' 'he life of
Jean Donovan, one ot the slam
a 'it a li be snow" Music will
also be performed For more in
ti.rma'ion call 752 4216
BAPTIST STUDENT
UNION
HEY1 Do you enioy friendly
fellowship, good friends and food,
and a chance to be yourself in this
"rat race" environment a' ECU
Then come 10m us a� 'he Bap'iS'
S'uden' union where we nave om
ners on Tuesdays a' 5 30 for only
SI 75 PAUSE on Thursdays a'
7 00 to allow us 'o 'ake a break
at'er an aimos' fulfilling week
and lots ot people ius' like you who
enioy others Call 752 4646 it you
have any ques'ions Bob Clyde
campus minister
SABMEETKNG
There will be a S'udent Athiet.c
Board meeting tonight a' 6 30 for
officers and 7 00 tor a other
members in MSC
CATHOLIC
NEWMAN CENTER
The Ca'hoin: Newman Cen'er
would like 'o invite everyone '
lom .n wi'h us tor ceiebra'mg
Mass every Sunoa in 'he Biology
Lec'ure Han starting a' 12 30 ano
every Wednesday a' 5 00 a' 'he
Catholic Newman Center loca'ed
down a' me bo"om ot Cc iege Mill
BAKE SALE
pi- Alpha Tne-a w sp-
Bake sale on Wedm
December l from 9 Man I . "
p m in Brews r
wiches. cake! - - brownie!
cheese cake and �
good ���
suppor me ms' � . ��
ECCEA
ECU - � �
Ass-
.
at 4 00 i ' - �'�
plant- .
a"e"t
feres I pi
FALLGRADUATES
Re - � . � �
ac g � " '
Store Eas'
Oet '�
� . . . .
to keep c �
tee "as oeer .
� '
tee pays tor y �- - �'
� � . � s
I he Im�n1 aroliman

Subscription Rate S-
The E- ' O'Cimur
�I- Wave m IM O.0
Bu.id.ng on 'h. campus .� EC
Gree�vIK C
HAVE A PROBLEM'
NEED INFORMATION'
1
Mait
REAL Crisis Intervention
24 HOUR SERVICE
ABORTIONS
1 24 week terminations
App'ts. Made 7 Days
CALLTOLL FREE
1-800-321 0575
Gl Camouflaged Fatigues and
T Shirts Sleeping Bags
Backpacks Camping Eguip
mem Steel Toed Shoes Dishes
and Over T0C Different New and
Used Items Cowboy Boots
S36 9S
ARMY-NAVY
STORE
lsois e.o"
St'cet
The Girts Students, Faculty, Families
And Friends will all enjoy!
Praised by all reviews and readers!
The Hell You Say
B) Charles Edwards(ECTC '35)
Best quality hardback Illustrated
Autographed Available at Student Store and
Book Barn U2.5)�r (1395) Mailed
anywhere from:
Old Sparta Press Box 6363, Raliegh NC
27628 Third printing in first year!
Fun stones including ECTC ECC & ECU
and others you'll know or wish you had.
Pepsi and the Pirates
a winning combination
758 HELP
31 2 E 10th Street
Greenville. N.C 27834
beI beef buy
in gr cc nu ilk!
22 ounce draft 85C, refill 50C keep the cup
Wednesday night is conege ' jht at the �
After your first beer at regular price each 22 ounce Sar i �
Game Cup ot araft is only 50c Get your friends and
the Sanawich Game-the best peer bu, he spest gan
ana finest sandwiches in town
264 Bypass Behina Ramaaa Inn
South Park Shopnmg Center �Greenville



Qmtra
i
- Hi -
QUALIT
SHOE REPAl
1
Mini Kl V
Tar Landing Seafood
Restaurant
105 Airport Road Greenville, N.C
ALL YOU
CAN EAT
Tues Wed & Thurs.
Shrimp
Oysters
Flounder
Trout
Only
Served with French Fries or Baked Potato. Cole Slaw and Hushpuppies
Regular
Hours
Sunday thru Thui&day
Friday and Saturday
105 Airport Road Greenville. N.C.
758-0327
Bob Herring, Manager wishes to invite everyor ! out to enjoy a line
Seatood Dinner Hell be in the Greenville Restaurant Irom now
on. So come by and say Hello
ssssssssssssssssssssssmsms
Banquet Facilities Available 7&0"UOfc I
Bob Herring, Manager
GREAT GIFT IDEAS
V�fc?reek Jerseys are great
Christmas gifts tor your favorite guy
or gal.
This season get your jerseys at
H.L. Hodges Bonds Sporting
Goods. We have a large selection ot
jerseys in every color imaginable.
FAS
Or Combination of Any 2
Tuesday November 30 through Saturday
December 4 we are offering free lettering
with the purchase of a jersey at s10.95
11 00 AM � 9:00 P M
11 00 AM to 10 OOP M
FREE LETTERING
w purchase of greek jersey
at MO95
BRING THISCOUPON
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 30, IS2
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Job Prospects For Grads Worst In Decades
ITHACA, NY.
(CPS) - "It really
looks bleak and scary
says Dawn Levine, a
senior at Cornell. "I
live with six other girls,
and our parents are
always sending us ar-
ticles about how still
the job market is these
days
All of them �
Levine, her roomates,
their parents � aren't
moaning without
cause. This year's col-
lege grads are chasing
the fewest job pro-
spects any college class
has had For decades, a
ariety oi observers
sa.
There will be fewer
jbs this year than last
tor engineering,
business and liberal arts
grads. according to the
College Placement
Council, a trade group
of campus employment
counselors.
Michigan State's an-
nual survey of some
(00 employers found
businesses will pro-
bably hire 17 percent
fewer grads than they
did last war.
And while they sa
they'll be paying the
average new employee
2.8 percent more than
they gave those from
the Class of 1982, "the
real dollars earned by
the Class of 1983 will
be less than the Class of
1982 says John
Shingleton, MSU's
placement director.
Northwestern's an-
nual hndicott Report is
not yet ready for
publication, but NU
counselor Victor Lind-
quist says the student
job market is the worst
it's been "in 25 years
The CPC's Judith
OTIynn Kayer says she
hasn't seen this kind of
tightening in the job
market since 1ST5, in
the wake ot the Arab
oil embargo.
There aren't many
bright spots. Federal
government hiring �
traditionally a major
consumer ot liberal arts
grads � "is flatter than
a pancake Shingleton
says.
The CPC found a
12-percent drop m de-
mand tor engineers,
and a tour-percent
drop in demand for
business majors.
Northwestern's Lin-
dquist notes, "the in-
dustries that are re-
maining strong (in
recruiting college
grads) are beneficiaries
of defense contracts
particularly companies
dealing in "militarized
electronics
But some
"militarized" com-
panies don't agree.
"Projections for high
tech (hiring on campus)
appear to be pretty
flat says Rod Hanks,
manager of salaried
personnel at I ockheed
in Burbank, Calif.
"My requirements
are down 25 percent
adds John Kubeyka.
employment manager
of Sperry-Univac in
Blue Bell, Pa. "1 don't
anticipate any
change
Gail Marshall of
United Technologies'
personnel office says
decentralization makes
it hard to gauge her
tirm's recruiting efforts
this year, but she does
volunteer that "it is
definitely not a good
time to be a graduate
out on the street look-
ing for a job
I have seen increases
in two areas: the
number of students
walking into the office,
and their level of anxie-
ty says Thomas
Devlin, Cornell's place-
ment director.
Student traffic at
placement centers
around the country
does seem to be up this
year. A fifth of Los
Angeles City College's
student body has used
the school's placement
office since September,
says Student Personnel
Office Coordinator
Jose Ruiz.
There are also more
students at St. Louis
University's placement
office, where counselor
Dr. Susan Dayringer
notices "an interesting
change in the type of
person we are seeing.
About 25 percent are
alumni
Her office has helped
people who graduated
20-to-30 years ago, she
says.
Currently-enrolled
students, moreover, are
coming in with lowered
expectation.
Students last year
came in concerned with
salaries, says University
Martyrs Remembered
ECU Catholic Cam-
pus minister Sister
Helen Shondell will be
the featured speaker
Thursda night at a
memorial service tor
four Catholic chur-
ch women who were
murdered in HI
Salvador two vearv
ago.
Three o t the
murdered women were
Catholic nuns and the
fourth. Jean Donavan.
was a lav social worker.
All ton r � ere
Americans doing mis-
sipnar) - work in the
Central American na-
tion.
Sister Shondell told
I he Last Carolinian
that the memorial ser-
vice was being held "to
remember people w ho
have given their lives
unselfish!) and (who
have) been devoted to
the poor for the sake of
the Gospel
I he serv ice will begin
at 7 p.m. at the
Catholic Newman
Center. A musical
group will also be per-
forming and a tehv ision
documentary about the
lite and death of
Donavan v ill be
shown.
Jean Donavan was a
young woman from a
wealths background
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who refused to leave El
Salvador even alter the
continuous urgings of
her triends and family,
Shondell said.
Shondell praised the
women tor their lone
term missionary work
and devotion to t he-
poor people of Central
America. "That was
their life, to brine the
message ol Christ to
the people Shondell
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The other three
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of South Carolina
Director of Student
Services Len Maiden.
"Now the interest is
whether there is a job
out there
Cornell student
Levine, who works at
her campus placement
office, recalls last
year's engineering
students bragging
about the number of
job offers they'd gotten
even before beginning
the formal interviewing
process.
"Now they come in
discouraged
There are exceptions.
A recruiter at two-year
Georgia Southwestern
College had trouble fin-
ding students to inter-
view during a recruiting
visit the week before
Thanksgiving, com-
plains a college ad-
ministrator.
The administrator,
who asked not to be
named, expects "some
students may go to the
Houston and Dallas
area" to look for work
when the term is over.
Cornell students are
"saying I would go
anywhere Levine
reports. Insisting on
finding a job in-state
last year, now they're
willing to go to
"Washington, Califor-
nia, the cities in the
west
About the only
"confident" Cor-
nellians are computer
science majors, she
says.
Indeed, most
counselors do think
computer science ma-
jors are among the
more fortunate grads
this year. The only area
the CPC predicted an
increase in hiring was in
science, math and
technical jobs.
"The industries that
are showing the best
opportunities
Michigan State's
Shingleton says, "are
the hospitality and
computer industries
"Accounting will
hold up pretty well
he also predicts.
"This is a great time
for math and science
majors concurs
South Carolina's
Maiden.
At the State Univer-
sity of New York-
Albany, computer
science is the lone
bright spot, says Mary
Ellen Stewart, career
planning director.
Even amid the
gloom, Shingleton ad-
vises, "Keep in mind
that most college
graduates will have
jobs by graduation
time He predicts 17
percent of this year's
seniors will fail to get
jobs by the time they
graduate, compared to
an average of 13-to-16
percent over the last
five vears.
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THF KMMv"l IMAS
'


Qllie East Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller. cwM�.wr
Mike Hughes, ManaimtEditor
WAVERLY MERRITT, D.retor oj Advrnis.n, ClNDY PLEASANTS, Sporu Editor
Robert Rucks, m Greg Rideout. ,��,��
Ali Afrashteh, cm Manager Steve Bachner. ����.�&���
Stephanie Groon, c-rrwawnM Juliana Fahrbach, j�,��
Chip Gideons, rftn,�jsurul)r Mike Davis, i��.� wM�,r
November 30, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Klan Rally
Canceled Event Incites Violence
It would be difficult to assess the
"rights" and "wrongs" of Satur-
day's violent anti-Klan demonstra-
tions in Washington without at least
appearing to take sides. Perhaps,
then, it would be beneficial to call to
mind the faults � the tremendous
faults � of both parties, not to
mention the inherent similarities
between the two.
Since its inception, the Ku Klux
Klan has become this country's
foremost organization of terrorism.
Deny it as we may, terrorists � the
caliber of those so common in the
Middle East and Europe � are at
work here in the United States.
They serve no constructive purpose
whatsoever, be it civil, "religious
fraternal or otherwise.
Although their infamous cross
burnings have dwindled somewhat
in recent years (insofar as numbers
of incidents), the organization is
still very much at large, attempting
in its own fascist way to impose a
virtual Nazi state on the fundamen-
tal freedoms of America.
And if certain members of our
various legislative bodies had their
way, they would, without a doubt,
pursue immediate and eternal bann-
ing of the Ku Klux Klan.
But, once again, this brings about
the incredible ethical dilemma
which has plagued the courts and
ideologies of this country for
decades. Are not those who would
ban the Klan guilty of the same
freedom infractions as the KKK
itself? Are they not attempting � in
the same way � to impose their
biased morals on others who do not
necessarily choose to live by them?
Disagree as we may with the
ideals and practices of groups like
the Klan, we must understand that
if freedom is to be realized as a tenet
of the United States, then it must be
untainted, unrestrained freedom for
everyone, regardless of race, creed,
color or "moral conviction
However, no written word � let
alone an editorial in a small college
newspaper � will ever prompt an
organization like the KKK to see the
proverbial light, to "turn over a
new leaf as it were.
Racial bigotry and hatred are in-
ward emotions, not mere political
ideolgies that are subject to fluc-
tuate with the changing whims of
constituents. And it is impossible �
legally or physically � to curb that
inborn hatred.
But certain civil measures could
and should be taken in this racial
dilemma. In the past, KKK crimes
have been largely overlooked by
legal authorities. Although the
front-page crimes of the 60s
(lynchings and the like) have been
considerably quelled, the organiza-
tion is still responsible for hundreds
of greater or lesser crimes. Never-
theless, convictions among Klan
members are extremely rare.
Idealistically though, it would seem
the entire membership of the KKK
could be convicted of guilt by
association.
But by the same token, the anti-
Klan demonstrators who rioted the
streets of Washington Saturday are
only widening the gap of understan-
ding.
Frustrated by the fact that a face-
to-face confrontation with the Klan
was made impossible, the
demonstrators proceeded to lay
seige to downtown D.C smashing
vehicles and store windows and
looting everything in sight. And
what good did it do? Did the subse-
quent clash with police officers get
their "point" across?
No, it did not. If anything, their
anti-establishment demonstration
only increased the tensions between
the two extremes.
If, indeed, there is an organiza-
tion that is simply wrong, the Ku
Klux Klan is it. All moral and
ethical considerations aside �
although they are by no means
separable � the KKK poses a
serious threat to freedom in the
United States. Pure and simple, the
Klan is wrong.
But when a group vehemently op-
posed to the moral and legal biases
of the KKK succumbs to the same
violent demonstrations, then they
have surely assumed some of the
blame themselves.
rCampus Forum
Student Misunderstands
"Idealistic Do-Gooders'
In response to Gordon Ipock's letter
of Nov. 23, I would like to correct some
misconceptions about the "flawed
reasoning of the idealistic do-gooders"
concerning "the world hunger causes
they champion on our campus
I must agree with him when he says
that "to continuously supply food to a
nation that does not have the resources
to feed its people is a disservice and only
exacerbates the nation's plight As a
Chinese proverb says:
Give a man a fish,
and you feed him J or a day.
Teach him to fish,
and you Jeed him for a lifetime
There are many organizations that do
more than "just" give food; many of
them teach people "to fish The
ECUGreenville Hunger Coalition often
works in conjunction with one such
organization, Oxfam America.
Oxfam America is a non-profit, inter-
national agency which funds self-help
development programs in Asb, Africa
and Latin America. People are sup-
ported in their efforts to grow more
food, raise community health standards
and learn new economic skills through
the funding of local, grassroots groups.
In Gujurat, India, for example, cooper-
tative dairies have been set up for village
women. In other areas stricken by
drought, solar-powered water pumps
produce clean drinking water. These
projects do not end when Oxfam leaves
but continue to reduce hunger and
poverty.
I would be glad to let you borrow my
"rose-tinted glasses Mr. Ipock, so
that you too can "take a look at the
world in the bright light of reality Or
if you prefer, you are most welcome to
come to our Hunger Coalition meetings
yourself. We'd be happy to have your
help in our fight against hunger.
Mary Rider
Senior, Computer Science
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted.
Researching The Lusty Dik-Dik
Golden Fleece A wards
I guess it all started the other day. 1 turn-
ed on the TV and switched it to Mutual of
Omaha s Wild Kingdom, and standing
there with a dumb look on his face was
Marlin Perkins with his trusty assistant
Jim knee deep in East African mud (the
worst kind because you're never really sure
what's in it), trying desperately to bind and
gag an unwilling female dik-dik.
After about 10 minutes of non-stop
fighting, snaring and name-calling, an ex-
hausted and mud-entrenched Jim stands
up and smiles for the camera.
"We got her Marlin drones proudly,
holding up a reeling burlap sack and an
elephant tranquilizer gun. "She was a
tough one, but we got her
Something about that bugged me,
though. I mean, here are two full-grown
men, both laden with more tranquilizing
hardware than the late, great John Belushi,
and they're both incredibly proud because
they've conquered such a devastating
40-pound animal.
Marlin tried repeatedly to explain that
the capture was a necessary step in the ad-
vancement of his federally-funded research
on the "mid-autumnal mating habits and
practices of the female dik-dik but I for
one failed to see the justification. After all,
does anyone really, honestly care whether
or not the dik-dik is relatively dormant
(sexually speaking, of course) in
November?
And you know, that got me to thinking;
most of us Americans would probably be
pretty shocked to find out just where our
money goes each year. So, as a service to
you, ECU's elite, I did a little homework
and came upon a few other research pro-
jects which our government, in its infinite
wisdom, has funded heavily in past years.
In March 1975, Senator William Prox-
mire of Wisconsin instituted a monthly
Golden Fleece Award to be given to
the biggest, most ridiculous or most ironic
example of government spending or
waste A selection of the proud winners
follows:
Mike Hughes
Just The M av It Is
In 1976, the Federal Aviation Ad-
ministration was bequeathed the outstan-
ding honor for allocating $57,800 to a
research group to study the body
measurements of American Airline
stewardesses and trainees. Not only the old
standards � bust, waist and hips � were
calculated, but 76 other measurements �
including the skinfold of the posterior calf,
length of the buttocks and height of the
nose. Researchers said the study was
designed to aid in the production of safety
equipment. (Presumably, the airlines will
now be manufacturing breast belts and
buttock holders as new "precautions)
In another infamous case, the Law En-
forcement Assistance Administration
spent nearly, 127,000 oi tax-payers' money
to determine exact!) why inmates vsan;
escape trom prison. I wonder wnat
Washington Ph.D. dreamed that one
(No doubt the same one guy who request
550.(XX) to pertorm the ultimate studv
ringworm migration in sterile cattle.)
Another award was presented in the
70s to the National Institute tor Mc:
Health for their tunding S9()00 tor a
study ol behavior and social relationships
in a Peruvian brothel.
Naturally, since thev wanted a c
prehensive and in-depth study � God tor
bid thev should miss a trick � thev seni
their ace researchers. Marlin Perkins ana
Jim, to South America with plenty ot
llamas. Juicy Fruil gum and Boxcar Willie
records to trade tor "services rendered
It they absolutely have to spend their
money on research, then why not at least
spend it on something useful, like maybe
finding out the respective underwear sizes
of all the members of the British royal
family (something I've always wanted to
know) or perhaps a study on the mating
practices ot U.S. congressmen. I'm sure
Marlin and Jim would be more than will-
ing.
Editor's Sole: Mike Hughes is a licensed
chick sexerfrom Hog Stench. N.C where
his ma and pa own the general store. He
sometimes wonders what the hell the
cameraman does while Marlin Perkins and
Jim are wrestling with anir yaks.
Reagan Crumbling Under Pressure
Bv PAT O'NEILL
Well, it finally happened: President
Reagan and Defense Secretary Weinberger
� after exhausting their supply of idiotic
suggestions on why we need to build even
more nuclear weapons to maintain our
security � are now implying that pro-
ponents of a bi-lateral nuclear freeze are
really puppets of the Soviet Union.
Surely these are the cues of desperate
men, men who have lost their ability to
reason in logical terms. These are the same
men who have brought us words like
"winable, limited and protracted" when
they refer to nuclear war. No longer do
they speak in hushed voices of the war that
will never be fought. Instead, they pro-
claim loudly the importance of both
fighting and winning such a war.
Their planners tell them that 20,000,000
Americans dead would be a victory. And
now a new report, called Defense
Guidance, tells us that perhaps 31 nations
will have nuclear weapons capability by the
year 2000. The report goes on to warn
Weinberger that "as nuclear capabilities
spread, additional measures will be re-
quired to protect U.S. forces and in-
terests
Defense Guidance suggests that the U.S.
begin to bolster its "small" tactical nuclear
forces so that we will be prepared to
engage in nuclear battles with nations
other than the Soviet Union.
I disagree with this suggestion � 1 don't
want my country to consider nuclear war
as an option under any circumstances �
and I can assure you, I am not a fan o the
Soviet Union either.
Use of nuclear weapons is not a viable
option, and I don't appreciate it when the
leaders of my country try to peg as subver-
sives or puppets all the clear-thinking
Americans who see the madness of their
plans.
These "leaders" are narrow, desperate
and dangerous. Their counterparts in the
Kremlin are just as unstable. People
throughout the world must stick together
and keep the pressure on if we really want
peace.
Demonstrators Spoil Holiday Turkey
By STEVE DEAR
Thanksgiving has always been one of my
favorite times of year � what with the
turkey and all the extras, the family back
home (yes, some people still enjoy family
reunions), football games, Macy's
Thanksgiving Parade on TV and all sorts
of good, clean fun.
Yet, my Thanksgiving vacation was
marked by a particularly annoying event
this year. I live around Washington, D.C
a town which has seen many violent
demonstrations in its relatively short
history. The events of last Saturday make a
case in point.
I was going to go look at the new Viet-
nam Veterans' Memorial and play football
on the Mall in front of the White House on
Saturday. That is, before I saw the
superintendent of the D.C. Police Depart-
ment on television urging people to stay
away from downtown on Saturday.
You see, the three major branches of the
Ku Klux Klan planned to march through a
section of the city, and although only
about two dozen Klan members actually
showed up, the anti-Klan protestors were
in full force.
Of course, both groups have the right to
"peaceably assemble guaranteed by the
Constitution. But peaceably assemble the
anti-Klan demonstrators did not.
In fact, the KKK only showed up for a
few minutes before the police secretly bus-
ed them away. Had the police not done so,
the Klan members would have met
thousands of very angry people, many
armed with bricks and bottles. (My bet is
some of those Klan members aren't as op-
posed to busing as they once were!)
Those thousands of people were not
about to go home and eat their turkey lef-
tovers (if, indeed, they had any turkey to
begin with) once they realized the Klan
wasn't going to show. Instead, they
unanymously decided to throw the bricks
and bottles at the police and at store win-
dows. Many of them had the nerve to loot
stores.
Why in the world should they have been
angry? Just because Washington's popula
tion is 70 percent black, and teenage
unemployment among blacks is 59 per-
cent? Just because the KKK decided to
protest in the streets on which many of the
people grew up?
And what possible reason could thev
have for chanting "We want the KKK and
Reagan out of Washington?" It just
doesn't make sense.
Anyway, those people sure do know
how to put a damper on a good vacation.
Grou
54
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Ho� Stair �no '�
A Durham man, who
led a church group on a
fact-finding mission to
Guatemala, claims that
the human rights situa-
tion has not improved
in the Cent
American country and
accuses the United
States and Israel of
aiding the continued
violence in Guatemala.
"The IS govern-
ment continues to pro-
vide some military
equipment and training
to the Guatemalan
military aespe a I
m a i c j:
Pot Li
Bv EMIL1w:

Earlier this seme
the Student H.
Center reported
several case ol j
disease as
Salmonella ha
peared among fcC I
students.
.cording to rep
trom the Student
Health Centei
j some spex .
raised thai the i
oi the disease n
been related to :e use
of contamma
juana.
Mosco
Bv KMII1 BRII 1 MN
The
General o 1 n a
claimed Thurc:
Moscow & aid
peace and
freeze novetnei
S e c r e t a r v Jos
L urns, citing
telhgence
�"The Soviet Utmam na-
aided and abetted the
nuclear freeze anj
peace movement
The statement was
made during a I on
meeting ot the N
Atlantic Ass n i
Lums stated thai
movements were b
used as a vehicle tor the
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Bruce Springsteen Billy J
Rush R'v
Tone Basil Dan F-j
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IHEEAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 30, 1982
S
ne
want to
vhat
nt up.
i letted
id) on
i� late
Mental
'or a
hips
: for-
. ent

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i aybe
u
royal
� .� -tnted to
n the mating
len. I'm sure
an uiil-
th
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i � 1 don't
ar ar
lances �
ot the
' a Mahle
ien the
ubver-
ir-thinking
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THE NOBEL
tl PRIZE
IMITTEE
iVWAKTIT
J�0-
Group Says U.S. Aids Guatemalan Violence
From Staff �nd Wire Reports
A Durham man, who
led a church group on a
fact-finding mission to
Guatemala, claims that
the human rights situa-
tion has not improved
in the Central
American country and
accuses the United
States and Israel of
aiding the continued
violence in Guatemala.
"The U.S. govern-
ment continues to pro-
vide some military
equipment and training
to the Guatemalan
military despite a for-
mal cut of such
assistance in 1976
said Joseph Moran,
who acted as logistical
advisor to a National
Council of Churches
delegation that visited
Guatemala two weeks
ago.
Moran was chosen
for his knowledge of
the country. He spent
four years there as an
employee of the Agen-
cy for International
Development.
The NCC was invited
into Guatemala at the
invitation of President
Efrain Rios Montt,
who told the group to
come see for themselves
if human rights' viola-
tions were still occurr-
ing.
According to a pro-
mise the church delega-
tion made to Rios
Montt, it was agreed
that none of the data
collected by the group
be made public until a
copy was first supplied
to his office.
The final report,
which was released last
week by the
Washington, D.C of-
fice of the NCC, cited a
dozen findings which
they claimed were bas-
ed on about 40 inter-
views they conducted
with individuals and
groups. The report said
Guatemala showed vir-
tually no improvement
in human rights.
This information
runs counter to recent
claims by the Reagan
administration that the
situation has improved.
According to State
Department reports
released last week, the
Reagan administration
is at present consider-
ing the re-establishment
of some military aid to
Guatemala cut by
President Carter in
1976 because of human
rights violations.
The NCC report ac-
cuses the Guatemalan
government of "gross
and consistent viola-
tions of human rights
and claims the
Guatemalan army car-
ries out "extrajudicial
killings of men it iden-
tifies as supporters of
the guerrillas, using
hooded informers, fre-
quently in the presence
of families and
neighbors of the vic-
tims
An official at the
Guatemalan Embassy
in Washington, D.C
said that no official
response was available
Pot Linked To Campus Disease
now, but that one
would be forthcoming.
Spokesperson Fran-
cisco Villagran, a
political counselor at
the Embassy, personal-
ly praised the NCC
report.
"I think the report is
extremely accurate
Villagran said. "I
couldn't deny any of
the charges that have
been made
The report further
claims: "The army of
Guatemala uses terror
and torture, selecting
people, sometimes at
random, to be tortured
and killed, often
publicly, as an example
of what will happen to
those who support or
join the guerrillas
Moran claimed that
civilians were being
forced by the army to
join civil patrols and
that army officers
responsible for "gross
violations of human
rights" under the
previous government of
Lucas Garcia have not
yet been brought to
trial. A captain in the
Guatemalan army told
Moran that "a govern-
ment can change its
face, but the army re-
mains the same
The report also
charges that "the
government of Israel
appears to be playing
an important role in the
support of the
Guatemalan military,
providing training and
material critical for
waging a counter-
insurgency war and
that "most Roman
Catholic clergy and
religious workers are
still suspected of being
in sympathy with anti-
government elements
Moran said his group
found no evidence that
Cubans were involved
in the fighting and that
no Cubans had ever
been found among the
dead or captured guer-
rillas.
The NCC called on
the Guatemalan
government to establish
an unbiased human
rights commission,
perhaps from the
United Nations, to
monitor the situation
there. They also called
on the U.S. and Cana-
dian governments to
begin a complete
moritorium on both
military and
developmental aid go-
ing to Guatemala.
"We're saying 'cut
off military aid' and
where it's already been
cut, honor that
moritorium
scrupulously and in-
definitely Moran
said.
Moran claimed that
many of the NCC inter-
views were conducted
in civilian areas con-
trolled by the
Guatemalan army, yet
the residents were still
willing to speak out
against them. "That
would seem to me to be
a very high risk thing to
do Moran said.
By EMILY CASEY
Siatt Wntet
Earlier this semestff
the Student Health
Center reported that
several cases of a rare
disease known as
Salmonella had ap-
peared among ECU
students.
According to reports
from the Student
Health Center, there
was some speculation
raised that the outbreak
ot the disease may have
been related to the use
of contaminated mari-
juana.
While only four
"documented cases" of
Salmonella were
reported among ECU
students, there were
"significant out-
breaks" of the disease
in other states.
Jolene Jernigan, a
family nurse practi-
tioner with the Health
Center, claims that
although no further
cases of Salmonella
have been reported on
campus in recent
weeks, students should
still be cautious.
Jernigan said that
although there has not
been an absolute
positive connection
drawn between the use
of marijuana and the
occurance of the
disease among the ECU
students, the link had
been made in other
areas where Salmonella
appeared.
She noted that mari-
juana contaminated
could possibly occur
when untreated manure
is used as a fertilizer on
ihe marijuana plants or
through accidental con-
tamination during the
drying and storage pro-
cess.
"I would still be kind
of cautious. My best
advice is to tell people
to stay away from it
(marijuana) complete-
ly, but people are not
going to do that
Jernigan said that
one of the major pro-
blems with the use of
marijuana is that there
is no way the user can
tell where the mari-
juana originally came
from.
Exposure to
Salmonella will usually
cause a sudden infec-
tious reactions within
eight to 48 hours after
the person ingests the
bacteria from a con-
taminated source.
Jernigan noted that
students should be
aware of the symptoms
of the disease and that
if they have "a real bad
case of diarrhea,
vomiting, fever, chills,
or abdominal cramp-
ing" they should report
immediately to the Stu-
dent Health Center for
an examination.
Law Grad Faces Full Board
To Appeal For Bar A dmission
UNC � Chapel Hill Law School graduate
Alex Charns will be going before the full
11-member N.C. Board of Law Examiners this
Wednesday for his final "non-legal" appeal to
the group for admission to the N.C. Bar
Association.
Charns, 26, was denied entry to the bar early
last month by a three member morals panel
which concluded that Charns didn't possess the
"character and general fitness requisite for an
attorney
Although the panel would not specify its
reasons for denying Charns, it was believed that
his arrest during a non-violent protest last
March was the main reason that prompted the
panel's decision.
Charns served approximately two weeks of a
90-day federal prison sentence for "impeding
traffic" at Fort Bragg last March 27 during a
demonstration protesting U.S. training of El
Salvadoran troops.
Charns, who called his initial hearing a
"moral and religious inquisition has vowed
to appeal his case all the way to the Supreme
Court if necessary.
The N.C. Board of Law Examiners is an ex-
tension of the North Carolina Bar Association.
They review all infractions of the law by at-
torneys.
Moscow 'Aids9 Peace Movement
B KEITH BRITTAIN
Miff Wriler
The Secretary
General of NATO
claimed Thursday that
Moscow is aiding the
peace and nuclear
freeze movements.
Secretary Joseph
Lums, citing in-
telligence reports said.
"The Soviet Union has
aided and abetted the
nuclear freeze and
peace movements
The statement was
made during a London
meeting of the North
Atlantic Assembly.
Lums stated that the
movements were being
used as a vehicle for the
COUPON
Soviets to destroy the
West.
ECU political science
professor Edwin Grif-
fith said he felt the
NATO chief had no
reason to lie. "With
available intelligence to
Mr. Lums I'm sure he
know's what he's talk-
ing about he said.
fcduh Webber of the
Greenville Peace Com-
mute stated, "I believe
they probably are en-
volved in it; I wish our
government was
A statement similar
to Lums' was made by
President Reagan
earlier in the week. The
president made
reference to a nuclear
freeze demonstration in
Washington, D.C.
"The demonstration
was infiltrated and pro-
bably planned by
Soviet agents Reagan
said.
The NATO and
presidential statements
preceded the presi-
dent's decision on the
basing of the MX mis-
sle. Whitehouse sources
said the intelligence
reports have been
released to help public
support for the missle.
Ihe Pentagon
believes that the MX
missle is needed to add
support to the aging
minuteman missies.
They claim Russia has
developed newer
missies that have more
warheads and are more
accurate than the
minutemen.
Proponents also
believe that the missle is
vital to the U.S.
"three-legged" defense
system. Opponents
believe that two legs,
being nuclear sub-
marines and bombers,
are sufficient.
Another worry to the
Whitehouse is that
defeat of the MX
would signal disarray
to European allies.
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Jerry Garcia
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Men At Work Linda Rondstadt
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Little River Band Kiss
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Tone Basil Dan Fogelberg
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CAROLINA OPRY HOUSE
pesents in concert
XVIIJi j � t ft- A i
DELBERT
McCLINTON
-� � J
with special guest- THE BILL LYLERLY BAND
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2
Advance Ticket locations:
Apple Records, Record Bar-Pitt Plaza,
Western Pleasure, Carolina Opry House
Doors Open 7:30-8:15 For Advance Ticket Holders
Come out early and try to
BEAT THE CLOCK! Can Beer Will Be 25C
till 8:15, 50C till 9:00, 75C till 9:45
For further information call 758-3943
ATTENTION
BSN CLASS OF
'83
Th Air Force has a
special program for
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you can enter active
duty soon after gradu-
ation - without waiting
for the results of your
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overall 3.0 GPA.
After commissioning,
you'll attend a five-
month internship at a
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It's an excellent way to
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you'll have as an Air
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For more information,
contact:
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PRESENTS
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$1.00 in advance $1.50 at the door
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f
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THEEASTCAROLINIAN
Entertainment
NOVEMBER �, l�2
Pdtef
Oice Again,
It's Time For
doggers Day
By MIKE HAMER
M�f��rilrr
Traditional music and dance
lovers are in for a treat this Saturday
as Greenville will celebrate its 7th
annual Green Grass Cloggers Day at
Agnes Fullilove Community School,
1600 Chestnut St. in Greenville.
Clogger day is once again being
sponsored by the Roxy Music Arts
and Crafts Center, Inc a non-
profit community arts organization.
The celebration will include after-
noon workshops covering beginning
clogging, advanced clogging, square
dance, bluegrass fiddle, western sw-
ing, traditional blues and children's
songs.
The evening concert will feature
special appearances by the World
Champion Green Grass Cloggers of
Greenville, N.C Touchstone, The
Hometown Boys, Michael Fishback
and the Bull City Ramblers, Big Boy
Henry, Walter Lyerly. and the Cane
Creek Cloggers.
The Green Grass Cloggers have
recently danced at the Brandywine
Mountain Music Festival, one of the
most widely respected dance
festivals. They also danced in
Louisville, Kentucky, for the Ken-
tucky Fried Chicken Bluegrass
Festival, and locally for the
Southern Flue Cured Tobacco
Festival. This past summer they
danced for Greenville's 4th of July
Celebration and at the Eno River
Festival in Durham, N.C.
Members of the team danced for
a world tour earlier in the summer.
They spent two weeks in New York
and Canada and four weeks in
Holland, Denmark and Sweden.
Touchstone, from Chapel Hill,
has recently released a highly ac-
claimed album entitled The Sew
Land. This is an Irish band that
mixes some lively old-timey
American mountain music with
some of it$ own source material.
The band features Triona Ni
Dhomhnail, the Donegal-born
singer who was a founding member
of the Skara Brae and the Bothy
Band. She plays clarinet and syn-
thesizer. Other members of the
group include flutist Mark Roberts,
banjo-mandolin player Claudine
Langille, and boudran player-
guitarist Zan McLeod.
Big Boy Henry is one of the hand-
ful of original blues, singers from
North Carolina who is still perform-
ing. Mr. Henry is from Beaufort,
N.C. He went to live in New York
City in the late forties and did some
recording for Bobby Shad's "Sittin'
In With" label. He was backed by
Sonny Terry and Prownie McGee
on those sessions.
Mike Fishback is a multi-
instrumentalist and music instructor
who has studied old-time banjo
under Fred Cochran and old-time
fiddle under Tommy Jarrel. He and
the Bull City Ramblers play old time
string music for dances in the
Durham area on a regular basis.
The Home Town Boys have
recently backed up bluegrass recor-
ding artist Mac Wiseman. They play
bluegrass and western swing music
and have played for Clogger Day
for several years.
Walter Lyerly is an excellent
bluegrass fiddler who has also
studied classical music at ECU's
School of Music.
The Cane Creek Cloggers are
from Chapel Hill, also. They form-
ed themselves as a group to help
preserve Cane Creek from becoming
a reservoir and have been dancing
together for three years.
Three concerts will be held at
Greenville night clubs to focus the
public's attention to Clogger Day.
Papa John Kolstad, a friend of the
Cloggers, will be playing a selection
of traditional blues, bluegrass and
old time music at the Rathskeller on
Wednesday evening, Dec. 1. Papa
John has a couple of albums to his
credit; his home is in Minneapolis,
Minnesota. "The Hometown Boys
will be performing at the
Rathskeller on Thursday evening,
See CLOGGERS, Page 7
Chapel Hill mountain music band Touchstone will perform with many other bands and artists on Green Grass Cloggers Day.
Thursday Is Opening Night
'Shadow Box' Now A Playhouse Production
The Shadow Box, the Pulitzer
Prize and Tony Award winning
Broadway hit, will be presented by
the ECU Playhouse for a series of
five performances beginning Dec. 2
and continuing through Dec. 6 at
8:15 p.m. in McGinnis Theatre.
Reviewed as "triumphant" by the
Sew York Times, "extraordinary"
byUia. Mutton�LUoJtw. and "a
magnificent evening at the theatre"
by the Xew York Daily ews, The
Shadow Box is a facinating play that
takes a penetrating look at a
,
previously "hush-hush" subject.
Playwright Michael Cnstofer has
interwoven the lives of three
separate groups of people into
parallel sequences in a hospice in the
woods of California. Here patients
live out their remaining days as part
of an experiment which allows them
to examine the meaning of life.
According to Director Cedric
Winchell, the play "attempts to
show how a tremendous amount of
warmth and love are the ingredients
of a successful life
"It's really a celebration of life, a
play about living that shows us that
time is valuable stuff he said.
"Time and love are something we
should cherish. Life is there, so why
not make it count for something? "
For this production, the large
McGinnis Theatre has been extend-
ed out over the orchestra pit,
thrusting the playing space closer to
the audience.
"This show offers an audience a
rather powerful emotional ex-
perience said Winchell. "We
didn't want to have any unused
space or barriers between the actors
and the audience to diminish that
power and intimacy. That's why
Theatrical Trio
Hazel Stapleton (foreground),
Gregory Watkins and Catherine
Rhea in a scene from The
Shadow Box.
we've exteneded the stage
The enlarged stage is not the only
visually distinctive feature of the
East Carolina Shadow Box produc-
tion. The large set, built under the
direction of Technical Director
Leonard Darbv, includes three
separate cottages within the forest.
"With our new technical support
facilities, we can produce that kind
of environment, and we have
noted Darbv
The Shadow Box is a profound a
moving play about terminally ill pa-
tients and how they live through
their own crises. It is a play meant
for mature audiences, a play that
poses some disturbing questions
about the nature and value of hope
with straight-on honesty and a great
deal of love
Playhouse General Manager Scott
Parker commented that The
Shadow Box is only the tenth play to
receive both the pulitzer prize and
the Tony Award.
Tickets are now on sale at the
Playhouse Box Office in the
Messick Theatre Arts Center at the
corner of Fifth and Eastern streets.
The box office is open each weekday
from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. For reser-
vations and further information,
telephone 757-6390.
Handling Pressure
Joel Makes Impressive Comeback
�y wo PC. SON
Bright New A rea Band Performing At A ttic Tonight
Innovative, new Greenville band Laughing Matter will be performing tonight at 9:30 in the Attic's
Phoenix Room. The band plays only original progressive rock compositions. Laughing Matter
features lead vocalist Derek Collins, guitarist John Shannon, drummer Joe Shotwell and bassist
David Garza.
By LYNN VAN MATRE
CWcatoTribaac
CHICAGO � His image � fostered by cocky album-
cover poses and several onstage verbal attacks on critics
� is perhaps pop's most pugnacious. Billy Joel knows it
only too well.
"Oh yeah, 'the obnoxious frat boy, always coming on
to the stewardess on the plane' � that's what one writer
called me Joel says amiably, in far milder tones tha
might be expected. "That one kind of irked me. I never
came on to a stewardess in my life. I hate fraternities. I
didn't even graduate from high school. What the hell
was that writer talking about? I am not like that.
Anybody who knows me will tell you I am not like
that
For those who know him only through his music and
his feisty image, Billy Joel as seen by Billy Joel may
come as somewhat of a surprise. "Shy" and "bookish"
are two of the words the 33-year-old singer comes up
with when asked to describe himself. A "cream puff"
with a low profile.
"Mv wants and needs are pretty simple, I think
says Joel, whose major indulgence is buying motor-
cycles (he has 10). "I'm not a Studio 54 guy; I don't en-
joy basking in the aura of fame or whatever you want to
call it
He thinks of himself as "funny and, indeed, he can
be. "And I place a lot of value on friendship and loyalty
and steadfastness in relationships he notes. "It really
shook me up when my marriage didn't work out. I was
one of those people who intended for that to last
forever, like with swans, but I found out that we're not
swans, we're people
As Joel tells it, he's practically a shrinking violet.
"I'm usually not this gregarious he says, "but I just
Music
had 15 cups of coffee, and yesterday I gave a lecture to a
music class at the New School in Manhattan that went
real well. You've caught me on a roll
These days, Joel is on a roll in more ways than one.
The past year held more than its share of pain, physical
and otherwise; the singer and songwriter broke his right
wrist and left thumb in a motorcycle accident and broke
up with his wife and onetime manager, Elizabeth.
The thumb "is still pretty screwed up" and Joel ad-
mits he's a bit worried about how it will affect his piano
playing on his current tour, his first in more than two
years. (He will perform at Greensboro Coliseum Mon-
day at 8 p.m.) As for the marital split, that still hurts
somewhat, too.
"It's not that we didn't work at the marriage Jod
says. "I took my wedding vows thinking this was it it��
not that we didn't try
But the past year also saw Joel do a lot of growing
judging by his new release, The ylon Curtain. Already
a best seller, it is, by far, his most ambitious and ac-
complished effort, the songs frequently reflecting what
Joel sees as "the dilemma of a generation" aged 25 to
40.
See 'CURTAIN Page 7
�.
'Curta
Continued irom Page 6
"1 don't have a wa to exp
how 1 came up with the I
says. "But when 1 was thi
the album. 1 nour it w;
very American album.
about growing up behi:
of curtain or barrier
that nylon is a verj i
material, and it stu �
While Joel, musu-
for pop baliac 'J
Wa You Are agree
effort repre enl
in terms of subject rr.
gestion that he r
meets with some i
"eli, I'm rw
was when I made Glass House
1 hope to God tha
says "As for gr i
think that you
grown up .
is something thai I
Elizabeth and I tried, but
a lot, and we never wa
a family I be
lv; I have a k
deep down.
"So 1 don
yet, but I've gi -
Anothei m
like to clear ur
image 1 never aid I wa .
just said 1 used to boa :
some o! the guys I us I j
with were kind ol wild.
cream pufl
"And I'm sur
chauvar �there
brutal Billy Joe. mad
critics are the ones �
that. Thev would -a. 'W
write that sons.
Woman" And �
must mc s Mwa
Woman
there are a .
themseKe p as
feminism. Who the he
talk tor women?
"The thing thai rea � -
maddest, though, �
would to exp lin �
me. Their exp wo
Auditions F
Of 'Custer'
Audition tor
East Carolina
Playhouse production
of Robert Ingl .
power!ui dramaiK pu
Custer will be lu
Monday and TeNja.
Dec. 6 and " i are
open to ECl students
faculty, stafl ai
member
commumtv
The auditions -
conducted n rooo 2 -
of the Messick Tlieal
Arts Center (corner
Fifth arc: East
streets), at 7:30 p.m.
each evening
The pi
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It is a play meant
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jrbing questions
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nesty and a great
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nted that The
ily the tenth play to
pulitzer prize and
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Office in the
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jopen each weekday
4 p m. t-or reser-
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gaea lecture to a
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K marriage Joel
�ng this was it. It's
a lot of growing,
(urtain. Already
imbitious and ac-
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lation" aged 25 to
'Curtain' Revenge For Billy
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 30. I9t2
Continued From Page 6
"1 don't have a way to express
how I came up with the title he
says. "But when 1 was through with
the album, I thought that it was a
very American album, and it's
about growing up behind some kind
of curtain or barrier. It struck me
that nylon is a very American
material, and it stuck
While Joel, musically best-known
for pop ballads such as "Just the
Way You Are agrees that his new
effort represents "a quantum leap"
in terms of subject matter, the sug-
gestion that he has "grown up"
meets with some resistance.
"Well, I'm two years older than I
was when I made Glass Houses, and
1 hope to God that I've grown he
says. "As for growing up, I don't
think that you're really totally
grown up until you have kids, which
is something that I want to do.
Elizabeth and I tried, but I was gone
a lot, and we never were able to start
a family. I believe in a strong fami-
ly; I have a kind of provincial streak
deep down.
"So I don't think I've grown up
yet, but I've grown
Another misconception he would
like to clear up is "that tough-guy
image. I never said I was tough. I
just said 1 used to box. I suppose
some of the guys I used to hang out
with were kind of wild, but I was a
cream puff.
"And I'm supposed to be a male
chauvanist � there's that whole
brutal Billy Joel macho thing. Male
critics are the ones who called me
that. They would say, 'Why did you
write that song, "She's Only a
Woman"?' And I would say, 'You
must mean "She's Always a
Woman ' I find it amusing that
there are a lot of males who set
themselves up as defenders of
feminism. Who the hell are they to
talk for women?
"The thing that really got me the
maddest, though, is when writers
would try to explain what motivated
me. Their explanations were ab-
solutely wrong. The tendency was to
write me off as a crass commer-
cialist that just churns out these pop
tunes to make a lot of money.
Anybody who knows me knows that
I do not do that
He especially resents being
downgraded while other groups are
praised for their motives.
"The Clash, for instance �
they're considered to be so holy in
their motivations, but I'm supposed
to be just a Tin Pan Alley churn-
smith Joel says. "Well, wait a
minute. I'm just as highly motivated
as the Clash. Maybe more so
because I don't pretend to be that
political. A lot of critics like to iden-
tify with bands that get involved in
these romantic crusades. But how
do they know that the Clash knows
so much about those things they
write songs about? Especially when
they come over here from Britain
and sing about Ho Chi Minyh. Who
the hell are they to talk about Viet-
nam? That wasn't their war, that
was our war
Joel himself tackles "our war" in
"Goodnight Saigon one of the
best cuts on The Nylon Curtain and
one about which he feels strongly.
"Before I wrote that song, I talk-
ed to a lot of friends who were in the
Vietnam War he says. "I read a
lot of books and did a lot of
research. You know that book, All
Quiet on he Western Frontl In tell-
ing the story from the soldiers' point
of view, the author made what
ultimately was a very strong anti-
war statement. The book Red Badge
of Courage was like that, too.
That's what I wanted to do in
'Goodnight Saigon It's a lot more
effective to just show the horrors of
war through the soldier's eyes than
it is to make a big political statement
like Country Joe and the Fish did,
singing 'I ain't gonna fight no
stupid war That's easy for him to
say; he didn't go
Neither did Joel. "I lied to my
draft board he says. "I was 18,
prime rib, but I disagreed with he
war politically. I didn't get caught
Auditions For New Production
Of 'Glister' Being Held Soon
Auditions for the
East Carolina
Playhouse production
of Robert lngham's
powerful dramatic play
Custer will be held
Monday and Tuesday,
Dec. 6 and 7 and are
open to ECU students,
faculty, staff and
members of the local
community.
The auditions will be
conducted in room 206
of the Messick Theatre
Arts Center (corner of
Fifth and Eastern
streets), at 7:30 p.m.
each evening.
The production
scheduled for Feb.
17-22 in McGinnis
Theatre will mark the
North Carolina
premiere of Custer. It is
a memory play that
takes place in limbo
after Custer's Last
Stand.
The principal
characters all recount
their versions of the
events on that fateful
day. What really hap-
pened? Who was to
blame for the
massacre? Why did
General Custer's 200
men apparently do so
little fighting?
There are principal
roles for three men and
one woman. Also need-
ed is an ensemble of
men and women for the
secondary roles and a
singing chorus. Direc-
tor Edgar Loesin is
especially interested in
folk singers who play
guitar, banjo, or har-
monica.
Custer scripts are
available in the ECU
Joyner Library reserve
room. For further in-
formation, call
757-6390.
STROWS
presents
THE PHANTOM
FORECASTER
WIN s100 Beat the Phantom
Forecaster Contest
Details in Dec. 7th issue of
PHANTOM FORECASTER
Overtoil's
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AccuCopy
j.Bs�lsland Seafood
Varsity Barber Shop
Sandwich Game
Arcade Variety ft Grill
Sammy's Country Cooking
Piiia Transit Authority
Sharp's Formal Wear
Hodges
Bonds
Archie's Steaks
Pantana Bobs
Subway
Nautilus
USE.
Tree House
Mr. Gattl's
Arcade Variety
Krispy Kreme
Tinder Box
Sharpe's
up in the peace movement, though.
To me that smacked of elitism �
the college kids going out and pro-
testing while the working-class kids
who didn't have the money for col-
lege or a shrink or a lawyer to get
them out of being drafted had to go
and fight. Besides that, I tried being
a hippie for a year, and I was a
dismal failure at it. Anyway, I told
the draft board that I was suppor-
ting my family and got a temporary
deferment that way.
"Then, when I was 19, the draft
board burned down. A lot of the
files got burned, but mine didn't It
just got all crispy around the edges.
I remember, when they pulled it out,
I thought, 'Oh, man, I just missed
having my file burned up I could
have just disappeared.After that, I
got classified 1-A, 1 started thinking
about going to Canada or going to
jail. But then they instituted the lot-
tery. Believe it or not, I was No. 197
and they stopped at No. 1. It was
great for me, but it was so arbitrary.
Guys lived and died on the basis of
when their names were pulled out of
a hat.
"There's a lot of guilt that guys
my age still have to deal with about
all that. And there is a feeling of
guilt if you didn't go, because your
friends went and some of them died.
They were fed the pap and they
believed it
Another new song Joel feels
strongly about is "Surprises
which � although there is nothing
in the lyrics to indicate it � was
triggered by his motorcycle accident
last spring and is one of the few
strictly autobiographical songs on
the album.
"That accident affected my
outlook on life says Joel, who hit
the brakes on his Harley-Davidson
to avoid a car that had run a red
light. "I knew what was going
though my mind consciously when it
happened. I was thinking, 'Wow,
I'm flying through the airLet's see
if I can get up But I was interested
in what was going on subconscious-
ly, too, so I really pressed myself
one night, and this one came out in
a kind of stream-of-consciousness
way. I'm still not sure what all the
references mean, but it's an in-
teresting form of writing for me
The commercial and critical suc-
cess of The Nylon Curtain is all the
sweeter after the reception accorded
Joel's last release, a live album of
older songs that sold poorly com-
pared with some of his other
albums.
"The record company wanted an
album with a lot of songs on it that
could be hit singles, and I didn't
want to do that he says. "The
album ended up selling around a
million and a half, but compared
with The Stranger, which sold 5
million, it was a bomb. So people
figured I was on my way out.
"You know, there's an expecta-
tion in this business that you've got
a five-year span and then you've got
nothing to say anymore. It's like
after that you're expendable. I don't
believe that. There are a lot of
singers and songwriters who could
be around for a long time. May be
we won't be doing pubescent pop
music aimed at pubescent masculine
ritual types who want to bang their
heads against the wall � we've got-
ten more sophisticated � but that
doesn't mean we should be written
off.
"I think there is a certain amount
of bitterness on the part of younger
groups toward artists like myself.
They think of me as middle-of-the-
road. I don't think I'm MOR, but
they do. And they look at me like
it's my fault that I'm dominating
the radio airplay. I sympathize with
them. I say, hey, go ahead, knock
me off � if you can do it. But you'd
better be better than me. And you'd
better have some substance behind
your music to back it up.
"A lot of new groups want
everything at once, without growing
into it. There's not a whole lot of
places for them to learn their craft,
maybe, but it's not something you
learn overnight. It takes years and
years of working at your music to
make it become something special.
But that's something that people
have to learn the hard way, I
guess
Cloggers
Continued From Page 6
and Touchstone will play at the New
Deli on Friday evening.
Admission price will be $5 for the
entire day's activities. Senior
citizens and children under twelve
will be admitted free. The afternoon
workshops wil begin at noon and
the evening concert will begin at 8
p.m.
I have attended Green Grass
Clogger Day several times in past
years and have witnessed many
memorable performances at the
workshops and at the concerts. I
think I can say that Clogger Day is
the highlight of the year for lovers
of traditional music and dance in
the Greenville area.
Many memorable performances
have been witnessed at the
workshops and concerts at Clogger
Day in the past. Green Grass Clog-
ger Day is the highlight of the year
for lovers of traditional music and
traditional dancing in the Greenville
area.
WANTED:
Responsible person to
share new 3 bedroom
house in Greenville. Call
756-2376, ask for John.
After 5 p.m call
756 8652.
207 E.
6th St.
BLACK
Belt
Instructors
Charles Jane ft
Samuel Barger
(combined experience
of 34 years)
come by for a FREE Intro.
lesson
0pen:Mon-Thurs noon-9PM
! M0��OFF I
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H
:
123 E. 5th Str
752-7483
Tuesday Pizza Buffet 279 all you can eat 5-9
Ladies Nite with Steve Brian
LADIES ADMITTED FREE
FREE DRAFT for the ladles
Wednesday
Salad Bar Special �215 all you can eat 5-9
Thursday
Spaghetti Special 2" all you can eat 5-9
FOOTSBALL
TOURNAMENT
The Department of
University Unions is spon
soring an all campus table
soccer tournament in con
junction with the Associa
tion of College Unions
international (ACU I)
The tournament will be
conducted to determine the
one open doubles team,
which may consist o� two
men, two women or one man
and women, who will repre
sent ECU. it sufficient par
ticipation permits, in the
Association of College
Unions International
regional face to face tourna
ment The regional tourna
ment will be held at the
University of Tennessee on
Feb 10, II and 12, 19U
A registration form,
available at the Billiards
Center at Mendenhall Stu
dent Center, must be com
pleted by each entrant and
submitted to the supervisor
on duty at the center by
Tuesday. Nov 30.
The tournament will begin
on Thursday. Dec 2. at 6
p.m , in the MSC recreation
arta. Double elimination
format will be followed
Each match will be two out
of three, except the final
match which will be three
out of five
An entry fee of $2 per
team is required and
payable at the tournament
site

ATTIC ATTIC
752-7303
THE LA UGHING MA TTER
Wed. and Thurs.
Wed: Reduced Admission
for students
Thurs: Ladies Light Night
COMINGFRI. A SAT.
SUPER GRIT
ik minx
xnoxaG
Located 1 mile past
Hasting's Ford on
10th St. extension
Tuesday, Wednesday
& Thursday
POPCORN
SHRIMP
$295
French Fries or Baked Potato
Tossed Salad may be substituted
tor Slaw35c extra




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11'
Banana Eating Contest
Tues. Nov. 30,1982 8:30-1:00
Adm.M00
Prizes
1 St - s60�� Plus 1 year's free pass to the Elbo
2nd - s40�� Plus 1 year's free pass to the Elbo
3rd - s20�� Plus 1 year's free pass to the Elbo
ft use
COME EARLY
Sponsored by:
Hodges
Pharo's
Upstage
Record Bar

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The East Carolina Playhouse
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December 2-6 - 8:15 pm
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For mature ECU
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
NOVEMBER 30. 1982
Page 8
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Sports Editor
With 8,564 people looking on, the
ECU men's basketball team put on
a dazzling performance at Duke
University that will be remembered
for a long time to come.
The Pirates, who quickly built a
10-lead and stayed ahead until the
last three minutes of play, were
barely beaten by the Duke Blue
Devils, 70-65, in a hair-raising,
nerve-racking game.
The Bucs were up 61-60 when
Duke freshman Johnny Dawkins re-
bounded and made a lay-up to put
the Devils ahead with 3:01 remain-
ing.
Warren County native David
Henderson then came in and sank
two freethrows to push the Blue
Devils ahead, 66-63.
Sophomore forward Barry
Wright pumped in a jumpshot to cut
Duke's lead to one point, but
Dawkins made two more freethrows
to give Duke a three-point lead once
again. A two-hand dunk from
another Duke freshman Mark
Alarie boosted the Blue Devils' lead
to 70-65.
The Pirates astounded the Duke
squad in the first half with a tough
man-to-man defense. Offensively,
center Charlie Green, guard Bruce
Peartree and freshman Johnny Ed-
wards combined in a trio attack to
give the Pirates a 20-6 lead with
12:49 remaining.
But four fouls were called on the
Bucs, two each on Edwards and
Green, and Duke took advantage by
penetrating the ball in to 6-8 center
Mark Alarie and 6-8 forward Jay
Bilas. Dawkins and Henderson also
aided the tall twosome in an effort
to pull the Devils closer.
With 10:04 remaining, ECU's
Green slammed a two-hand dunk,
but fouled on the next play to put
DKe's 6-9 sophomore Todd Ander-
son on the free throw line. Ander-
son sank two, cutting the Pirates'
lead to 28-23.
With 7:28 left, the Pirates began
holding the ball after three starters
Charlie Green, Johnny Edwards
and Barry Wright had three fouls
each.
The Bucs delay game was effec-
tive, and the Pirates gradually gain-
ed a 31-25 lead. The score was soon
to change, however, when Hender-
son was fouled twice, and Dawkins
pumped in two to Duke just two
points behind with less than 2:00 re-
maining.
Freshman Curt Vanderhorst, a
6-0, 178-pound Fayetteville native,
came in and scored after junior
Tony Robinson assisted him. But
Peartree fouled Duke guard Chip
Engelland, who popped two
freethrows to shorten the lead to
37-35 in ECU's favor.
In the second half, the Pirates
forged ahead, and three consecutive
shots put the Pirates back up, 43-35.
The Blue Devils, however, were
about to begin their scoring streak.
Duke cut the lead to four points,
49-45, when the Pirates began get-
tinginto foul trouble.
After some controversy, Edwards
was charged with an intentional
foul, and sophomore Danny
Meagher made two freethrows,
making the score 49-47.
With 10:50 remaining and a 57-52
lead, another technical foul was
called on an ECU player. Green
missed a shot at the top of the key,
and took the rebound back up when
he was charged with fouling
Engelland.
The Pirates went to the delay
game once again, and held the lead
until the last few minutes.
Harrison said the reason why the
Pirates ran a delay game was to
shorten the duration of the halves.
"We felt at times that we needed to
take some time off the clock he
said. "It was not in an effort to stall
the game.
"We knew we had to do
something to shorten the game up.
We just didn't think that we could
play inside with the people we had
on the bench
The head coach said the players
had only practiced holding the ball
for about 30 minutes in practice, but
he was pleased with how well the
players executed the delay game. "I
thought the kids did a heck of a
job he said.
"In the delay, I thought, gave us
an opportunity to win the ball game.
It didn't win it for us, nor could it
have won it for us, but it did shorten
the game down so we had the chance
to win it
"We were very aware of our defi-
ciencies on the bench and in size.
We knew that we weren't very deep
and that Duke was very strong and
physical
Harrison said the players were
aware of what they had to do to
win. "I thought our kids did well
enough in spots to deserve to win,
and I think with a couple of breaks
here and there, they could have won
the ballgame
Despite such an impressive show-
ing, especially by the freshmen,
Harrison was disappointed to lose
to Duke � a team the Pirates have
never beaten. "I'm not satisfied
he said. "I'm not happy, but I'm
encouraged with some of the things
I saw.
Harrison had quite a few things to
be encouraged about. The Bucs shot
62.2 percent from the floor, with a
71.4 average in the first half.
Sophomore Barry Wright, who sat
out last year, was ECU's high scorer
with 16 points. Peartree followed
with 15, while Green had 11. Robin-
son scored eight points, Edwards
pumped in seven and Vanderhorst
had six.
The Pirates had a total of 15 tur-
novers, seven assists, and made 28
of 45 field goals while Duke finished
with 25 of 55 attempts.
On the freethrow line, Duke
sank 20 of 30 shots, and the Pirates
were nine for 15. According to Har-
rison, missed freethrows were a real
factor � the winning factor, that
is. "Should we have made all the
front ends of our one-and-ones, we
would have won that ballgame he
said.
Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski not
only praised the Pirates for their
outstanding play, but coach Har-
rison as well. "He coached one
helluva game he said. "ECU
stuck it to us in that ballgame
The Pirates take on Christopher
Newport Wednesday night.
Gametime is 7:30 p.m. at Minges
Coliseum.
� ill KF 70.Ell 5
EllMP K, KIKK1pi
Wright328-110-041616
Oretn325-8II714ii
Edwards253-61-451x7
Robins303 5i ��024t
Peartree32' II12;315
Vandrhisi19114 44016
Harris90-00-01030
Brown19130-21042
Fox10-00-00000
Rcichnekr10-00-00000
Totals200 2�-45 9-15 2727�5
1)1 krWP H, KTK�.1Pi
Jack man8020-00000
Meagher13o:2 310J2
Alarie257-I3V�50416
Engelland141-33 3001
Dawkins386 133 524115
McSetlv152 30-0s0I
Henderson:395 97i;II
Bilas82-30-230i
Emma284 50-015t8
Tissa10-00-01010
Anderson2-�0-25 631-�5
Tullls200 25-5520-30 281:i�
E. Carolinay2� -�5
Dukea35-71
Poq By DAVE WILLIAMS
Turnosers � East Carolina 15. Duke 8 TevhnK
Green Officials � Croft. Moser. Burch Alt � 1.54
ECUs Charlie Green
Lady Pirates Split Pair
By KEN BOLTON
Assistant Sports Editor
The ECU Lady Pirates returned
from a road trip to the Northeast
Sunday evening with a split of two
tough games.
On Friday night, the Lady Pirates
were in Fairfield, Connecticutt for a
contest against Fairfield University.
ECU came out on the short end of a
58-54 score, due mainly to 28 per-
cent shooting from the field.
The Lady Pirates bounced back
on Saturday night, however, to
defeat Fairleigh-Dickinson Univer-
sity in a game played at Teaneck,
New Jersey. The victory upped
ECU's record to 2-1 on the season.
According to ECU head coach
Cathy Andruzzi, there were positive
aspects about the lengthy trip.
"Anytime you split on the road,
you have to be happy said An-
druzzi. "We learned a lot by this
trip, especially that we have to get
used to playing on the road
In Friday night's game, the Lady
Pirates took 23 more shots than
Fairfield, but made four less than
the Lady Stags.
"We were shell-shocked at
times stated Andruzzi. "We
didn't execute offensively, but I was
proud of the job that we did in forc-
ing turnovers on defense
The Lady Pirates out-rebounded
Fairfield and limited them to only
nine second shots, as compared to
ECU's 17. The number of second
shots is one of the many team
statistics that Andruzzi and her staff
diligently record.
ECU is a well-respected name na-
tionwide when it comes to women's
basketball, and Andruzzi felt that
this was one factor that helped the
Lady Stags get fired up for the
game.
"They were very well prepared
commented Andruzzi. "But we
came back the next day and turned
the tables, which is something I was
very pleased to see
In Saturday night's contest
against the Fairleigh-Dickinson
Lady Knights, the Lady Pirates
employed a faster-paced offense to
pull out a 73-59 victory.
Another statistic that the Lady
Pirate staff pays attention to is the
success of their fast break. Against
Fairfield, the Lady Pirates con-
verted four of 14 fast breaks, as
compared to 18 of 37 on Saturday
night.
"The second game was much
faster paced, and our offense was in
much better control responded
Andruzzi.
The Lady Pirates also improved
their field goal percentage, hitting
on 30 of 60 attempts. Ail-American
candidate Mary Denkler led the way
with 29 points. Loraine Foster and
Darlene Chaney contributed 12 and
10 points, respectively. Delphine
Mabry led ECU with four assists.
One of Andruzzi's goals for the
Lady Pirates is to have a balanced
scoring attack. That objective was
achieved against the Lady Knights,
as nine players scored in the game.
At this early point in the season,
the Lady Pirates have made positive
progress so far. "We have a long
way to go, but we're where we want
to be defensively, which is the most
important thing said Andruzzi.
"At this time, it is very important to
concentrate on defense
The Lady Pirates will need to be
at their best both offensively and
defensively this Thursday night
when ECU travels to Raleigh to take
on N.C. State. The Wolfpack is cur-
rently ranked 15th in the nation,
and has a very experienced squad.
On Dec. 30, the Lady Pirates will
begin a lengthy road trip at South
Bend, Indiana against the Notre
Dame Fighting Irish. This will be
the first of ten games in a row on the
road.
But as Andruzzi puts it,
"Sacrifices will lead to a day in the
sun
Krzyzewski Unveils Freshmen
1
By KEN BOLTON
Aisistant Sports Editor
At Saturday night's Duke-ECU
basketball game, the Blue Devils
unveiled what many have said to be
the best freshman class in the coun-
try.
Duke's taunted first-year players
were thrown right into the hot and
heavy action of college basketball.
The Pirates started off in a full-
court pressure defense that seemed
to catch the Blue Devils off-guard.
Duke survived an early 10-0 ECU
lead to finally overcome the Pirates
70-65 in the season-opener for both
teams.
The Blue Devils started three
freshmen and a total of five first-
year players saw action during the
game. Bill Jackman, Mark Alarie
and Johnny Dawkins were the
freshmen starters, but it was the
play of David Henderson, a 6-5
guard from Warren County High
School, that really pleased Duke
head coach Mike Krzyzewski.
"Thank God for Manson, North
Carolina said Krzyzewski, referr-
ing to Henderson's home town.
"David Henderson really played his
butt off
Henderson came off the bench to
score 11 points and grab seven re-
bounds, including two free throws
with 42 seconds left to give the Blue
Devils a 66-6? advantage.
But it wa Henderson's defense
on ECU forward Barrv Wright that
made the difference.
"Wright was killing us said
Coach K. "We knew what he was
going to do, but we just couldn't
stop him until David came into the
ball game
The top scorers tor the Blue
Devils were Alarie, with 16 points to
lead the team, followed closely by
Dawkins with 15 points and four
assists.
Dawkins came to Duke from
Washington, D.C where he was a
Parade All-America third team
choice his senior year at Mackin
Catholic High School. His follow-
up basket with 3:07 remaining gave
Duke its first lead of the game. He
also hit two free throws with 15
seconds left to put the game on ice.
Krzyzewski had plenty of praise
for the ECU squad, which used its
quickness and 62.2 percent
shooting to stay in control for most
of the game.
"That team came ready to play
basketball tonight commented
Krzyzewski. "If I wasn't coaching
tor Duke. 1 would have loved to
watch what East Carolina was do-
ing
The Blue Devils will be hard-
pressed to compete in the ACC this
year with such a young squad.
Along with six freshmen. Duke also
has four sophomores on the team.
"There are a lot of young guys on
our team responded Krzyzewski.
"We have to go through our grow-
ing pains and gain our experience.
But that's a fact of life
The Blue Devils shot 45.4 per-cent
from the field, but relied on some
clutch free-throw shooting down the
stretch. The Pirates actually had
three more field goals, but it was
Duke's 20-9 advantage in free-
throws-made that proved to be the
difference.
Duke's next two contests will be
this week when the Blue Devils
make trips to Colorado and Califor-
nia. Then Duke will travel to
Charlottesville, Va. to face the No.
1 ranked Virginia Cavaliers on Dec.
8.
Krzyzewski is optimistic about
this year's young Duke squad. "We
have realistic expectations he
stated. "All we can ask is that they
listen and play hard. This team is
going to get better
Harrison Has Only One Apology To Offer
Former ECU basketball coach
Dave Odom may think the Bucs
should concentrate on improving
their Division-I status, but his suc-
cessor, Charlie Harrison, isn't really
concerned about which category his
new team is filed under.
"I think we should concentrate
on competing within the league
Harrison said. "If we do that, that
will put us in the top 150.
"Being in the top 50 or 150 is
completely irrelevant. That will take
care of itself
Odom, who left ECU this year to
become an assistant at the Universi-
ty of Virginia, stated in the Sunday
edition of The News and Observer,
that East Carolina has many
obstacles to overcome in order to
compete on the same level of in-
state rivals like North Carolina,
N.C. State and Duke, and should
strive to move up the ladder as a
Division-I basketball program. "My
feelings are that Dave Odom
wouldn't have made these com-
ments if he was still coaching here
Harrison said.
Cindy Pleasants
A Look Inside
The new coach said he is well
aware of the ACC's presence in this
area. "The ACC has been here
dating back to the 1950's. They are
a great, great tradition, and will
continue To be.
"Why fight them? You have to
respect them and go about your
job
Odom said ECU's major obstacle
is having to overcome the ACC's
regional dominance in areas such as
recruiting and media exposure. But
Harrison prefers to take a more
positive outlook when facing these
problems. "You can't say you can't
recruit because of the ACC he
said. "That's already admitting
defeat. I want players who know
about ECU, and who want to play
basketball for me. Let the cards fall
where they may as far as the leagues
are concerned
According to Odom, com-
munities need To get rid of the at-
titude that "ECU is where you go if
you're not good enough to play in
the ACC
What is Odom's solution? "The
best place to attack it is in the public
schools he said. "Coaches need to
be realistic, to realize that all players
can't play in the ACC or the Big
East or the Big Ten. There's nothing
wrong with being realistic
Harrison, however, disagreed
with his predecessor's way of think-
ing. "I think that's taking a negative
approach he said. "You're telling
a player that he's not good enough
to dosomething he may really want
to do.
"I can understand why a coach
would like to see a kid playing ACC
basketball and watch him on T.V.
� television exposure is just
something we can't fight right
now
But Harrison said he isn't looking
for athletes that the ACC rejects
from its recruiting list. "We recruit
kids that we think can play here
he said. "Many of the athletes we
look at aren't being recruited by the
ACC. We don't recruit kids that
come here because they can't go
somewhere else
Harrison said he wants kids that
are able to make a contribution to
the program, and wants to play
basketball for him. His goals, he
said, are the same as any recruiting
coach. "I want to get better people
than we have and to recruit to
replace what we're losing
Odom described Division-I
basketball as a "three-layer hierar-
chy with the top 50 teams as
"high majors the 50th to 215th
team as "mid-majors" and the re-
maining teams as "low majors
East Carolina, he said, should strive
to get to the "mid-major level
Harrison, on the other hand, said
he striving for only one thing � to
see his team get better, to compete,
and to become the best they are
capable of being.
"If people want to say we're a
mid-major league, that's fine he
said. "But where we are is pretty
damn good. Why go on and try to
categorize it? I have no apologies
for our league, and I have no
apologies for our schedule. I may
make apologies about the way we
play at times, but that will be all
Harrison certainly didn't have to
make any apologies for the Pirates'
showing against one ACC school.
The Bucs were edged out, 70-65, by
Duke this past weekend, after
leading up until the last three
minutes of the game.
"All we want to do is to compete
in a foreign territory he said. "As
long as we have opportunities to
win, I think we are competing
Spu
Buccaneers Battle With The 'Big Boys' I As
TAMPA, Ra
Heisman Trophv
ner and former f
Bav Buccaneer
back Steve Spur!
until last week oil
sive coordim
Duke L Diversity,
head coach of the
pa Ba Bar
Spurriers -ce
as the �
Tampa entry
United States I
League had ol
rumored for mtdc
and was mad;
Mondav r .
d 11 s' o w i
Basket:
ference
Basc-
ECU
In Cl
B EDW rd
Ml Kl
The EC I s
team cool
noteworttn A
finishing -ev
L'niversitv ol M
Carolina a: v
ington Sundav a:
sail Island. The
team had beaten
same L'NC-W qua
Oct. 17 to finish hrj
that contest.
The team,
consists of 12 mem
from the ECU Sur
Club plus alternate
jparu-of Jhe Car
Surfing Conferq
Also competing
conference are
W, Coavta; Can
Communitv
and Jackv
School.
"From '� . . ij
have 20 pe,
Ball
The ECL 1
Department,
with Miller Bel
Companv. is sp
ingap:e-sea
ball tourna -
tries will be
through Wed
Dec. 1. wr: the tOs
men: sch led
Dec. 3-5 En
limited to 36
teams and 2 wro
WOMEN'S HI
CARE YOU O
DEPEND ON
stcx: i ou ro
OHuml t "
SERVKES �
18 Wees I
:egc "�
Accervc I
llwJNi :jc 00Uf
and �ducawon i
nrer aj o oj
LAUTARI
Profl
Resetting
Design All
Premises
Re�is�ered jesi�e�5
I
I
T
'





IHL I AST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 30, 1982
9
oys'

HI 1
X
2
i L L AMS
hmen
j
. 1 A - QO-
iard-
I this
ig ciiad.
i en.� e a ho
. - .
j krzyzewski.
jiihn i
�: I be the
ntests will be
Devils
ind Califor-
� N
n Dec
ic about
quad. ' W e
-� ns he
� is that the
I This team is
r
V av we're a
league, that's tine he
It where Ae are is prett
V h go on and try to
I have no apologies
and ! have no
or our schedule. I may
es about the way we
H that will be all
certainK didn't have to
oologies tor the Pirates'
jairw one ACC school.
.ere edged out. 70-65, by
past weekend, after
until the last three
the game.
want to do is to compete
territory he said. "As
e hae opportunities to
ik we are competing
Spurrier Begins Career
As Bandits' Head Coach
TAMPA, Fla. (UP1)
Heisman Trophy win-
ner and former Tampa
Ba Buccaneer quarter-
back Steve Spurrier,
until last week offen-
sive coordinator at
Duke University, is the
head coach of the Tam-
pa Bay Bandits.
Spurrier's selection
as the first coach of the
Tampa entry in the
United States Football
League had been
rumored for some time
and was made official
Monday night by Ban-
dits' owner John
Bassett at a news con-
ference.
Bassett said he and
three other club of-
ficials met with Spur-
rier in mid-season in
Durham, N.C and
decided he was their
man at that time.
"We went to din-
ner Bassett said. "I
think 1 had made my
decision halfway
through the meal
"As 1 remember,
Mr. Bassett said, 'Hey,
Steve, we want you
And 1 said, 'Hey. 1
want to come, but can't
until the season's over
He said, 'Okay, looks
like we have a deal
"So, I am coming
back to Florida and to
Tampa in still another
role Spurrier said. "I
am aware 1 have to pro-
ve that I can be a head
coach
Spurrier starred at
the University of
Florida and won the
Heisman Trophy in
1966, edging out Bob
Griese who later starred
for the Miami
Dolphins.
He was a first round
draft choice of the San
Francisco 49ers and in
1976 was traded to the
Tampa Bay Buc-
caneers. After their
first NFI. season when
they went 0-14, Spur-
rier was waived.
He was an assistant
coach at Florida and
Georgia Tech until he
joined Duke in 1980 as
offensive coordinator.
During his two years
with the Blue Devils,
they climbed from
127th in the nation to
third in the nation of-
fensively this season,
averaging 453 yards a
game, an Atlantic
Coast Conference
record.
"The only thing I
have coached is the of-
fense and my record as
an offensive coach is
good enough, 1 think
Spurrier said. "I will
have a defensive coor-
dinator and he will run
that side of things.
Spurrier, 37, resign-
ed his post with Duke
Thursday, effective
after Saturday's game
in which the Blue
Devils upset rival North
Carolina.
"If 1 could have
picked a head job in the
United States Football
League, it would be the
one Mr. Bassett has
hired me to do Spur-
rier said Monday.
Spurrier signed a three-
year contract with the
Bandits. His salary was
not disclosed.
ECU Surfing Team Finishes 2nd
In Club Conference Competition
Bj KDWARD
N1CKI AS
The FCL surfing
team continued a
noteworthy fall season,
finishing second behind
University o North
Carolina at Wilm-
ington Sunday at Top-
sail lsiand. The ECU
team had beaten the
same L NC-W squad on
Oct. 17 to finish first in
that contest.
The team, which
consists of 12 members
from rhe ECU Surfing
Club plus alternates, is
part of ihe Carolina
Surfing Conference.
Also competing in the
conference are UNC-
W, Coastal Carolina
Community College,
and Jacksonville High
School.
"From the club, we
have 20 people who
surf competitively
said Surfing Club presi-
dent Tom Combs. "We
presently have 10 girls
in the club and would
like to encourage more
girls to join. The club is
mainly for people who
like to go to the
beach
The club, which is
SGA approved and has
a representative on the
Inter-Club Executive
Council, was tounded
by Dannv Monahan, a
present member ot the
surfing team.
"My brother and I
started the club at ECU
after also starting a
team in high school
he said.
" W h e n it first
began Monahan con-
tinued, "we only had
25 people in the club. It
has now grown to 65
with two of 12 that
compete Monahan
feels that they have
been successful in part
because they have to obtain funds from to raise money so the
worked closely with the the SGA, but have team can go to Florida
club council at FCU, nevertheless gotten this spring to compete
including getting funds financial support from against some teams
from the SGA. the intramural depart- from Florida
According to merit.
Combs, the club ap- "Our main objective
plied too late this year now said Combs, "is
FAMOUS PIZZA
Dine in or Fast Free Delivery
� Hot oven subs, Lasgna, Spaghetti, Hamburgers,
HAPPY HOUR 2-CLOSE
$225 pitcher 58C mugs
DAILY SPECIALS
Small Pepperoni Pizza 2"
NOT FOR DELIVERY 7585982
Ball Tourney
The ECU Intramural
Department, along
with Miller Brewing
Company, is sponsor-
ing a pre-season basket-
ball tournament. En-
tries will be taken
through Wednesday,
Dec. 1, with the tourna-
ment scheduled for
Dec. 3-5. Entries are
limited to 36 men's
teams and 12 women's
teams, and a five dollar
entry fee is charged.
The Streak of Lighten-
ing will be out to de-
fend their title in the
men's division, while
the Dribblers will be
gunning for another
women's title. Get your
team together and sign
up before 5:00 tomor-
row, at 204 Memorial
Gym.
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN ABORTION: a difficult dea-
DEPEND ON. sion that's made easier by
the women of the Hemmg Center Counselors are
available day and night to support ana under-
stand you Your safety, comfort and privacy are
assured Dy the caring staff of the Fleming Center
SERVICES: � Tuesday - Saturday Abortion Ap-
pointments � 1 st & 2na Trimester Abortions up tc
18 Weeks � Free Fregnancy Tests � Very Early
Pregnancy Tests � All Inclusive Fees � insurance
Accepted � CALL 781-5550 DAY OR NIGHT �
Healthcare counseling THE FLEMING
CENTER
and education for wo-
men of ai: ages.
ABORTIONS UP
TO I'ithWttK
OF PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 14
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
S185 00 Pregnancy Test, Birth
Control and Problem Pregnan
cy Counseling. For turther mfor
matron call 832 0SJ5 (Toll Free
Number 800 Ml S�l between �
A M and 5PM Weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
�I7 West Morgan St
Baielqr. N C
The East Carolina Playhouse
presents
TONY
AWARD
PULITZER
PRIZE
"Extraordinary! An overwhelming emotional eVenerKe A pla ot mi.Ii
power and beauty that 1 found rmsclt ransackingm manors tor comparisons
Straight-out profound, objectively balanced between compassion and wisdom.
truly startling and in its uncompromised wa. ver. verv tuiun " Boston Cliobc
Boston Cilobc
LAUTARES JEWELERS, INC.
Professional Jewelers
Established 1912
Resetting Repairing and Custom
Design All Work Done on �
Premises �M Evans Street 2i-
Registered Jewelers Certified Gemologists
December 2-6-8:15 pm
Mcginnis Theatre
For mature
audiences
E.C.U. Campus
Call 757-6390
i
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of thaaa advarHaad items Is required to be readMy available for tale
I below the advertised price In each AaP Store, eicept as specifically noted
In this ad
at or
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT. DEC. 4th at A&P in GREENILLE, NC
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
Between now and Dec. 4. we will
redeem all national manufactur-
er's cents-otf coupons up to SO
tor double their value. Offer good
on national manufacturers'
cents-otf coupons only (Food
retailer coupons not accepted )
Customer must purchase cou-
pon product in specified size
Expired coupons will not be
honored. One coupon per cus-
tomer per item. No coupons ac-
cepted for free merchandise
Otter does not apply to A&P or
other store coupons whether
manufacturer is mentioned or
not. When the value of the cou-
pon exceeds 50" or the retail of
the item, this otter is limited to
the retail price.
Clip the Manufacturers' "Cents-Off"
Coupons from your mail, newspapers
and magazines. . . then bring them to
your A P Food Store
Savings are Great with A&P s DOUBLE SAVINGS COUPONS!
MFC S COUPONMFC CENTS OFFP ADOeD CENTS OFFTOTAL COUPON AT ASP
COUPON A25'2550
COUPON B18'18�36
COUPON C5C50$1.00
COUPON D75'25'$1.00
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
Whole Bottom &
Eye Round
Cut
Free!
20-26 lb.
avg.
lb.
58
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED
FRESH
Fryer Breast
88
8 lbs. or
more
A&P QUALITY FRESHLY
Ground Chuck
-J68
3 lbs. or
more
�sM FARV
GOLDEN YELLOW RIPE
READY TO EAT
Dole Bananas
lbs.
only
88
FLORIDA GROWN SWEET & JUICY
TANGELOS (125) ORANGES (125)
LOCALLY GROWN CRISP SOLID
�cat toocerj
Cabbage
88
lbs.
only
P!NTO � GREAT NORTHERN 53 VIRUS
NAVY j
TROPICANA
GOLD N' PURE
Luck's Beans
or
Blackeye
Peas
Field Peas
WPork
2
15 oz.
cans
Orange Juice
98
12 gal.
ctn.
A&P QUALITY
CANADIAN BACON
PEPPERONI � HAMBURGER
SAUSAGE � COMBINATION
Facial Tissue Totino's Pizza
� White
� Yellow
SUPER SAVE - OUPON �
i
SAVE 20' ON
HUNT'S
You Pay 32-oz.
Only bt
7QC
- 9 M
665
GOOD THRU SAT. DEC. 4 AT MR
UMTT ONE WITH COUPON AND $7.50 ORDER
"I
SAVE 20'
ON THE PURCHASE OF 18-OZ. PKG.
Tomato Ketchup r "ELLr�W
You Pay 32-oz. 7QC � CONI FOReS
668
GOOD THRU SAT DEC 4 AT A� Trw�
UNIT ONE WITH COUPON AMD S7JC ORDER
SUPER SAVER COUPON .mm
&�?; SAVE 20� ON
SUNSHINE SALTINE
r-OT�
SUPER SAVER COUPON
;w
Krispy Crackers
59
You Pay 16-oz.
Only box
OOOO THRU SAT. DEC. 4 AT AM 666
UMTT ONE WITH COUPON AND $7.50 ORDER.
SUPER SAVER COUPON f1
SAVE 20 ON
P&Q BRAND
Bath Tissue
w a? 497
GOOD THRU SAT DEC 4 AT AAP OOf
UHT ONE WITH COUPON AMD $7 JO ORDER
ii
I I
I I
� I
I I
SAVE 20
ON THE PURCHASE OF 12-OZ. CAN
A&P FROZEN FLORIDA
Orange Juice
GOOO THRU SAT DEC 4 AT AAP
UMTT ONE WITH COUPON AND $7 JO
669
SUPER SAVER COUPON
-
� I
� I
� I Ann Page Biscuits
� I
SAVE 20
ON A 4 PACK OF 10 COUNT 8-OZ. CANS
HOMESTYLE � BUTTERMILK
GOOD THRU SAT DEC 4 AT AAK
IMTT ONE WITH COUPON AND S7J
670
-

r





10
THfc EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 30, 1982
Classifieds
PERSONAL
WANTED
MEL AGNES is madly in love
with your dog, ZENO Please
measure him. she want to knit
him a sweater tor Xmas RAOUL
ART YOU SHOULD have come
home with me tor Thanksgiving
Mom made yard bunard. and
Gramps showed us his scars trom
the war1 HERB
WALLY I can't stand it anymore
I flushed your engagement ring
down the toilet Don't try to talk
me out of it. I ve made up my
mmd I iust don t think you're the
one tor me FRIEDA
ROOMMATE
WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATES wanted
to share large house near campus
Call 355 �057 after 5 00 p m
FEMALE ROOMMATE
A AN . ED I or J females to share
apartment close to campus M3 J3
mo plus l 1 utilities Call 758 6S89
ROOMMATE NEEDED
preferably female I block trom
campus call 7SS 4987
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL Typist wants to
type a' home Reasonable rates
7 5� 360
PROFESSIONAL Typing service
experience quality work. IBM
typewriter Call Lanie Shive
758 5301 or Gail Joiner T5 1043
TYPING TERM papers resumes
thesis etc Call 752 6733
TYPING TERM PAPERS.
THESIS etc Call 757 362 before
v 00 p m
BUSINESS TUTOR E� Grad stu
dent and business instructor will
tutor most business classes Get
help before FINAL EXAMS Call
758 6354 or 756 5377 after 5pm
ENGLISH TUDOR HELP with
writing re writing and editing
papers Also proofreading and typ
� ng Can 757 0207 after 5
PROFESS MAI TYPIST Great
service Re e rates Call
between 3 and 6 p m 757 1378
PART TIME DRIVER mamt
truck 21 hr week SShr only depcn
dable mature't! Ref req 757 3681
4 8 only.
RIDES
RIDE NEEDED to Roanoke. Va .
or surrounding area for Christmas
break Will be willing to share ex
penses Call Julie, at 752 1332
MISC.
SKI VERMONT FIVE �DAY ski
vacation to Smuggler Notch. VT.
Jan 2 7 Package deal tor sis 50
includes 5 day ski pass, slopeside
condos and college bash partie
For further into . contact BETH or
LISA at 754 9573 or 757 382.
THIRSTY' COME quench that
winter thirst at Chill Thrill 12!
Dec 30 3 00 p m to 6 p m
FOR SALE
2 FISHER SPEAKERS model 530s
would like to trade for cassette
deck Can 7S4M77 or The East
Carolinian 757 4346 and leave
message lor Geep Johnson
FOR SALE 1978 HONDA 2S0 XL
DIRT OR STREET BIKE Call
758 9798 Mon Thur
NICE GRAY AND WHITE RAB
BIT FUR JACKET FOR SALE ISO
CALL 758 3894
WATERBEDS and bedding one
half oft! DON T pay retail! We
have complete waterbeds as low
asSl49 95 Also bedding sets as low
as �79 95 Come by Factory Mat
tress and Waterbed Outlet 730
Greenville Blvd ne�t to Sweet
Carolines 355 2626
AVAILABLE JAN 1 2 bedroom
duplex near campus Call 355 4057
after 5.
BEVERAGE AIR BEER TAP
PER Fully refrigerated C02
tanks included Wooded Michelob
handle Brown with stainless steel
top and drain Perfect tor fraterm
ty party Excellent 757 4480 or
7 54 9149

i-y
Pilot Training
Opportunities
FL V NA V Y
'���� presently has Several openings
r � e St exciting and challenging
job 11 tne world - NAVY PILrT. If you
lualify, we will guarantee you a seat in
the lost prestigious flight school
anywhere. At the completion of training
you will fly the Navy's highperformance
aircraft.
Qualifications Are:
Bachelors degree
Less than 28 12 years old
2020 uncorrected vision
Excellent health
U.S. Citizen
If you think you can qualify and would
like to earn a starting salary of
$18,000 with $28,000 in four years,
send a letter of qualifications to:
NAVY PILOT PROGRAMS
1001 Navaho Dr.
Raleigh, NC 27609
or call
1-800-662-7231
ITALIAN NkTE
LASAGNA
AND
SPAGHETTI!
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
Plus Garlic Bread ftQQ
WITH
' ALL
YOU
CAN
EAT
SOUP
AND
sLAOl
FOOD TOWN
l3EEESS3SBaDa;B
USDA Choice Beef Loin
These prices good thru
Saturday, December 4,1982
USDA
CHOICE
Freeh Cit - Ceeter Ct
Loin Chops
u 1"
20 Lb. Bag
USDA Cboie. Beef Lola
T-Bone
Steaks
Frill Quirtir
Pork Loins
u. 1�
4 8 lb. Aviraii
Fresh
Picnics
Fresh Whili M Rib Naif. Slieaa Fraa , t fi
Pork Loins i. H'
os
White
Potatoes

Frith
Florida Oranges sbm
$19
Pkf. af IS - It Oi. Ca��
IS It. - Chat m tilai, Rim. Rbieeikillir
Colony Wine
1.S Utir - 6.U. Rii Vhiti Nek
Taylor Lake Country
Paeka�e af � - 12 Oz. Cast
2 liter
Jri-rz?-
(mx&
'Je
It Oueee
Liquid
�W
Why Pay M.09

12 Oi. - larii
Why Pay M.29
389
1 Lb. - Qairtin
Wby Pay 39� Eoeb
�� u �.
4 Rail Pk. � Amriia'
Waldorf Toilet Tissue

23 Oz. � Baakar Hill ar Ctstleberry
Beef Stew '

.S Ot. - ll. einih. U Oil Tim
49 0���
Chicken Of The Sea jjO Cold Power
S Oz. � M-beee
BUNKER HIU.
BEEF STEW
Instant Potato

32 Oteei
Half Oellaa - Treelieee
Orange Juice
EGG
NOG
Quirt
Sealtest
,
to
a 6
T�����
Pel Monte Catsup
SM
14.S Ot. - But Urn Chiekia I-0!
Chippie1 Buf Hirtia.it
Alfro Dog Food
EVERY WEDS.
Prices feed at Greenville Feed Town Store only

1
SHONEYS
432 Greenville Blvd.

T
�v mmfm
pmmum�pwtimmmtmi"u "�� m� �"���





10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 30, 1982
Classifieds
PERSONAL
MEL AGNES is madly in love
with your dog. ZENO. Please
measure him. she wants to knit
him a sweater tor Xmas RAOUL
ART YOU SHOULD have come
home with me for Thanksgiving.
Mom made yard buiiard, and
Cramps showed us his scars from
the war! HERB
WALLY I can't stand it anymore
I flushed your engagement ring
down the toilet Don't try to talk
me out of it. I ve made up my
mind I iust don t think you're the
one for me FRIEDA
ROOMMATE
WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATES wanted
to share large house near campus
Call 3S5 60S? after 5 00 p m
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED I or 7 females to share
apartment close to campus M3 33
mo plus 13 utilities Call 7S� �S�9
ROOMMATE NEEDED
preferably female I block from
campus, call 75$ 4V87
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL Typist wants to
type at home Reasonable rates
75 360
PROFESSIONAL Typing service
experience quality work, IBM
typewriter Call Lanie Shive
7S8 5301 or Gail Joiner ?S 103
TYPING TERM papers resumes
thesis etc Call 752 6733
TYPING TERM PAPERS,
THESIS etc Call 757 392 before
' 00 p m
BUSINESS TUTOR Ex Grad stu
dent and business instructor will
tutor most business classes Get
help before FINAL EXAMS Call
758 6354 or 7i� 5377 after 5pm
ENGLISH TUDOR HELP with
writing re writing and editing
papers Also proofreading and typ
mg Call 757 0207 after 5
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST Great
service Reasonable rates Cali
between 3 and I p m 757 1378
WANTED
FOOD TOWN
fTCTpffosiflSinpa
PART TIME DRIVER maint
truck 31 hr. week SShr. only depen
dable mature Ret reg 757 3481
6 8 only.
RIDES
RIDE NEEDED to Roanoke. Va
or surrounding area for Christmas
break Will be willing to share ex
penses Call Julie, at 753 1332
MISC.
USDA Choice Beef Loin
SKI VERMONT: FIVE�DAY ski
vacation to Smuggler Notch, VT.
Jan 2 7 Package deal for 5154.50
includes 5 day ski pass, slopeside
condos and college bash partie
For further info contact BETH or
LISA at 754 �573 or 757 3�2�.
THIRSTY? COME jench that
winter thirst at Chill Thrill 12!
Dec 30 3 00 p.m to 6 p m.
FOR SALE
3 FISHER SPEAKERS model 530s
would like to trade for cassette
deck Call 756-8977 or The East
Carolinian 757 6366 and leave
message for Geep Johnson
FOk SALE 1978 HONDA 350 XL
DIRT OR STREET BIKE Call
758 9798 Mon Thur
NICE GRAY AND WHITE RAB
BIT FUR JACKET FOR SALE 550
CALL 758 3894
WATERBEDS and bedding one
half oft' DON'T pay retail! We
have complete waterbeds as low
as 5149 95 Also bedding sets as low
as 579 95 Come by Factory Mat
tress and Waterbed Outlet 730
Greenville Blvd next to Sweet
Caroline's 355 3636
AVAILABLE JAN 1 3 bedroom
duplex near campus Call 355 6057
after 5.
BEVERAGE AIR BEER TAP
PER Fully refrigerated C03
tanks included Wooded Micheiob
handle Brown with stainless steel
top and dram Perfect tor traterni
ty party Excellent 757 4680 or
756 9169
These prices good thru
Saturday, December 4,1982
Mk
W
,�
&
Pilot Training Opportunities FLY NAVY
The '� i � � presently has Several openings � ii the �jst exciting and challenging bint �'�� irld - NAVT PILlT. It yen, lualify, �e will guarantee you a seat in the ost prestigious flight school anywhere. At tie completion of training . itj vvill fly the Navy's high perfon.iance aircraft.
Qualifications Are:
Bachelors degree Less than 28 12 years old 2020 uncorrected vision Excellent health U.S. Citizen
If you think you can qualify and would
like to earn a starting salary of
$18,000 with $28,000 in four years,
send a letter of qualifications to:
NAVY PILOT PROGRAMS
1001 Navaho Dr.
Raleigh, NC 27609
or call
I 1-800-662-7231
ITALIAN NTTE
LASAGNA
AND
SPAGHETTI!
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
Plus Garlic Bread &QQ
J WITH
, ALL
YOU
CAN
EAT
aPSC SOUP
t &Er salao
Fratk Cat - Caster Cat
rrtll cat � Qaetar cai t 4 00
Loin Chops 1�
USDA Chalet Baal Laia
T-Bone
Steaks
Fresh Qaartar
Pork Loins
u M�
88
4-8 Lb. Average l�Do
Fresh
Picnics
20 Lb. Bag
USffl
White
Potatoes
j
Friii tfaele ar Rib Half, Sllea4 Fraa
Fraia
Perk Loins u. 1M Florida Oranges s�b 129
Pk�. ef II - 11 Oz. Caai
1.S It. � Cka4� ��, IfclM Ran RalMakeller
Colony Wine
1.S Utar - Oeli Rei Vtiti Piak
Taylor Lake Country
Paekafe of 6 11 0z. Caai
2 Liter
&�&&.
22 Ounei
r Liquid
Why Pay M 09

12 Oz. - Lar�a
Why Pay M.29
389

1 La. - Qaartari
�ay Pay J9� Eaeh
4 Rail Pk. - Asserte.
Waldorf Toilet Tissue
99.
23 Oz. � Baaker Hill ar Caetleherry
Beef Stew "
4.S 0z. � It. Caaak. la Oil Taaa
'� a
49 Owaa
Chicken Of The Sea y Cold PoiVer
8 Oz. - Maaeoe
BUNKER H!L1.
Instant Potato
32 Oaata
BEEF STEW
EGG
NOG
Quart
Sealtest
a i
Del Monte Catsup
? m 31
laiiaaa j jg
Orange Juiee j Afro Poo Food
Half Oallaa � Traph
14.S Ox. - Baaf Liver Chiekaa I-
ekaaaaa Bit Hartaaaat
Prieti good at Sreenville Food Town Store only

i


SHONEYS
432 Greenville Blvd.
wmmmm �










Hardeer
TWO BACON & EGG
BISCUITS FOR $1.29
Offer good at participating hardee's" Res-
taurants. Please present this coupon before
ordering. Onecouponpercustomer, per visit.
Customer must pay any sales tax due. hot
good in combination with any other offers.
Offer Good During Regular Breakfast Menu
Hours Only Through December 8,1982
2 BCEB 2 LESS BACON BISC
,1 i.
198,
ttardecr
TWO SAUSAGE & EGG
BISCUITS FOR $1.39
Offer good at participating hardee's" Res-
taurants. Please present this coupon before
ordering. One coupon per customer, per visit.
Customer must pay any sales tax due. hot
good in combination with any other offers.
Offer Good During Regular Breakfast Menu
Hours Only December 9-15,1982
'� 11 I �
�Ytordrer
TWO BACON & EGG
BISCUITS FOR $1.29
Offer good at participating flardee's" Res-
taurants. Please present this coupon before
ordering. Onecouponpercustomer, per visit.
Customer must pay any sales tax due. hot
good in combination with any other offers.
Offer Good During Regular Breakfast Menu
Hours Only December 16-22,1982
BCEB
.ESS BACON BISC
� me s8:
ttarderc
TWO SAUSAGE & EGG
BISCUITS FOR $1.39
Offer good at participating hardeeV Res-
taurants. Please present this coupon before
ordering. Onecouponpercustomer, per visit.
Customer must pay any sales tax due. hot
good in combination with any other offers.
Offer Good During Regular Breakfast Menu
Hours Only December 23-29,1982
�� G 2 LESS SAUSAGE BISC
�� ii :��.� h oaSvMer'ib Inc 1982
ttardeei
TWO REGULAR ROAST BEEF
SANDWICHES FOR $1.89
Offer good at participating hardee's" Res-
taurants. Please present this coupon before
ordering. Onecouponpercustomer, per visit.
Customer must pay any sales tax due. hot
good in combination with any other offers.
Offer Good After Breakfast Menu Hours
Through December 8,1982
2 REG R B 2 LESS REG R B
H ii ;��� ; : ������

Hardeer
TM
TWO BIG DELUXE
BURGERS FOR $2.39
Offer good at participating flardee's" Res-
taurants. Please present this coupon before
ordering. Onecouponpercustomer, per visit.
Customer must pay any sales tax due. hot
good in combination with any other offers.
Offer Good After Breakfast Menu Hours
December 9-15,1982
2 DEL 2 LESS DEL
�� ���� :

Harden
TWO REGULAR ROAST BEEF
SANDWICHES FOR $1.89
Offer good at participating hardee's Res-
taurants. Please present this coupon before
ordering. Onecouponpercustomer, per visit.
Customer must pay any sales tax due. hot
good in combination with any other offers.
Offer Good After Breakfast Menu Hours
Only December 16-22,1982

2 REG R B 2 LESS REG RB
H irdee dSyWer
��
ttardeei
TWO BIG DELUXE
BURGERS FOR $2.39
Offer good at participating hardee's" Res-
taurants. Please present this coupon before
ordering. Onecouponpercustomer, per visit.
Customer must pay any sales tax due. hot
good in combination with any other offers.
Offer Good After Breakfast Menu Hours
Only December 23-29,1982
2 DEL 2 LESS DEL
Hatdeesfo JSvs'e"
��
VA. U





Title
The East Carolinian, November 30, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 30, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.234
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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