The East Carolinian, November 18, 1982







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Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.23
Thursday, November 18,1982
Greenville, N.C
10 Pages
Circulation 10.000
Smokers Quit For The Day With 'Smokeout'
By EMILY CASEY
Staff Writer
The Great American Smokeout is
going on today as dozens of ECU
students, faculty members and staff
are going through a cold turkey ef-
fort to quit a habit that many health
professionals describe as the na-
tion's number one killer.
Yesterday, members of the
recently reorganized chapter of the
Alpha-Phi-Omega coed service
fraternity sat at a table outside the
Student Supply Store asking
passers-by to join in the nationwide
annual event sponsored by the
American Cancer Society and at-
tempt to quit smoking cigarettes for
twenty-four hours.
"The goal of the smokeout is to
get one out of five people to stop
smoking forever said ECU home
economics student Christine Taylor,
vice president of Alpha-Phi-Omega.
Taylor hopes that people who are
able to kick the habit for 24 hours
(from midnight to midnight) will
hopefully feel they can do it for the
rest of their lives.
People who were interested in
quitting were asked to fill out a
pledge card agreeing to "solemnly
swear to give up smoking for the
Great American Smokeout, Nov.
19 The pledge card also asked
potentional quitters to "promise not
to smoke for 24 hours (and maybe
longer), or to help a friend quit
According to Taylor there was a
lot of interest in the event and
numerous people gathered around
the table to sign-up.
Those who agreed to the 24-hour
trial period were also given various
information sheets, bookmarks,
buttons and a red rubber band,
which is worn on the wrist and
designed to help paticipants to quit.
"Whenever you want a cigarette, in-
stead of striken' up a match, you
just snap the band was the advice
written on slip of paper attached to
the band.
The bookmark had a quote from
the 1979 report on smoking and
health from the Surgeon General
that said "Cigarette smoking is the
single most important environmen-
tal factor contributing to premature
mortality in the United States
A fact sheet given out at the table
noted that the number of smokers
who have quit is rising steadily from
only 1.8 million in 1978 to over 33
million in 1980. However, the sheet
also pointed out that over 52 million
Americans still smoke, of which
nine out of ten claim they would like
to quit.
According to Joan Boudreaux,
Pitt County chairperson of the
Great American Smokeout for the
second year in a row, a person has a
better chance to quit smoking if they
have a "support group" to help
them. Boudreaux, who quite smok-
ing herself several years ago, sees
the American Cancer Society cam-
paign as providing such support on
the national level by this project.
"It is an upbeat, good natured ef-
fort on the part of the American
Cancer Society to encourage
smokers to stop smoking for at least
24 hours Boudreaux said.
She said that people should at-
tempt to quit, "If for no other
reason, just to prove you can do it
and that you have control over your
own body
Boudreaux, an ECU English
graduate student assistant, calls
herself a "radical champion" of the
effort to help people to quit smok-
ing and wished all participants good
luck in their efforts.
Local sponsors of the Great
American Smokeout are inviting
successful quitters to join in a
"procession and mock funeral"
tonight at 7 p.m. on the mall. Quit-
ters are asked to come "hury your
cigarettes" for the last time.
Taylor also pointed out that all 15
members of the Alpha-Phi-Omega
fraternity are non-smokers who
decided to take on the service pro-
ject after being put in contact with
the local Cancer Society by Rudy
Alexander.
"It's a good cause added
another fraternity volunteer Derrick
Carmichael. "I hope they can give
up smoking beyond the 24 hours
One potential quitter who signed
the pledge was ECU chemistry stu-
dent Shan Biggers. "I'm going to
give it up for one day he said, ad-
ding it was a possibility he may give
it up for good.
Unknown Male Attacks Student
On Pathway Near Practice Field
By DARRYL BROWN
Assailant News Editor
An ECU student was assaulted
and raped last Thursday night just
off campus property near the band
practice field, according to Gene
McAbee of the ECU Department of
Public Safety.
The female student, who's identi-
ty would not be disclosed by the
public safety department or the
Greenville police, was attacked
about 8:45 p.m. by an unknown
asailant. The incident ocurred on a
dark pathway leading from the
practice field to Rock Springs Road,
near a Stop-n-Go convience store.
The Department of Public of
Safety described the suspect as a
black male about 5' 10" in hieght,
with broad shulders, a narrow
waist, protruding hips and wearing
dark pants and a light jacket with
tight cuffs. A composite picture
could not be made because of the
darkness at the time of the incident.
Anyone with information on this
suspect is asked to contact Gene
McAbee at the ECU Department of
Public Safety, or contact the Green-
ville Police.
The Greenville Police are offically
handling the case because it took
place off campus property. Detec-
tive George Albertine, who is in-
vestigating the assault, could not be
reached for comment. Captain
Whitaker of the detective division
said the investigation was waiting on
lab reoorts to return and the
analysis of evidence in the cae
There are no definite leads in the
case as of Wednesday, according to
Whitaker.
There have been no previous at-
tacks in the area of the pathwav
recently, according to Francis Ed-
dings of the public safety depart-
ment. The pathway is frequentlv us-
ed by some ECU students living on
College Hill to get to and from cam-
pus. The path is near Tyler, a girls
residence hall.
No blue light security system is in
the area of the assault, because it is
off campus property, according to
Eddings. The nearest blue light
phone is up near Tyler dorm. A
representative of Tyler declined to
comment on security problems.
Photo By STANLEY LEAHY
Back To Work?
Two football officials start practicing old moves with a little confusion as they warm up for the remainder of the
NFL season. Owners and players reached a tentative agreement and the beloved sport could start this weekend.
Student Battles Tobacco Supporters
In Effort To End Cigarette Smoking
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
Calling herself a "radical cham-
pion" of the effort to get people to
quit smoking, the Pitt County
chairperson of the 1982 American
Cancer Society's Great American
Smokeout claimed that her event
was overshadowed by the Greenville
Tobacco Festival and that she would
rather see North Carolina farmers
growing crops other than tobacco.
"I know I'll be judged as disloyal
by local Pitt Countians said Joan
Boudreaux, head of this year's
smokeout event, "but I'd like to see
farmers raise something that's
helpful to people instead of
something that kills them
Boudreaux, an ECU English
department graduate studet assis-
tant, made her remarks while work-
ing at a table set up outside the Stu-
dent Supply Store to encourage peo-
ple to join the annual American
Cancer Society smokeout event.
Boudreaux also claimed that the
local tobacco festival which is also
going on this week in Greenville
overshadowed the Great American
Smokeout Event. "I don't think
that was an accident she added.
According to Boudreaux she was
told twice that her scheduled ap-
pearance on the WNCT television
program titled "Carolina Today"
was canceled and that one of the
cancellations was to give air time to
the Tobacco Festival. "They're giv-
ing it (The Tobacco Festival) a
whole week and they won't give me
10 minutes Boudreaux told The
East Carolinian.
She claims that a similar morning
television talk show program on
WITN (TV Channel 7) in
Washington, N.C. also denied her
air time. "Channel 7 said specifical-
ly that tobacco money is what runs
our operation Boudreaux said.
Boudreaux claims that fear plays
a big role in many people's decision
not to speak out on the issues of the
hazards of smoking cigarettes and
the federal tobacco price support
program that assures growers
a guaranteed price for their crops.
"Even individuals are afraid to
speak out added Boudreaux, who
said she had talked to many people
who agreed with her, but weren't
willing to say so publicly. "I would
like to see some diversification
Boudreaux said, referring to the
types of crops that are grown by
local farmers.
Reagan Encouraged To Make Effort
Toward Improving Russian Relations
Rebel Magazine
A wards Prizes
For Student Art
ECU's literary magazine, Rebel,
has announced the 1982-1983 win-
ners of their student art show and
writing contest.
Winners were chosen from three
categories in the eighth annual event
and their works will appear in the
latest edition of the magazine.
The Attic nightc'ub and a local
Budweiser beer distributor con-
tributed $500 each to be given as
prize money. Rebel editor Rick Gor-
don said he was pleased with the
number of people who entered the
contest.
ECU student John Boone took
home the best in show honors for
his mixed media piece titled "Self
Portrait For his efforts Boone
received a $150 grand prize.
The winner in the prose category
was Carolyn Ebert for her work titl-
ed "Living in Sin in the Bible Belt
She collected first prize of $125. Se-
cond place and $100 in prize money
went to Brian Rangeley for "A
Dogs Life" and third place went to
Keith Stallings for "Winter
Solstice He received $75 in prize
See REBEL, Page 3
Photo By STANLEY LEARY
Practicing For Exams
Unfortunately, class tests come around all too often in order to keep
students in shape for those infamous finals
WASHINGTON (UPI) � President
Reagan is moving cautiously to test
the waters of a possible new rela-
tionship with the Soviet Union. But
he is keeping his guard up, and the
overtures to the new Kremlin leader-
ship are restrained.
Both Secretary of State George
Shultz and national security affairs
adviser William Clark were said to
be in favor of Reagan attending the
funeral of Soviet President Leonid
Brezhnev.
Some observers believe it would
have been a dramatic gesture toward
1 conciliation with little to lose in a
relationship that has nearly hit rock
bottom.
Kremlinologists are studying the
profile of Soviet leader Yuri An-
dropov for clues to the future direc-
tion of the Soviets. If both Reagan
and Andropov continue in the hard
line tradition, the result will be a
standoff or a further deterioration
of relations.
There have been two ways to go
for the superpowers, cooperation or
confrontation, detente or the cold
war. And in some 40 years since
World War II there has been more
confrontation than cooperation.
Vice President George Bush and
Secretary of State George Shultz
outlined U.S. policy toward the
Soviets. It calls for a "realistic ap-
praisal" of the world, military
strength and will power to defend
the West, and a willingness to
negotiate if there is a reciprocal
readiness on the other side.
In a welcoming ceremony Mon-
day for West German Chancellor
Helmut Kohl, Reagan warned
against the massive Soviet "war
machine But at the same time in
Moscow, Bush was saying the
American officials had come "in a
spirit of seriousness and hope to
declare to the Soviet leaders, to the
Soviet people and to the world, that
the United States is devoted to the
pursuit of peace and a reduction of
global tensions
Meantime, gestures have been
made on both sides, neither of
which have been interpreted by of-
ficials, at least, that they are design-
ed to lay the groundwork for some
rapprochement. The Polish govern-
ment has released Solidarity Union
leader Lech Walesa from confine-
ment, a gesture that apparently took
place with Soviet acquiescence. And
Reagan has lifted the sanctions
against the Siberian pipeline.
The lifting of the sanctions was
meant to heal the growing breach
between the allies. But the timing of
the announcement last Saturday,
See UNITED STATES, Page 5
Former Sen. Morgan To Speak
By BOB MORGAN
Staff Writer
Former U.S. Sen. Robert Morgan
will be on campus Monday night to
speak at an open meeting of the
ECU chapter of the North Carolina
Student Legislature. The NCSL ex-
pects Morgan to speak on the role of
students in modern American
government.
Morgan, a democrat, was
defeated in 1980 in his bid for a se-
cond term by Republican John East.
The conservative East is a former
political science profesor at ECU.
The controversial campaign wag-
ed by East was financed heavily by
the Congressional Club, a political
action committee affiliated with
North Carolina's senior U.S.
Senator, Jesse Helms.
In television advertisements
across the state, Morgan was por-
trayed as a free-spending liberal
sympathetic to U.S. aid for com-
munists in Central America. Critics
of the unusually harsh ads claimed
that these were distorted views of
Morgan's record and that he was ac-
tually more conservative than many
of his democratic colleagues in the
Senate.
Since his defeat in 1980, Morgan
has spent his time practicing law and
working on various civic activities in
the state. He worked actively for his
party in the mid-term elections in
October when five congressional
candidates sponsored by the Con-
gressional Club were defeated by
their democratic opponents.
"I think the recent election was a
repudiation of the smear campaigns
that were conducted by the club in
1980 and 1982 Morgan said. He
feels that if the club is going to be
effective in future campaigns it must
change to a much more positive ap-
proach.
The former senator is still active
in politics and has not ruled out the
possiblity of seeking office in the
future.
The meeting begins at 7 p.m.
Monday night and will be held in
room 224 of Mendenhall Student
Center. Anyone interested in hear-
ing Morgan speak is welcome to at-
tend.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 18,1982
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
In the announcement column,
please type it on an announcement
form and send It to The East
Carolinian in care of the produc-
tion manager.
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications Building.
Flyers and handwritten copy on
odd sized paper cannot be ac-
cepted.
There is no charge for an-
nouncements, but space is often
limited. Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you want
and suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column for publicity.
The deadline for announcements
is 1 p.m. Monday for the Tuesday
paper and 3 p.m. Wednesdayy for
the Thursday paper. No an
nouncements received after these
deadlines will be printed.
This space is available to all
campus organizations and depart-
ments.
SOULS
The steering committee will
meet Thursday at 6:00 in room Ml
Mendenhall. A general body
meeting will follow at 7:00.
Everyone is encouraged to attend.
ALL CAMPUS PARTY
The Phi Kappa Tau fraternity is
sponsoring "Chill Thrill '82" on
Friday. Dec. 3from 3:00-until. The
party will be held at the Phi Tau
house at 409 Elizabeth St. There
will be lots of tree beverages, com
petition events, giveaways and a
drawing for a Fuji Supreme bicy-
cle. FGor further information con-
tact any Phi Tau or call 752-4379.
PSI CHI
Mo(o)re on Sex. you can become
informed November 30 at 7:30 in
room 109 Speight. Pst Chi presents
Or. Moore who will lecture on sex
uai deviance. This will be Psi
CLhi's last informative lecture of
this semester. This is open to Psi
Chi members and all other in-
terested persons. Come and learn.
TWIRLERS
The Tar River Twiners invite
ECU students, faculty and staff to
the weekly square dance Instruc-
tion on Thursdays from 7:30 - 9:30
at welcome Middle School (on
highway 1113 toward Bethel).
Beginning level dance instruction
will provide an opportunity for
anyone interested to be oriented to
square dancing, so come on out
and swing your partner. There will
be no fee or obligation for atten-
ding in November. Further infor-
mation is available by calling G.
Hamilton at 757 694?
CO-OPPOSITION �
The U.S. Naval Academy in An-
napolis, MD has a position open
for a Co-op student to work as a
programmer analyst. The student
must have a computer cscience
background and should be a
junior, the work experience Is
alternating for two periods, the
first beginning on January 3, 1962.
For more info contact Carolyn
Powell in the Co-op office, ext.
6979. Rawl 313.
STUDENT RECITALS
On Nov. II at 7:30 in the Fiet
cher Recital, pianist Elaine God
win of Badnson and voice student
Deborah Bennetrt of Durham,
both sen io students in the School of
Music, will perform a joint recital.
Miss Bennett will be accompanied
by Dr. Timothy Hoekman, pianist.
On Friday Nov. 19, three senior
students of the School of Music will
perform in the recital hall. They
ere clerineist Beverly Smith of
New Bern, scheduled to perform
at 7:30 , and voice student Alice
Bowler of Medlin of Hamlet and
saxophone student Matthew Cox of
Collinsvilte, Va who will perform
at 9:00. All student recitals are
open to the public and no admis-
sion is charged.
ACT
The American College Testing
(ACT) will be ottered at East
Carolina University on Saturday,
December 11, 1902. Application
blanks art to be completed and
mailed to ACT Registration, P.O.
Box 414, lowa City, towa 52240. Ap-
plications may be obtained from
the ECU Testing Center, Speight
Building, Room-105.
GRE
The Graduate Record Examina-
tion will be offered at East
Carolina university on Saturday,
December 11, 1902. Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to Educational Testing
Service, Box 966 R, Princeton, NJ
08540. Applications may be obtain-
ed from the ECU Testing Center,
Room 105, Speight Building.
BAKE SALE
The brothers of the ETA-Nu
Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha will be
having a canned food drive and
bake sale in order to give
Thanksgiving baskets to the needy
families in Greenville area. The
cooperation of all ECU students
will be appreciated. There will be
a collection table in front of the
book store on TuesThur.
ECCEA
ECU Cooperative Educational
Association will have its next
meeting on Thursday, December 2
at 4:00 p.m. in 306 Rawl. We'll be
planning the Christmas party so
make plans to attend. All in-
terested persons are welcome.
ART AUCTION
Original works of art will be
featured at an art auction Friday.
Nov. 19 at 7:30 in the Fellowship
Hall of Hooker Memorial Chris-
tian Church of Greenville, located
at the corner of Greenville Blvd.
and Elm St. YHou may preview
the collection beginnig at 6:30 p.m.
JUVENILES
OFFENDERS
What art the alternatives to (ail-
ing juvenile ottenders1 The public
is invited to a symposium on this
crucial issue on Nov. 23 at 7:00
p.m. at the Willis Building at the
corner of First and Reade Sts. A
panel will present the problem and
solutions tolowed by a question
and answer session.
RESIDENCE LIFE
The Department of Residence
Life is accepting applications for
Resident Advisors for Spring
Semester. Applications can be ob-
tained from the Residence Hall
Directors. Area Coordinators and
the Residence Life Office. The
deadline for completed applica-
tions is November 19.
COSTARICA
The deadline tor accepting ap-
plications tor the spring semester
abroad in Costa Rica has been set
at Thursday, Nov. 18. Students in
terestred in participating should
consult, before that date, one of
the following: Dr. Marie Farr,
assistant dean of the College of
Arts and Science. Dr. Simon
Baker, geography; Dr. John Bort,
anthropology; or doctor Edward
Leahy, geography.
ACCOUNTING
POSITION
Northern Telecom in Research
Triangle Park has an opening for a
co-op student to assist in assembl-
ing current information for cost
model, review sales proposals,
and assist in new product sum-
mary and reviews. Requirements
for the position are that the stu-
dent be a junior accounting major
with a GPA of 3.0 or gbetter. The
job starts in January 1983 with a
beginning wage of $6.73hour.
Contact Carolyn Powell in the Co-
op office, Rawl 313, ext. 6979, for
more information.
WZMB
The Electric Rainbow Show
jams Greenville on WZMB, Satur-
day from midnight to 4:00 a.m.
and Sunday from midnight to 3:00
a.m. Saturday the album special
will be the Rush album
"Permanent Waves" and Sunday
the album special will be the new
jimi Hendrix album "Concerts
BIOLOGY CLUB
There will be a Biology Club
Meeting Monday. November 22,
at 7:30 p.m. Guest Speakers will
include Gwendolyn Lee from the
Center for Student opportunities
and Nancy Fillnow from the
Cooperative Education office on
ECU campus. The meeting will be
held in Biology N-102. All in-
terested persons welcome.
FRSSBEE
It's great weather to play
ultimate; Come to the bottom of
college hill Thursday at 4:00 for an
excellent workout. Club meetings
are Mondays, 8:00 in 248, MSC.
ACCOUNTING
JOB
The Family and Psychological
Services In Greenville has an
opening for an accounting co-op
student to work as an accountant.
The student needs to have a
minimum GPA of 2.5 and have
general record keeping
knowledge. The job starts in
December and will involve 10-20
hours of work per week. For more
information, contact Carolyn
Powell in the Co-op office, Rawl
313, ext. 6979.
GOOD LUCK
Good Luck to the ECU ultimate
team, I RATES, who are traveling
to Raleigh this weekend for the NC
Ultimate Championships. The
team plays at the abottom of col-
lege hill Tues and Thurs at 4:00.
Anyone interested may join. Club
meetings are Mon. 8:09
Mendenhall Rm. 248. Good Luck
Irates I
BAPTIST CHURCH
There is a bus route for students
who wish to attend Sunday service
at Sycamore Hill Baptist Church.
The bus leaves the church and
goes into the campus from W. 5th
St. by Cotton, Fleming, and other
dorms at 10:40 am; swinging back
on 5th, going to main campus in
back of dorms and swinging by
Belk Dorm. It leaves and goes
across campus to dorms on South
Side (of campus) no later than
10:50 am, arriving at church at
n.oo. ecGC
The ECGC will meet Mondayt,
November 29 at 7:30 p.m. at the
Newman House. There will be a
speaker. Dr. Susan McCammen,
from the psychology department.
All interested persons are Invited
to attend what promises to be an
interesting discussion.
FACILITIES
CLOSED
Memorial Gymnasium facilities
including the pool, equipment
check-out room, weight room and
gymnasium will close at 6:00 pm
on Wed Nov. 24th. Minges Col
eseum weight room and swimm-
ing pool will not open on Wed
Nov. 24th. All facilities will
resume normal operations on
Mon Nov. 29th.
TURKEY SHOOT
The Department of University
Unions will sponsor a turkey shoot
tonight from 7-10 p.m. in the
Mendenhall Student Center Bowl
ing Alley.
Students may participate with
ID and activity card; faculty, staff
and their dependents must be
Mendenhall Student Center
members in order to participate.
The entry is S2 and only one turkey
per person may be won. The rules
are as follows:
Knock down at least 9 pins on 8
out of 10 rolls or knock down 8 pins
or more on 10 consecutive rolls
and WIN a turkey.
Each participant must wear
socks and present hisher ECU
ID. and activity card or hisher
MSC Membership Card.
Coupons will be awarded to the
winners. These coupons are
redeemable for turkeys which can
be picked up on the bottom floor of
the student center on Wednesday,
Nov. 24, between 2-4:30 p.m.
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines. There are 33
units per line. Each letter, punc-
tuation mark and word space
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space at end of line if word
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac-
cepted over the phone. We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
75c per line or fraction of a line.
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lower case letters.
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Phone.
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R�iam in MKDIA BOARD office (eat EAST
CAROLINIAN office) b 2 e.a. Moaeay kefefc
TiMiday paper and Weaaeaay before Tfcnea
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FOOTSBALL
TOURNAMENT
The Department of University
Unions is sponsoring an all
campus table soccer tournament
in coniunction with the Associa-
tion of College Unions-
international (ACU I).
The tournament will be con-
ducted to determine the one open
doubles team, which may consist
of two men, two women or one
man and women, who will repre-
sent ECU, if sufficient participa
tion permits, in the Association of
College Unions-international
regional face-to-face tournament.
The regional tournament will be
held at the University of Ten
nessee on Feb. 10,11 and 12, 1983.
A registration form, available at
the Billiards Center at Mendenhall
Student Center, must be com-
pleted by each entrant and submit-
ted to the supervisor on duty at the
center by Tuesday, Nov. 30.
The tournament will begin on
Thursday, Dec. 2, at 6 p.m In the
MSC recreation area. Double
elimination format will be follow
ed. Each match will be two out of
three, except the final match
which will be three out of five.
An entry fee of $2 per team is re
quired and payable at the tourna-
ment site. The participants who
will be going to Tennessee will
have the costs of lodging,
transporation, meals and entry
fees paid by Mendenhall Student
Center.
Each participant will be re-
quired to show an ECU ID or
driver's license and activity card
prior to the start of the tourna-
ment. The tournament will be con-
ducted in accordance with a
modified version of the rules and
regulations established by the
World Table Soccer Association.
Each participant must have a
2.0 GPA. This will be verified with
the Registrar's Office. Copies of
the rules are available for use at
the Billiards Center. It is highly
recommended that participants
study the rules prior to the tourna-
ment.
Trophies will be awarded to the
individuals of the first and second
place teams.
PHI BETA
LAMBDA
Omicron Chapter of Phi Beta
Lambda hosted the Fall Member
ship Training Conference for the
State Chapter on Saturday,
November 6. There were over 200
members present from 21 colleges
in North Carolina. All meetings
were held in the Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
HILLEL
There will be a Hillel meeting at
8:00 Monday, 22nd, at MSC. Plans
for upcoming events will be
discussed. All members are asked
to attend If there are any ques-
tions call 7S2 7290.
CATHOLIC
NEWMAN CENTER
The Catholic Newman Center
would like to invite everyone to
join in with us for celebrating
Mass every Sunday in the Biology
Lecture Hall starting at 12:30 and
every Wednesday at 500 at the
Catholic Newman Center located
down at the bottom of College Hill.
SI6MA TAU DELTA
The English honor society will
hid its Fall 1982 induction
ceremony Monday, Nov. 23 at 7:00
-in Austin 209. All new inductees
please try to attend. Current
members are also encouraged to
attend. Our guest speaker will be
Dr. Douglas McMillan who wll
give a presentation on "The
Unicorn Tapestries and Other
Meddieval Things Hope to see
you there.
QUAKER-FRIENDS
A Quaker Silent Meeting for
worship will be held mis Sunday,
11:00-12:00, at Planters National
Bank. Friends and the public are
invited to attend. For further in-
formation call L. S. or Susan
Fetker at 752-0787.
GOSPEL SHOW
The Contemporary Gospel show
on WZMB every Sunday morning
from 6 to 10 a.m. beginning Nov.
21.
BAPTIST STUDENT
UNION
HEY! Do you enjoy friendly
fellowship, good friends and food,
and a chance to be yourself in this
"rat race" environment at ECU?
Then come join us at the Baptist
Student Union where we have din-
ners on Tuesdays at 5:30 for only
J) 75- PAUSE on Thursdays at
7:00 to allow us to take a break
after an almost fulfilling week,
and lots of people just like you who
enjoy others. Call 752-4646 if you
have any questions. Bob Clyde
campus minister.
FRESHMEN
REGISTER
Freshman Registers may be
picked up in the Buccaneer office
on Tuesdays and Thursdays from
2:00 p.m. till 5:00 p.m. The Buc
caneer Office is located on me se-
cond floor of the Publications
Building. NOTE: Remember you
have already paid for mis publica-
tion, so why let your money go to
waste.
SPECIAL
EDUCATION
On NOV. 22, 1982 in room 129
Speight at 4:00 there will be a pro
gram of much interest. As our
November program meeting
SCEC has invited Special Educa
tion Directors from different
school systems to talk about their
system and job requirements.
Please attend, it will be to your ad
vantage.
CONCERT
On Nov. 30,1982 Student Council
for Exceptional Children will host
the Casweil Spirit Singers for a
Christmas concert. The concert
will begin at 3:30 cm in
Auditorium 244 Mendenhall Stu
dent Center. Everyone is invited
and welcome Come out and get
into the Christmas spirit early.
ZATA BETA
TAU
There will be a meeting at 6:00
at the Western Steer. Plans for in-
iation will be discussed all
member must attend.
LAW SOCIETY
The ECU Law Society will meet
Thursday. Nov. IS at 7 30 in room
248 Mendenhall. Marvin K Blount.
a local attorney, will be me guest
speaker.
PHI SIGMA PI
Phi Sigma Pi will now its
Thanksgiving dinner meeting on
Sunday. Nov. 21 at 4:00 pm at the
Methodist Student Center. All
brothers and pledges are asked to
bring a covered dish.
WOLFTRAP
All day Tuesday. Nov. 23 Sigma
Alpha lota. ECU'S nonprofit
women's music fraternity will be
noMing a Rock a-Thon in tne Moby
of the music building in order to
ra.se money to help rebuild Wolf
Trap, a farm park for the perform
ing arts in Vienna. Virginia Dona
fions should be sent to the School
of Music or brought by the lobby
on Nov 23 between 7:00 a.m. and
11:80 p.m. Please make all checks
payable to Sigma Alpha lota.
JOIN THE FAST
join the Fast for a World
Harvest today Demonstrate
your compassion tor the world's
rntnntr Go without eating for iust
today and donate your food money
to Oxfem America to support self
help development protects in the
poorest areas of Asia. Africa ana
Latin America. Skip as many
meals as you can today and there
will be a table in front of me Supp-
ly Store and a boom in Mendenhall
on Friday, where you can donate
the money you saved. For infor
ma'on call 758 4216. Together, we
can make the world a better lace
ALPHA PHI SIGMA
Alpha Phi Sigma will hold a din-
ner meeting at tne Western Sizzim
Steak House on Nov. 29 at 5:00.
Meet at Allied Health
Building!Belk) at 5:00 where we
will meet members of NASW.
ADM and CorSo. All members,
prospective members and staff
art encouraged to attend.
The East Carolinian
Smut tkec�tpi�s cvmmmt
suk 1925
Pubiisned every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ing the summer
The East Carolinian is me of
ficial newspaper of East
Carolina university, owned,
operated, and published for and
by the students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate: S3yearly
The East CareiHiiaa office
arm lecaSed �� � Ota) ��
Suitdme en the campus o ECU.
Greenv.tie NC
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carolinian
I Old South Building. ECU Green
I vilte, NC 27834
Teiephone 7S7-6366.6J67,6389
FALLGRADUATES
Remember to pick up your cap
and gown from the Student Supply
Store. East Carolina University
before leaving school.
These keepsake gowns art yours
to keep, providing the graduation
fee has been paid. For those
receiving the Masters Degree tne
fee pays for your cap and gown,
but there is an extra fee of 811.75
for your nood.
PHI SIGMA IOTA
Phi Sigma iota, the National
Foreign Language Honor Society,
is sponsoring a lecture Oy Dr. John
Bort on Nov. 23 at 8pm mtheCo
fee House at Mendenhall. Or
Bort, of the Dept. of Sociology. An
rnropology and Economics, will
speak on "The Distribution of
Languages m central and South
America and Their Use m E'
nohistoncal Research " A -ejec-
tion will follow the lecture All m
terested persons are welcome �o
attend.
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w-fcsp
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at the
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featuring
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and special guests THE GREEN GRASS CLOGGERS
BEER CHUGGIN' CONTEST
FOR
LADIES AND GENTS
DOORS OPEN AT 6:00P.M.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL
758-5570
ons Over
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Taking Orders now
for Homecoming bouquets.
Large selection of Purple
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Also bouquets available
fur all occasions.
Call Mrs. Tabor
am lime � day or night:
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Fresh Pies Baked Daily
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 18. 1982
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III Dr
Judge Finds Registration Resister Innocent
ONEILLB,PATRICK
Suff Writer
In a complicated
court decision that
cited three different
legal areas of con-
sideration, a federal
judge Monday ruled
that the United States
draft registration law is
invalid while also
dismissing charges
against a young draft-
registration resister
who claimed he was
singled out for prosecu-
tion because of his
vocal dissent.
In his ruling, U.S.
District Judge Terry
Hatter Jr. declared the
1980 draft registration
(Presidential Proclama-
tion 4771) law invalid
on the grounds that the
law was not properly
enacted because it was
published in the
Federal Register one
week prior to the pro-
per date.
The ruling came as a
surprise and initially
confused attorneys and
reporters who had been
covering the case of
draft registration
resister David Wayte,
21, a former Yale
philosophy student
from Pasadena, Calif.
Hatter dismissed
charges against Wayte
on the grounds that he
was selectively pro-
secuted, also citing the
Reagan administra-
tion's refusal to let
defense attorneys see
White House and Pen-
tagon documents or to
question presidential
counselor Edwin
Meese.
"This is not an easy
matter the judge
said. "It involves one's
personal liberties (and)
it involves the three ma-
jor branches of govern-
ment
Justice Department
attorneys immediately
said they will appeal the
entire decision to the
9th Circuit Court of
Appeals.
"The court finds it
hard to believe that the
prosecutive arm of the
government, with ac-
cess to Social Security
records, could not
locate any non-
registrants other than
those who were vocal in
their opposition to
draft registration
Hatter said.
"What this means is
that all the prosecu-
tions that follow from
the same (draft
Rebel Awards Prizes For Student Work
Continued From Page 1
money. Jamie Harris is
prose editor for the
Rebel.
In the poetry
category Katharine
Kimberly took first
place for her poem titl-
ed "The Hothouse
Variety She received
$90 in prize money. Se-
cond went to Edith Jef-
fereys for her poem titl-
ed "Power She was
awarded $70. Don Ball
took third place and a
$40 prize for his poem
called "Letter to a
Brother The Rebel
poetry section is edited
by Bobbie Houston.
Nine categories were
awarded prizes in the
Art section. Each win-
ner was given $50 in
prize money. Diane
Maisel won the Mixed
Media category for her
work titled "Line and
Literal: One Under
The Scupture award
winner was Gregory
Shelnutt for
"Amphibian I An
untitled piece by Bob
Ray won the drawing
division. Photo was
won by Rochel Roland
for "Night Study:
Do you
Frequent
The Library
It's a
CHAMPAGNE JAM
LADIES
o
f
invites you ladies to
have all the "bubbly"
you can drink FREE
between 10-11 p.m.
Don't miss the "TOAST"
at 10:00
at
"The Four Seasons"
Restaurant & Lounge
301 Evans Str. Mall
(Corner of 3rd & Evans
in basement of Minges Bldg.)
"Pilot pens!
You have to
hold onto
them with
two hands
-Rodney Dangerfield
"Get your claws off
my Pilot pen. I don't get
no respect
Awareness
lustration
copped by
mons
"CAT-
Ceramic winner
Steve Jones for
" The it-
prize was
Keith Sim-
for
VAC
was
his
work titled "Vessel
Number 2 Ed Midget
took printmaking
honors for "All Dress-
ed Up With No Place
To Go The painting
division was taken by
Ellen Amendolara for
"The Tenth Gate
and design was won by
Paula Moffitt for her
untitled fiber piece.
The Rebel Art Editor is
Gina Diehl.
"We had good stu-
dent response Gor-
don said. "Which will
contribute to a good
edition of the Rebel.
The contests are what
makes or breaks
the Rebel in the end
he added.
The Rebel first ap-
peared on ECU's cam-
pus in 1958. It was
founded by then pro-
fessor Ovid Williams
Pierce. More than 200
entries were received in
all categories this year.
Winners received
their awards during a
reception and awards
ceremony at the Green-
ville Museum of Art
last week. Attic owner
Tom Haines presented
the awards.
According to Gor-
don all winning art
works are presently on
exhibit for public view-
ing at the museum.
registration) system
would be illegal and
discriminatory if the
court's ruling is
upheld said attorney
Mark Rosenbaum, who
defended Wayte on
behalf of the American
Civil Liberties Union.
According to the
Philadelphia Pised
Central Committee for
Conscientious Objec-
tors, there are still 13
indictees awaiting pro-
secution, but that no
new indictments have
been made by the
government in over a
month.
CCCO, which claims
to be the largest draft
and military counseling
organization in the
country, immediately
released a press state-
ment calling on the
Reagan administration
to cancel draft registra-
tion in wake of the
court's decision, which
they say holds registra-
tion invalid.
"The Committee
also urged the Presi-
dent to drop all pen-
ding prosecutions of
young men CCCO
administrator Mike
Barba told The East
Carolinian in a
telephone interview.
"We think it is high
time for the President
to keep his campaign
promise and end draft
registration
Barba, who said
CCCO counsels people
to follow the dictates of
their conscience on
draft registration, also
said the CCCO was
"delighted that the in-
dictment was dropped
against David Wayte
and we hope that the
appeals courts will rule
favorably on the im-
portant points of laws
raised.
"It's really unclear
just what impact the
case will have said
Ken Hennis, a
counselor with the
Raleigh based Draft In-
formation Service
(D1S) "It's clear to me
that there is selective
proscution going on
Another DIS
Counselor Russell Her-
man said he was glad to
see the decision in the
Wayte case which he
claimed was long over-
due. "I'd rather have
had them throw it (the
draft registration law)
out as being un-
constitutional because
the draft violates the
13th Amendment
which prohibits in-
voluntary servitude
Herman said.
Herman agreed with
Hennis that the present
registration law was be-
ing selectively ad-
ministered and that he
felt the ruling would
probably make people
less inclined to register.
FAMOUS PIZZA
Dine in or Fast Free Delivery
HOT OVEN SUBS.
Lasagna. Spaghetti, Hamburgers
HAPPY HOUR 2 Close '199
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DAILY SPECIALS
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NOT FOR
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Credit Card Calculator
with purchase of any
ART CARVED
CLASS RING
Nov. 17,18,19
WedThurs Fri.
Time: 9-4
STUDENT STORE LOBBY
j W
mGHTS
AT T H E
ATTIC
WED. STUDENTS
FREE CTILL 10
THUR. LADIES FREE
FRI. DORMS FREE
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Restaurant
105 Airport Road Greenville, N.C.
People hove
o hunger for
my Pilot Fineliner be
cause they're always
fishing tor a fine point pen
mat writes through cartoons And
Pilot charges only 79� for it.
Peoptog their hands on It and - �
forget rs my pen. So I don't get no respect! I dornttww out any Dene
wtlh my Pilot Razor Point It writes whip-cream smooth
with an extra tine tine, its metal collar helps keep
me point from going squish-so people
love it For only 89� they
should buy their own pen
01; 3how some re
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ALL YOU
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Thursday Only
Shrimp
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Flounder
Trout
Or Combination of Any 2
Served with French Fries or Baked Potato, Cole Slaw, and Hushpuppies
Regular Sunday thru Thursday 11:00 A.M.� 9:00 P.M.
Hours: Friday and Saturday 11:00 A.M. to 10:00 P.M.
105 Airport Road Greenville. N.C.
758-0327
Bob Herring, Manager wishes to invite everyone out to enjoy a fine
Seafood Dinner. He'll be In the Greenville Restaurant from now
on, So come by and say Hello.
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Bob Herring, Manager
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Marti caattftri aajahueMB
,





THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 18, 1982 J
I wanted to
j plenty),
i my bir-
giving an
tendencies.
c be the
to count
I last year's
you have
Inodded in
looks of a
knality of a
land ability
a sexual
Ted to ECU
Greenville,
�d todav.
Ipons are
pponent's
can strike
leave the
le to res-
Ick is laun-
ultimate
kation and
jge. This
U.S.S.R.
knch their
kces in an
ig" status
ting to the
starting a
e Kremlin,
make the
lypse more
let that the
itch these
then both
Iward laun-
want our
ith nuclear
lidd that the
many dif-
ly different
jace. Sure,
ty shows up
ace is an
and many
ig for it.
If or Social
e made ap-
jnd the U.S.
ligence and
Imake them
ient Reagan
insmen and
la Klansman
Iwick Jacobs
Items Mgmt.
'Nice' Party Improves Greek-Faculty Relations
By GREG HIDEOUT
NmUtar
The Panhellenic
Council, an inter-
sorority organization,
held a party Tuesday
night. There were lots
of people at the party,
most of them girls. This
was so because, for the
most part, girls make
up most of the
sororities.
The other party-
members. They were a
minority, though. The
faculty members were
there as guests of the
council � they wanted
to promote better
"Greek and faculty
relations
The house the party
was at was big, real big.
It was nice, too. It
belonged to all the girls
at ECU who called
themselves
'A-oh-pies
the girl at the door,
"I'm here to cover this
for The East Caroli-
nian
"Come in she said.
She was very nice.
"Can I help you with
anything?"
I thought about the
question as I peered
through the remaining
screen door, the last in
a series of three. There
were lots of people in-
side, dressed up in
"Yes I said, as I
looked down at my
worn-out Nikes,
"could you tell me
who's in charge?"
She pointed around
the corner and told me
the person I wanted to
see was standing at a
table there. She smiled
and said bye. "Hmm
I mused to myself,
"nice person
Well, I made it
around the corner and
found the person I was
goers were faculty "Hello I said to varying degrees
United States And Soviet Union
Have Chance For Cooperation
Continued From Page 1
without all the
allies on board, ap-
peared to be a signal to
the Soviets that the
United States is ready
to do business any time
they are.
Each time, the
United States and the
Soviet Union has
sought a common
ground of understan-
ding, the world has
breathed easier. But
those times have been
few and far between.
There was the long
hiatus from the
Bolshevik revolution
until Franklin
Roosevelt recognized
the Soviet Union in the
early 30s. In World
War II, the two nations
cooperated mutually
against a common
enemy.
In 1946 at Fulton
College in Missouri,
Winston Churchill
observed that an iron
curtain had fallen
across Europe.
The Cold War lasted
through most of the
'50s until Dwight
Eisenhower and Nikita
Khrushchev decided to
break the ice in the
spirit of coexistence.
Doors were opened and
a new spirit of
understanding
developed for a brief
period.
Then when John
Kennedy met with
Khrushchev in Vienna
in 1961, they discussed
world problems, and
Kennedy, shocked at
the Soviet leader's
tough stance, pro
phetically announced,
"it's going to be a long,
cold winter
Clearly, Reagan has
a chance now to seek a
better relationship, and
he has indicated he is
willing to do that.
Meantime, both the
United States and the
Soviet Union are plung-
ing ahead with their
military buildups while
talking arms reduc-
tions. And the question
of peace or belligerency
remains tenuous.
looking for. "Hi, I'm
from The East Caroli-
nian
"Oh, hi the person
in charge, Carter Fox,
said. She said it was
nice of me to come and
to help myself and look
around. She handed me
a nametag, a nice
nametag. "Thank
you I said.
I asked exactly what
is this party about. She
said it was a party for
the faculty and
sororities that would
help promote better
relations and mutual
understanding between
the two during ECU's
75th anniversary.
"Oh I said, "that's
nice
Well, 1 proceeded to
mingle, doing my best
socialite impression �
well, as best I could do
with my Lcvis, sweat-
shirt and old winter
coat on.
I walked into one
room, a nice room,
where two girls were
sitting. I introduced
myself and asked what
they thought of the par-
ty.
"It's nice one said,
while sipping Paul
Masson from a plastic
cup.
"Are you required to
be here?" I inquired.
"It's highly recom-
mended the other
one said. I thought
about this. I was sitting
down. I wondered,
"What if a girl has
something to do?"
Well, they must have
been reading my mind.
"If you have a lot to do
it's okay, but it's only
for two hours That's
nice, I thought to
myself. Two nice girls.
The party was a suc-
cess. Everyone seemed
to be having a good
time. The main idea
these young ladies were
trying to get across was
that sororities do good
things.
"Every sorority has a
philanthropy one
nice young girl told me.
Very nice, I thought.
March of Dimes. The
Cancer Foundation.
The Arthritis Founda-
tion. All these wor-
thwhile causes receive
help from sororities.
I mingled some
more. I was getting hot
� I had forgotten to
take off my jacket.
There's Dr. Meyer, and
there's Dean Bailey.
There are faculty here.
There's an English
teacher. "Well, I better
talk to them I
thought to myself.
"Hi I said to the
English teacher, "I'm
from The East Caroli-
nian. How do you like
the party?"
"It's nice she said,
"very nice
The Panhellenic
Council is made up of
girls from the different
sororities on campus.
Carter Fox is the presi-
dent. Cindy Neilsen is
the vice president. Bet-
sy Steinert is the
Treasurer. But, the
president told me, the
one who put the party
together was the
secretary, Sue
Richards. "She
deserves all the credit
Well, it was getting
time to go, so I started
to make my way back
to the front door. 1 said
good bye to all the peo-
ple I had met.
"Goodbye they said.
I walked through the
doors and down the
steps, thinking about
the assignment I had
just finished. "Well I
said to myself, "it was
a nice party
It appeared as
though the faculty and
Greeks were getting
along. A good idea.
I'm glad I went.
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GREENVILLE SQUARE
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LILLIAN FLYTHE OF
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with purchase of any
ARTCARVED CLASS RING

valid only on dates listed below
Dates: Nov. 17,18, 19th
Time: 9-4:00
Place: Student Supply
Store Lobby
MERR Y CHRISTMAS
from
ARTCARVED! $25 off on alll4k Gold Rings
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I
I
i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
NOVEMBER 18, 1982
Page 6
Julius Baker
Flutist Gets Crummy Treatment
Photo By STANLEY LEAHY
Renowned flutist Julius Baker played to a house of, for the most part, heathen imbeciles on Monday night.
By MARTY HARDIN
Staff Writer
Greenvile music lovers were fortunate in having the
opportunity to hear Julius Baker, the principle flutist
for the New York Philhamonic Orchestra, in concert at
Hendrix Theatre on Monday evening. Approximately
700 people were present for what I feel was one of Mr.
Baker's most difficult concerts in the area of presenta-
tion � to a not-so-well-mannered audience � in an
acoustically poor hall. Baker presented a fluid, soothing
and extremely professional selection of p:es from the
19th and 20th centries.
Baker, during a break in Robert Muczynski's Sonata,
Op. 14, appeared to have a great deal of difficulty ad-
justing to the poor lighting system in Hendrix Theatre. I
could also detect changes in playing style to adjust to the
poor acoustics, which were not at all acceptable for a
performer and artist of Julius Baker's level.
He and his pianist, Lisa Emenheiser, played flawless-
ly. Baker did not, to many people's dismay, attempt to
appeal to the masses' idea of what a virtuoso flutist
should do in a concert performance; not trying to be
Jean-Pierre Rampal by playing tacky French pieces as a
vehicle to show his abilities nor lowering himself to play
trite pieces as does James Gullaway in his nauseating
renditions of "Annie's Song"(sorry John Denver and
James Gullaway fans). Instead, the Muczynski piece
showed musicianship rather than implying � as the
Romantic pieces tend to do with abounding cadenzas �
sweet harmonies and runs in great excess. While playing
the opening piece, many people were still entering the
hall to find seats, a distraction which could ruin a per-
formance, but Baker did not let it and kept control of
the situation.
The piece that followed, Pierre Sancan's modern
Sonatine, which was written in 1946, showed the true
romantic voice of the flute in the hands of a master. I
was left feeling that Baker had indeed rendered the piece
with soul and heart.
After a short intermission, Baker player Cesar Fran-
ck's Sonata in A Major with great skill but unfortunatly
with poor attacks which were not due to bad playing
habits but to age, which strikes the embrochure not
allowing the flutist to attack notes in the upper register
of the flute's voice. At present, Rampal is having the
same problem in his appearences.
Mr. Baker closed out the performance with an exqusite
rendition of Claude Debussy's Afternoon of a Faun.
The piece was brought forth in the epitome of the im-
pressionistic style. Shortly after the prelude someone's
lens fell out of his glasses, almost totally destroying the
mood of the piece as well as Baker's concentration. This
incident was just one in a series of coughs, movement
and rattling of candy wrappers, which was a poor reflec-
tion of the audience's understanding of a concert-goer's
etiquette. Julius Baker has my praise for undergoing all
these distractions and presenting an encore of the third
movement of Charles Marie Quido's Romance.
After a beautiful rendition of the encore piece, Baker,
on his second bow, saw about 25 people giving a stan-
ding ovation while about 250 people were making a mad
dash for the door. If anyone was dissapoinied with the
concert given, keep this in mind, what kind of perfor-
mance would you give to a group of people who did not
have the respect, manners or understanding that you
deserve? 1 think it is clear why after the concert Mr.
Baker said that he was glad it was over and happy he
could leave.
Julius Baker teaches at the New England Conser-
vatory of Music and is also on the faculty of the Julliard
School of Music. Mr. Baker may be heard on RCA Vic-
tor, Decca, Vanguard, Westminister and Desmar recor-
ding labels.
Julius Baker presented a master class at the ECU
School of Music, where a select number of flute
students played for a critique.
Bowling For Turkey
Tonight At Mendenhall
The Department of University Unions will sponsor a
turkey shoot tonight from 7-10 p.m. in the Mendenhall
Student Center Bowling Alley.
Students may participate with ID and activity card:
faculty, staff and their dependents must be Mendenhall
Student Center members in order to participate. The en-
try is $2 and only one turkey per person may be won.
The rules are as follows:
Knock down at least 9 pins on 8 out of 10 rolls or
knock down 8 pins or more on 10 consecutive rolls and
WIN a turkey.
Each participant must wear socks and present his her
ECU I.D. and activity card or his her MSC Member-
ship Card.
Coupons will be awarded to the winners. These
coupons are redeamable for turkeys which can be pick-
ed up on the bottom floor of the student center on
Wednesday, Nov. 24, between 2-4:30 p.m.
tw?
Rounding
this wetkei
old and ni
above in a
at 3:30 p
For )i'ur

All
J
i
JiSt
Fifteen- Year- Old Maggie Ree
Sings Blues Like No One Else
Maggie Ree and her accompanist
father will perform tonight at 9p.m.
in Mendenhall Student Center's
Hendrix Theatre. The concert is
free.
By SUSAN CLARY
The (Greenville Ne�s
SPARTANBURG, S.C. �
"Every day 1 have the blues; every
day, every day I have the blues
Well, if you see me worry, it's cause
it's you I hate to lose
The piano is mournful, the voice
husky and sensuous � full of the
tears and gutsy hold on life that
broke the hearts of Billie Holiday's
audiences over and over again.
The music slows to an end and the
owner of that addicting voice
whispers "thank you" and flashes a
tiny grin � the slightly flustered,
head-ducking grin of any 15-year
old caught in the spotlight. Because
that's what she is � a freckle-faced,
diminutive 15-year old with, as she
puts it, "30 year-old vocal chords
"That's what people tell me I
have, and I do have a low voice
Meg Hughey explains breathlessly.
"But it's probably because I got
nodules in my vocal chords when I
was little from screaming so loud
trying to sing. My parents say I was
screaming in the bathtub at 2. But I
don't remember that
Margaret Ree Hughey is one-half
of the Maggie Ree Duo. Her father,
Bobby Hughey, makes up the se-
cond half, but admits he is the
Pop Orthomolecular Medicine
Seen As A Viable Alternative
This is the second of two parts.
By JAY STONE
Muff Writer
It is indeed the viewpoint of many within the
academic establishment that the subject of or-
thomolecular medicine has been resolved. In speaking
with Dr. James Mathis, Director of Medical psychiatry
at ECU, the East Carolinian learned that he is in agree-
ment with the statements made in Brain & Behavior.
"Orthomolecular psychiatry is not an accepted
therapy Dr. Mathis said "The debate is over as far as
the National Institute of Mental Health is concerned.
They have investigated orthomolecular medicine
thoroughly and it has been proven to be of absolutely no
therapeutic value
In explanation of orthomolecular physicians' claims
that they are able to cure from 70 to 80 percent of the
schizophrenic patients who they treat. Dr. Mathis said:
"They're the only ones who say they have that kind
of a cure rate He added "You can never discount the
article of faith. If somebody thinks they are going to get
well on Tar river water they frequently do
In actual point of fact, however, in the course of do-
ing research for this story the East Carolinian has
discovered that the Canadian Schizophrenia Founda-
tion and the Schizophrenia Foundations of America
agree with the 70 to 80 percent cure rate figure. The
Schizophrenia Foundations of America, of which there
are about forty chapters nationwide, are entirely
volunteer non-profit organizaitons. Their membership
is composed largely of family members of former pa-
tients or present patients. Sometimes former patients
also become members.
Moreover, there are at least three mental hospitals in
the country which are receiving state funding to employ
orthomolecular principles in the treatment of
schizophrenia: Coral Gables in Fort Lauderdale,
Florida, Bryce State Hospital in Tuscaloosa, Alabama,
and Nassua County Hospital in Manhasset, New York.
This does not include the more than two thousand (this
figure comes from the Huxley Institute) orthomolecular
physicians who are in private practice in clinics or in-
stitutions like the Brain-Bio Center in Skillman, New
Jersey.
According to Dr Cynthia Bisbee, a PhD and Direc-
tor of Patient Education at Bryce State Hospital the or-
thomolecular program there has yielded a large measure
of success.
"We took a number of people who hadn't responded
to anything else and we've had a lot of success with im-
proving their condition She said "As far as the
general population goes they have improved as a group.
One particular benefit of the vitamin therapy is that it
seems to improve theefficacy of the neuroleptic medica-
tion (For instance, Thorazine, Holdol, and the other
phenothiazines). We use vitamin C and niacinamide in
particular. Vitamin C has been shown to be an antip-
sychotic while niacinamide has a tranqmlizing effect
In explanation of why the state of Alabama is funding
the application of orthomolecular techniques at Bryce
State Dr. Bisbee said:
"We're fortunate to have a Commissioner of Mental
Health who is favora-jle to orthomolecular medicine. It
was at his request that ihc orihmolecular program here
was begun
Any serious examination of the topic of or-
thomolecular medicine must include mention of the
work of Abram Hoffer and Humphrey Osmonds. Hof-
fer and Osmonds were the original founders of or-
thomolecular psychiatry. Their double-blind ex-
periments (experiments in which patients are divided in-
to a control group and an experimental gorup. The con-
trol group is given a placebo and the experimental group
See TREATMENT, Page 7
"lesser half
"My job is father, teacher and
fellow performer � and when it gets
to the fellow performer, she has to
carry me Hughey explained with a
smile. "Every once in a while father
slips into teacher, but never into
performer
Meg says teacher slips into father,
too. And sometimes "it's pure
pain she says ruefully.
"When he first started me on jazz
piano it was pain she said. "I
thought he was cruel and I used to
cry in the car. Now I'm glad he
worked me so hard, but then
And work her Bobby Hughey did
� pouring more than 25 years of his
own experience as a professional
jazz trumpet player into the
daughter he quit work three years
ago to work with exclusively. "I
hated to stand by and waste her
talent; it was silly to waste it he
said.
His wife, Betty, is the family
bread winner now, as president and
director of the Horizon Day Care
Center on East Main Street in Spar-
tanburg, S.C. She, too, is a profes-
sional musician who sang with "the
big bands" in the Piedmont for
years and worked professionally
with her husband after their third
child was born. "I've always been a
frustrated singer she said.
She left her singing career when
Meg was born, and had worried
when Hughey decided to quit the
day care business and devote
himself to teaching Meg. "I was
afraid she'd be denied her
childhood Mrs. Hughey said.
"He used to work me hard, too, and
I'd think 'that child should be out
playing But now that I've seen the
results, I know it's the best thing he
ever did
Hughey began teaching Meg
theory and harmony at 7 years old
while she was taking piano lessons
through the Converse College pre-
college program. "But we had
prepared her so well to get the
scholarship, they couldn't find a
spot for her he said. "She'd been
taught what they were teaching
So Meg quit Converse and began
taking lessons from Hughey.
"That's when the duo really started
coming about he said.
Thur
SU!
Maggie A Child Of The Blues
Fifteen-year-old prodigy Meg Hughey (Maggie Ree) has been appearing
at arts festivals, date, colleges aad beaefits since she was thirteea. She
was once told by one of her Maes Mob, the great Ray Charles, to "Take
everythiag yoa caa get. Good jobs, loasy jobs, beaky tonks.
ballrooms Yoo've got to he kicked ia the backside aad for God's sake
have taieat
�' - �
�P�f � �-
T
VI





t
tntration. This
is, movement
a poor reflec-
concert-goer's
mdergoing all
re of the third
nance.
piece. Baker,
giving a stan-
�making a mad
linted with the
lind of pertor-
lc who did not
mg that you
concert Mr.
and happy he
(land Conser-
of the Julliard
on RCA Vic-
Desmar recor-
at the ECU
bet of flute
key
nhall
ill sponsor a
Mendenhall
activity card;
)( Mendenhall
:ipate. The en-
may be won.
lof 10 rolls or
iitive rolls and
jresent hisher
ISC Member-
linners. These
jh can be pick-
lent center on
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 18, 1982
Bond Fest On For Sunday
Rounding out a full schedule of Student Union sponsored films for
this weekend is a James Bond Film Festival that features both the
old and new bonds, Sean Connery and Roger Moore (pictured
above in a scene from For Your Eyes Only). Dr. So will be shown
at 3:30 p.m followed by You Only Live Twice at 5:45 and, finally,
For Your Eyes Only at 8.
NOTIC
All Fraternity and Sorority
Jewelry in stock NOW at
DEALER COSTS!
Limited time only.
Sorry-No special orders,
Layaways, or refunds.
Floyd G. Robinson
Jewelers
on thP mall downtown
INDEPENDENT
JEWELERS
758-2452
Thurs. Spaghetti Special $2.49 all you can eat 5-9
with Bruce Frye
ri. Happy Hour 4-7
withLahnn & Lofton Finite
Sun. Lasagna Special $2.49 all you can eat 5-9
Mon. Pizza & Pasta s2.79 all you can eat 5-9
i23E.5thStr.
752-7483
New Treatment Controversial
Continued From Page 6
is administered the substance or the
technique to be tested and neither
the patient or the administering
physician knows which is which.
Only the persons who design the ex-
periment can evaluate the result.)
done over the course of seven years,
from 1952 to 1959 are still cited by
many orthomolecular physicians to-
day as being conclusive experimen-
tal proof of the efficacy of niacin,
niacinamide and nicotinic acid in
the treatment of schizophrenia.
In discussing the controversy sur-
rounding orthomolecular psychiatry
with the East Carolinian Dr. Hum-
phrey Osmonds asserted:
"Since we did the first double-
blind studies in psychiatry we are in
a better position to discuss them
than anybody else. They were very
thorough and well-contolled
studies. On the other hand, not a
single orthomolecular doctor was
involved with the 1973 APA task
force report on the orthomolecular
medicine.How can they expect to
duplicate our results if they can't
follow orthomolecular procedures
correctly? This violates their own
rules for procedure. According to
their rules a task force is supposed
to have a representative or represen-
tatives from the therapy under in-
vestigation. So the 1973 task free
report on orthomolelcular
psychiatry fails their own criterion.
Dr. Hoffer and myself pointed this
out in our reply to the task force
report
According to the textbook Brain
& Behavior Tardive Dyskenesia is
an incurable side effect which
results from taking neuroleptic or
antipsychotic medications. It in-
volves uncontrollable twitching of
the facial muscles and extremities
such as the hands and feet and a
shuffling walk. The book estimates
that fifty percent of the people who
are on these medications for two
years or longer will develop Tardive
Dyskenesia.
"Since 1972" Dr. Osmonds said
"there has been a tremendous
recognition of the fact that Tardive
Dyskenesia is often a result of treat-
ment with the major tranquilizers.
There are three varieties, one of
which is curable, one of which is
questionable, and the other of
which is incurable
Because of this side effect and
because of the "less than optimal"
cure rate of conventional therapies,
(which is generally accepted to be
approximately 50 percent) or-
thomolecular physicians maintain
that the search for alternative
therapies merits more emphasis than
it has been receiving.
When discussing the safety of
megadoses of the vitamins which or-
thomolecular physicians employ Dr.
Osmonds declares "Everyone, even
the people who disagree with or-
thomolecular techniques, agree that
the substances we employ and the
amounts which we prescribe are not
toxic
In explanation of the APA's con-
tinuing refusal to reevaluate its posi-
tion on orthomolecular medicine
Dr. Osmonds agrees with those who
find Thomas Khun's analysis of
"paradigm" shifts illuminating.
In his book The Structure of
Modern Scientific Revolutions
Khun shows that most new
discoveries in science and medicine
take about fifty years in order to
reach general acceptance by the
scientific community. According to
Khun, this lag between a discovery
and its application is due to the tact
that older members of a scientific
establishment have formed an at-
tachment to their belief systems or
"paradigms
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
NOVEMBER 11 1982 Page 8
Pirates Carry Hot Offense To Philly
B KEN BOLTON
tssislani sptK hdiior
Entering the final game of the
1982 season against Temple, the
ECU Pirates need only 64 yards to
go oer the 4,000 yard mark in total
offense.
This would be the first time in Ed
Emory's three years at ECU that the
Pirates have eclipsed this mark.
Two years ago, the Pirates only ac-
cumulated 3,043 yards.
In a record-breaking year that has
seen NCAA Di. 1 games averaging
over 700 yards total offense between
the two teams, the Pirates have kept
pace. ECU is currently ranked 17th
in the NCAA in rushing offense,
with oer 250 yards per game.
According to ECU head coach Ed
Emory, this year's new offensive
back field formation, under the
direction of tirst-year offensive
coordinator Larry Beckish, is a ma-
jor reason for the Pirates' success.
"The I-formation has a lot to do
with it, but it is also the case of
players being better said Emory.
The increase in production has
also led to an increase in fans. A
new record attendance mark has
been established by ECU already
this year with one game yet to play.
Thus far. the Pirates hae played
before 305,304 spectators, just over
the 199 record oi 305,259.
ECU is sure to keep up their at-
tendance average of 30,530 fans per
game when they face the Temple
University Owls this weekend in
Philadelphia.
The game against Temple will be
played in Veteran's Stadium, the
home of the NFL's Philadelphia
Eagles as well as the home of the
Owls.
This will be the first meeting bet-
ween the two teams, and Emory is
worried about the extremely
physical nature of the Owls, and the
prevailing elements of emotion.
"They have good receivers and a
very productive quarterback, but
the big thing is that they have the
best offensive line of any team
we've faced this year Emory said
at his weekly press conference.
"The fact that their coach,
Wayne Hardin, announced his
resignation effective after our game
is yet another obstacle we must
overcome
Hardin. who is the most suc-
cessful coach in Temple history,
declared his resignation after last
week's 27-24 loss to Colgate, a
defeat which dropped the Owls'
record to 4-6.
While coping with Temple's in-
centive, the Pirates will be careful to
avoid a letdown after last week's
emotional victory over William ?
Mary. The 31-27 victory assured
ECU of its' first winning season in
three years.
The Pirates now have n;ne winn-
ing seasons in their last 11 years
under three head coaches.
"1 have not spent a more joyful
moment in the dressing room than
after the win over William &
Mary responded Emory. "The
players are now highly motivated to
be 7-4
Temple's 1982 record of 4-6 is
deceiving. The Owls have played
such national powers as Penn State,
Boston College, Pittsburgh and
West Virginia.
ECU q.uarterback Kevin Ingram,
who lives only 20 minutes away
from Veteran's Stadium, had some
impressive stats in the last two
games.
Against William & Mary, Ingram
scored three touchdowns, a high for
an individual at ECU this season.
That accounted for 18 of the
Pirates' 31 points. Having been tab-
bed the starting quarterback in the
last two games appears to have set
well with Ingram. He's hit 65 per-
cent of his passes and directed ECU
to its' only two road victories of the
year.
Ingram, a Philadelphia native,
began his college career at
Villanova, but transferred to ECU
when the Wildcats dropped their
football program two years ago.
Three other Pirates will be return-
ing to their home state. Keith
Brown, Harrisonburg; Gerry
Rogers, Pottstown; Tom Mitchell,
Lancaster will all be heading home.
One more field goal and freshman
sensation Jeff Heath will tie the
school record for most field goals in
one season. Heath picked up his
13th of the season against William &
Mary.
The Pirates hope to return home
from "The City Of Brotherly Love"
with happy hearts, a feeling which
would be gained by a victory over
the Owls.
Tony Baker leaps through the middle against William and Marv.
PlKl'O B CINDY MALL
Prominent Georgian Byner
Sparks Talented ECU Offense
ECU leading rusher Earnest Byner
Photo By CINDY WALL
Pirates Demolish Canadian Team In
Exhibition Game A t Minges Coliseum
B kE BOLTON
�W iu Sp ttsEd �
The ECU Pirates have benefited
all year from the tremendous pool
of talent that has existed in the of-
fensive back field.
One of the most prominent
members o that talented group is
Earnest Byner. a junior from
Milledgeville. Ga. Byner. a 5-10.
205-pound physical education ma-
jor, is currently ECL's leading
rusher with 722. yard Byner's
amount is the most yards that an
ECU back has gained since Anthony
Collins picked up over 1100 yards in
1979.
As a sophomore at Baldwin High
School, Byner wa- a quarterback.
He was switched to running back
before his junior year, a move that
has proven to be a wise one.
Byner gained over 900 yards in
just seven games his senior year in
high school. He was recruited by
Georgia Tech's out-of-state
recruiting coordinator � Ed
Emory.
When Emory came to ECU, so
did Byner.
His biggest worry about attending
East Carolina was being many miles
away from home.
"At first, 1 thought it would
bother me being away from home
Byner related. "It was a totally new
atmosphere, but 1 like the surroun-
dings and I've met a lot of people.
The biRgest adjustment 1 had to
make wa- all ot the studying
Bvner has made a lot ot tr:end-
on the field and around the dorm
room. The Pirate baktieid teature-
three powerful running back-
beside- Bvner. I ne to.
Bvner. Reggie Branch. Jimmv
Walden and freshman Tony B� -
have accumulated over 1900 yards
in 1982
"It reaiiv helps to have so manv
good backs available responc
Byner. It one oi us gets I red, so-
nieone just as govxl can come in. It's
less pressure on us individually
Byner had his finest game a- a
Pirate last weekend against William
A. Marv He gained 180 vards on 2;
carries, including a season-high
36-yard touchdown run in the third
quarter.
�1 took more time in nnding the
hole, running three-quarter speed
explained Byner. "Thecoaches nave
been trving to get the fullback- to
slow up a bit in getting to the hole
all year. Saturday, it jus! seemed to
fall in place and holding oil from
full speed reaiiv worked
One of the main reasons tor the
Pirates' offensive success this
season has been the installment of
an l-fonnation and the addition of
ofIensive coordinator Larrv Beckish
to the coaching staff.
"Coach Beckish has pushed us
hard all vear because he knew that
the potential was there stated
Byner. "Other teams can't ke on
our running came because we have a
good passing threat now
Byner, who enjoys basketba ind
tract - well as football, hasad
much time foi othei pursuits Cti -
vear with ECL's schedule that
c ides seven road trips 'At firsl I
didn't hke all of the games
Bvr.e: said. "But I like pla ng
front ,x' big crowd so 1 don't m
road games too n t
One � ie things that has
bothered Byner th s treat -va
negative talk thai was associate
with coach Ed En 's contract ex-
tension. As Byner put. Emon - d
job. "He's bi
us a long wav. and I'm giac he's
coming back
The Pirates will be I og to run
their record to 7-4 this weeKer.c;
when thev trav� to Temple Univer-
sity . Byner. wl to
Philadelphia, is looking forward tc
the tnp. He doesn't tnink the resign-
ment of Temple head coach Wayne
Hardin will affect the outcome ol
the game. "From out standpo
we're looking tor win nurr
-even replied Byner. "We're
going to have to go up there and do
our best
Regardless of the outcome of this
weekend's game, the 19S2 ECU
Pirates have been a success. One of
the main reasons Tor this has been
the offensive back field. And since
he is onlv a junior. ECU fans can
look forward to another year of
tackle-breaking runs by Earnest
Bvner.
B CINDY PLEAS ANTS
sporii r dilor
Making their first debut of the
season, the ECU men's basketball
team completely overwhelmed
Carleton University of Canada in an
exhibition game Wednesday night,
89-44.
Leading by 14 points at halftime,
the Pirates jumped to a 20-point
lead in the first few minutes of the
second half.
Guards Bruce Peartree and Tony
Robinson combined for 14 points in
the first eight minutes of" the final
half to give the Pirates a 67-42 lead
with 11:45 remaining.
CU apparently had trouble with
the Pirates' full-court press, and
scored onlv 15 points in the second
half to ECU'S 40.
New head coach Charlie Harrison
has been wanting to expose his
players to a competitive situation so
he could make any adjustments
needed before the season opens on
Nov. 27.
What were Harrison's observa-
tions of his newly-acquired team?
"I'm not overly disappointed, but
I'm not real confident right now
either he said. "I did see a team
playing some defense at times
The Pirates played a tight man-to-
man defense in the first half before
switching to a zone defense in the se-
cond half. Harrison said the Bucs
have mainly been concentrating on
man-to-man defense, but will have
to practice much more on the zone
defense.
"If we do a good job defensively,
the biggest part of our job is finish-
ed Harrison said. "You can't win
basketball games by giving them se-
cond shots
In the first half, ECU freshman
forward Johnny Edwards rebound-
ed to score and then slammed a one-
hand dunk to give the Pirates a 4-0
lead. But Carleton retaliated, and
the two teams battled for the lead up
until the final 11 minutes of the
half.
The Pirates began pulling ahead
after senior forward Thorn Brown
and sophomore guard Mike Fox
pumped in two jumpshots each to
put the Bucs up, 27-20.
After a five-second call on
Carleton, ECU gained control once
again. Senior forward Charles
Green's lay-up and a corner shot
from Barry Wright gave the Bucs a
33-24 lead with 7:51 remaining.
Robinson then nabbed two steals
in a row, and was fouled by
Carleton's Ricky Powers in the final
minutes of the half. A technical foul
was called on the Carleton bench
after the play, and two freethrows
boosted the Pirates to a 10-point
lead. Fox and Wright each scored
two with less than a minute left to
give ECU a 48-34 lead.
The Pirates had five players to
score in double figures. Peartree,
who averaged 8.3 points last year,
was the Bucs leading scorer with 16
points. Green followed with 15; for-
ward freshman Johnny Edwards ad-
ded 13 and senior forward Thorn
Brown finished with 11.
Carleton guard Ricky Powers,
who averaged 24.7 points for his
team last year, scored 16 points to
lead CU. "
Green, who averaged 11.3 points
and 4.3 rebounds per game last
year, pulled down 14 rebounds
against the Canadian team. Ed-
wards grabbed 11 and Wright was
responsible for seven.
Rebounding is one area where
Harrison has expressed concern,
and although the Bucs appeared to
have dominated the boards, the
head coach said he feels the Pirates
can have a much better showing.
"We're very small, but you don't
have to be big to rebound he said.
As far as shot selection, Harrison
said the Pirates showed good judge-
ment at times. ECU made 40 of 70
attempted shots for a 57.1 percen-
tage total.
Harrison also stressed the need
for consistency in execution. "I
thought we were too rushed he
said. "It's like I've said before, they
keep going for the homeruns. They
don't want to go for the singles
The Pirates begin the season at
Duke University on Nov. 27.
Gametime is 7:30 p.m.
Harrison Announces 1st
Pirate Basketball Signee
Photo By OAKY PATTERSON
ECU's Johnny Edwards
GREENVILLE, N.C - East
Carolina University head basketball
coach Charlie Harrison announced
today the signing of his first recruit
since becoming head coach. This
also marks the first early commit-
ment in the history of Pirate basket-
ball.
William Grady. 6-2, 1 "0-pound
big guard, of Eastside High School
in Patterson, NJ. has signed both an
East Carolina grant-in-atd and the
national letter of intent. The signing
comes within the Nov. 10-1" early
commitment date, a new ruling with
the NCAA.
"W illiams is the type young man
that not only can play various roles
on the basketball team . but will be a
great asset off the court with his
tremendous attitude said Har-
rison. "He is a very enthusiastic
young man that has a way of being
contagious.
"Not only is Williams a fine
basketball player, but he's also a
fine student (3.0 average). He comes
from a quality program and other
players out of Eastside have been
successful in college
Grady, who plays for coach Dom
Pelosi, averaged 15.7 points per
game as a junior, along with five re-
bounds per game. From the floor.
Grady hit 53 percent, whtle shooting
percent from the line. L ntil a
wrist injurv slowed him. Grady
averaged 2" points per game on a
club that finished 19-8.
"Williams has been a stabilizing
force for our program for four
vears noted Pelosi. "He's a hard
worker and we are all very happv to
see he will have the opportunity to
play major college basketball.
"Coach Harrison's scheme is
much like ours at Eastside. so the
adjustment should be no problem
for Williams
During the second session of the
Five Star Basketball Camp in Pitt-
sburgh this summer. Grady was
named to the all-star team after the
week of play. He was also runner-up
for the outstanding defensive plaver
of the week award. For Harrison,
the thing about Five-Star that stands
out the most, is that Grady won the
Mr. Hustle award.
An all-county performer as a
junior, Grady was recruited b
assistant coach Tom Barnse. who
played for coach Pelosi and Eastside
High School.
Grady narrowed his choice of
schools to four and picked East
Carolina over Rutgers. Boston
University and Northeastern.
s
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 18,1982
��
'��V'
f
��
!� WALL
letbali and
lasn't had
rsuits this
le that in-
At first. I
games
laying in
lon't mind
tnat has
was the
tssociated
mtract ex-
lory is do-
's brought
glad he's
ing to run
weekend
lie Univer-
e been to
Forward to
jtne resign-
ch Wayne
itcome of
tandpoint,
number
We're just
:re and do
jme of this
982 ECU
ss. One of
has been
And since
fans can
year of
Earnest
1st
ee
lie shooting
le. Until a
m, Grady
same on a
stabilizing
for four
le's a hard
happy to
rtunity to
taut
Ischeme is
de, so the
o problem
sion of the
ip in Pitt-
irady was
after the
i runner-up
sive player
Harrison,
that stands
ly won the
mer as a
:ruited by
prise, who
id Eastside
choice of
eked East
Boston
I rn.
i
! Sneaker Sam Sez
1
I
I Superbowl in the Superdome
� The Superbowl of Co-Rec Football was - v� ��
� played on Thursday, November 11. Two very the court look to be the defending champs, the
l intense teams met at 6:00 p.m. for the battle of Body Snatchers, as well as ROTC Number One,
1 ?"� championship title.The well-rounded and and the Wham Bham Jammers. The competi-
"A Sixteen teams are anticipated to par-
ticipate in the post season playoffs. Powers on
tllC C"C"i-nv�aiiij uiiWiliiv VTVinuuuuvu anu mv ���� ���� �
diversified Bod-Squad faced the fierce Third tion will prove to be exciting as several teams
show much talent. Playoff competition begins
Tuesday, November 23, and will conclude after
the Thanksgiving holiday on Monday and
Tuesday, November 29 and 30. Playoff
schedules will be posted Friday, November 17,
outside MG204. So come on out to Minges for
an evening of "spiking" good entertainment.
I
j Regiment.
I The Bod-Squad, led by quarterback Bobby
I Hill and receiver Maureen Buck, paired up in
an awesome combination, enabling the first
half to be a lopsided battle. The Bod-Squad led
I at halftime 22-0. However, the Third Regiment
� proved to be fighters as quarterback Will Shell
I scored the first touchdown in the second half.
j This drive did not hamper the Bod-Squad as
J Joanie Ford and Jeff Holiday paired up and
I returned two unanswered touchdowns. Even
I though the Bod Squad appeared to have the ti-
tie in their hands, Third Regiment would not
retreat! With minutes left in the game, Will
� Shell scored another touchdown. This fine scor-
� ing drive proved to be invaluable as the Bod-
! Squad became victorious in the battle for the
co-rec championship title. The final score-
� Bod-Squad 44, Third Regiment 12.
I Soccer World Cup Finals Set
The finals for the All Campus Championship
� in soccer have been set for Tuesday, November
� 23 at 5:00 for the women and 6:00 for the men.
J Several undefeated teams appear to be destined
J to the Championship Game. In the Men's
� Residence Hall Division the Slay Hippies and
I the Scott Booty Crew, both 5-0, are expected to
I have quite a battle. The Sensation and the
Scuzzmen are both undefeated in the Indepen-
� dent Division. Pi Kappa Phi is the top team
� among the Fraternities. The only undefeated
I team in the Women's Division is the Umstead
J Jockettes. Come watch some expert soccer as
� the playoffs decide what team is the World Cup
I Champion.
I
I "Bumping" to the Sound of Intramurals
I The Co-Rec Volleyball season winds up
tonight as four teams still have a chance to go
j to the playoffs; Iron Curtain, Belk Ball
f Bouncers, Third Regi
Gl Camouflaged
T Shirt, Sle
Backpacks, C�
menl. Steel Toed
and Over 700 Diff
Used Items. Cowboy
Y-NAVY
and Phi Sigma Pi Februarv
Pre-Season Basketball
The Intramural Department along with the
Miller Brewing Company is sponsoring a Pre-
Season Basketball Tournament. Entries are
taken on November 29-December 1 with the
tournament scheduled for December 3-5. En-
tries are limited to 32 men's teams and 8
women's teams, and a five dollar ($5.00) entry
fee is charged. The Streak of Lightening will be
out to defend their title in the Men's Division,
while the Dribblers are practicing for another
Women's title.
Attention Faculty and Staff
The Intramural Department is sponsoring a
Racquetball Tournament just for you! Here is
your chance to show your comrades what a
competitor you are. The entry dates for this
event are November 29-December 2. Play will
begin on December 6.
Kareem Abdul Jabbar Witch Out
The Intramural Free-Throw Contest is about
to begin. Entry dates are November 22-30 with
play beginning on November 30. Come on out
and "Shoot Some Hoops
Aerobic Fitness Classes
Next semester IRS will be running two
aerobic fitness sessions. Each session will run
for six weeks. Registration for the first session
will be January 10-January 14 with classes
beginning January 17 and running through
I
I
I
Registration for our second session will be I
February 28-March 4. Second session classes
will begin March 14 and run through April 21. I
Don't Be a Turkey-Gobble Up These Dates and
Tines for Friday Night Fun After Thanksgiv- -
ing
The IRS Department will offer an opportuni-
ty for free play volleyball andor badminton in
Minges Coliseum on December 3 and 10 from
8:00 p.m. through 10:00 p.m. These dates pro-
vide rare occasions for free play volleyballbad-
minton activities on campus due to the busy
schedule of activities reflected in our facilities.
The equipment and supervision will be provid-
ed. All you need are your bodies and some in-
terest!
!
Are You Gymnastically Inclined?
The IRS Department is providing a supervis-
ed period for recreational free use of the gym-
nastics room located in Memorial Gym. Each
Tuesday and Thursday night from 7:30
p.m9:00 p.m. the area is open for free exercise
use of the matted area as well as supervision
and direction on some apparatus. Bring your
I.D. card.
Tar River Cruises
IRS-Outdoor Recreations is sponsoring
another canoe trip. The last one on a weekend
was a big success but now we would like to of-
fer one at a time perhaps more convenient to
others. This trip will be on Thursday,
December 2, (meet behind Memorial Gym at
3:15 p.m.). We plan to paddle leisurely down
the Tar River for about 1 Vi hours and return to
the Gym about 5:15 to 5:30. Cost:
$3.00-payable at registration. Must register
prior to Thursday, December 2. We have room
for 11 people so sign up now in Room 133
Memorial Gym. For more information, call
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
ttiq
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN a�owkN: a difficult dec�-
DEPENDON. stonthafs mod� easier t
the women of the Fleming Center. Counselors are
available day and night to support and under-
stand you. Your safety, corr '4 and privacy are
assured by the caring staff of the Fleming Center.
SERVICES: � Tuesday - Saturday Abortion Ap-
pointments � 1 st & 2nd Trimester Abortions up to
�18 Weeks � Free Pregnancy Tests � Very Early
Pregnancy Tests � All Inclusive Fees � Insurance
Accepted � CAU. 7�1-6S50 DAY OR NIGHT �
Healthcare counseling ?HE FLEMING
CENTER
757-6911 or stop by Room 113 Memorial Gym
���
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13-U
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
tlW.OO Prtt"��ey Ttt.EjrWi
Control. ��d ProWom Rrf��i�-
ev Coun�tlin�. For further infor-
mation call WJ-0S3S (Toll Freo
Nombor �00-MMSrt) botwotn t
A.M. and � FM. Wookdav.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
?17 Woit Morgan St.
Ralol�n.N.C
HAVE A PROBLEM?
PATTERSON
Sophomore Brace Peartree
sucker bones for the serious collector
NEED INFORMATION?
sticker idea books b America's premier sucker, artists
REAL Crisis Intervention.
24 HOUR SERVICE
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312 E. 10th Street
Greenville. N.C. 27834
QUALITY
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ana education tor wo-
men of all ages.
SAAD'S
SHOK REPAIR
113 Grande Ave.
758 1228
LET'S MAKE
A
DEAL.
ON
SHIRTS & SWEATERS
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The �H� Stadia. ��� fomHJe.
Am4 Mwi will eW aafrrf
Praised by oil reviews end raodan!
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By Charles Edwards (ECTC '35)
Best quality hardback Illustrated
Autographed Available at Student Store and
look �arn(U.�S) or (13.M) Mailed
anywhere from:
Old Sparta Press Box 4343, Ralieoh, NC
27� Third printing in first yearl
Pun stories including ECTC ECC ECU
and ethers you'll know or wish you had.
1
PLAZA SHELL In-
complete
automotive
SERVICE
610 Greenville Blvd.
756-3023 �24 HRS.
I
24 hour Towing Service
D-Haul Rentals
Available
-Sty
WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH FOR:
CLASS RINGS WEDDING BANDS
"DIAMONDS
ALL GOLD & SILVER
SILVER COINS
CHINA & CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
& RING
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401 S. EVANS ST. OPEN 9:30-5:30 MONSAT.
(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH) PHONE 752-3866
"YOUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER
25CCAN BEER
at the
CAROLINA OPRYHOUSE
Beat the Clock Night
Every Thursday!
8:30-10:00-25$
10:00-11:3075C
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SEE YOU THERE!
Stickers! Stickers! Paper! Paper!
Stickers Paper!
by the yard, by the piece by the pound, or 14 lb.
Put them all together!
COLOR, FUN, DAZZLE!
Jefferson's
Florist
WcstStfcStr.
Open Sunday 1-6
Student Golf Special
Indian Trails
Country Club
Fairway Dr Griffon, N.C.
Cart (2 riders) & Green Fees
for 18 holes only
$6.00
Monday-Priday
8 a.m5 p.m.
1
WE CUT FT
FRESH,
EVERYDAY.
Sizzlin'
Sirloin, Jr.
1.99
with
oll-you-con-eat
Salad Bar
2.99
11 A.M2P.M.
MonSot.
ANDWEDOIT
JUST FOR YOU!
UNIVERSITY
HAIRCUTTERS
NOW OPEN
Located on corner
of 14th & Charles Blvd.
in Gold Leaf Warehouse
Excellence in easy care
Low maintenance, precision haircuts.
for Men and Women
Styles by
PhilJones
752-0559
MonFrl.
�-�p.m.
by appointment only
S
nj
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Adjacent to Camelot Inn
2826 S. Memorial � 335-2251
Hrs Mon-Thurs. 6 a.m9 p.m.
FriSat. 6 a.mlO p.m.
Sunday 7 a.m2 p.m.
Welcome ECU Students
& Faculty
'reasonably priced
Specializing in
Broiled or Fried Seafood
also Steaks
and some Italian dishes
Beer 4. Wine available
Private Dining Room A vailable
"Daily Specials"
mmmmmmm ������������������� ������
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IT'OO-












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10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 18, 1982
Duke QB Bennett Sets ACC Classifieds
Seasonal Passing Records
GREENSBORO,
N.C. (UPI) � With the
collegiate football
regular season in its
waning days, Duke
quarterback Ben Ben-
nett continues to lead
the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference in three
categories, according to
statistics released
Wednesday show.
Going into Satur-
day's final game
against 19th-ranked
North Carolina, Ben-
nett has 2,610 total
yards and 2,760 pass-
ing, both season
records that erase
marks set by former
Wake Forest quarter-
back Jay Venuto. Ben-
nett also leads in pass-
ing efficiency with
141.6 points, the best
by any ACC player
since the present system
was established five
years ago.
Duke wide receiver
Chris Castor's 13
receptions are a record
for touchdown passes
caught. If Castor sur-
passes the 1,000-yard
mark in receiving yards
in Saturday's game, he
would become only the
third ACC player to ac-
complish the feat in a
single season.
The league's rushing
crown may not be
determined until after
the season's final game,
but Clemson tailback
ATTIC
v
Dorm Students
FREE
see page 3
Cliff Austin appears to
have the best chance
for the honor.
With two games re-
maining, Austin leads
the category with an
average of 105.2 yards
per game. Georgia
Tech's Robert Lavette,
currently the only ACC
running back with
more than 1,000 yards,
is second with 100.5
yards. Lavette only has
one game remaining.
In number of passes
caught, Castor is one
behind teammate Carl
Franks, who leads with
45, for a 4.5 average.
Duke's Mark Militello
and Wake Forest's Phil
Denfeld are tied for
third with 41 catches
each.
Lavette is the
league's leading scorer
with 17 touchdowns for
102 points. His nearest
challengers, Castor and
Maryland kicker Jess
Atkinson, each have 78
points. Lavette also
leads all-purpose run-
ners with a total of
1,335 yards for a 133.5
average.
Wake Forest's Harry
Newsome still has the
league's best punting
average at 43.1, while
North Carolina's
Brooks Barwick has the
top field goal percen-
tage with .833. Barwick
and Atkinson each
have kicked 15 field
goals, but Barwick has
missed only three,
while Atkinson has had
four unsuccessful at-
tempts.
In team statistics,
Duke has set an ACC
record for passing yar-
dage with 3,066 yards,
breaking the record set
last season by Wake
Forest.
Led by Bennett,
Duke has completed
232 of 378 passes for a
61.4 completion
percentage and a
306.6-yard average.
The Blue Devils also
lead in total offense
with 4,474 yards for a
447.4-yard average.
North Carolina is se-
cond with a 437-yard
average and a total of
3,933 yards.
Defensively, North
Carolina leads the con-
ference overall, in pass-
ing and in scoring.
Overall, the Tar Heels
have given up an
average of 206.3 yards,
while Maryland is se-
cond with 300.1.
North Carolina has
allowed averages of
117.8 yards passing and
11.3 points.
The Tar Heels also
pace the league in
rushing with a
260.9-yard average.
Nationally, North
Carolina has regained
its No. 1 position in
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Complete
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total defense and ranks
sixth in total offense,
while Duke is fifth in
total offense.
Defending national
champion Clemson
leads in rushing
defense, giving up a
mere 86.4 yards per
game, and ranks se-
cond to North Carolina
in rushing offense with
249.6 yards and scoring
defense with 13.8.
Maryland leads in
scoring offense,
averaging 30.8 points
per game, and is third
in total offense,
rushing and passing.
The Terrapins are
averaging 405.2 yards
overall, 190.1 on the
ground and 215.1 in the
air.
Wake Forest ranks
second in pass offense
with a 219.2-yard
average, and Georgia
Tech, assured of its
first winning season
since 1978, ranks se-
cond in pass defense
with a 161.6-yard
average.
On the speciality
teams, Wake Forest re-
tains its lead in net pun-
ting with a 39.8-yard
average; Georgia Tech
ranks first in punt
returns with an
11.5-yard average; and
Maryland has a slight
lead over Clemson in
kickoff returns with a
21-yard average.
PERSONAL
TO OAIL HEATH (alias Hinay
Haatf): Have a bang of a birth
day 11
DEE: HAVE a happy one, kid!
Yea, I did remember. Surprised?
Juit don't forget the good. T.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY WHITLEY I
LOVE YOU, KITTY.
MIHE is made out of cheese
WENDELL
MANFRED.
EAT caca, man.
NED: Man. you should have
stayed the other night. After you
left, we skimmed the scum off the
top and drank all the restm
ALEXIS
HEY WALLY, take it easy. Say hi
to Eddie Haskell, Lumpy Ruther-
ford, Larry Mondello, Whitey,
Penny, Miss Landers and the
whole gang! THE BEAVE
ROOMMATE
WANTED
2 FEMALE ROOMMATES
wanted by t i-�3 s�i per month,
pets okay. Call 754-5114.
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL Typist wants to
type at home. Reasonable rates,
7S-30.
PROFESSIONAL Typing service-
experience, quality work, IBM
typewriter. Call Lanie Shive.
7M-S301 or Gail Joiner 7S4-10M.
TYPING TERM papers, resumes,
thesis, etc. Call 751713.
TUTOR IN SPANISH available.
Call Oscar (native speaker)
7S� Wae.
TYPING: TERM PAPERS,
THESIS, etc. Call 7S7-3MJ before
9:00 p.m.
LOST AND
FOUND
FOUND: GIRL'S RING at Green-
ville Town Common. OWNER
MUST IDENTIFY. 750-5544.
FOUND: FEMALE GOLDEN
Retriever in College Hill Area. For
information, call 750-tt1 after
WANTED
PART-TIME DRIVER maint
truck 21 hr. week SShr. only depen-
dable mature) Ref. req. 757-1401
-� only.
WaMen's Pond for a Thoreau-ly
good time? BREATHING EASY.
BIRTHDAY BOY: I got you a real
present. Copies of Cliffs Notes to
match every novel you have to
read. I figure that Cliffs Notes will
help you review faster so we'll
have more time to celebrate. Cliffs
Notes now. Good times later. Hap-
py dayl PRACTICAL.
YELLOW 10-SPEED: Remember
at the stoplight? You asked where
I got my Cliffs Notes in my basket.
Hope the bookstore had the one
you needed. They're a great way
to save time when you review.
Maybe even some extra time to
get better acquainted. BROWN
3 SPEED.
FOR SALE
RIDES
RIDE NEEDED: TO PALM
BEACH for Thanksgiving break.
Can leave Wed. Nov. 24. Will share
expenses call 757-0207 (LATE).
MISC.
SKI VERMONT: FIVE�DAY ski
vacation to Smuggler Notch, VT.
Jan. 2-7. Package deal tor $154.50
includes 5-day ski pass and lodg-
ing, along with various extras. For
further info contact BETH or
LISA at 754-0571 or 7S7-M2T.
DO YOU know your toorball? Beat
the Phantom Forecaster for
$100.00.
BEAT THE PAHNTOM
Forecaster and win 1100.00.
WHO IS THE PHANTOM
Forecaster? You'll find out who it
is when you get a check for SIMM
with his name on it.
LIFESAVER: Thanks for bring-
ing me those wonderful Cliffs
Notes. They really helped me
understand what l read, and they
gave me a great review. You and
Cliffs Notes are Number l in my
book! Whaddya say we head out to
2 FISHER SPEAKERS model 510
would like to trade for cassette
deck. Call 754-0977 or The East
Carolinian 757-4144 and leave
message for Geep Johnson.
FOR SALE: 1970 HONDA 250 XL
DIRT OR STREET BIKE. Call
750-9790 Mon Thur.
NICE GRAY AND WHITE RAB-
BIT FUR JACKET FOR SALE $50
CALL 750 3094.
WATERBEDS and bedding one-
half off! DON'T pay retail! We
have complete waterbeds as low
as $149.95. Also bedding sets as low
as $79.9$. Come by Factory Mat-
tress and Waterbed Outlet 710
Greenville Blvd. next to Sweet
Caroline's. 155-2424.
STEREOS. CHAIRS, sofa, bar.
10-speed bike, very reasonable
prices 750-9907.
ECONOMICAL VW BUG 1974
$1550 call 754-0592 after 2 p.m.
NIKON 15 MM SLR CAMERA,
perfect cond. $150. Call 750-0017
days; 757-1141 mghts.
DKGREEN upholstered chair,
excellent cond. price neg. 355-4052
after 4.
FOR RENT: APARTMENT for
rent. One bedroom, patio in back,
three blocks from campus. $105
per month. Available Dec. 10. one-
half month's rent free! Call Paul
at 757-4501. Leave a message.
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re-
quired to b� rBBdily available 'or
sale m aacn Kroger Sav on. except
as specifically noted m this ad if we
do run out of an item we will offer
you your choiCB of a comparable
tem when available reflecting the
same savings or a ramcheck which
�iii entitle you to purchase the
advertised item at the advertised
D"ce withm 30 days
Items and Prices
Effective Wed. Nov. 17.
thru Wed. Nov. 24, 1982
In Greenville
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orrery l .99 for Fish
Mon Fri Nov. 15th to 19th from Ham to 9pm.
OLD FASHIONED HOMEMADE
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1011 Charles Street � 752-1373 1 Block from Campus
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?'
�lie lEaat (flarnlfnfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, GtntraiManner
Mike Hughes, mmm mm
WAVERL Y MERRITT. Director oj Advertise ClNDY PLEASANTS, Sports Editor
Robert Rucks, �,� Matter Greg Rideout. �� Editor
ALI AFRASHTEH, credit Manager STEVE BACHNER, iMkw �a,w
Stephanie Groon, ca�jw Juliana Fahrbach, st Editor
JONI GUTHRIE, r�-m�rcSupervisor MlKE DAVIS, Production Manager
November 18. 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Football's Back
So Who Gives A �?
So, the National Football League
Players Strike is finally over. After
eight weeks of Sumo wrestling,
welterweight boxing and enough
gymnastics to make anyone vomit,
pro football is back
After 57 days without Dandy
Don, Frank Gifford and the Wizard
of Wit, Howard Cosell pro foot-
ball is back.
After 57 days of non-stop bicker-
ing, name-calling and diverse other
typical strike actions pro football
is back
Big deal.
Now, I'm sure that probably 90
percent of the "red-blooded"
American population will consider
this editorial nothing more than a
verbose exercise in blasphemy.
After all, next to Mom, apple pie
and video games, what's more
American than football?
Nevertheless, as much of a fan as
I consider myself, I couldn't care
less whether or not the NFL will be
playing this Sunday. Admittedly, I
may be dead wrong, but I just have
a hard time agreeing with a bunch
of overgrown babies who care more
about their six- and seven-digit
salaries and compensation benefits
than the game itself.
I like football. I like the "human
drama of athletic competition I
like the shotgun formation,
halfback options, flea-flickers,
reverses, fake puts and quarter-
back draws. I like pro football
pools, hot dogs and icy cold Bud on
Sunday afternoons in November.
Suffice it to say, I like football.
What I don't like is what profes-
sional football has become: a
sickening big-business venture,
overflowing with gray-suited
agents, fast-talking owners and
hundreds upon hundreds of players,
all of whom are too busy "looking
out for No. 1" to care about play-
ing.
All things considered, it's no
wonder the actual game on the field
has become practically incidental
nowadays. Pro football players
don't care about playing the grid-
iron game. Why should they, when
playing the money game is so much
more self-gratifying?
This is not to condemn, in any
way, a group's using a strike as a
means to improve living conditions.
I'm all in favor of better living con-
ditions for Polish workers, for
teachers, for factory laborers, etc.
But when it comes down to a group
of spoiled athletes � most of whom
already make a handsome salary by
any standards � walking off the
job for a bigger piece of the NFL
pie, I simply cannot empathize.
And the attempt by some players
to justify the NFL strike by compar-
ing their compensatory demands to
those of nurses, teachers and the
like is utterly absurd.
It's high time these gentlemen
understood their relative impor-
tance in our society. Sure, entertain-
ment � and it is entertainment �
has its place in ours or any society.
However, much to the chagrin of
many professional athletes, their
relative importance and contribu-
tion to society is somewhat less than
they might expect.
Deciding who came out ahead in
the strike is, right now, a difficult �
if not impossible � proposition,
what wfth ali 41fJ,u�tuating
demands and weekly proposals. But
whereas a winner may not be readily
apparent as yet, the loser has been
evident all along � the fans.
You know, it's funny, when a
team is winning, it's "because of the
terrific support of the fans When
a team's in the cellar, it's because
the fans aren't supportive enough.
But when push comes to shove, we
the fans find out exactly where we
stand.
One final note: I think I would be
hard-pressed to find anyone who
could have summed up the strike
more perfectly than a young woman
in a Los Angeles bar who, when
asked Tuesday night if the strike's
end was good news for her, said,
"Oh yeah, I'm glad it's over I
can't wait for the World Series
M.H.
Herman Talk Reinforces
Anti-Russian Sentiment
By PAT O'NEILL
Victor Herman came to ECU last week.
He spoke of his experiences of having
spent 45 years living as a prisoner and an
outcast in the Soviet Union. He recounted
for his audience the horrors of being exiled
to Siberia and being beaten by prison
guards for no apparent reason and being
twice left for dead.
There is no doubt that Herman is a man
of incredible bravery, having survived such
an ordeal. "I would survive Herman
said. "I would come back someday I
would give this message to my people
Herman has, indeed, returned � with
many messages � and some of them were
not what I expected. No doubt, Herman is
an expert on the conditions of a Soviet
prison camp in Siberia, and he also had
wonderful praises for the Russian people.
"The (Soviet) people in general do not sup-
port their government he said. "They
see it's all lie on top of lie Herman even
made a statement that I considered shock-
ing: "They (the Soviets) want war less than
we do
He noted that the Russians were familiar
with the suffering of war because of their
heavy losses in World War II, and they did
not want to see it happen again. Herman
also cast an optimistic note when he said
that the relationship between the U.S. and
U.S.S.R. would "normalize" some time in
the near future and that a nuclear war
would never happen.
I was glad to hear Herman make a few
optimistic predictions, but I couldn't help
but wonder on what grounds he based his
expertise to do so. For 45 years, he hadn't
read an American newspaper � years of
history went by that he knew nothing
about. I find it hard to believe that in a few
short years of freedon Herman has been
able to become an expert on foreign policy.
I personally have no desire to live in the
Soviet Union and I don't doubt for a
minute that being in a Russian prison is
disgusting (I can't say much for U.S.
prisons either). But 1 am also clearly able
to recognize the ways in which my own na-
tion is not upholding the rights of certain
peoples. I see the horror of U.S. policy in
Central America; I see the many people in
our nation who suffer from poverty,
racism and injustice. I see how U.S. cor-
porate investment exploits people in poor
countries. As an American, I refuse to turn
my back when I see policies being practiced
by my own country that are wrong.
Victor Herman has returned to the
United States � one hell of a good country
� and unfortunately, he has become
delirious with abundance. He has failed to
critique his country the way he has done so
to the Soviet Union. I suggest that Victor
Herman spend a lot more time studying
before he speaks out on subjects he knows
very little about.
Crystal Ball Predictions Too Often True
A Look At Horoscopy
I've been into reading Horoscopes late-
ly. You know, the kind that tell you what
kind of a day you're going to have and
what to look out for in the people you
meet. And I swear, I don't know how they
do it, but I'd say about 90 percent of the
time they hit the nail right on the head.
Frankly, sometimes I wish they didn't.
Take the other day, for example. I got
up first thing and ran downstairs to get the
morning paper. Practically tearing off the
front page, I searched frantically to find
out what would happen to me during the
course of the day. (Once you start, you just
can't stop.)
I read right past all the Virgo verbosity,
Gemini garbage and Capricorn crap, right
down to the daily predictions for Libras.
The tension mounted, as I unveiled the
plan of my day: "You will meet a tall, dark
stranger the computer Horoscope said.
"And your financial situation will take on
a new shape today
And sure enough, when I walked out of
Pantana Bob's that night, a gigantic beast
named Abdul pulled a knife on me and
stole my wallet.
And thenltlere w& my Horoscope from
about a month ago: "Be more outgoing
it proposed, "and visit as many friends as
you can and show affection for them in
some way
Unfortunately, that one didn't work out
so well either. Boy, those girls in White
Dorm have absolutely no sense of humor.
And just last week, I read this one: "A
good day to add to your possessions.
Listen to the advice of a trusted friend and
be sure to follow it Improve your ap-
pearance
So, I went upstairs, took a shower, shav-
ed and went out and stole a truck with my
good buddy Raoul.
Ironically, my Horoscope for the next
day read: "Don't hesitate to ask for finan-
cial assistance from a friend. You may
need it Well, I can't honestly say Herb
and I are the best of friends, then again,
35-percent interest on a bail bond ain't too
shabby either.
Mike Hughes
Just The Way It Is
"You are magnetic today another one
proposed, "and can easily get others to go
along with your ideas. Co-operate
I must admit I really didn't understand
that one till later on in the day, when four
"friends" accosted me in a dark hall and
proceeded to convince me that I wanted to
take them to lunch.
Then (as if that weren't already plenty),
as an added feature, every year on my bir-
thday, I get an entire paragraph giving an
entire rundown on me and my tendencies.
Needless to say, this used to be the
highlight of my year. I even used to count
down the days. Unfortunately, last year's
was, well, less than encouraging.
"Born today it expounded, "you have
definite animalistic traits I nodded in
thoughtful agreement. "All the looks of a
disfigured bulldog, all the personality of a
brown slug and all the potential and ability
of a three-legged hedgehog.
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes, a sexual
physchology major who transfered to ECL
from Bob Jones College in Greenville,
S.C is not in a very good mood today.
rCampus Forum-
Smokers Urged To Stomp Butts
The 1982 goal of the Great American
Smokeout is to get at least one in every
five smokers to give up cigarettes from
midnight to midnight on Thursday,
Nov. 18.
For those thousands of Pitt Countians
and ECU students who have written to
me requesting information on how to
stop smoking, I would like to share these
tips, which they can use Thursday when
they take part in the sixth Great
American Smokeout:
(1) Don't carry a lighter or matches;
hide all ashtrays.
(2) When the urge to smoke hits, take
a deep breath. Hold it for 10 seconds,
then release it slowly. Taking deep,
rhythmic breaths is similar to smoking,
only you'll inhale clean air, not
poisonous gases.
(3) Exercise to relieve tension.
(4) Wrap your cigarettes in a sheet of
paper, then rubberband.
(5) Drink liquids � lots of them.
(6) Spend your day with friends who
don't smoke.
(7) Brush your teeth often during the
day.
(8) Go public with your plans to quit
by telling your friends. Ask them to help
keep you from backsliding. Promise so-
meone a dinner if you return to smok-
ing.
(9) Use money you save from a day of
not smoking: make a three-minute,
long-distance phone call to an old
friend; play three games of Pac man;
play three favorite songs on a juke box;
take a chance on a lottery ticket.
(10) Treat your body and soul with
kindness. Indulge in a bath, massage,
nap. Listen to your favorite music. En-
joying these activities in the absence of
smoking will help you realize that you
don't need a cigarette to have a good
time.
Please let me hear about your suc-
cesses. I know you can do it this time.
Good Luck.
Joan Boudreaux
Pitt Co. Chair.
Great Am. Smokeout
Peace Movement
Thinking people of the world unite!
The Peace Movement: part of a cam-
paign by the KGB? Hah! Keith Brit-
tain's article in last Thursday's edition
of The East Carolinian was so filled with
empty rhetoric and twisted half-truths
that it is difficult to know where to
begin.
First of all, Mr. Brittain alleges that
the U.S.S.R. has 1,398 ICBMs com-
pared to the United States' 1,052 and
that the U.S.S.R. has 5.540 warheads on
these missiles compared to 1,052 for the
U.S. What he adroitly neglects to men-
tion is that he is only speaking about
land-based ICBMs. His figures fail to in-
clude submarine-launched ballistic
missiles, intercontinental bombers with
nuclear missiles and cruise missiles.
The fact of the matter is that the U.S.
has more total warheads, owing to the
larger number of warheads on its
SLBMs. The U.S. also has many more
intercontinental bombers, with much
larger payloads and a five- to 10-year
lead in the new technology of small,
long-range, low-flying cruise missiles.
These facts are easily verifiable by
anyone who wishes to check them in the
November 1982 issue of Scientific
American.
The point is that it is important to
stop the arms race now because of the
new breed of counterforce weapons
which the (Reagan) administration
wants to build. These weapons are
designed to attack the opponent's
nuclear weapons, and they can strike
within six minutes. This would leave the
target nation virtually no time to res-
pond between the time the attack is laun-
ched and when it hits. In the ultimate
scenario, they can disarm a nation and
hold its population hostage. This
development would make the U.S.S.R.
feel more pressured to launch their
missiles first or place their forces in an
automatic "launch-on-warning" status
in peacetime, further contributing to the
possibility of a computer error starting a
nuclear war.
Also, with new leaders in the Kremlin,
counterforce weapons only make the
possibility of nuclear apocalypse more
likely. Not to mention the fact that the
Soviets will inevitably match these
developments themselves, and then both
sides will tend even more toward laun-
ching a first strike. Do we want our
leaders playing "chicken" with nuclear
weapons and our lives?
In closing, I would like to add that the
peace group is composed of many dif-
ferent organizations with many different
approaches to the issue of peace. Sure,
the Communist Workers Party shows up
at peace rallies. So what? Peace is an
idea whose time has come, and many
organizations are working for it.
Greenpeace, Physicians for Social
Responsibility and others have made ap-
peals to both the U.S.S.R. and the U.S.
to overcome their intransigence and
work for peace. Does that make them
puppets of the KGB? President Reagan
was supported by many Klansmen and
Nazis. Does that make him a KUnsman
and a Nazi?
Fernwkk Jacobs
Senior, Whole Systems Mgmt.
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 18, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 18, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.232
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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