The East Carolinian, November 16, 1982






She iraat (ilaruliuian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 NoT � Lf
Tuesday, November 16,1982
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Bearden To Direct
Management Center
By BOB MORGAN
Staff Writer
ECU School of Business Dean
James Bearden has been selected to
assume the role as director of the
Branch Banking and Trust Com-
pany Center for Management and
Development at the university.
In accepting the new position,
Bearden will step down from his
position as dean as soon as his suc-
cessor is chosen. He will not work
full time for the center until January
1, when he will become the first full
time director.
Bearden has been on the ECU
faculty since 1959 and became dean
in 1968. He says that he is excited
about the opportunity to work as
director of BB&T Center.
"I've had 15 good years as
dean said Bearden. "I look for-
ward to the new challenge in the
area of management development
The decision to change positions
was originally announced by
Bearden to the faculty convocation
at the beginning of the semester.
Chancellor John Howell made an
official announcement last Wednes-
day.
"Dean Bearden is assuming a
very significant new role for the
university and the region it serves
Howell said. He expressed that he
regrets losing Bearden as the dean of
one of the university's largest and
fastest growing professional schools
but said, "I am happy that the
university will continue to have his
services and he is going to stay
here
The Center for Management
Development was named after
BB&T this fall. Dr. Bearden helped
obtain a $250,000 grant from the
bank to help support the programs
of the center.
ECU's School of Business has
been the primary support of the
center for the last ten years. It is in-
tended to work with the university
in promoting growth in manage-
ment and development.
A committee selected by the vice-
chancellor for academic affairs, Dr.
Robert Maier, will conduct a na-
tionwide search to fill Bearden's
position as dean of the School of
Business. He will remain as dean un-
til a successor is chosen.
Coed Dorms
SRA Votes For Changes
Dean James Bearden
By ED NICKLAS
Sun Writer
The Student Residence Associa-
tion, in an attempt to convey to the
administration the student's view-
point, recently voted on a proposal
that would, if passed, change cer-
tain dorms to coeducational and
others to all male or female.
The proposal, which will be
discussed Thursday by the
Residence Life Committee, will at-
tempt to make Jones and Fletcher
dorms coed, to make Garrett an all
male dorm and to add more female
suites to Belk. The SRA voted in
favor of changing Fletcher and ad-
ding more female suites to Belk.
They did, however, vote against
converting Jones to coed and, by a
slim margin, voted in favor of mak-
ing Garrett all male.
According to Associate Dean of
Residence Life Carolyn Fulghum,
the proposal was mentioned in an
ad-hoc housing committee two years
ago and a decision was made to
study the proposal.
Now that the SRA and all of the
Area Residence Councils have voted
on the proposal, it will go to the
Residence life Committee to be
discussed. Sitting on the Committee
are Chairman Brett Watson of the
music department, a representative
from the home economics depart-
ment, a doctor from the infirmary,
the three ARC presidents, three
students appointed by the SGA, the
SRA president, Fulghum and Vice
Chancellor for Student Life Elmer
Meyer. Fulghum and Meyer will
serve as ex-officio members and will
together make a final decision on
the proposal.
"Some decision has to be made
soon Fulghum said. "The com-
mittee meets Thursday, so a recom-
mendation has to be made by then
As for the SRA turning down the
idea of making Jones coed, Russo
felt that circumstances might have
played a role in SRA's opposition.
"I think coeding is something SRA
wants to see he said. "They want
more coed than we presently have;
however, they may just be disaaree-
See SRA, Page 3
Handicapped Students Say Wheelchair Van Undependable
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
According to reports from several
ECU students, the van being used to
transport handicapped students is
not always keeping to its schedule.
On several occassions there have
been ECU wheelchair students
stranded without a ride. One
wheelchair student claims he has
even seen the van used without
authorization to move a
refrigerator, and, on at least one
other occassion, no one knew where
the van was.
The handicapped student van is
owned by the Student Government
Association and is maintained by
the ECU Office of Handicapped
Services. The van, which is equip-
ped with a special hydrolic lift for
wheelchairs, is required by law since
ECU's student bus service does not
serve wheelchair students.
The van is supposed to offer the
same transportation opportunities
for handicapped students that other
students receive from the buses, but
because of various factors, the van
is unable to provide such service.
"The van barely runs said ECU
English student Brian Rangeley.
"It's been really hectic this
semester
Rangeley, who uses a wheelchair
to get around, claims that the per-
manent schedule for use of the van
is confusing. He said it's not
available often enough for regular
service, such as going to grocery
stores and other types of trips. "I
really think they need a new van
Rangeley saiu.
"The number one priority is get-
ting students to and from class
said C. C. Rowe, coordinator of
handicapped student services. Rowe
said that he is interested in replacing
the 1977 vehicle, but that he would
prefer to see lifts installed on all
SGA buses so that the whole system
would be accessable. "That's the
recommendation that came from
the planning commission of Han-
dicapped Services Rowe said.
Rangeley also noted that since
there is only one van available for
wheelchairs, when it breaks down
students are essentially stranded
without transportation. Rowe said
he would like to see a back-up van
provided but that he doesn't think
the need is great enough to justify
the expense.
One ECU wheelchair student,
Wayne Dawson, who owns his own
van, has been called on numerous
occassions to transport other
wheelchair students when the SGA
van has been out of commission or
unavailable.
Dawson told The East Carolinian
that he has had to take time away
from his studies on several occas-
sions to go out and pick up another
student who was stranded or to take
someone to an appointment when
the van didn't come.
According to Dawson, there was
one time when the van was needed
for a number of students who were
going out together but the van
couldn't be located. "Nobody knew
where the van was Dawson said.
"Mr. Rowe didn't know where the
van was
Rowe acknowledges that the inci-
dent had indeed taken place, but
that he was never able to determine
what had happened to the van. He
also claims that none of the drivers,
who each have a set of keys to the
van, knew where it was either.
Rowe says that four drivers who
are assigned to the permanent
schedule have keys to the van. "To
my knowledge these drivers are very
dependable Rowe added.
He said that he appreciated
Dawson making his van available as
a back-up. "That's the only possible
back-up we have Dawson is paid
by Rowe's office anytime his van is
used.
Approximately 10 students use
the van on a daily basis and the
drivers are paid through the ECU
work-study program. This also
created another problem two years
ago when the funds for work-study
were exhausted in March. "When
work-study ran out of money, we
suddenly ran out of transporta-
tion Rangeley said.
Rowe had to make an appeal to
the SGA, which made a special ap-
propriation available to keep the
van running that year.
When contacted by The East
Carolinian, Bill Hillird, the
manager of ECU's Student Govern-
mnet Transit Office said that Rowe
has never made a formal recommen-
dation to the transit board concern-
ing the Handicapped Services Plan-
ning Commission. "He (Rowe) only
mentioned it briefly to me one day
when we were in the parking lot of
Mendenhall said Hillird. "It has
never been formally introduced to
the transit board
Moral Majority �Violates Rights'
Professor Combats Censorship
By STEVE DEAR
Staff Writer
Photo By STANLEY LEAKY
Nothin'LikeA Good Brew
Students outside the Student Supply Store enjoy a good brewski and nabs as they wait until it's time to trek off
to their next class.
Geology And Biology Clubs Draw Up
Petition Against Building Proposal
The student presidents of the
ECU geology and biology clubs
have drawn up a petition protesting
the decision "to destroy the part of
the arboretum directly behind the
Graham Building to allow for con-
struction of a new building
ECU students David Jerose,
president of the Geology Club, and
Karen Thomas, president of the
Biology Club are hoping to collect
5000 signatures on the petition dur-
ing the next week.
"We feel that the unique beauty
and historical significance of that
part of campus has not been ade-
quately taken into consideration
and its destruction would result in
the regrettable loss of three trees
believed to be in excess of 100 years
of age the petition states.
The petition also calls for a
"public debate to discuss the deci-
sion of the building site and to sug-
gest alternatives. The petition claims
that the choice of the building loca-
tion was made by an administrative
committee without adequate input
from the academic community.
"The Biology Clubjust wants
to go on record as saying 'we don't
want that part of campus
destroyed " said Thomas.
"We're not against the building
itself added Jerose. "We just
want further discussion as to its
location
The petition is titled, "Trees and
Education because of a quote that
Jerose claims was made by
Chancellor John M. Howell com-
paring the two issues. "Trees and
education are not the issue � we
can have both Jerose said.
Thomas also pointed out that the
N.C. Legislature has not finalized
the funding for the project and pro-
bably won't do so until next spring.
"The issue will die down between
now and then and we will have to
bring it up again next spring she
said.
Jerose and Thomas mentioned
four possible alternative sites for the
new building, including behind
Mendenhall, across the street from
the steam plant (which would
border on Tenth Street), at the bot-
tom of College Hill and on the west
side of Slay dorm.
"Conservative groups such as the
Moral Majority have resurrected the
mentality of the McCarthy era.
They are quietly usurping our basic
rights said Dr. Gene D. Lanier,
professor in the Department of
Library Science.
Lanier was one of the featured
speakers at a recent conference of
the N.C. Association of School
Librarians. Lanier is chairperson of
the Intellectual Freedom Committee
of the N.C. Library Association.
The Moral Majority has been
concentrating its pro-censorship
lobbying in North Carolina and
Wisconsin, Lanier said.
According to a guideline sheet
printed by an affiliate of the Moral
Majority in Union County, N.C. in
the fall of 1981, students are recom-
mended not to "discuss values, boy-
girl or parent-child relationships, or
to exchange opinions on political or
social issues in class The Moral
Majority has tried to ban many tex-
tbooks from public school systems
along with books such as The
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
and The Catcher in the Rye.
Lanier claims that the goals of the
Moral Majority violate the basic
rights guaranteed to citizens by the
first amendment.
"Imagine the thoughts, the
philosophies that will never reach
the printed page Lanier said, "if
these groups are successful in cen-
soring what appears in our tex-
tbooks. How can our students make
reasonable and rational choices if
they do not have all the options
presented to them? This is what our
country is all about
Lanier added that although
groups such as the Moral Majority
claim to be religious and not
political, there targets are often
political issues and politicians. "To
disagree with those groups means
being labeled anti-Christian and
anti-moral he said. "I've been
labeled a pornography supporter
Lanier feels that the success of the
attempts by the Moral Majority has
been minimal. Although some com-
mercial publication companies have
admitted to changing the list of
books they publish, very few books
actually have been removed from
library circulations, according to
Lanier. "I think they're burning
themselves out
Lanier has responded to over 100
complaints he has received from
directors of libraries who feel they
have been pressured by the Moral
Majority to ban books from their
See PROFESSOR, Page 5
Survivor Of Prison Camps
Lectures On Experiences
After 38 Years In Russia
By KEITH BRITTAIN
Sufi Writer
The sole American survivor from
Russia's infamous m Gulag camps
spoke at ECU Thursday night.
Along with 300 other Americans,
Victor Herman was arrested by the
Soviet Union in 1938 because of his
refusal to become a Soviet citizen.
Herman's life in Russia is por-
trayed in his book Coming Out of
the Ice. The book was also the sub-
ject of a recent CBS television
movie.
According to Herman, he was
given up for dead twice at the
Gulag. He was beaten from 10 p.m.
to 8 a.m. for 54 consecutive days.
These "rounds of torturing" were
administered because he had sup-
posedly given the score of an
AmericanSoviet basketball game
(that never existed).
After being released from the
Gulag camp he was sent to
Krasnoyarsk, where he worked as a
boxing coach. Soon after this he was
exiled further north in Siberia to
Yeniski. He was not allowed to live
in the village, and was forced to eat
rats to survive.
Herman stated that one thought
kept him alive through his ordeal.
"I wanted to get back to America to
tell people about the evils of Soviet
communism he said.
Herman said that many of the
United States's problems could be
solved by understanding how the
Russian mind works. He described
the Soviet mentality as "inhuman
and as saying one thing while doing
another.
Responding to a question, Her-
man stated that he felt the Reagan
military building was "very
necessary. If we're strong Russia
will respect us he said.
At a news conference, Herman
expressed several of his opinions on
politics and world events.
"Knowing the Soviet government, 1
definitely feel it's behind the peace
See EX-SOVIET, Page 3
TT
m0jijpii0t0&iti0$mpmifa"








JTHE EASX.CAROL1N1AN NOVEMBER 16, 1982
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
It you or your organiiation
would like to have an item printed
m the announcement column,
please type it on an announcement
form and send it to The East
Carolinian in care ot the produc-
tion manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications Building.
Flyers and handwritten copy on
odd sued paper cannot be ac-
cepted
There is no charge tor an
nouncements, but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you want
and suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column for publicity.
The deadline for announcements
is 3 p m Monday tor the Tuesday
paper and 3 p m Wednesdayy tor
the Thursday paper No an
nouncements received after these
deadlines will be printed
This space is available to all
campus organizations and depart
ments.
ART AUCTION
Original works ot art will be
featured at an art auction Friday.
Nov. 19 at 7:30 in the Fellowship
Hall of Hooker Memorial Chris
tian Church ot Greenville, located
a' the corner of Greenville Blvd
and Elm St YHou may preview
the collection beginnig at 6:30 p.m.
JUVENILES
OFFENDERS
What are the alternatives to jail
ing juvenile offenders0 The public
is invited to a symposium on this
crucial issue on Nov 23 at 7:00
p.m at the Willis Building at the
corner of First and Reade Sts A
panel will present the problem and
solutions toiowed by a question
and answer session
PRC
The PRC Club will meet at 8: IS
Tuesday evening in room 221
mendenhall All parks and recrea
Tion students are urged to attend
Brin ideas
GAMMA BETA PHI
Our next meeting will be Tues
day. Nov. 18 in room 244
Mendenhall at 7 00 p m. Members
please bring canned goods to
suport our drive. Immediately
following the meeting will be our
social which will fea'ure enter
tainment from a well known cam
pus organization Come and enjoy.
ILO
The international Language
Organization will be meeting on
Nov 17 at 3 pm. in BC 305 Discus
sion will be about 'he Noche
Latma. All old members are en
couraged to attend this very im
porant meeting All interested per
sons are welcome to attend
RESIDENCE LIFE
The Department ot Residence
Life is accepting applications for
Resident Advisors tor Spring
Semester. Applications can be ob
tained from the Residence Hall
Directors, Area Coordinators and
the Residence Lite Ottice. The
deadline tor completed applica
lions is November 19.
ACCOUNTING
POSITION
Northern Telecom in Research
Triangle Park has an opening for a
co op student to assist in assembl
ing current information for cost
model, review sales proposals,
and assist in new product sum
mary and reviews Requirements
tor the position are that the stu
dent be a junior accounting major
with a GPA of 3.0 or gbetter. The
10b starts in January 1983 with a
beotinning wage of If 73hour
Contact Carolyn Powell in the Co
op office, Rawl 313, ext 6979, for
more information.
CIRCLE K
On November 16, Circle K will
meet at the Boy's Club at 6:30 to
discuss the Boy's Club project.
Other topics to be covered include
the election of a new vice-
president and the drawing tor the
dinner at the Beef Barn. All
members and interested persons
are urged to attend. Plan to meet
in front of Mendenhall �t 6:00 and
we will go as a group.
BETA KAPPA
ALPHA
Beta Kappa Alpha, the banking
and finance fraternity, will have
its next meeting Tuesday,
November 16 in Rawl BIdg. Room
130. Mr Bill Reagan from North
State Savings and Loan will speak
on thrift intstitution's operating
environment and employment op
portunities. Membership is open to
all business majors and all
members are encouraged to at
tend
YHDL
Young Home Designer's League
meets Tuesday, November 16th at
5:00 in the Van Landingham room.
ACCOUNTING
JOB
The Family and Psychological
Services in Greenville has an
opening for an accounting co op
student to work as an accountant
The student needs to have a
minimum GPA ot 2 5 and have
general record keeping
knowledge. The job starts in
December and will involve 10-20
hours of work per week For more
information, contact Carolyn
Powell m the Co-op office, Rawl
313, ext 6979
PHI ETA SIGMA
The freshman honor society will
meet Nov 17 at 5 p.m in room 248
Mendenhall Plans will be made
for December All members are
urged to attend
TWIRLERS
The Tar River Twirlers invite
ECU students, faculty and staff to
the weekly square dance instruc
tion on Thursdays from 7 30 9:30
at Welcome Middle School (on
highway 1113 toward Bethel)
Beginning level dance instruction
will provide an opportunity for
anyone interested to be oriented to
square dancing, so come on out
and swing yovr partner There will
be no fee or obligation tor atten
ding in November Further mtor
mation is available by calling G
Hamilton at 757 6961
CO-OP
The co op office has available an
opportunity with The Federal Law
Enforcement Training Cenfer in
its Criminal Justice intern Pro
gram The internship runs from
January 3 through March 11 and is
located in Glynco, Georgia tor
more information contact Nancy
Fiilnow in the Coop office, ext.
6979
SOULS
The steering committee will
meet Thursday at 6:00 in room 221
Mendenhall. A general body
meeting will follow at 7:00.
Everyone is encouraged to attend.
ALL CAMPUS PARTY
The Phi Kappa Tau fraternity is
sponsoring "Chill Thrill '82" on
Friday, Dec. 3 from 3:00-until. The
party will be held at the Phi Tau
house at 409 Elizabeth St. There
will be lots ot free beverages, com
petition events, giveaways and a
drawing for a Fuii Supreme bicy-
cle. FGor further information con-
tact any Phi Tau or call 752 4379.
PSICHI
Mo(o)re on Sex. you can become
informed November 30 at 7:30 in
room 109 Speight. Psi Chi presents
Dr Moore who will lecture on sex
ual deviance. This will be Psi
CLhi's last informative lecture of
mis semester. This is open to Psi
Chi memoers and all other in-
terested persons. Come and learn.
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines. There are 33
units per line. Each letter, punc-
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end of line if word
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac-
cepted over the phone. We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
75C per line or fraction of a line.
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lower case letters.
Return lu Ml 111 BOARD office (no! EAST
CAROLINIAN office! b 2 p.m. Monday before
luesd�� paper and Vtrdnrsda before Thursday
publication.
Name
I
Address.
CityState.
Ngfc -lines
-Zip.
Phone.
, at 75C per line S.
, No. insertions.
.enclosed
r-r� .��.i�
N��
�9
f�M1I
�11�1
��i
1�i
-�1
a
L-j1�mmmm
AMBASSADORS
Mark your calendars far our
General Meeting on Wednesday,
Nov. 17 at 5:00. It will be in the
Mendenhall Multi Purpose Room.
We have alot of important and
"tun" items to talk about, so
please make plans to attend this
important meeting.
PRC MAJORS
Seymour Johnson Air Force
Base in Goldsboro, NC has an
alternating Coop position
available tor Spring semester in
the ir recreation department. The
position reequires a 2 0 GPA and
you must be willing to work for
two terms It is an excellent opor
tunity tor anyone interested in
gaining valuable work experience
in the area of recreation Salary:
approximately $1,000 per month
gross Contact Nancy Fiilnow in
the Coop office, 313 Rawl,
757 6979, if you would like to apply
or want more information
THE EARLY
YEARS
The members of the Historic
Site and Museum Development
Class of the Department ot History
cordially invite you to view the ex
hibit "East Carolina: The Early
Years, 1907 1934 The exhibit is
located in the main lobby of the
Spillman Building and can be
viewed from November 4 18. It
was created in celebration of the
75th Anniversary of the institution.
SHORT SHORTS
The Alpah Tau Pledge class of
the Kappa Sigma Fraternity
would like to invite all students
down to the Elbo Room tonight to
see the Short Shorts contest. The
time to be there is by 900 p.m. So
come on out and see the Shortest ot
the Shorts
ASPA
American Society ot Personnel
Administrators proudly presents
Dave Davenport, IBM represen
tative and recent graduate ot the
ECU School ot Business on Nov.
17. at 3:00 in room 127 Rawl. Come
and find out what it is like getting
your first job after college. This
presentation is open to members
and non members See you there
SAB MEETING
There will be a meeting ot the
Student Athletic Board at 7:00
Nov. 16 in Mendenhall 247. All
members are urged to attend.
BLOOD DRIVE
Central Campus Area Residence
Council is sponsoring a blood drive
on Tuesday, Nov 16 The drive
will be hel between 12 noon and
600 in the lobby of Umstead
CO-OP
Automatic Data Processing in
Charlotte has a co-op position open
for a CSC I major, undergraduate
or graduate The job will involve
technical support and operating
systems Students should have
analytical skills and a background
in Assembler, Compiler, Cobol,
and RPG languages The alter
nating position will run from
January May For more into , con
tact Carolyn Powell in the Co op
ofice, ext. 6979, Rawl 313.
STUDENT RECITALS
On Nov. 18 at 7:30 in the Fletcher
Recital, pianist Elaine Godwin ot
Bednson and voice student
Deborah Bennetrt of Durham,
botti senio sTudenTs in the School ot
Music, will perform a joint recital.
Miss Bennett will be accompanied
by Dr Timothy Hoekman, pianist.
On Friday Nov. 19, three senior
students ot the School of Music will
perform in the recital hall They
are clarineist Beverly Smith ot
New Bern, scheduled to perform
at 7:30 , and voice student Alice
Bowler of Medlin of Hamlet and
saxophone student Matthew Cox ot
Collinsville, Va, who will perform
at 9:00. All student recitals are
open to the public and no admis
sion is charged
COSTARICA
The deadline ior accepting ap
plications for the spring semester
abroad in Costa Rica has been set
at Thursday. Nov 18 Students in-
terestred m participating should
consult, before that date, one ot
the following: Dr Mar.e Farr,
assistant dean ot the College of
Arts and Science. Dr Simon
Baker, geography, Dr John Bort,
anthropology or doctor Edward
Leahy, geography
PRINT AUCTION
The seventh Annual Print Auc
tion, sponsored byt he ECU print
group, will be held. November 21
at 7 pm. There will be original
nnts by ECU students, faculty.
Alumni Intaglios, woodcuts, paper
castings, collographs, lithographs,
serigraphs Bidding prices on all
prints start at S5 So the public can
purchase some good prints at
bargain raTes aT The same Time
help us provide tor sTudio needs,
workshops ' guesT lectures. All
prints go on preview outside the
Auditorium from 2 7 pm the night
of the auction
ALPHA PHI SIGMA
Alpha Phi Sigma will hold a din
ner meeting at the Western Sizzlin
Steak House on Nov. 29 at 5:00
Meet at Allied Health
Building(Belk) at 5:00 where we
will meet members ot NASW,
ADM and CorSo. All members,
prospective members and staff
are encouraged to attend
FREE PLAY
The IRS department will offer
an opportunity for free play
volleyball andor badminton in
Minges Coliseum on Dec 3 and 10
torn 800 to 10 00 p m These dates
provide rare occasions for free
play volleyballbadminton ac
tivities on campus due to the busy
schedule ot activities on campus
due to the busy schedule ot ac
tivities reflected in our facilities.
The equipment and supervision
will be provided. All you need are
bodies and some interest.
GYMNASTICS
The IRS department is pro
vidmg a supervised period tor
recreational free use of the gym
nasties room located in Memorial
Gym Each Tuesday and Thurs-
day night from 6 30-9 00 The area
is open tor free exercise use of The
matted area as well as superv ision
and direction on some apparatus.
TODAY'S THE DAY
Today is 'he day of the Ending
Hunger Briefing If you would like
to fino out how you can help The
tragedy of dramatic starvation
from occurring i50 000 people
starve to death every day) You
are mvitged to The Ending Hunger
Briefing to be held This afternoon
from 3 to 7 p m in the Coffee
House at Mendenhall This is a
purely educational even! For
more information call 355 6855 or
752 8786
mM
ositively
Pepsi taste
caffeine free!
Si,
. -��:
CAFFEINE
FREE
COLA
SUGAR
FREE
CAFFEINE
FREE
J
1
KcGULAR
THY HEW PEPSI FREE
Anybody can make a caffeine
free cola, bur there's only one
with positively Pepsi tasle.
Available in regular or
one calorie sugar free.
SAVE50
� i
WSuSmtm On any mutri-pack of 2 liter 1 M I
bottle of caffeine free Pepsi Free, regular or sugar free
Mr Rao To Tarawa P�ajl paFwawa-aandaaa coupon ID Papn- Cda Company Bo T776 Canton KMMS27S4 Vou
�ill faoaiva ma 5CK pkn 7t tor handhng � accordance wtt. our conawnar oner Conaumar aajat pay and dapaaa andVor
aaaa m tajajjajt mtommBimm&Mtlmm&ll4fl4kltmK&Waimcm0mmmtBi
muat oa ihowniaxm najuaat Caativaajaol t20of w Oaar aajH����� profaMad or aoanaa raqurad Onar MM
Kona coupon par pwrhaaa ny oT uaa ouraaamai fraud OWar anpiraa Mni 31 193
ST0K COUPON �.��.
S
BAKE SALE
Phi Beta Lambda will be holding
a bake sale on Nov 17 in front of
the Student Supply Store starting
at 900 a.m. Do come and some
home baked goods
PHILOSOPHY CLUB
There will be a philosophy club
meeting on Nov 17 in BO 313 at
7:00. John Spagnoia will present a
paper on "Ben's inequality ano
Reality Theory All interested
persons are welcome
LAW SOCIETY
The ECU Law Society will meei
Thursday. Nov 18 af 7 30 m room
248 Mendenhall Marvin K Blount
a local aTTorrtey, will be the guest
speaker
SIGMA TAU DELTA
The English honor society w'l
hid its Fan 1982 induction
ceremony Monday, Nov 23 at 7 00
in Austin 209 All new TtducTees
please Try to attend Curreh-
members are also encouraged M
attend Our guest speaker w.H be
Or Douglas McMillan who aH
give a presenTaTion on "The
Unicorn Tapestries and Other
Meddievai Things " ttooe fo see
you There
BAKE SALE
SCIENCE EDUCATION
ECU'S Science Education Club
presenTs Ms Alice Howeli a"c an
informal,ved prtogram on "Food
ano NuTriTion" Wednesday Nov
17 aT 4 00 .n room 303 ot Fianagsa"
Building Ail mteresTed oersors
are urged to aTteno
PHI SIGMA PI
Ptl Sigma P H Held IS
Thanksgiving dinner meeTig or
Sunday Nov 21 a 4 00 pm at the
Methodist Student Center Ml
brothers anc pledges are askec �c
brng a covered dish
PHI SIGMA PI
Congratuia'ions To Rcder"
Zaiimen. ano M.cfaei Hosey in De
ng e'ectec as P" Sgma Pi na
tionai Officers Representing
ECU'S Tau chapter Zaiimeni was
electee vce president and t?se
was voted ahaajani reoresen-a1 ves
a me "82 Pn s gman Pi natponai
corven'tcn Aisc for "he 18Tf con
secutive year Tau chapTer was
awarded the Joseph Tors a
ou'standing cap'er
SGA
T-e DOS tens of An te Oc
representative and gracua'e vice
presen are currently unfilled II
meres'ec please ape "
SGA off.ee in Mendennaii Studen-
Cener interviews will be neio 3"
Wed . Nov 17 :n room 24 :
Mendenhall
The East Carolinian
y�y Si?
Published eer. Tuesca. BtaS
rnursoa our.ng the ecaae-
�ear and ever, Weflnesca. M)
�g the Sjrnrner
-he East Caroi "iaW � i z'
- a newspaper 0)1 Eas'
Card.na Un.vers.tv :�'�:
ooeraTed. ano pubi shed fat a-
by the s'odes ol East Car !��
University
Subscription Rate MfJvean
The East Carolinian offices
are located m ne OH taa
�ajaMkaJ on the campus of ECU
Greenville. NC
POSTMASTER Send arr-si
changes'c "ne Eas'Care n a-
Oia Soul B- o � ECU G'ee-
vine. NC 27834
L
Teepno�e 7571 J7 �3�
The brothers of The ETA Nu
ChapTer of Alpha Pn, Aipra will be
having a canned food drive anc
bake sale in order M g e
Thanksgiving baske's (o me neec,
families in Greenv.ne area The
cooperaiion of all ECU sTuoents
will be appreciated There will be
a coilecT.on Table m front of The
book sTore on Tues Thur
BAHA'I
The Bana assoc at.or of EC
a MM s b ee: � -es :f
Wecnesca. Ncv 17 a" 5 B.IK
Anyone wto tines d'Scuss-on of
worio religions of nteresT �s
e me
WOLFTRAP
ah aa� Tjesca, Nov :3 Sgr-e
Alpha iota Ed. s nan pro!
-e s dm c �ra"e '� at
- - g -g a Reck a Tnan n the 'ooc�
of the "jS c Cv W na. " c-re- M
'a s "ce. hex 'ee c : �
Trap a tar park tor na pe"or �
nq ar's fi . e"a v a Da ;
'ions shouic oe se" M "e Scoc
:� v.s ; ?' rg" r. �" :r
m Ma. � De-ween " X a �� a-c
M X c � �iease a�r a e�
oavaoie "c $-g-3 - ca a
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 1
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
1185 00 Pregnancy Test. Birth
Control, and Problem Pregnan
cy Counseling. For further infor
mation call 832-0535 (Toll Free
Number 800-721-258! between v
A.M. and 5 P.M Weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
917 West Morgan St
Raleigh NC.

5.99
Super Tramp
Pat Benatar
Phil Collins
Donald Fagen
Don Henly
Dan FogelDerg
jom Mitchell
Rick Springfield
Glenn Frey
John Lennon
Crosby, Stills, & Nash
Romeo Void
and more
8 Track Tapes 4rV off list price Large number
How to civilize 7a.m.
i ! �'� ��!� I . -L-laU
��-�� -jt- ,�Aiiir-ia ' - i-T . .
�3ZZ lit:
The schedule may be less than civilized, but you don't have to be. Trv a warm cud of
Cafe Francais. Smooth and creamy-light, if s a nicer wav to meet the morning. And
just one of six deli- �
dously different flavors
from General Foods
International Coffees.
GENERAL FOODS INTERNATIONAL COFFEES.
AS MUCH A FEELING AS A FLAVOR
� ooda Corporator '��
fy

I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 16,1982 3
Coach Andruzzi Speaks To Catholic Group
IS ia
c '
ae
�obDy
hoer tc
a- �
r�orm
Dona
SCOO!
looby
�r and
lcecus
B
Isri
Cathy Andruzzi,
head coach of the ECU
Women's Basketball
team, gave the keynote
address during this
weekend's Catholic
Campus Ministry Con-
vention held at Atlantic
Beach.
Andruzzi was invited
to give the address by
the Diocese of Raleigh
Office of Young Adult
Ministry, at the recom-
mendation of ECU's
Catholic Newman
Center. The Office of
Young Adult Ministry
provides various ac-
tivities that bring
together students from
throughout the Univer-
sity of North Carolina
system.
Andruzzi, who was
born and aised as a
Catholic in New York
City, gave a talk entitl-
ed, "The Time to be
Happy is Now She
gave a brief history of
her childhood in New
York and the time she
spent attending highly
disciplined Catholic
schools. She claims that
she has now adopted
this same demand for
strong discipline and
dedication for her
women's basketball
team.
Members of the Lady
Pirates rise at 5 a.m.
three days a week for
weight training, go to
class from 8 a.m. to 2
p.m have study hall
from 2:15 to 4:15 p.m.
and practice from 5:30
to 8:00 p.m. six nights a
week.
Andruzzi said that
women athletes must
always "think big" and
struggle because as
women in athletics they
have to prove
themselves far beyond
men.
"Our team has been
ranked in the top twen-
ty in the countryour
crowds have outdrawn
our men's (and) the
academic achievements
of our athletes have
been very good An-
druzzi said. "One of
the finest ac-
complishments is that
we feel we have
brought spirit to our
community and
school
Andruzzi said that
her faith in God was
one of the key factors
in both her success as a
college athlete and now
as a coach.
She also related some
of her struggles in try-
ing to get involved in
activities that were only
reserved for boys when
she was a child.
"My cousin and I
were constant compa-
nionsbut he played
little league baseball
and was an altar
boybut I wasn't
because little girls
couldn't and didn't do
those things Andruz-
zi recalled.
Andruzzi summed up
her school years by say-
ing she was never con-
sidered for the role of
the Blessed Virgin in
the Christmas school
play, but that her sister
"was always good"
and played the role of
the Virgin many times.
Andruzzi attended
Queens College in New
York City and played
for their basketball
team which was in the
top 10 in the nation
during the three years
she was there.
"During my years in
college I observed and
learned a great deal
she said. "I saw that
women's athletics had
great potential, we just
needed to be given the
opportunity to learn
the trade, so to speak
The purpose of the
Campus Ministry con-
vention was to bring
together various
ministers and students
working in campus
ministry for a series of
educational workshops
and social events.
"All kidding aside,
my family and my
Catholic upbringing
have given and con-
tinously give me
strength and desire
Andruzzi said. "The
desire in my life to be
the best I could be and
to never say I can't
SRA Debates Changes In Coed Dorms
Continued From Page 1
ing with the residence
halls that are being pro-
posed.
"The reason why
coeding Jones was
downed in the
meeting Russo con-
tinued, "was that they
were afraid of putting
freshman males and
females together
Paul Sjmrell, presi-
dent of Jarvis, a coed
residence hall, agrees
with SRA's vote
against making Jones
coed. "1 don't think
it's a good idea he
said. "It would be bad
Ex-Soviet Prisoner
Relates Experiences
Continued From Page 1
and nuclear
freeze movements He
cited a comment made
by the late president
Leonard Brezhnev in
1979 as a reason for his
feeling. According to
Herman, Brezhnev said
"We'll play the game
of peace with America
then crush her
A second part to the
CBS movie is set to be
filmed shortly which
will portray Herman's
plight to regain his
American citizenship.
He was exonerated in
1955, but not released
until 1976. His cousin
and several members of
the state department,
including Henry Kiss-
inger, worked for his
release.
Herman's wife
Galina attended the lec-
ture. She once walked
100 miles in Siberia to
find her husband after
he was exiled. After she
found him they were to
build a home from trees
and ice where they rais-
ed their two daughters.
Herman plans to
write three or four
more books on his life.
Works he as already
published include The
Cray People and
Realities: Might and
Paradox in Soviet
Russia.
The Gray People
discusses others among
the 300 American Ford
employees with whom
Herman went to the
Soviet Union. Realities
addresses other issues
such as Soviet policy
and culture. The book
was co-written by an
ex-member of the CIA.
The agent operated
in the Soviet Union for
20 years. He recently
stated, "I thought I
understood the Russian
mind until I met Victor
Herman
because when you put
freshman males and
females together, pro-
blems will arise
Sumrell noted some
important diferences
between Jarvis and
Jones. "Coeding in
Jarvis works out bet-
ter he said, "because
we've got more up-
perclassmen (only 25
percent are freshmen)
and we're in a smaller
environment. Jones is
possibly too big for
coeding freshmen
Sumrell thinks the
problem could be solv-
ed by making Jones all
female. "I'm in favor
of considering Jones as
an all-female residence
hall he said. "I do
see a need for males on
West Campus and
more females on Col-
lege Hill to balance out
the campus
Russo does not think
Jones will become an
all-female residence
hall soon. "Jones
becoming a female
residence hall is
something that is not
going to happen in the
near future he said.
"I personally would
not like to see Jones go
all female Russo con-
tinued. "I think Jones
has come a long way in
terms of overall ap-
pearance. Their ap-
pearance has changed
dramatically
"The resident staff
at Jones has done a
fantastic job through
the leadership of Don
Joyner (residence direc-
tor) and I wouldn't
want to see their pro-
gress become
stagnated he added.
Russo, who also sits
on the Residence Life
Committee, is OP-
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN ABORTION: a difficult deci-
DEPEND ON. sion that's made easier by
the women of -he Fleming Center Counselors are
available day ana night to support and under-
stand you Your safety, comfort and privacy are
assured by the caring staff of the Fleming Center
SERVICES: � Tuesday � Saturday Abortion Ap-
pointments � 1 st & 2nd Trimester Abortions up to
18 Weeks � Free Pregnancy Tests � Very Early
Pregnancy Tests � All Inclusive Fees � Insurance
Acceptea � CALL 761-5550 DAY OR NIGHT �
Healthcare counseling TUC Cl CUIM
and education for wo THE FLEMING
men of all ages. CENTER
The Gifts Students, Faculty, Families
And Friends will all enjoy!
Praised by all reviews and readers!
The Hell You Say
By Charles Edwards (ECTC '35)
Best quality hardback Illustrated
Autographed Available at Student Store and
Book Barn (12.95) or (13.95) Mailed
anywhere from:
Old Sparta Press Box 6363, Raliegh, NC
27628 Third printing in first year!
Fun stories including ECTC ECC & ECU
and others you'll know or wish you had.
QUALITY
USEDTIRES
s10and up
Guaranteed
to hold air and
pass inspection
ALL SIZES
AVAILABLE
Inquire at Evans Seafood
1
timistic that the pro-
posal will be accepted.
"It still has to go back
to the SRA for more
discussion so I can
decide how , to vote
when I go to Residence
Life committee. The
committee's vote is im-
portant because it's the
final opinion that
Fulghum and Meyer
will consider before
makeing their deci-
sion
The SRA is a student
organization designed
to give students a say in
residence hall pro-
ceedings. Members of
the SRA work to see
that life in the dorms is
comfortable.
Fraternity Collects Food
For Thanksgiving Drive
The brothers of the
Eta-Nu Chapter of the
Alpha Phi Alpha
fraternity will be taking
up a special canned
food collection this
week to provide free
Thanksgiving baskets
to some needy families
in Greenville.
"A lot of families
around town aren't as
fortunate as some of
the families of the ECU
students said Alpha's
President Danny Scott.
Scott said the Ladies
of Black and Gold,
who are affiliated with
the Alphas, would also
be holding a bake sale
this week to raise funds
to purchase the turkeys
which will go in the
baskets.
The group plans to
collect the food at
tables which will be set
up in front of the Stu-
dent Supply Store to-
day through Thursday.
The bake sale will be at
the same location on
Friday.
Scott said he would
be getting the names of
some needy families
from a local Baptist
Church. He added that
the group would pro-
vide as many baskets at
they could, depending
on how well the
students responded to
the drive effort.
"Thanksgiving is
supposed to be a time
of giving Scott said
"The people who are
more fortunate than
others should think
about sharing with the
needy
Any student or facul
ty member wishing to
give can come by the
Student Supply Store
tables during the day to
drop off their contribu-
tions.
MALPASS
MUFFLER SHOP
2616 E. 10th Str.
Credit Card Calculator
with purchase of any
ART CARVED
CLASS RING
Nov. 17, 18, 19
Wed Thurs Fri.
Time: 9-4
STUDENT STORE LOBBY
Thru November 24th
And this week just $6.99
for the latest by
The Clash, Saga, Devo,
Men at Work, Joe
Jackson
And every prerecorded cassette Record Bar
sells is guaranteed against defects
by the Exclusive Record Bar Tape Guarantee.
MUSIC TELEVISION EXPLOSION.
PRESENTED BY RECORD BAR �r ROCK 93
ENTRY BLANK
QUESTIONS
11 Which Record Ch�in has the most complete line of records tapes tt
accessories
2a) Which FM Radio Station plays your favorite music 24 hours a day'
2b) Which cable TV channel will be playing your favorite musc m stereo
starting Nov 14' �
3) In which Record Store can you register to win a wild 93 second cassette
PRIZES:
Grand Pnze-93 second cassette run
OTHER PRIZES:
4 MTV Tour ujcaeU. 10 MTV tote bags
100 MTV T-shirts. 10 MTV sweat
shins. 4 MTV baseball shirts
DRAWING: Friday Nov. 19. 1982 on W1TN
Cassette Run Sat. Nov. 20. 1982 at 2:00 PM
at the Record Bar
'
9
MTV is brought to you by Tar River Cable TV. Cable TV of Greenville New Bern. Washington Kmston Er Onton
NAME.
ADDRESS.
TELE �
Quvterilash Simulcast on MTV and Bock 93 Nov, 20. 198Z
�� �� T "� i � � �� iMMhMfjaAfc)





Qtye 3Eat (HwcalMan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, cmmMiw
Mike Hughes, ����.�, ��,
WAVERLY MERRITT, a�� �, ,�,rf��� ClNDY PLEASANTS, Sporu Editor
Robert Rucks, ��� hur Greg Rideout, New, Editor
Ali Afrashteh, ct M�Mier Steve Bachner, amnmm Editor
Stephanie Groon, 0�� u.n� Juliana Fahrbach, si Eduo,
Chip Gideons, r�mcw 3� Mike Davis, Product� ���!��
November 16, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Law Examiners
Board Practices 'Double Standard'
It somehow seems ironic that the
same state that has continually con-
doned the drinking and driving
practices of Congressman Ike An-
drews (a lawyer convicted of
speeding more than a dozen times)
would refuse bar admission to an
aspiring lawyer who chooses instead
to act with conscience.
And it seems an incredible double
standard is at work when scores of
North Carolina lawyers found guil-
ty on all sorts of ethical offenses �
from forging judges' signatures to
embezzling � retain their "right"
to practice, while a peaceful
demonstrator is denied that same
privilege because he lacks
general character and general fitness
required for an attorney
Alex Charns, a recent graduate of
the UNC School of Law, was denied
admission to the state bar last
month, obviously stemming from
his March 27 arrest and subsequent
prison sentence for blocking Fort
Bragg traffic during a protest
against the Army's training of El
Salvadoran soldiers.
Charns appeared at a standard
morals hearing on Sept. 30, at
which time he was thoroughly and
ridiculously questioned by members
of the Board of Law Examiners
about his moral stance. Charns ad-
mitted he could make no guarantee
that he would never take partin
similar acts of "civil disobedience
However, he assured the panel that
he would not advise or encourage
prospective legal clients to break the
law.
In addition, he presented to the
board several letters from character
references � one of whom was
UNC law school Dean Kenneth
Brown � all of whom deemed
Charns a man of high moral
character.
Charns' background as a peaceful
demonstrator was made well-known
to the 11-member board (all of
whom, incidentally, have refused to
comment on his case).
Nevertheless, within a week of his
morals hearing, Charns received a
form letter from the panel explain-
ing that he doesn't possess the
qualifications of character and
general fitness requisite for an at-
torney
"It's important that people who
practice law in North Carolina have
a clean record ethically said
Robert Baker, a Durham lawyer
and president of the North Carolina
Bar Association. Presumably, then,
the likes of Ike Andrews are exclud-
ed from Baker's theoretical prere-
quisite.
In our estimate, the situation can-
not be summed up any more suc-
cinctly than it was in the Charlotte
Observer of Nov. 10:
"We wish the bar were even
tougher in its efforts to protect the
public from unethical lawyers, but
the Charns case reveals a flawed
standard. It suggests that if you
broke the law as a peaceful political
protest, you can't be a lawyer in
North Carolina. But if you broke
the law because of drunkenness, in-
eptitude, congenital dishonesty or
greed, you can
It is. our sincere belief lha the
panel's decisfon was erroneous, not
to mention reflective of their
flagrant social biases. Accordingly
then, we strongly suggest that those
lawyers concerned with the preser-
vation of at least some semblance of
justice in North Carolina urge a
reversal of the Charns ruling.
If Alex Charns lacks the moral
character requisite of aspiring
North Carolina lawyers, then it
would seem the term "moral
character" itself is ill-defined.
THIS IS A7EST THIS IS 0NLVA7EST�. IF 7H(S HAO B��M
AN ACTUAL PRESOeNTAL &K770AI, VDO WUU
HAVE KEN ANNMUTED
r-Campus Forum-
Millionaires Line Up For Unemployment
NFL Players' Strike
I was watching Howard Coseli interview
some nameless pro two-ton defensive
tackle in an unemployment line the other
day. And although it was fairly interesting,
needless to say, it was likewise pretty
typical:
"Well, Rahim Howard proposed, "it
would seem the utmost undesirable
ramifications of the professional football
stoppage have, indeed, made themselves
manifest, as exemplified by your dismal
appearance in this succession of idle-yet-
willing laborers here today
"Yeah the meat-wagon admitted, "we
feelin' duh pinch
Mike Hughes
Just The Way It Is
"Indeed, you are Coseli blurted out
(as only he can blurt). "Then, of course,
my next question is as follows: Can I �
and the millions of other American sports
aficionados viewing from their humble
abodes nationwide � infer from your ir-
revocably obstinate position here in this
weaving pursuit for jobless compensation
that you, personally, are in support of the
present grid-iron walk-off, which is now, I
might add, entering its 56th traumatic day
of existence?"
"Well, Howuhd the seasoned veteran
answered, "you an1 dem can stir in
anything you want, but I could say dis
much; we sho is feelin' duh pinch
It was at about this point in the interview
that I couldn't take it anymore. I mean,
here's a guy who graduated from UCLA
with a degree in the Philosophy of Physical
Education; he's probably already made
more in his previous three years than you
or I will ever dream of making, whatever
our careers. And Coseli let's him off the
hook.
I'll tell you, if that were me with the
microphone and the yellow jacket, I think
I'd have a little more fun with him.
Nothing extreme, mind you, just a little
more fun. Perhaps � just perhaps � the
interview would go something like this:
"So, Rahim, can I assume that your be-
ing here in line today is, itself, a symbolic
gesture to demonstrate your head-strong
dedication to the demands of the Profes-
sional Football Players' Association and
your refractory convictions on that sub-
ject?"
"Convictions? Is dat mike on? Don't be
talkin' 'bout convictions wiff duh mike
on
"Well, okay, whatever you say,
Rahim Let me rephrase the question
somewhat Would you say, perchance,
that you consider yourself an exemplifica-
tion of the typical athlete for the 80s, with
its diverse connotations, including
unregulated usage of controlled
substances, dubious sexual preference,
selling-out for higher personal gain and the
like?
"Well urn, yeah I think dat's me
�o duh mose part
"One final question, Rahim: What
about the recently-limelighted issue of co-
caine usage in professional football? Do
you agree that continued misuse of the
drug will eventually bring about the
downfall of the NFL?"
"Well um, yeah You right
dayuh See, day's a lot uh deese rookies
what comes tuh spring trainin' wit bad
toot. You know, that stuff git aroun' when
everybody git day first paycheck, an' b'fo
you know it, everybody be snortin' bad
toot. So, yeah, I'd say duh way it is now,
pro ball can't lass too much longer,
anyhow
"Thank you, Rahim
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes is a senior
Home Ec. major from East Zygote, N.C
the only small town in the state which has
never won the Governor's Community of
Excellence A ward.
Local Peace Group fUp In Arms'
Keith Brittain's and Paul Hamilton's
accusations against U.S. peace groups,
local peace activists and critics of U.S.
nuclear arms and foreign policies are
laughable at best.
To masquerade as fact that the U.S.
peace movement is Soviet KGB or-
chestrated and to imply that all people
critical of the U.S. government's defense
and foreign policies are tools of the
Soviet KGB is not only absurd, but slip-
shod propaganda.
It is a fact that there are groups in the
U.S. peace movement that are suppor-
tive of Soviet goals and ambitions. But
these people are only tolerated by
mainstream activists and are of such in-
significant proportions that there is
haMyneed to pay thenHip service. Jhe
peifce Ihovement does not strive to be a
homogenous group, and in the spirit of
brotherhood and democracy, welcomes
people of all political persuasions. If I
were to be gripped by the paranoia of
Brittain and Hamilton, I would pass
those groups off as implants by the CIA
to discredit the peace movement; but
that "fact" is as absurd as Brittain's and
Hamilton's "facts
Given the increasing number of critics
of the Reagan administration's nuclear
arms and foreign policies, painting all
government critics as communist sym-
pathizers would put this country in the
political red. It's a wonder with former
high government officials denouncing
the arms escalation, prominent defense
experts calling for a nuclear freeze and
even President Reagan himself opposing
draft registration, that the U.S. is not
already a Soviet client.
However, the peace movement is not
concerned with pointing fingers and tak-
ing sides. The peace movement is con-
cerned with alleviating a world hostage
crisis through disarmament. The arms
race holds us all at gunpoint, as funds
needed for the basic essentials of life are
diverted to the manufacture and
maintenence of the weapons of life's
destruction. We understand the role of
Eastern Bloc countries in the nuclear ter-
ror, but peace activists in the U.S.
understand their activities are best
directed toward their own government;
this is the place where we can affect
change. The U.S. government will not
suddenly drop the cloak of weaponry to
allow Soviet aggression, but the U.S.
can take a more active role in initiating
worldwide disarmament.
What is the "way of life" Paul
Hamilton sees as being assaulted? Is it
an acceptance of nuclear weapons,
poverty, hunger and oppression as the
inevitabilities of life? As long as govern-
ments permit these things to fester on
our planet, we will attack them with
words and nonviolent action. This is not
the struggle of capitalism vs. com-
munism, but the struggle for survival.
It's time we quit playing politics. The
goal of our generation is to reveal that
the policies of mutually-assured destruc-
tion (MAD) and international aggres-
sion are no longer workable tools of
foreign policy, if they ever were; to
eradicate the nuclear menace, poverty,
hunger and oppression; and to restore a
sense of purpose and dignity to all life
on this planet.
Will you join us in this fight?
Jeff Roberson
Greenville Peace. Comm.
In response to Paul S. Hamilton's let-
ter in The East Carolinian on Nov. 11,1
would like to defend the actions and
writings of the Greenville Peace Com-
mittee, Patrick O'Neill and Jay Stone.
I believe Hamilton has misinterpreted
the actions of the Peace Committee.
Criticizing the U.S. should not be inter-
preted as "pro-Soviet propaganda
Criticizing the U.S. might motivate us to
make changes in our social government
toward world peace. I believe it would
be futile to sit around criticizing the
Soviet Union because there is very little
we can change from here.
Can't Hamilton understand that for
peace to be maintained, it can only start
here? The United States should have the
courage to take the first step toward en-
ding the arms race. It is obvious that
continuous build-up only reaffirms the
certainty of war.
Jay Stone and Patrick O'Neill are
needed to balance out the warmongers in
Washington. They can help us see what
our government is really doing. I think it
is a mistake for people like Hamilton to
follow the government blindly without
foreseeing the end result.
As for the "final note I suggest that
if anybody is moved to Russia, it should
be those who feel that arms can solve
everything. They should join the Rus-
sians and feel right at home.
Ellen Moore
Freshman, Art
Ron's Sorority
As members of Gamma Sigma Sigma
National Service Sorority, we would like
to announce our 30th anniversary as a
national sorority and also our 10th year
of serving the East Carolina campus and
community.
We are a sorority dedicated to helping
others. On campus, we have worked in
blood drives, SGA elections and the
homecoming queen polls. In the com-
munity, we have raised money for
Eastern Lung, the Greenville Hospice
and have had various activities for the
elderly. We have participated in many
activities, but our favorite project is
spending time with our loving Grandma,
whom we "adopted" through social ser-
vices.
In the following exerpts from a recent
mailgram sent to our national head-
quarters in Wisconsin, the author
praises Gamma Sig for its "national,
state and local involvement He also
states, "Gamma Sigma Sigma can be
rightfully proud of the leadership role it
has exercised over the years in suppor-
ting civic organizations. Your helping
hand has made life better and easier for
thousands of Americans � the han-
dicapped, the ill, the illiterate, the
underprivileged and the elderly May
your sorority continue to afford the
same exemplary service to others in the
years ahead that you have provided in
the past. I send the best wishes to all who
belong and serve in Gamma Sigma
Sigma The author was none other
than our President Ronald Reagan.
Susan Halloran, Karen Cameron
Sophomores, Nursing
Buddhist Lecture
Buddhism or Buddha Dharma was
first brought to Tibet in the seventh cen-
tury by Padmasambhava, or Guru Rin-
poche as he is known in Tibet. Shortly
thereafter, Buddhism vanished in India,
the land of its birth, owing to the
Moslem invasion and to absorption into
Hinduism. For about 1,300 years, the
Tantric teachings of the Buddha were
preserved intact on the isolated Tibetal
plateau until the Chinese annexation of
Tibet in the late 1950s brought it all to
an end.
Padmasambhava made a criptic pro-
phecy whose meaning now becomes
clear when he said, "When the iron
birds fly, and horses run on wheels, then
will the Tibetans be scattered like ants
over the earth, and the Dharma will
come to the land of the red man
And so it has come to pass. Many
Tibetan lamas, including the heads of
the major schools of Tibetan Buddhism,
have settled in India or in the West, and
a major effort is being made to
transplant the flower of Tantric Bud-
dhism in fertile Western soil, particular-
ly here in America.
The West Coast has had gurus and
Zen masters for more than 20 years and
to some extent also the Northeast;
however, Eastern religions are still
something of a novelty here in the
South. Accordingly, when 1 invited my
teacher, Khenpo Karthar Rinpoche, to
come to Greenville to give teachings and
initiatives to the Greenville Dharma
group and to present a public lecture at
ECU, I was not sure how he would be
received. As it happened, I had no cause
for concern. The Dharma group could
not have related to Rinpoche in a more
wholesome manner, and the large crowd
that turned out to hear his public talk in
Brewster was courteous and attentive to
Rinpoche's message and asked questions
that were clearly recognizable as at-
tempts to gain information, rather than
attempts to draw attention to self.
I would especially like to thank The
East Carolinian and Staff Writer Patrick
O'Neill for their sensative and prescrip-
tive coverage of Rinpoche's visit. 1
would also like to thank the departments
of Anthropology, Sociology, Economics
and Philosophy for their sponsorship of
the public talk along with the Asian
Studies Committee chaired by Professor
Avtar Singh. I would like particularly to
express my thanks to Dr. Robert Bunger
who was a constant supporter and
tireless worker throughout the visit.
Last, but not least, I thank my Dharma
students, whose openness to Rinpoche
and diligence in their practice made the
visit the outstanding spiritual event that
it was.
Joseph Norwood Jr.
Assoc. Prof. Physics
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the outhorfs). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All let-
ters ore subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted.
Students are limited to one published
letter every three weeks or six issues,
adhere to the above strictures.
The
North
has r
mark
and
tional
poputs
RA1
The
of
Mondl
award)
Maryl
Pr
Fi
Lii
Contii
libraril
they
sorsl
unbel
Lai
the
censol
becor
other)
grouj
censor
the Mi
their
theKi
Ameril
Party
folio
know
not b
lectior
Ear
Lamer
ARC
ARC
ki
i � � �
- � - �
��" " �- Mt m w





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 16,19t2
I
jr.e
he
:re
ha!
of
to
iny
of
m,
md
to
fud-
llar-
and
and
past;
-till
the
my
. to
and
irma
re at
Id be
jause
lould
lore
kwd
ilk in
e to
tions
at-
Ithan
The
ktrick
kcrip-
it. I
lents
mics
up of
isian
tessor
rly to
inger
and
visit.
larma
oche
ie the
kt that
od Jr.
Physics
letters
fail or
South
nary.
V letters
r and
lumber
Letters
pages,
All iet-
breity,
mat at-
fblished
issues,
lures.
OfN,
Prisons Breaks Record
The population of
North Carolina prisons
has reached the 17,000
mark for the first time
and according to na-
tional statistics, the
population of all U.S.
prisons has increased
by almost 7 percent
during the first 6 mon-
ths of 1982.
Newly released
Bureau of Justice
statistics show that the
national prison popula-
tion stand at 394,380
inmates, an increase of
6.9 percent from the
end of 1981
The Bureau of
Justice said the growth
was equivalent to a 14.3
percent increase, two
percent higher than any
annual increase since
the government began
counting in 1926. Last
year's increase was over
12 percent.
The U.S. Justice
Department partially
attributes the recod
breaking figures to new
sentencing and parole
laws which are
lengthening jail terms
for many offenders.
According to the
Prison and Jail Project,
a Durham based group
working for alter-
natives to incarcera-
Maryland Company To Repair Bridge
RALEIGH (UPI)
The State Department
of Transportation
Monday decided to
award a contract to a
Maryland firm for
repair work on the
damaged William B.
Umstead Bridge cross-
ing Croatan Sound.
McLean Contracting
Co. of Baltimore sub-
Professor Honored
For Fighting Against
Library Censorship
Continued From Page 1
libraries. " The tactics
they have used in cen-
sorship are
unbeleivable he said.
Lanier feels that if
the Moral Majority's
censorship attempts
become successful then
other special interest
groups might try to
censor more books. "If
the Moral Majority gets
their way, others like
the Ku Klux Klan or the
American Communist
Party might try to
follow. Before you
know it, there would
not be any library col-
lections at all
Earlier this year,
Lanier was awarded the
national Hugh M.
Hefner First Amend-
ment Award in Educa-
tion in Chicago.
At the recent
NCASL conference he
received the coveted
Mary Peacock Douglas
Award for outstanding
contributions to North
Carolina school
libraries.
Lanier has given 35
presentations to
library-related
organizations this year.
This Friday he will
speak at a regional
meeting of Division of
Support and Post-
Secondary Personnel
of the North Carolina
Association of
Educators.
mitted the low bid for
the work at $387,000,
said Frank Coieman,
the department's chief
engineer. Coieman said
other factors also
figured in the selection
of McLean.
��We felt after
reviewing the price and
method of performing
the work, and also the
fact that they might be
able to come in a few
days earlier, that they
had the best for the
department Coieman
said.
Also submitting bids,
which were opened at 5
p.m. Monday, were
Hardaway Construc-
tors Inc. of
Chesapeake, Va and
Tidewater Construc-
tion Corp. of Norfolk,
Va.
Hardaway submitted
a bid of $869,240 and
said it could be on the
"bridge site Nov. 29,
while Tidewater sub-
mitted a bid of
$416,000 and said it
could be on site three
days after the contract
was awarded, said
DOT spokesman Cy
Lynr.
Coieman said
McLean's bid said the
company will be on site
by Nov. 29, but the
contractor planned to
start work on design
forms Tuesday and
could begin work ahead
of schedule.
The contract price
was "relatively close to
what we thought it
would be Coieman
said, but it covers only
a portion of the cost
associated with the
bridge closing.
'�The figure does not
include the cost of the
ferry service, of course,
and the docking ramps
and other items involv-
ed in the service he
said. "At this point we
are thinking that the
total cost of being out
of service down there to
the DOT will be in the
$850,000 to $950,000
range
The contract calls for
the bridge to be reopen-
ed to traffic by Jan. 31.
tion, the recent in-
creases will cause a
tremendous over-
crowding problem in
most prisons.
"This overcrowding,
both in North Carolina
and nationally, will
cause severe problems
for both prisoners and
guards said Prison
and Jail Project Staff
Member Lao Rubert.
Rubert noted that the
national statistics are
reflecting what's hap-
pening in North
Carolina where prison
admissions for misde-
meanors are up 20 per-
cent and felon admis-
sions are up seven per-
cent for the third
quarter of 1982, as
compared to the same
quarter of 1981.
Statistics also in-
dicate that North
Carolina has the
highest per capita rate
of incarceration of any
state in the nation.
N.C. also has the
highest percapita in-
carceration rate of
minorities in the na-
tion.
Rubert further noted
that many of North
Carolina's prisoners
are in for non-violent
offenses.
"Seventy-six percent
of all 1981 admissions
to North Carolina
prisons were for non-
violent offenses
Rubert said. "For
many of these people,
alternative programs
within the community
would be far more
preferable
The Prison and Jail
Project supports alter-
native programs such
as restitution to the vic-
tim, work release.
Third Party custody
release, and community
volunteer programs,
which can keep people
out of jail and working
as productive members
of society.
Members of the staff
of the project are
presently awaiting a
North Carolina Gover-
nors task force report
to be released on
November 24 which has
done an extensive study
of the need for alter-
natives in North
Carolina prisons.
ARCADE VARIETY
2 Hot Dogs
'1.00
ARCADE VARIETY
Ice Cream
2 pints for 99C
ARCADE VARIETY
All 2 litre
soft drinks 99C
ARCADE VARIETY
& GRILL
"Good for
reasonable prices"
5 SV. � lljccutc CrdC
Bausch & Lomb j
Soft Lenses
COMPLETE
includes initial eye examination, lenses, cace
kit, instructions and follow up visits torhe
month. ECU student Y.D. required.
100
OWQMCTWC
�Y�CARCG�HI�R
Of mmmmM� m
228 GREENVILLE BLVD.
TIPTON ANNEX
758-9404
Dr. Pater Hollis
NOW LOOKING GOOD
COSTS LESS
take a
Here's some good
advice that could give
you 10,000 flavor
buds of savory enjoy-
ment. It's the No. 3
Sirloin Tips at
Western
Sizzlin. USDA
Choice Sirloin
Tips sea-
soned to
perfection
from
jzzHn
with onions and bell
peppers and served
with your choice of
potato. So come on in
and follow up on
some good advice at
Western Sizzlin.
Western
SizzLun
KAPPA
' SIGMA
Located 1 mile past
Hasting's Ford on
10th St. extension
Tuesday, Wednesday
& Thursday
POPCORN
SHRIMP
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad may be substituted
tor Slaw35c extra
r&m
MM UAL1
o
NOV. Ifc2
$1258.
��
� �
5o� rfitftfyr
sponsors: .KRisfVW��'N�mu��a�rs,�sr
�FOR MEADS OMV .RECORD ��;HA5�fi2!SL
� WKKSKICR RS0DPD4 to! em-1WD �"
� MR. Gm � SNATCH 0ANO � WEST E�I0 UWCRY MAT
� K4SH 4KABRY, Wsr. �ELTW�.�W0S PIZZA
Credit Card Calculator
with purchase of any
ART CARVED CLASS RING
valid only on dates listed below
Dates: Nov. 17,18,19th
Time: 9-4:00
Place; S.S.S. Lobby
MERR Y CHRISTMAS
from ART CARVED!
25 off on all 14k Gold Rings
. .J�-
�"���
. H





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
Th
NOVEMBER 16,1982
Page
Mature Outlook
Keeps Winwood
In Music Race
Rolling Sione
Steve Winwood would clearly
rather be anywhere else at the mo-
ment. As the spotlights ringing
MTV's mid-Manhatten taping
studio cast their brutal glare on the
British singersongwriter and multi-
instrumentalist, he stares nervously
at interviewer J.J. Jackson, then at
the rock posters and memorabilia
crowding the studio wall just over
Jackson's shoulder. When it comes
time for him to tape a few MTV
promo spots, he tries to stare down
the camera with a forced smile.
But in one of his rare American
television appearances, Winwood
answers his interviewer's questions
with gentlemanly grace, if not ease.
He even submits to more than a
dozen takes to get the promos right,
nervously laughing at himself when
he flubs his lines, and he is not
above a little idle chitchat with the
crew and onlookers when the
shooting is completed. After nearly
20 years in the music business, en-
during its petty annoyances and
fighting its fatal pressures without
betrayng his muse, Steve Winwood
simply can't help being what his cur-
rent lyricist Will Jennings calls "just
a good guy with very nice man-
ners
"The fact that someone in rock
'n' roll should turn out badly ad-
justed � it should not be a forgone
conclusion complains Winwood
with mild irritation back at Island
Records' nearby offices. On the
desk next to him stands a glass
figure in the shape of the numeral
one. Billboard magazine awarded it
to Winwood last year, naming him
top male vocalist for his hit album
Arc of a Diver and Top Ten single
"While You See a Chance
"Who's to say if you suffer for
your art you're going to do it any
better?" he continues. "Just the
reverse is usually the case
Winwood speaks from ex-
periences. A mere teenager when he
first went pro with the Spencer
Davis Group in 1963, he hit the road
with his parents' blessing � and his
older bass-playing brother, Muff, to
look out for him. Before turning 21,
he was already leading the seminal
British progressive band Traffic and
wrestling with the supergroup hype
that surrounded Blind Faith. But
the death of his friend Jimi Hen-
drix, and Blind Faith bandmate Eric
Clapton's bout with heroin in the
early 70s, contrasted starkly with
Winwood's accelerating success as
he guided Traffic to triumphs like
1970's John Barleycorn Must Die
and 1972's The Low Spark oj High-
Heeled Boys and ventured into fr-
inge projects with the likes of
Japanese avant-garde percussionist
Stomu Yamash'ta and salsa's Fania
All-Stars. He even presevered
through Traffic's multiple breakups
See POP'S, Page 8
A Trip Through Our Nation's Parks Still As Exciting As Ever
Portraits of America - The National Parks brings host Doug Jones nyon and the Grand Tetoas. Whoa! Tickets hHtel STaC?
To Mendenhall's Hendrix Theatre this Wednesday night at 8 p.m. for a Travel-Adventure F 1m are $3.50 for �-� J� Jj
ook at the splendor of our nation's parks. The film journey will take tickets for groups of 20 or more are S3 and canJ �'dJtf�
X from Maine's Acadia National Park to Hawaii's Volcanoes. Abo Central Ticket Office .nMemlenh.ll. Students w.M be adumitted free
on tap are looks at the "birth" of YeUowstone in 1872, the Grand Ca- with ID and activity card.
Romero And King Team Up For 'Creepshow'
By MICHAEL S. BUTZGY
Staff Writer
JLreepshow (���) is currently being shown at
Carolina East's PJitt Theatres in,Greenville.
George Romero and Stephen King are not well men.
They're the type of guys that must have laughed at
World War II. You probably remember George
Romero, he directed Night of the Living Dead, and its
popular sequel Dawn of the Dead. Stephen King wrote
some minorly succesful books like The Shining and Car-
rie. Well, if you see Creepshow, you won't be disap-
pointed. They're dynamite together.
Cinema
Creepshow is a series of vignettes done in a comic
book sort of backdrop. And this movie is essentially a
comic book, which is not an insult, because there are
many well done comic books. Of course, there are many
bad ones as well. But, this film is closer to the former
than the latter.
Vignette number one is titled "Father's Day and
true to the Romero tradition, it has a zombie in it. The
basic idea behind this film is to mix horror and humor,
which is a hard thing to do if you're not very good at it.
The best comedy horror film I've ever seen was a Night
of the Living Dead parody called Children Shouldn't
Play With Dead Things. But that's another film. In
"Father's Day" we learn the importance of giving Dad
his Father's Day cake.
Number two is the best of the six. Stephen King plays
a real hick and is absolutely hilarious. I had no idea he
could act too. This sketch is the most innocuous as well,
which means it won't scare the shit out of you.
Number three has Leslie Nielsen as a jealous hus-
band, and number four as Hal Holbrook as a henpeck-
ed husband. Both put in wonderful performances, prov-
ing that they are indeed, two of our most versatile ac-
tors. Adrienne Barbeau puts in an OK job as the
henpecker. Tippi the wonder rhino is wonderful as the
monster.
The real problem with number four, was it was tow
scary. I almost warned to leave the theatre it was so bad1.
Some may consider this a blessing. Hey, if scary
monsters are your bag, more power to you. You pro-
bably eat lunch with Stephen and George. I just don't
want to know what you eat.
Number five is also rather frightening, with E.G.
Marshall as an absolute asshole Wall Street fiancier or
something like that. In this skit, he has something of a
roach problem. Hey, just don't eat before you see this
film, OK? I can deal with zombies, vegetrons and scary
monsters, but roaches are real, and they live in my
dorm. Boy will I sleep tonight.
Let's lay the cards on the table. If you like Night of
the Living Dead, The Shining, torturing small animals
with kitchen utensils or the nightly news, you'll eat this
up with a cuisinart. If you're afraid of being afraid, go
see E. T. Then again, maybe he'll scare you. People like
you scare me. Oops!
The tag line for this film is "The most fun you'll ever
have being scared For the first half of the film, I
believed it. But the film does become a little too scary
(Don't take your kids!), which is why I give it a three-
star rating instead of a better one. But the funny parts
of the film are well done, indeed, and show that King
was involved. There are no "Here's Johnny type
lines, or the like. But there are roach wranglers. 1 kid
you not; that's what it said in the credits. Hce Hee.
Basically, if you like King or Romero, this film will give
you everything you like them for. Sweet dreams.
The 'Who' Brew
Schlitz Rocks America's Youth
American Ballet Theatre II AtMcGinnis This Week
The University Unions Theatre Arts Series will lead off its 'S2tt series with the worid acclaimed
American Ballet Theatre II this Thursday night at 8 p.m. in McGinnis Theatre. The dance company
(formerly Ballet Repertory Company) is a showcase for talented young dancers and is committed to br-
inging dance to a greater number of locations. Tickets are $4 for students, $8 for faculty, staff and
public, and $8 at the door; tickets for 14-and-unders are specially priced at $5. Single show and season
tickets are on sale at the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhali Student Center.
Rolling Sione
The rock 'n' roll industry may not be going through
its strongest period, but big business is just beginning to
discover rock's potential as a merketing tool. Last year,
Jovan reportedly paid more than $1 million to put its
name on tickets and posters for the Rolling Stones'
tour, and this summer, Schlitz Light beer paid a
reported $500,000 to underwrite Fleetwood Mac's con-
cert tour. In addition, Miller High Life has been using
Jimmy Buffett and Gary U.S. Bonds as commencal
spokesmen. But those efforts pale next to the deal that s
been made between the Who and the Stroh Brewery
Company, which owns Schlitz. The Who put themselves
on the market by first announcing their tour in Adver-
tising Age and inviting corporate sponsorship: Stroh
jumped at the offer, and the slogan "Schlitz Rocks
America" now adorns all advertising for the Who's
shows. But the connection goes further than that:
Schlitz commercials featuring the band will soon ap-
pear, while posters, print ads and a nationwide
sweepstakes wiU also ballyhoo the relationship. For
both the band and the brewery, the advantages are ob-
vious: the Who gets a lot of money (neither side would
say how much, though both say it's a seven-figure deal
and the largest of its kind), and Schlitz gets a new im-
age. At least that's how it's supposed to work, said
Hunter Hastings, Stroh's vice-president of brand
management.
Why did yon decide to use a rock band to promote
Schlitz?
When Stroh's acquired Schlitz, it got a famous na-
tional brand, but it's well known that the brand has
been going through hard times. Its image, especially
among the younger end of the beer-drinking audience,
was a product that was just not relevant to them �
Schlitz is the brand their fathers drank. We wanted to
enhance the brand's image, to wake people up to
Schlitz, and we want to rock 'n' roll because there's an
obvious link between the young beer drinkers and rock.
So you deckled to to sponsor the Who tour
Actually, we're doing a lot more than just sponsoring
the tour. That's just the beginning of a muititiered
marketing program based on the slogan "Schlitz Rocks
America We'll be using radio and television ads,
sweepstakes prizes, posters � we'll be using all the tools
we normally use, but they'll all emphasize the connec-
tion between Schlitz and the Who.
Was the group responsive to aH your ideas?
They've been tremendously cooperative. Of course,
they were the ones who initially let it be known that they
were seeking corporate involvement, so we know that
they wanted something tike this. But we were surprised
by their willingness to do anything we wanted.
I understand that iaduaid filming ads far Schlitz.
Well, we didn't want this to seem tike commerical ex-
See WHO'S, Paga 8
B
The East
chestra, in
ECU ChoruJ
Choral Sock
rendition of
No. 9 in D
standing-ro
Wright Audj
day afternc
performing
Robert Hai
more than
under the dir
The concert
of the contii
75th Anni
University
Soloists fc
Jane Mun
soprano; J;
Gary Glaze,
bass.
I could n
ed to the o
concert was
quality of
that is in at
ville area an
guided b
ECU Schcx
Oi
B
M
1
mf f, "�
IWJ�!UiJJ
�� �.






red
loor:
the
as the
Irful as the
�as loe
is so nacf
scary
ou pro-
,ust don't
E.G.
. ler or
'hing of a
see this
and scary
.e in my
it Sight of
iui animals
eat this
afraid, go
Feople like
Hi'U ever
: film, I
I too scary
� a three-
inny parts
that King
my type
giers. I kid
Hee Hee.
lm will give
;am
th
to promote
famous na-
brand has
especially
tg audience,
to them �
fe wanted to
:ople up to
se there's an
fcrs and rock.
lour
ft sponsoring
multitiered
khlitz Rocks
evision ads,
all the tools
the connec-
tas?
Of course,
hvn that they
e know that
ere surprised
ued.
for ScMitz.
mmencal ex-
The Ninth
Stirring Performance In Wright
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 16, 1982
By MIKE HAMER
SlaH Writer
The East Carolina Symphony Or-
chestra, in conjunction with the
ECU Choruses and the Greenville
Choral Society, presented a stirring
rendition of Beethoven's Symphony
No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125, to a
standing-room-only audience in
Wright Auditorium this past Sun-
day afternoon. The orchestra was
performing under the direction of
Robert Hause while the chorus,
more than 200 strong, performed
under the direction of Brett Watson.
The concert performance was part
of the continuing celebration of the
?5th Anniversary of East Carolina
University.
Soloists for the performance were
Jane Murray Dillard, mezzo-
soprano; Jane Williams, soprano;
Gary Glaze, tenor; and Joseph Pate,
bass.
I could not help feeling as I listen-
ed to the opening movement that the
concert was a tribute to the high
quality of classical musicianship
that is in abundance in the Green-
ville area and that is stimulated and
guided by the extremely capable
ECU School of Music.
Review
The combined efforts of the or-
chestra and chorus on Schiller's
"Ode to Joy the final movement
of the afternoon, were exhilarating
as approximately 300 musicians
combined their efforts in music and
song.
Another star of the afternoon was
Wright Auditorium itself. With its
new, sloping floor, and the new
acoustic tiles, the acoustics and sight
quality were much improved over
the old Wright Auditorium. And I
felt that it was a tribute to the music
lovers in Greenville that they filled
Wright Auditorium to overflowing
on a Sunday afternoon. I say let's
have more concerts of such a scope.
It is evident that Greenville has the
talent to pull this off.
As I walked out of Wright, at the
end of the concert, I could hear a
great number of people humming
the melody line of the "Ode to
Joy
SPECIAL:
Rib or Fish Dinner with
fries, slaw or hush puppies
ONLY 2.99 for Ribs
ofergood 1.99 for Fish
Mon FrL, Nov. 15th to 19th from 11am to 9pm.
I
25C
OLD FASHIONED HOMEMADE
BREAD PUDDINGonly
1011 Charles Street � 752-1373 l Block from Campus
THURS 7 PM FRI & SAT 5, 7, 9 PM HENDRIX THEATRE
ADMISSION: ID & ACTIVITY CARD OR MSC MEMBERSHIP
Lote Show Friday And Saturday, Midnight, The Decline Of Western Civilization
bcl beef buy
in 9 fcc ftv ilk!
22 ounce draft 85$, refill 5(W; keep the cup.
Wednesday night is college night at the Sandwich Game.
After your first beer at regular price, each 22 ounce Sandwich
Game Cup of draft is only 50C. Get your friends and come to
the Sandwich Game�the best beer buy, cheapest games,
and finest sandwiches in town.
264 Bypass Behind Ramada Inn
South Park Shopning Center �Greenville
The Shoe Outlet
� No B.S. Jewelry
'Repair (Custom
Crafting � Fair
Prices &

Guaranteed Work) I
i
201 West 9th Street
NAME BRANDS at
DISCOUNT PRICES
50-75
Off Regular Price
Men's & Ladies' SHOES
bylES JEWELRY
� 120 E. 5th St. I
J728-2127 �10-5 I
TuesSat.
I Bring this ad for 20
� off 14K chain repairs.
TIM YOUR FIGURE
YOUR BEST
LOOK, INC.
35$ �?
Lose 'MS Pounds in )Wni
Programs for Men A Women
� Medical Weight Control �
Nutritional Counseling
SKIN CARE
individual Shin Analysis
Deep Pore Cleansing
Face A Body Waxing
Manicures and Pedicures
Complimentary Consultation
Chech phone book tor
discount coupon
Acme D .
Dingo DOOTS
Hanover
Name Brand Leather Clogs
$4.95-$ 10.95
Ladies' Dress & Western Boots
$10-527.95
KAPPA
SIGMA
?Udtie4
"FAMOUS MAKER
SHOES AT SUPER LOW
DISCOUNT PRICES"
Next door to
EVANS SEAFOOD
Student Coif Special
Indian Trails
Country Club
Fairway Dr Griffon, N.C.
Cart (2 riders) & Green Fees
for 18 holes only
$6.00
Monday-Friday
8a.m5 p.m.
524-5485
Musi hrii'
msm
0SBBS
: 0 OPTICAL
PIlOIH'
750-4204
PALACE
� �
5oss ifrgiyp
SPONSORS: 'MfWHHM'mTiUJS'&MlSHESI
� ?UK9WJKrR WWD4BO CM. � HOD MtAJFSR
�MR. Grn � SWATtW MNP �WEST END UUM)rYMAT
� K4SH4MRftV,M$T. �ELTZKD.RMrlcusPtrzA
� 70S Greenville Blvd. (Actom From Pitt PUza. Nest To ERA Realty)
) Gary M. Harris, Licensed Optician Open 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m Mon-Frl.
Bring in tne coupon for:
'10.00 Off
Bausch &
Lomb Soft
Contact Lenses
Reg. s99.95
i
25 off all frames in stocks
�"���� Offer Expires
The same day r
Nov. 30,1982
We can arrange
An eye exam
Pilot Training
Opporfunifies
FLY NAVY
The Navy presently has several openings
for the most exciting and challenging
job in the world - NAVY PILOT. If you
qualify, we will guarantee you a seat in
the most prestigious flight school
anywhere. At the completion of training
you will fly the Navy's high performance
aircraft.
Qualifications Are:
Bachelors degree
Less than 28 12 years old
2020 uncorrected vision
Excellent health
U.S. Citizen
If you think you can qualify and would
like to earn a starting salary of
$18,000 with $28,000 in four years,
send a letter of qualifications to:
NAVY PILOT PROGRAMS
1001 H. vaho Dr.
Raleigh, NC 27609
or coll
1-800-662-7231





! Ml t M i K(1 IM V
St I MHI K in s;
Pop's Winwood Mature
i ontinueti from Vat f�
and dii:u' personnel
changes until finally
ng ir a day in I9"4
1 hat U inwood, now
i has come through
thai gtor grind with
minimal scars is evident
in the supple, good
u.i tured t tin k and
i omantic electronic-
k h�ifd glaze ol his
v Recorded
tpletei) solo in the
ack studi
i. English
side I ondoi
a Pner and
I ell kin a Hdkk
'u are logi(
extensions oi W in
twmg
r all i
I was d
it tic
,
I R&B
al this
manor
in oj
e ik u
o the
ethnic music It's jusi
that it's the wa the're
presented. explains
inwood. a model of
normality in a blue
casual shut, brown
trousers, gray socks
and wine colored pn
ny loafers
"It doesn'l make a
lot ol sense to me being
underground now he
adds, responding to
critical charges thai he
iv tui ning oul identikit
s nth pop tiii
whipped cream disco
T he pomi to: me is to
reach people through
what I'm doing, and to
deliberately a oid a cei
tain section ol the
public is self-defeating.
ert � nly lon'i say
� I make music
like disco I
id a whole
different audience I
il I make music that
el
that's tine with me
1 hey used to dance in
" he
Who's Schlitz
( ontinued l-rom Pane f�
in album
. at a reheat tage and U
ert We're trying to associate the
� . � i ural set
to crass c i �m
, e Pete I id inginc the
dances were different
1 he pogo was oni
dance thai caught VA in
wood up short
Retreating atter I raffic
into the comfortable
anonymity ol sporadu
session work. Vv in
wood came b.uk with
his debut solo I P in the
midst ol the punk
uprising in 197" and
Found thai no one
cai ed 1 he album .
simplv titled Sfi�' H in
wood was, in his own
words,
"wishy washy an
were its sales
His current rec
though they may
the creative tension and
restless searching ol his
band day �. spruit' from
a single minded detei
mination to satisfy only
his own st11 nge n I
ria tor what
tes a good pop
reco ti he m
n all bv himsell
(assisted only by an
: Nobby
and by his v Ni
- i
. nd
ies) was. al
lib a m
momic nece
;unk all
into
� moans in
" I:

i
I i
� !
COUPON
COUPON
s3.00oMre� p.iceANY GIANT PIZZA
2 OOoUres pnceANY LARGE PIZZA
den
PC ti ��
HEALTH PROFESSIONS
SCHOLARSHIPS
if you're planning a career in
medicine you owe it to yourself to
find out about the Air Force's
Health Professions Scholarship Pro-
qram.
Qualified U.S. Citizens can
receive scholarships for medical or
popathic school.
Our scholarships include:
Tuition
Require Books
Required Lab Fees
Required Equipment Renta
and More Than $550 Monthly Stipend
���UB
rfotlons 'i J " 4 I '4
r Ur,th S ynni
AIM HIGH
ITALIAN N1TE
LASAGNA
AND
PAGHETTII
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
Plu Garlic Sraad l-gg
win
I ii e it m ordei to
lor il ()t ourse,
aft � ha ing the studu i
built. I couldn't attord
really sophistic a ted
nenl cither So,
no musii ian oi engineei
worth his salt would
� iv liked the place "
His only option: "It
gel the mater ial
: ight, I could make an
album � impletely on
my own in the �tudio,
which was a pretty
lhardy thing to
think at the time
His lengths solitary
almost three
to build the
ul Ire " u
ti. � another I w o
to crank oul
Talking Hack to the
ighi imply th.rt
�v ' � d is resting
toe rat u rock stai
privilege, not to i
tion reii s im
i recluse- Bui he
� tually
that lone to turn oul a
n � truth,
igh " h
. iddle
id
Wi Lo;
. t e
i
irms

d -
( !usad H B K
Manilow
sev e K � '
�.
a
� "I was not that
familial with Steve or
tns work lennings
confesses "But I went
to his place and he
played me the tracks
tor Arc of a Diver 1
lust sat in the studio
with him and did the
lyrics to tour oi them in
about a week and a
halt '
lennings also notes
Winwood's occasional
difficulty in reconciling
bis nice manners with
his artistic discipline
'I here was one poem I
w rote foi t he new
album, a lyric called
"Where Is Robin
very English with all
this Robin Hood im-
agery Steve thought
oul it and thoug
ut it, and after,
w hen I got back to the
states, he finally called
me and said, 'Chris
(Blackwell, the head ol
Island Records) and I
h.o e b( en ' Ik me about
tnd we just think
"Where i � K 'bin
well, would
mind trying another
lyru ' '
a m w o o d adn
that strongarming
not his style, even par-
blaminj fic's
ill nto the
million seller league on
his own in I
himsell a - lead
It may well be thai
it r- still on the cha
. ause oi thar maturi-
rtoi in spite
Credit Card Calculator
with purchase of any
CLASS RING
NOV. 17,18,19
Wed Thurs Fri.
Time: 9-4
STUDENT STORE LOBBY
nly one of these pens
is thin enough
to draw the lineoelow.
HONEYS
432 Greenville Blvd.
jballof Pilot v Precis
� � i vent guessed whi -one it is. - �'
top pi ' � . - i � � � m beauty nth eft
�� � eat beauty � � I - � e Ball
. � ��� � . � �; .�
i
because its tiny
irely witl i � I � kesta
papt ' : '�
jsti i � '� � held
� � i
� ����� � rabl
. � �
� � . int: the I
thavi
Bollintr
7776 rotting ban pen that revolutionizes thin writing.
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each ol t� �Ovf���1 it�m� is '�qul'M) to M '��dHy � ��tl�bt tot � ��� �'
t�tow th� aN�riU�J pi' � m �� AP Sto� �ic�pt �� o H�c�lh
in this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT NOV 20 AT A&P IN GREENVILLE. N
703 GREENVILLE BLVD GREENVILLE
SQUARE SHOPPING CENTER -
GREENVILLE,N.C
�gMMM
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED
Young Turkeys
57c
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED
Young
Turkeys
18 lbs. and
up
ib.
USDA
Ck2i5
(LIMIT ONE WITH ADDITIONAL 1 bO ORDERi
GOOD
SUN
MON
&TUES
ONLY
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED
Fryer
Leg Qtrs.
6 lbs. or
more
Ib
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAiN FED BEEF
BONELESS
Whole
Sirloin Tip
9-12 Ib
avg.
-��j�sy
IHMltr OCEAN SPRAY FRESH WHOLE
Cranberries
12 oz.
bag
77
c
CALIFORNIA CR'e SOLID ICEBERG
Head Lettuce
2 100
large
heads
CALIFORNIA FIRM
Crisp Celery
49c
Jumbo
24
Size
Coca-C
Mello Yello
Sprite
Tab
�5rtea GroceAT
2
Savings
White Bread
Liter Bottle
P&Q BRAND
BVV i- 24oj oov
T mKm toaves
TROPICANA
GOLD N PURE
i
ALL FLAVORS
Ice
Cream
1 Orange Juice I Sealtest
I ' -gai ,0 J TiM "
v � ctn Mmr SrLl ctn �
SUPER JAVEB COUPON �
SAVE 20e
ON THE PURCHASE OF 13 OZ BAG
MASTER BLEND
ALL GRINDS
Maxwell House Coffee
GOOO THRU SAT NOV 20 AT AAP 659
LMUT ONE WTTH COUPON ANO I X 0�0�B
StiPEB JAV SB COUPON ��
i O jSl SUPER SAVER COUPON � tm
SAVE 20c
ON THE PURCHASE OF 32 OZ JAR
ANN PAGE
Mayonnaise
GOOO THRU SAT NOV 20 AT AAP 661
UM1 ONE WTTH COUPON ANO t 5C 0�OCR
iri T) JM SUPER SAVER COUPON i �� m
SAVE 20e
ON THE PURCHASE OF 1-LB PKG
IN QUARTERS
Mrs. Filbert's Margarine
GOOO TH�U SAT NOV 20 AT AAP 663
Lt�T ONE WITX COUPON ANO 7 SC OSOCB
�-PD
SAVE 20
ON THE PURCHASE OF 2 LB BO X
CONFECTIONERS 10X OR LIGHT BRC�. N
A&P Sugar
GOOO Tutu Sat iov 2C - AAP 660
�� p) jSl S. "fR SAVES 00 S im
SAVE20C
ON THE PURCHASE OF 5 LB BAG
PLAIN-SELF-RISING
Martha White Flour
GOOO TN�t. SAT VO X A 4F 662
U�IT ONE rtT. COUPON ANv' I .
� tm T) jSm SL'PCR SAveb COUPON m mm ,
SAVE 20�
OH THE PURCHASE Of 4 1 5 OZ CANS PKG
BUTTERMILK
Pillsbury Biscuits
GOOO THRU SAT NOV 20 A' ��F 664
UMn ONE WITM COUPON ANO t SC �OCB
1'





s.c
C
C
y
t- �
ri
e
lam
B BOX
BROWN
660
i SO ORO�R
)N IS
BAG
iur
662
rscoaocR
WS PKG
luits
p 664
'50 0001
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
NOVEMBER 16. 1982
Page 9
Pirates Fight Off Determined Indians
By KEN BOLTON
Assistant Sports Editor
With its historic tradition and
beautiful scenery, Williamsburg,
Va. made an ideal setting for Satur-
day afternoon's contest between
ECU and William & Mary.
Even compared with the cap-
tivating surroundings, the game
itself was no letdown, as the out-
come came down to the final minute
before ECU pulled out a 31-27 vic-
tory over the Indians.
The Pirates were led by quarter-
back Kevin Ingram, who scored
three touchdowns, and Earnest
Byner, who carried the ball 23 times
for 180 yards. Byner's rushing yar-
dage was a single-game high for the
Pirates this year.
The victory upped ECU's record
to 6-4, and assured the Pirates of
their first winning season in Ed
Emory's three years as head coach.
Philadelphia, a city with as much
historical tradition as Williamsburg,
will be the scene of ECU's next
game. The Pirates will be looking
for their seventh victory of the year
when they square off with Temple
University this Saturday afternoon
at 1:30.
In the William & Mary game, the
Indians had a first down on the
ECU 17-yard line with a little over
two minutes remaining in the game.
With the score 31-27, a touchdown
would have given the Indians the
lead.
After an incomplete pass on first
down, the Indians tried a reverse
that ended up being the biggest play
of the game. Defensive tackle Mar-
tin Daniel broke through the line to
hit wide receiver Jeff Sanders, caus-
ing a fumble that Sanders recovered
on the 37-yard line.
Following the 20-yard loss, the
Indians were forced to pass the ball
on third down, but the ECU defense
was ready. Defensive end Jody
Schulz hit William & Mary quarter-
back Stan Yagiello as he attempted
to throw the ball and it was ruled in-
complete.
With 45 seconds left in the game,
the Indians had only one last
chance. On fourth down, Yagiello's
pass was batted down in the end
zone and the Pirates' victory was
secured.
The entire game had been basical-
ly a battle between ECU's running
attack and the passing of W & M's
Yagiello.
The Pirates' 378 yards rushing
was a team best for this season.
Besides Byner's 180 yards, Ingram
(80 yards) and tailback Tony Baker
(85 yards) also ran successfully
against the Indians.
Yagiello, who came into Satur-
day's game with 1472 yards passing,
was 20 of 35 for 206 yards and two
touchdowns.
The Pirates scored first on their
second possession of the game as
they ran the ball all eight plays of
the 57-yard drive. Ingram scored on
a run from four yards out and a Jeff
Heath conversion made it 7-0.
After the two teams exchanged
fumbles, the Indians took over on
their own 30 and proceeded to
march all the way down to the ECU
10, where fullback Jim McHeffey
scored on a burst up the middle.
After Jimmy Walden returned the
kickoff to the 34-yard line, the
Pirates went to the ground again.
Eight more running plays,
highlighted by two Byner carries of
38 and 14 yards, resulted in another
Kevin Ingram touchdown and a 14-7
ECU lead.
The only scoring done in the se-
cond period was a nine-yard
touchdown toss from Yagiello to
Kurt Wrigley. The teams went to the
dressing room at halftime with the
score tied 14-14.
Byner put the Pirates back in the
lead with a 36-yard touchdown run
in the third quarter.
Yagiello went back to work again
on the next possession, and faced a
fourth-down and 12 on the ECU
21-yard line. After being forced out
of the pocket by the ECU rush,
Yagiello lofted a "Hail Mary" pass
into the endzone that was caught by
tailback Bernie Marrazzo.
The extra-point attempt was miss-
ed wide to the right, and the third
quarter ended with ECU leading
21-20.
Jeff Heath added a 21-yard field
goal to up the Pirates' lead to 24-20.
That gave the Virginia Beach, Va.
freshman 13 field goals for the
season, one short of the team mark
set in 1976 by Pete Conaty.
After the two teams traded punts,
William & Mary used a
4'flea-flicker" to pull ahead of the
Pirates.
Marrazzo took a pitch at his
tailback position and appeared to be
running a sweep to the left side. But
he pulled up and threw a 55-yard
TD pass to Wrigley over a stunned
ECU defense. The 27-24 score was
the first and last time that the In-
dians would be in the lead.
The Pirates took over for their
game-winning drive on their own
20-yard line. ECU took nine plays
to score, with Ingram getting his
third touchdown from one yard out
for the final margin.
The Indians refused to give up,
and appeared to be heading for the
endzone before the last-minute
heroics of Daniel, Schulz and the
rest of the ECU defense.
Head coach Ed Emory was highly
enthused following the victory that
assured ECU of a winning season.
"That was the biggest win ever
for me, but it's also a big win for
East Carolina Emory said after
the game. "I always wanted to
coach a winning major college team,
and the William & Mary win assures
us of a winning season
One problem that the Pirates had
all day was with the wet turf. A hard
rain Friday night had left the play-
ing surface at Cary Field soggy.
On numerous occasions, the
Pirates were hurt by bad footing, in-
cluding one instance when Ingram
slipped on a crucial third-down play
in the fourth quarter.
The field didn't do much to slow
down Byner, who had 104 of his 180
yards rushing in the first quarter.
"The field was a major factor for
our quarterback and tailbacks, but
Byner had just a great day at
tailback stated Emory.
It would be hard to find a team
with more injuries at one position
than ECU. The Pirates lost their
12th linebacker of the year when
Kevin Banks went out with a knee
injury.
Banks was operated on Monday
for torn ligaments, and will miss the
final game with Temple.
The Temple contest will be the
last of four road games in a row that
will end ECU's season. If the
Pirates are able to win the game, it
will give them a 3-1 mark for that
stretch of road games. It would also
leave them with a 7-4 record, which
would be a perfect way to cap off
the year for Emory and all ECU
followers.
E.CaroS��Ma Man
IFirst Do�ns19
W-Z3�Ruling?V90
61Passing ards5M
0Return arils1
W-5-2Pasnt� : -
4-31 5Punting6-30 0
J-lFumbles! Od6
7-60Penalties1 15
East l arohaaM � t m� a
V�itU�m4Mt�
Scoring
ECL - Ingram. 4 run lHea,K kackl
VkiM - M.Hr'itv M run tMocrsv .
BCl - Ingram iun , Heath kick)
V.A.M - ngie.M pus fnm agieilo Mcr - i rjt)
ECL � Bner. 36run (Heath kick!
�iM � Marrazzs. ;i pass 'rom agiello (lick, tailodl
EC'l � Rj Heathn
�AM - ngleS3 pas from Marrazzo (Moms i .�
Pftoto by GARY PATTERSON
ECU fullback Earnest Byner picks up a few of his 180 yards that he gained against William & Mary.
ladmdaalMaiBno
R.vr. r-ii BCl - Baker tZK. Ingram r-SO. BMier
:� ISO. Maiden 5-15. Branch? AM - Scanlon ll-�6
Vdto 101. McHeffes M4. Marrazzo 5-IS. Pe�elt6-11.
Sanders Ih-30i
Passing BCl - Ingram 5-10-61. �iM - a�eito
H4HK Mhmbd M-SS
Receisine ECl - Frazier III. Nelson �-� Bw 1-6.
kiV - M.Hertes : Pc-s�etI4-13. Mngto 4 Samiers
S-7. Bodnar MO. Scanlor.34. Marrazzo : :
Ingram Looking Forward To
Going Home To Philadelphia
Emory Makes Winning Mark
By ECU SPORTS INFO.
1 hey say going home is never easy
after living life on your own, but
Fast Carolina quarterback Kevin In-
gram has two reasons for disputing
that adage this weekend.
The 5-11, 181-pound, junior
quarterback graduated from Dob-
bins Technical High School in
Philadelphia and later attended
Villanova University on a football
scholarship.
Ingram, who was selected as the
Daily News All-Public League
"Quarterback of the Decade" while
at Robbins, transferred to ECU
after Villanova dropped its football
program two years ago. ECU and
Ingram will travel to Philadelphia
this week to end the season's finale
against Temple University.
"The guys are teasing me about
going home Ingram said, "but I
try not to think of it that way. I'm
taking it as just another game. I
haven't been home in 16 weeks, and
although the trip is 95-percent foot-
ball to me, I'm looking forward to
seeing my family and friends
At one time Ingram's family lived
PATTERSON
Quarterback Kevin Ingram will be returning home this weekend when the
Pirates play Temple.
very near the Temple University
campus, although the ECU business
major never seriously considered be-
ing an Owl.
"I attended Temple's games in
high school he said, "and I still
live only 15 to 20 minutes from the
stadium. I rejected their offers
because of the proximity to my
home
Lately home for Ingram has been
the Pirates' starting quarterback
slot. All year Ingram has fought
senior Greg Stewart for the job,
with Stewart being the passer and
Ingram being the runner. But In-
gram has come of age during the last
two games for the Pirates, and
established himself as a passer in the
Texas-Arlington game.
"Kevin's natural running abilities
and abilities as an option quarter-
back are beginning to surface said
offensive coordinator Larry
Beckish. "He gives us a threat on
the corner, which is a bonus for us
since we are a perimeter-oriented of-
fense.
"In the past few weeks, it's all
seemed to fall into place for Kevin
as far as understanding the offen-
sive concept and what the defense
does in order to stop the T. He is a
gifted athlete with excellent speed
During last week's game against
William & Mary, Ingram scored
three of the four ECU touchdowns
while gaining 80 yards on 27 carries.
He also passed for 61 yards for five
of 10 attempts. Two weeks ago, In-
gram connected on 12 of 16 aerials
for 193 yards and a touchdown
against Texas-Arlington. Statistical-
ly, Ingram has completed 17 of 26
passes for 254 yards and a 65- per-
cent completion percentage in the
last two contests.
"I feel optimistic, real good In-
gram said. "I'm taking the Temple
game as just another game. I feel
like in the last two games, the team's
performance was reflected in my
performance. I don't feel I perform-
ed better in one than the other, but
both feel real good
It has been a long two years for
Ingram, who sat on the bench last
season and played a substitute role
until just two games ago. How the
former Philadelphia prep star will
feel when he arrives in his home City
of Brotherly Love remains to be
seen. One has to believe it's only
four quarters away.
Needless to say, head football
coach Ed Emory was thrilled
when the Pirates clinched a too-
close-for-comfort win over
William & Mary this past
weekend.
But the three-year coach had
even more to celebrate. After
finishing 4-7 and 5-6 in the last
two seasons, Emory and the
Pirates secured their first winning
record since 1979.
"We're very, very happy to be
6-4 Emory said at the Quarter-
back Club's weekly meeting
Monday night. "I've never seen
any players show such emotions
and feelings of happiness that go
with a winning season like our
players did Saturday night
The Pirates nudged out the In-
dians, 31-27, after scoring a
touchdown late in the fourth
quarter. "I think to come back
like we did showed a lot of
character and effort on our
part he said. "We would have
liked to have come out of there,
50-0, but we got what we went
down there for
Emory praised quarterback
Kevin Ingram for his outstanding
play. Ingram scored 18 of the
Pirates' 31 points, an individual
high for the season. "He's got
the quickest feet I've ever seen
Emory said. "He takes ten steps
before you even know he's mov-
ed
Ingram, however, as well as his
other teammates, had trouble
simply moving on William &
Mary's field. "It looked like the
sprinklers had been on Emory
said about the drenched, soggy
turf. "For some reason,
thoroughbreds don't run as well
on wet turf as plowhorses.
"If it had been a dry track, I
really don't think it would have
been a contest
Emory added that the Pirates
have played under various condi-
tions for weeks now. "At West
Virginia we played on astroturf
he said. "In Texas, we played on
superturf; at William & Mary, we
played in mud and in
Philadelphia we're going to play
on a different kind of turf
But with only three starting
linebackers left, Emory's main
concern is the Pirate defense �
an area that disappointed him
while in Williamsburg. "At the
half, it was 14-14 he said. "We
just could never put it away. In
the second half, the defense
played exceptionally well. We
didn't give up but 37 yards
rushing, and wouldn't have given
up much more if it hadn't been
for their two big plays
Cindy Pleasants
A Look Inside
The loss of linebacker Kevin
Banks was the last blow suffered
by the Pirates. Joining Banks on
the injured list are defensive end
Steve Hamilton, offensive guard
Norman Quick and split end
Ricky Nichols, all of which are
sidelined with bad ankles.
Besides trying to keep the re-
maining players healthy, Emory
will also be preparing for a tough
confrontation against Temple.
Temple's head coach Wayne
Hardin announced that he will
resign after the ECU game, and
according to Emory, that may or
may not prove to be an advan-
tage. "I'm sure they will be very
emotional, and may go out there
trvmg to play their hardest to win
one for the coach he said, "or
they may see it like he's leaving
while the ship is sinking.
"But Temple is a fine football
team and has a very fine coach.
Coach Hardin has done a great
job at Temple during his 12
years
Emory said he is more leery of
Temple's offensive line than
anything else. "They have the
best offensive line that we'll face
this year he said. "They are
just awesome
The Pirates last road trip will
be a long one � an eight hour
bus drive. "Playing on the road
will tax you Emory said. "I
wears out the coaches and t
players, but we've got to
ready.
"Temple is much better than a
team, 4-6. Talent-wise they're
close to West Virginia and
Missouri
�It
he j
be
A

T





10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 16, 1982
Swimmers Lose
Tough Match
On Saturday after-
noon in Minges Ac-
quatic Center, the Old
Dominion swim team
defeated ECU, with
identical 60-53 scores
for both the men and
women's teams.
Both ECU teams
evened their records at
1-1, while Old Domi-
nion is 1-0.
"It was a real close
meet said ECU head
coach Rick Kobe.
"Anytime you lose it's
disappointing
The women's team
set two varsity records
in the Old Dominion
meet. Nan George
swam the 50-freestyle
in 24.48, breaking her
own record set last
week.
The 400 medley relay
team also set a record
with a time of 4:08.76.
The members of the
relay team are: Luanne
Peura, Joanne Mc-
Culley, Kaky Wilson
and Nan George.
For the men, the two
relay races were the
strong points. The 400
medley relay team,
composed of Kevin
Richards, Eric Sebnick,
Doug MacMillan and
Stanley Williams, turn-
ed in a time of 3:32.91.
The 400 free relay
team, Williams, Eric
Stevens, Chris Pittelli
and Woody Woolard,
swam the race in
3:17.23.
After the match,
Kobe remained op-
timistic. "Last year,
the women lost to ODU
by 15-20 points; this
year they were within
seven. We're just going
to have to come back
next week
ECU's next meet is
this Saturday against
UNC-Wilmington and
Georgia Southern in
Minges.
Wolfpackln Bowl
Photo by DAVE WILLIAMS
ECU defensive end Curtis Wyatt makes a shoestring tackle against the
Indians' Jeff Sanders.
FAMOUS PIZZA
Dine in or Fast Free Delivery
HOT OVEN SUBS.
Lasagna. Spaghetti. Hamburgers
HAPPY HOUR 2 - Close M99
Pncher45 Mugs
DAILY SPECIALS
ALL SMALL SUBS
NOT FOR !�
DELIVERY 758-5982
207 B.
6th St.
BLACK
Belt
Instructors
Charles June &
Samuel Barger
(combined experience
of 34 years)
come by for a FREE Intro,
lesson
.OpeniMoja-Thuxs-jioon-�Pf
f iSoff" "T
JFirst MonthsJr�tjonsj
North Carolina State
coach Monte Kiffin
said Monday the
Wolfpack came out of
a 21-16 win over Duke
with improved morale
and play, relatively few
injuries and an
"outside chance" at a
bowl bid.
"It was a great win
for us Kiffin said.
"What made it even
better than normal was
the fact that we were
coming off a tough loss
at Penn State and that
we were down 10-0 at
the half
The Wolfpack, 6-4,
travels to Florida this
weekend tor a contest
against Miami that Kif-
fin said could boost
either team's hopes for
a bowl.
"It's a long shot, an
outside chance at
best Kiffin said.
"We're certainly not in
the position right now
for a bowl. But I'm be-
ing honest there is an
outside chance
Kiffin said he had
made some contact
with bowl scouts but
would not say which
bowls were involved.
"Bowls, a lot of
times, look at how
many people you can
bring said Kiffin,
who said North
Caolina State "has a
good following and
people know we could
bring some people with
us
Miami is 5-4 on the
year but is as good as
the club that beat
North Carolina State
14-6 last year, Kiffin
said.
"I know last year
after we played them in
our last game of the
year, we felt that they
were as good or better
than any team we
played last fall, in-
cluding Clemson, who
was the national cham-
pion Kiffin said.
While Kiffin was
praising the play of his
team in the Duke win,
Blue Devil coach Red
Wilson was looking
ahead to his team's up-
coming contest against
nationally ranked
North Carolina.
The Tar Heels, 6-3,
are coming off a 27-14
win over Virginia and
hoping to salvage their
own hopes for a bowl
bid.
"In order for us to
beat North Carolina we
will have to play an
error-free game
Wilson said. "We can-
not turn the ball over a
single time and expect
to win
Wilson said the Tar
Heels have "the
quickest defense that
we have faced this
year
Missed opportunities
in the first half con-
tributed to the loss
against North Carolina
State, said Wilson,
whose team is 5-5.
"We cannot miss
these opportunities if
we hope to have any
chance of beating a fine
team like North
Carolina he said.
uke In Tournament
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
EacM o� these advertised items is re-
quired to be readily available for
sale m each Kroger Sav on. ecept
as specifically noted m this ad II we
do run out of an item we vi" otter
you your choice ot a comparable
.tem wh�n available reflecting the
same savings or a ramchech which
will entitle you to purchase the
advertised tem at the advertised
pr.ee wthin 30 days
S-
Begin At Kroger!
Copyright 1982
Kroger Sav on
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold To Dealers
MISSION, Kan.
(UPI) � Defending
champion Connecticut
and 22 other teams
have been selected for
the NCAA Division I
men's soccer cham-
pionship, the NCAA
announced Monday.
Duke (18-0-2), the
top-rated team in the
college soccer coaches
poll, joined Connec-
ticut (13-2-7) in the
tournament, as did
Alabama A'M (15-5),
Eastern Illinois (12-2-5)
and Philadelphia Tex-
tile (14-1-2), who
finished second
through fourth, respec-
tively, in the 1982
championship.
First-round games to be
completed by Nov. P
with second-round
games to be played by
Nov. II The tourna-
ment's third round will
be determined by Nov.
28 and the semifinals
will be played bv Dec.
5. The finals will be
Dec. 11 in Fort Lauder-
dale, Fla.
KROGER FRESH
Orange Juice
7 7 VGal.
Ctn.
hBLOO
IV
TUES. NOV. 16th
12 NOON TO 6PM
in
UMPSTEAD
LOBBY
Sponsored by: CESTRAL CAMPUS AREA RESIDEST1AL COUSCIL
KROGER ALL MEAT OR
All Beef
Wieners
$419
KROGER
Cream Cheese
59
a-oz
Pkg.
GOLD CREST
VIRGINIA OR
Spanish Peanuts
;Tar Landing Seafood
Restaurant
105 Airport Road Greenville, N.C.
ALL YOU
CAN EAT
Tues Wed Thurs
Or Combination of Any 2
600 Greenville Blvd Greenville
Open 8 a.m. to Midnight
Open Sunday 9 a tv to 9 p.m.
Shrimp
Oysters
Flounder C9
TrOUt Only J
Served with French Fries or Baked Potato. Cole Stawr and Hushpupptes
Regular Sunday thru Thursday 11:00 A M - 900 P M
Hours: Friday and Saturday v X A M to 10-00 P M
t05 Airport Road Greenville. N.C.
758-0327
Bob Herring, Manager wishes to bwtte everyone out to enioyafine
Seafood Dinner. He'H be in the GreenvMe Restaurant from
on. So come by and say HeHo.
� f�ne

W V
Banquet Facilities Available 758-0327
Bob Herrinq, Manager

J
-i w ii� aHemn
� mimmm&fQeQ&
G
ATLAM
One doesn
Georgia's ;j
in terms of
"legend
" Legem
craggy faced
voices like
who run th
teams like
feudal lord!
looks and sq
like a college
But Dooi4
are becominj
because ther
two active d
ball coaches!
tion who ha
the job a-
has with b
� Aiabar
Bryant and
Bo Schemi
and theve
years, not
two have kel
Thee r
seasons, in
down in
historv
Herschei W
the Bulkiogi
31 of ?2 reel
games �
13-3 de. -
at Clemson
on to w.r
championn
And
Bulldog v
top-ran
hand D f
5
P





THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 16. 1982
un s up-
igainst
ranked
I is, 6-3.
I 27-14
lima and
ue their
a bowl
0 us to
rolina we
lay an
game
'We can-
oer a
d expect
the Tar
"the
se that
L I this
o:tunitie
it f con-
he loss
Carolina
v ilson,
- s
not miss
Unities it"
ae an
ng a tine
North
-aid.
ent
i Nov. P
n J - r o u n d
nlayed b
tourna-
mnd will
I : b No.
vemitinals
j-ej b Dec.
a- w.l! be
rt Lauder-
th
M
Z COL Mil
jppies
Georgia's Dooley Fast Becoming Legendary
ATLANTA (UPI) �
One doesn't think of
Georgia's Vince Dooley
in terms of a coaching
"legend
"Legends" are
craggy-faced men with
voices like a foghorn
who run their football
teams like medieval
feudal lords. Dooley
looks and sounds more
like a college professor.
But Dooley's results
are becoming legendary
because there are only
two active college foot-
ball coaches in the na-
tion who have been on
the job as long as he
has with better results
� Alabama's Bear
Bryant and Michigan's
Bo Schembechler �
and these past three
years, not even those
two have kept pace.
These past three
seasons, in what will go
down in Georgia
history as "The
Herschel Walker Era
the Bulldogs have won
31 of 32 regular-season
games � the lone loss a
13-3 decision last year
at Clemson which went
on to win the national
championship.
And the 1982
Bulldogs, unbeaten and
top-ranked, bid to
hand Dooley his second
national title in three
years.
The irony of his suc-
cess, 150 victories
against only 58 losses
and six ties in 19
seasons, is that most
Georgia followers were
unhappy when Dooley
was named head coach
of the Bulldogs in
December 1963.
Georgia, in the wake
of the Waily Butts era
(1939-1960), had just
gone through three try-
ing seasons under
Johnny Griffith � 3-7
in '61, 3-4-3 in '62 and
4-5-1 in '63 � and its
more influential sup-
porters wanted a "big
name" coach to turn
things around.
But Georgia hired
former Auburn basket-
ball coach Joel Eaves as
athletic director, gave
him the authority to
pick the football coach
of his choice, and
Eaves selected Dooley,
then a 31-year-old
assistant at Auburn.
From the first,
Dooley proved Eaves
made a smart move.
His first season, 1964,
Georgia went 7-3-1, in-
cluding a Sun Bowl vic-
tory over Texas Tech,
and the Bulldogs have
had only one losing
season since. That was
in 1977 when, after los-
ing only one regular-
season game in '76,
Georgia went 5-6 by
losing its last three
games.
Even before Herschel
Walker, Georgia,
under Dooley, won a
couple of SEC cham-
pionships and went to
11 bowls in 15 years.
But, as Dooley will
tell you, the glory years
have been the Walker
years. With the talented
tailback setting the
NCAA freshman
rushing record (1,616
yards), the Bulldogs
were 12-0 in 1980; lost
that game at Clemson
and a 24-20 heart-
breaker to Pitt in the
Sugar Bowl last season;
and came from behind
seven times this season
to post a mark.
Dooley says the final
comparison between
the 1980 national
champs and this top-
ranked Georgia team
can't be made until
after the Sugar Bowl
where the Bulldogs are
expected to play Penn
State with the national
title on line again.
"This team has some
of the characteristics of
the '80 team says
Dooley. "So far, it's
done what that team
did. But the final com-
parison can't be ade
until the season is over.
The 1980 team won it
all. This one still has
that challenge and I like
the way they are going
about it so far
Georgia has
dominated the
Southeastern Con-
ference the past five
years, posting a 28-1-1
league record over that
span and winning the
conference title the past
three years in a row
after finishing second,
behind Alabama, in
both 1978 and 1979.
The Bulldogs, who
haven't played
Alabama in that span,
missed sharing the '78
crown when Auburn
tied them, 22-22, and
missed sharing the '79
crown when Auburn
beat them, 33-13.
The SEC champion-
ship was on line again
this past Saturday at
Auburn when Georgia,
led by Walker who
rushed for 177 yards
and two touchdowns,
came from behind in
the fourth quarter to
win, 19-14.
"All the credit goes
to Georgia said
Auburn Coach Pat
Dye, a Georgia star
himself in the late '50s.
"They are the No. 1
team and they won the
SEC again with class. I
hope the close score
doesn't hurt Georgia's
chances of winning the
national title
Dooley says the folks
who vote on the rank-
ings shouldn't let the
close score fool them.
"Auburn played us as
hard as a team can play
us he said. "It took a
championship effort on
our part to get over the
hump
Dooley had fretted
before hand that by
trouncing Florida 44-0
the previous week and
moving to the top of
the rankings, Georgia
might not be razor-
sharp for Auburn.
"The easy win and
being No. 1 put a lot of
extra pressure on us
he said. "It had to af-
fect us. But, as we've
done all year, when
we've had to do it, we
have
And that's the stuff
of which coaching
"legends" are made.
Local and
Out of Town
Newspapers
Full line of Magazines,
Paperbacks & Greeting Cards
Central Book
&News
Greenville Sq. Shopping Ctr.
Open 7 days a Week
9:30-9:30
756-7177
ATTENTION
BSN CLASS OF
'83
The Air Force has a
special program for
BSNs. If selected,
yon can enter active
duty soon after gradu-
ation without waiting
for the results of your
State Boards. To quali-
fy you must have an
overall 3.0 CPA.
After commissioning,
you'll attend a five-
month internship at a
major Air Force facility.
It's an excellent way to
prepare for the wide
range of experiences
you'll have as an Air
Force nurse officer.
For more information,
contact:
V
The best 'izza
in Town � Hones f
, � LUNCH BUFFET-Mon thru Fri 11-2 only 2.89 .
y? EVENING BUFFET Mon and Toei 5:10 8pm only 2.99
SPAGHETTI Wed all you can eat- Compare at only 2.25
Ml
�All new game room and game machines
fDrive-up window for 'to go' orders.
BIG SCREEN TV
It's the fun
place to eat.

AIM HIGH

�A
"Enjoy The SOAPS with lunch or
CURRENT MOVIES! PG) Sat 7pm 9pm
Open Mon. Thurs 11:30 a.m11 p.m.
Fri. and Sat. -11.30a.m. 12p.m.
t 300 E lOtnSf"
1 7586121 Ch
(
'?
123 E. 5th Str.
752-7483
Tuesday
Pizia Buffet S2.79
all you can eat from 5-9
LADIES
NITE
w Bruce Frye
Pizzalxm
Greenville's Best Pizzas
Now Being Delivered
Most delivery pizias lack in
true quality and have 'hidden'
delivery costs in the price
PIZZA INN has changed
all that!
We sell our delivery
pizzas at Menu Prices!
No Surcharge. We also
give FREE Drinks with
our large and giant
pizzas. TRY US TODAY!
CALL 758-6266 Greenville Blvd.
Are
d
Ladies Admitted Free
FREE DRAFT for the ladies
DOLLAR SPECIALS all nite
starting at 9 O'clock
Wednesday
Salad Bar Special 2.15 all you can eat 5-9
Thursday
Spaghetti Special $2.49 all you can eat 5-9
MEW OWSTMAS SPECIAL P�CK
FRCHA NOW TILL CHRISTMAS
AllflWS 45 WL11 00
70 70 ii-eo TIL.
ADMISSION 4.60
�?
fT'OO-9-30 $KT UC SIS UftWVooft
Pepsi and the Pirates
a winning combination
am EAELVll!
STROWS
presents
THE PHANTOM
FORECASTER
WIN $100 Beat the Phantom
Forecaster Contest
Details in Dec. 7th issue of
PHANTOM FORECASTER
Overton's
Marsh's Surf-NSea
AccuCopy
J.BIsland Seafood
Varsity Barber Shop
Sandwich Game
Arcade Variety A Grill.
Sammy's Country Cooking
Pizza Transit Authority
Sharp's Formal Wear
Hodges
Bonds
Archie's Steaks
Paotana Bobs
Subway
Nautilus
U.BE.
Tree House
Mr. Oatti's
Arcade Variety
Krispy Kreme
Tinder Box
Sharpe's
PET
VILLAGE
Red Tag Fish Sale
Sat. Nov. 13thSat. Nov. 20th
VARIETY OF FISH
10 gallon starter kits '17.99
includes tank, pump, filter kit,
booklet, fish food, 5 lbs. of gravel
ALSO
ALL BIRDS CAGES IN STOCK 25 OFF
-t n �
T
I
mil i�nwwiww�
mmi I mm Qi






(
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 16, 1982
Classifieds
PERSONAL
MISC.
A
f

SHERRIE, Parents weekend was
a jam and Mom was definitely too
buxied. Now that I've had some
time to recover, how about this
Saturday jgfjgtf MATT.
KEITH: there is a lonely Basset
Hound that needs me. Love, SAN-
DRA;
JETHRO BOOINE: Loved skinny
dipping in the ceeement pond over
at Job's place last Friday night. Is
Ellle May really into SAM as
much as Oranny said she was?
Roy, that Granny's a tripl
WANT TO HAVE A GOOD TIME?
Play Monopoly underwater with a
special kid today i
THE NEW PHONEBOOK IS
HERE:THE HEW PHONEBOOK
IS HERE. I'M SOMEBODY NOW:
I'M SOMEBODY NOW It I
SLIM WHITMAH'S CHRISTMAS
ALBUM will be hitting the stands
In a few short weeks) Via Con
Mem, My Darlln'H
SHE came all wrapped in card-
board; all pink and shrivelled
down. A breath of air was all she
needed, to make her lose that
frown 11 PET STUNG.
MY WIFE HAS burned the
scrambled eggs; the dog iust bit
my eg. My teenage daughter ran
awa. ' "ne young son has turn-
ed oui And it would be okay
on any other day 11
JON I: We miss youthe STAFF.
THERE WILL BE an Ending
World Hunger briefing on
November lath and a fast on the
10th. For more details, call Jen
niter at MMEg,
ECU FACULTY MEMBER seeks
mature housemate to share
3-bedroom bouse two blocks from
campus. Own room and bath. Rent
SlMmonth plus shared utilities.
Available from I January. For in-
formation, write to: J041 "O"
Street N.W. Washington, D.C.
jfjjg.
SKI VERMONT: FIVE-DAY ski
vacation to Smuggler Notch, VT.
Jan. 2-7. Package deal for S1M.S0
includes 5-day ski pass and lodg-
ing, along with various extras. For
further info contact BETH or
LISA at 7S-�S71 or 7S7-30T.
THE ENDING WORLD HUHGER
BRIEFING is today! See the an-
nouncements section for details.
Let's help stop dramatic starva-
tion once and lor all!
The "Fast for a World Harvest" is
this Thursday! You are asked to
go without eating or skip a meal or
two and donate the money you
would have spent. See the an-
nouncements on page 2 lor more
info.
out the STAFF
MATE
RIDES
ABORTIONS
1-24 week termmatieas
App'ts. Made 7 Days
CALLTOLL FREE
l-WO-321-0575
Gl Camouflaged Fatigues and
T-Shirts, Sleeping Bags,
Backpacks, Camping Equip-
ment, Steel Toed Shoes, Dishes
and Over 700 Different New and
Used Items. Cowboy Boots,
$34 t s
ARMY-NAVY
STORE
1501S Evans
Street
ARCADE VARIETY
USE JthA
Reade Circle
Cigarettes
67C
72C ioo�
reo
pock
ARCADE
VARIETY
218 E 5th and Reade Circle
40Cfor
12 oz. cup of
Draft Beer
QUALITY
SHOE REPAIR
SAAD'S
SHOE REPAIR
113 Grande Ave.
758 1228
FOR SALE
ROOM
WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share apartment. Call me,
757-3434.
4 MALE ROOMMATES HEEDED
FOR 1I1B S. Cotanche St. U7.S0
per month plus one-fourth utilities,
750-344 4-0 p.m. M-F.
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL Typist wants to
type at home. Reasonable rates;
754-3440.
PROFESSIONAL Typing service-
experience, quality work, IBM
typewriter. Call Lanie Shive.
750-5301 or Gail Joiner 754-1042.
TYPING TERM papers, resumes,
thesis, etc. Call 752-4733.
TYPING: MANUSCRIPTS,
papers, thesis, reasonable rates.
Call 754-3744.
10 YEARS TYPING - reasonable
rates, spelling, punctuation and
grammar corrections. Pro-
ofreading. Cindy amt p.m.
355-2440.
TUTOR IN SPANISH available.
Call Oscar (native speaker)
750-tOM.
TYPING: TERM PAPERS,
THESIS, etc. Call 757-342 before
�:00 p.m.
RIDE NEEDED: TO PALM
BEACH for Thanksgiving break.
Can leave Wed. Nov. 24. Will share
expenses call 757-0207 (LATE).
2 FISHER SPEAKERS model 530s
would like to trade for cassette
deck. Call 754-077 or The East
Carolinian 757-4344 and leave
message tor Geep Johnson.
FOR SALE: 170 HOHDA 250 XL
DIRT OR STREET BIKE. Call
7$0-�70 Mon. Thur.
HICE GRAY AND WHITE RAB-
BIT FUR JACKET FOR SALE $50
CALL 750-304.
WATERBEOS and bedding- one-
half off! DON'T pay retaill We
have complete waterbeds as low
as f U.5. Also bedding sets as low
as S7.5. Com by Factory Mat-
tress and Waterbed Outlet 730
Greenville Blvd. next to Sweet
Caroline's. 355-2424.
TWOGRE PREPARATION books
and one mat book for sale 752-027.
FOR SALE: 140 Coachman
21-foot trailer, excellent condition.
All gas appliances, underpinned,
avg. utilities 525, storms. Avail.
Jan 1st price $2500. Great for stu-
dent call 744-2542 or 134-4437 aft.
4.
YAMAHA CLASSICAL GUITAR
excellent cond. with casetl25.00
752-241.
STEREOS, CHAIRS, sofa, bar,
10-speed bike, very reasonable
prices 7SO-WI2.
ECOHOMICAL VW BUG 174
S15S0 call 754-052 after 2 p.m.
NIKON 35 MM SLR CAMERA,
perfect cond. 5150. Call 750-0017
days; 757-1143 nights.
FOR SALE: 102 Chev. S-10 truck
speed ac amfm stereo; sport
package, power steering. $7100.
Call after 7 26-0240.
FOR SALE: 10,000 BTU air condi-
tioner. Used l year. $300, call
76-0240 after 7.
FOR SALE: 2 HP Tiller, excellent
for flower gardens, $300. Call
24-0244 after 7.
PROUDLY
wear your personal
COAT OF ARMS
engraved on a fine
14 Kt. gold signet ring
Let us recommend
the ring most suita-
ble for such detailed
engraving.
We offer a selection
of sizes and shapes.
$300 and up
LAUTARES
JEWELERS
DIAMOND SPECIALIST:
Registered Jewelers
Certified Gemologisis
414 Evans Street
We do not sell discount
or promotional jewelry.
ATTENTION
BSN CLASS OF
The Air Force has a
special program for
BSNs. If selected,
you can enter active
duty soon after gradu-
ation without waiting
for the results of your
State Boards. To quali-
fy you must have an
overall 3.0 CPA.
After commissioning,
you'll attend a five-
month internship at a
major Air Force facility.
It's an excellent way to
prepare for the wide
range of experiences
you'll have as an Air
Force nurse officer.
For more information,
contact:
AIM HIGH
� �
10 Us. hi Of � Ortdo A
Thoio rfleoi good thru
Hi
Saturday, fiovombor 20,1982
10-14 Ik. A�. - Frttk
6ridt A Tttrktyt n, 88
120 Ik, A�. - SlltW fog � tfbtlt
Smoked
Fftik trtfit A a - .
Turkiy Brititfu. lm
to I Ait �� . Fttl Ttm trtfit A
Basted
Turkeys
I lit - SliMfl Frtt ot
Amour Canned Himi l. 69S
OSPA Ci.it. ittf Okttk Ittt-lt
Chuck
Roast
Vbtlt tr Sktak Ntlf Stal-fctttlttt
14-17 Ik. Ata, - Slitt. Frtt .Jtl-
Diiitr Btll Hintu.1"
Fttktft tf 6 -12 Ox. Cate
1.1 llltr - tar Mitt, Ckak Ft. Cfctk.
Paakaat Of 12 -12 Ox. Cast
1 lifer
Old Kl Coca
Milwaukee j Cola
�i�
22 Or - 20 Off - DliH�atl� !
DetergentI
Dawn 1
tt Oattt
Wky Pty M 29
32
1 Lb. - Qttrttrt
My Pty' 1.1�
Margarine
Hfcyfty - IS
� Ox. � CttMtktrry tr taker Kill
Beef Stew
14.S Ox. � IttfUttrOMtktt
CfctFfttl IttfMtrttattl
zzz
Qiart
JFO Mayonnais
Ntlf Otlltt - Trtfltttt III
Orange Juice Edon Toilet Tissue
2 Flf - 4 Roll Fttk
4f Omi
Alfro Poo, Food H Cheer Deterge
4tO�M�
Food Town Oil
11 Owtt � Lartt
Jeno's Pizza
L "i
obv NTtsnctunnzu
5- Ba� froth
Florida
i
fvrvy
Prlooo food tt OrtttwilU Food Tom Sloro only
�-���
I Ukf
mm'&
HifHnuntil� tT-n-ni m i-inn





Title
The East Carolinian, November 16, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 16, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.231
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy