The East Carolinian, November 11, 1982






�be
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 NorM
Thursday, November 11,1982
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 10.000
. �
Democrats Claim Advantage In '84 Elections
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
Last week's elections, in which
the Democrats gained two more
congressional seats, was a "big
blow" to Sen. Jesse Helms and his
National Congressional Club
organization, according to the
chairman of the Pitt County
Democratic Party.
"We laid the groundwork for
1984 said George Saleeby, the
local leader for the Democrats.
Saleeby was making a reference to
the Senate race that is almost certain
to take place between Helms and
N.C. Gov. James B. Hunt, a race
that many insiders predict will bring
a lot of national attention to North
Carolina.
"The Republicans were figuring
on winning one or two seats said
Saleeby, who warned that the
Democrats should not "let their
guard down but instead keep
working towards greater gains and a
higher voter turn-out in 1984.
Pitt County Republican party
chairman, Henry Smith of Foun-
tain, disagreed with Saleeby and
said he didn't think the recent elec-
tion results were major blow to the
GOP. "The Reagan administration
is still strong Smith said, adding
that he felt sure that Helms would
not go down to defeat against Hunt
in the upcoming Senate battle.
Now that the damage can be
assessed, N.C. Democrats certainly
have reason for optimism. The Con-
gressional Club backed four
Republican congressional
challengers aginst democratic in-
cumbent seats, one republican for
an open seat and GOP incumbents
for re-election � all seven lost last
Tuesday.
The Congressional Club raised
and spent over $9 million on the re-
cent campaign and also benefited
from a personal visit from President
Reagan during the closing days of
the campaign.
The Republicans backed Bill
Cobey in the 4th District race
against incumbent Ike Andrews,
which some thought would be an
easy victory. Cobey, who spent over
$500,000 on his campaign, lost in a
close race. That lose coupled with
the defeat of the two Republican in-
cumbents left the GOP with two out
of the 11 congressional seats in
North Carolina.
Democratic National Committee
Executive Director Eugene
Eidenberg gave a lot of credit for
the strong Democratic gains to Hunt
himself. "What Hunt did in the
congressional election was tanta-
mount to the first real shots of the
Mtoto By STANLEY LEAHY
Sitting On The Corner Watching All The Girls
ECU students have to take a break now and then between classes. In front of the Student Store is a popular place
to do it.
Enrollment Of Foreign Students Up
Across The Country And At ECU
By DARRYL BROWN
Assistant News f dilor
U.S. colleges and universities
have a record number of foreign
students enrolled this year, accor-
ding a recent report by the Institute
of International Education. There
are over 326,300 students from
abroad currently studying in the
United States, a six percent increase
over last year's number.
The number of foreign students at
ECU has also increased, over 25
percent in comparison to last year.
The nationwide increase was ap-
proximately six percent over last
year.
However, while foreign students
make up 2.6 percent of the overall
student population in this country,
they represent less than one percent
of ECU enrollment.
In many European countries, in-
cluding Switzerland, France, Britain
and Germany, foreign student
enrollment counts for 20 percent of
the campus population.
Iranian students make up the
largest group from any one country
studying in the United States.
However, since the inception of the
Ayatollah Khomeini's Islamic
government there has been a drastic
decline in the number Iranians stu-
dying in the United States.
"Since the revolution, the govern-
ment isn't giving money for students
to come here said Douglas Boy an,
editor of the HE report, in a College
Press Service interview. "The Shah
of Iran had a lot of money and was
encouraging Iranians to study
here
There has been a 25 percent
decrease in the number of Iranians
enrolled at U.S. colleges since last
year. Iranians formally represented
20 percent of all foreign students in
the United States. They now repre-
sent only eight precent.
Only two Iranian students are
Federal Reserve Board Puts
Fewer Constraints On Banks
1984 campaign he said.
The chairman of the DNC,
Charles Manatt, went one step fur-
ther predicting the defeat of Helms
in 1984. "The Prince of Darkness
(Helms) is going to be retired by a
leading democrat Manatt said.
The Congressional Club, which
was formed from the remnants of
Helm's 1972 campaign organiza-
tion, is considered to be the
wealthiest and most skillful political
action committee (PAC) in the na-
tion. Helms and North Carolina's
junior Senator John East are both
honorary chairmen of the commit-
tee.
Saleeby was obviously pleased
with the democratic victories but
was also disappointed with what he
thought was a low voter turnout. "I
wish more democrats had voted
Saleeby said. "The Pitt Counts
Democratic party spent aproximate-
ly $4,000 in newspaper and radio
advertising to help turn out the
democratic vote The democratic
voter turnout was under 50 percent.
Saleeby expressed his confidence
in Hunt saying "He's definitely go-
ing to run and he's definitely going
to beat Helms
Saleeby said the Helms-Hunt race
would be "one of the toughest in the
history of North Carolina � and
the highest priced
Charges Disputed
Arcade Owners Respond To Surgeon General
currently enrolled at ECU.
There has been a significant in-
crease in the number of students
from OPEC nations studying in the
United States in recent years, as well
as from Mexico and developing
Asian nations. Students from Iran,
Tawain and Nigeria make up the
largest national groups of foreign
students studying in this country.
ECU currently has 93 foreign
students enrolled on cam-
pus,according to Lucy Wright, ad-
visor to foreign students at ECU.
The largest national delegation is
from the OPEC nation of Kuwait,
which has 17 students on campus.
ECU has students from 37 different
countries currently enrolled, Wright
said.
"We're expecting a large increase
next semester" Wright said. She is
expecting a group of 24 students
from Malasia next term if all goes
according to plan.
FROM STAFF AND
WIRE REPORTS
The Surgeon General of the United States, Dr. C.
Everett Koop, said Tuesday that video games may be
hazardous to the mental and physical health of young
people who are addicted to them.
"They are into it body and soul, Koop told an au-
dience of the Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic at
the University of Pittsburgh. " Their body language is
tremendous and everything is zap the enemy. There's
nothing constructive in the games
"There are educational video games, but the kind the
kids like and the kind they are addicted to are martians
coming in that have to be killed Koop said.
"Everything is to eliminate, kill, destroy; let's get up
and do it fast
Koop noted that symptoms brought on by the video
games included "tensions, sleeplessness in kids and
dreams that have to do with the things they've been do-
ing all day
Bobo Thompson, manager of the Sandwich Game, a
combination sandwich shop-video arcade in Greenville
disagreed with the conlcusions of Koop. He said that
video games often provide a way for people to get relief
from their tensions and anxieties.
Thompson mentioned the case of an ECU instructor
who is writing a book, who comes to his shop to play
video games so she can get "good and relaxed" before
she does her writing. "She's plays for a couple of
hours Thompson added.
A spokesperson for downtown Greenville's Barrel of
Fun Arcade also disagreed with Koop's remarks. "I see
no evidence of that, (health hazards or addiction) said
the spokesman" It's (playing video games) more of a
fascination. It's exciting; it's something unique
"To me it's just entertainment, pure entertainment
he continued, equating video games to things like record
albums, movies or other types of entertainment kids
By KEITH BRITTAIN
Staff Writer
The Federal Reserve Board of
Governors is currently phasing out
three major constraints on the bank-
ing industry, according to J. Charles
Partee, who spoke at a banking
forum Tuesday in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
Partee, speaking to a packed
house, said the board is in the pro-
cess of deregulating interest rate
ceilings and laws regulating in-
terstate banking, and are trying to
protect banks from the encroach-
ment of savings and loans.
"(It's) a wind of change said
Partee, referring to the phase out to
be completed by 1986.
Non-banking financial institu-
tions have recently been capitalizing
on laws that allow them to compete
with banks. Partee said that the
Federal Reserve Board will continue
to view banks as unique.
Partee said that the policy of the
board has continued to control
"stagflation a combined dose of
low economic growth and high in-
flation. The late 1970s was plagued
by stagflation.
Kelly S. King and Thomas I.
Stores also spoke at the forum. King
is senior vice president of Branch
Banking and Trust Company. He
spoke on banking in the future.
Stores is the Chairman of the
Board of North Carolina National
Bank Corporation. He described the
would spend their money on. He said he saw no
evidence of addiction.
Thompson also said he was unaware if any of his
young customers were addicted and that if he became
aware of any situations where he thought kids were
stealing money to play the games, he would notify their
parents.
Dr. George Weigand, head of ECU's Counseling
Center said that he personally had not seen any research
on the use of video games, but that being addicted to
anything is not too good.
Dr. Rosina C. Lao, chairperson of the ECU
psychology department, also said she had not seen any
studies on video game use and abuse, but that she felt
there were numerous other factors to take into ensidera-
tion in diagnosing health problems related to the use of
video games by young people.
Lao said that the child's relationship to his parents,
his peers and the amount of time he spends at the arcade
were related factors.
She noted that use of video games by children had
been totally banned in some countries because they were
spending too much time at the arcades and not doing
their school work. "Obviously, the child spends a lot of
time at the arcade, they spend less with homework or
with their families learning about their social environ-
ment Lao said.
Lao, who has two children that use video games, said
she keeps close supervision on her children and rarely
lets them go to the arcade. She added supervision was
the key condition for parents w ho were concerned about
their child's video game use. "Addiction can take many
forms
"They sort of sit back because they are used to seeing
this on a screen Koop said. "What they saw last night
on television is being re-enacted. In fact, it's a little bit
more fun because it's real and vou're right there
UBE Awards Six Scholarships
By BOB MORGAN
Staff Writer
banks of the future as "not being
able to be all things to all people
The event was attended by about
200 local bankers, students and
members of the finance faculty. It
was described as "a red letter day
for the university and community"
by Dr. James H. Bearden, dean of
the School of Business.
The banking forum was spon-
sored by the Department of
Business' finance section. Bruce
Wadrip, the chairman, organized
the event. This was the first time, he
said that a man of Partee's stature
has spoken at ECU.
The Federal Reserve Board of
Governors regulate the nation's
monetary policy. It consists of seven
members.
The University Book Exchange,
Inc ECU's largest off-campus
bookstore, is donating money to the
university for a scholarship program
in the name of the family-owned
business.
The UBE was opened in 1968 by
ECU alumnus Jack Edwards. The
store is presently under the co-
ownership and management of his
son Don Edwards.
Beginning last year five $500
scholarships were awarded to
undergraduate or graduate students
by the UBE. Recipients were
selected on the same basis as the
Alumni Association Scholars Pro-
gram.
The Edwards specified that last
year's scholarships be designated
for two students enrolled in the
School of Art, one each in the
School of Business and in the
Department of Home Economics,
one in the math department and one
as a general merit scholarship.
This year the UBE has given six
$500 scholarships to the university.
Five are specified to the same areas
as last year with the additional one
going to the School of Business. Ac-
cording to the younger Edwards, the
goal is to increase the number of
scholarships by at least three per
year beginning in 1983.
In previous years, the Edwards
have donated money to the universi-
ty through the Pirate Club. "We are
very excited about the academic
scholarship program said the
younger Edwards. "We've always
given to ECU athletics, but we
thought that Pieties isn't all. We
thought, well, all of our business is
coming from academics
"We intend for this program to
grow said Edwards. "In fact,
growth has been the key word in our
business, largely because of the
students. It is our goal to increase
the number of scholarships.
"I personally feel that we owe this
to the university because our
business has been so good said
Edwards. "We want the students to
know that we appreciate their
business
�y �AK Y PATTCI
That's Right, AlAnd Tom In Greenville
Al Franken and Ton Davis were a big hit Monday night at ECU. For
�ore on the Saturday Night Live comedians, see Style, page 6.
Mt�gWMIp�ifff�nirniri��ixgi





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 11,1982
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcement column,
please type it on an announcement
form and send it to The East
Carolinian in care of the produc
tion manager.
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications Building.
Flyers and handwritten copy on
odd sized paper cannot be ac
cepted.
There is no charge tor an-
nouncements, but space is often
limited. Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you want
and suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column for publicity.
The deadline for announcements
is 3 p.m. Monday for the Tuesday
paper and 3 p.m. Wednesdayy tor
the Thursday paper. No an-
nouncements received after these
deadlines will be printed
This space is available to all
campus organizations and depart
ments.
INTERVIEWING
The Career Planning and place-
ment Service in the Bloxton House
is offering these one hour sessions
to aid you in developing better in-
terviewing skills for use in your
job search. The next session is
November 11 3:30 p.m.
A film and discussion of inter-
viewing th-ough the Career Plann
ing and Pla Service will be
shared.
CO-OP
The co-op office has available an
opportunity with the Federal Law
Enforcement Training Center in
its Criminal Justice Intern Pro
gram. The internship runs from
January 3 through March 11 and is
located in Glynco, Georgia, for
more information contact Nancy
Fillnow in the Coop office, ext.
6979.
CO�OP JOB
Burroughs Wellcome in Green-
ville has an alternating Co op posi
Tion open in its Validation Depart
'ment. The job will be for two
terms beginning in January, 1983.
INDT students with some
background in math, physics,
computers, electricity, ana
chemistry and who hav good
writing skills should contact Nan
cy Fillnow in the Co op office, ext.
6979.
CHEMISTRY MAJORS
Burroughs Wellcome in
Research Triangle Park has an
alternating co-op position open for
a chemistry major The job will in-
volve working with chemistry
researchers and begins in January
1983 running for about six months.
All interested chemistry majors
with at least two semesters of
organic chemistry should contact
Nancy Fillnow in the Co-op office.
ext. 6979.
CAMPUS SERVICE
There will be a Sunday Morning
Worship service, November 14 at
11:00 a.m. in the Jenkins
Auditorium in the art bulding.
Sponsored by the Fountain of Life
Christian Fellowship. Come wor-
ship the Lord with us.
CATHOLIC
NEWMAN CENTER
The Catholic Newman Center
would like to invite everyone to
join in with us for celebrating
Mass every Sunday in the Biology
Lecture Hall starting at 12:30 and
every Wednesday at 5:00 at the
Catholic Newman Center located
down at the bottom of College Hill.
BAPTIST STUDENT
UNION
HEY! Do you enjoy friendly
fellowship, good friends and food,
and a chance to be yourself in this
"rat race" environment at ECU?
Then come join us at the Baptist
Student union where we have din
ners on Tuesdays at 530 tor only
$1.75 PAUSE on Thursdays at
7.00 to allow us to take a break
after an almost fulfilling week,
and lots of people lust like you who
enjoy others. Call 752 4646 if you
have any questions. Bob Clyde
campus minister.
CO-OP
Automatic Data Processing in
Charlotte has a co-op position open
for a CSCI major, undergraduate
or graduate. The job will involve
technical support and operating
systems. Students should have
analytical skills and a background
in Assembler, Compiler, Cobol,
and RPG languages. The alter
nating position will run from
January May. For more info con-
tact Carolyn Powell in the Co-op
of ice, ext. 6979, Rawl 313.
WINNERS
Congratulations to the following
artists in the following categories
who placed in the REB.EL art con-
test: Painting Ellen Avendolava,
Printmaking Ed Migett,
Ceramics Steve Jones. Sculpture
- Gregory Sheinett, Design - Paula
Moffitt Poppe, Mixed Media
Diane Maisel, Graphic Art and Il-
lustration - Keith Simmons,
Photography Rochel Roland,
Drawing Bob Ray. Their work
can be seen at the Greenville
Museum of Art and will be publish
ed in Rebel '83.
MORE WINNERS
Congratulations to the following
writers who placed in the REBEL
prose ad poetry contests: First
Place Carlyn Ebert, Second
Place Brian Rangeley, Third
Place Keith Stallings for prose
Poetry winners: Firsl Place
Katharine Kimberly, Second
Place - Edith Jeffreys, Third
Place Don Ball Look tor their
worK in REBEL '83.
BAPTIST CHURCH
There is a bus route for students
who wish to attend Sunday service
at Sycamore Hill Baptist Church.
The bus leaves the church and
goes into the campus from W. 5th
St. by Cotton, Fleming, and other
dorms at 10:40 am; swinging back
on 5th, going to main campus in
back of dorms and swinging by
Belk Dorm, it leaves and goes
across campus to dorms on South
Side (of campus) no later than
10.50 am, arriving at church at
11:00.
SEMINAR
There will be a seminar by the
Department of Chemistry on
"Coplymers and Coplymer Pro-
perties" by Dr.Michael Theil. Dr.
Theii if from the department of
Textile Chemistry at North
Carolina State University. The
seminar is on Friday, November
12, 1982 at 2:00 p.m. in room 201,
Flanagan Building. Refreshemtns
will be served in the conference
room following the seminar.
ZETABETATAU
There will be a meeting at 6:00
p.m. on Tnursday, November 11.
in Mendenhall Conference room,
executive board must be there at
5.30. All members should try to at
tend. There will be a pledge test on
Chapter one.
SAM
The Society tor the Advance
ment of Management will be hav-
ing a meeting on November 17, at
3:00 in Rawl 104. The guest
speaker will be Terry Martin, Vice
President of Salaired Personnel
tor Burlington Industries. Mr.
Martin will be speaking on
employment opportunities in Burl-
ington Industries. All members
and interested guests are invited
to come. Further information call
7585258.
ATTENTION ALL
SORORITIES
Phi Kappa Tau slave auction
tonite � Be There It will be
more than an auction, a fun party.
9:00 kegs
DUKE POWER
Duke Power in Charlotte has a
co-op position open for a program
mer analyst. The job is alternating
for two periods, the first beginning
January 3. 1982 Interested CSCI
or math majors, preferably
juniors with a GPA of at least 2.0
and a fairly strong computer
background, chouid contact
Carolyn Powell in the Co-op office.
ext. 6979, Rawl 313.
PRC MAJORS
Seymour jonnson Air Force
Base in Goldsboro, NC has an
alternating Co-op position
available for Spring semester in
the ir recreation department. The
position reequires a 2.0 GPA and
you must be willing to work for
two terms. II is an excellent opor
tunity tor anyone interested in
gaining valuable work experience
in the area of recreation. Salary:
approximately $1,000 per month
gross. Contact Nancy Fillnow in
the Coop office, 313 Rawl.
757-6979, if you would like to apply
or want more information
IBM CO�OP
IBM in Charlotte and Greenville
have alternating coop positions
for CSCI or math majors. The
work in Charlotte involves pro
gramming while the Greenville
job includes general training with
the company. The positions are to
start in January. Contact Carolyn
Powell in the Co-op office, ext.
6979, Rawl 313, for more into
YHDL
Young Home Designer's League
meets Tuesday, November 16th at
5:00 in the Van Landingham room.
GEOLOGY CLUB
the East Carolina Geology Club
would like to invite all interested
people to come hear Dr. Alan
Glazner from UNC Chapei Hill
speak on "The Tertiary volcamcs
of the Southwest U.S He will
speak Friday, Nov. 12 at 2:00 in
Graham Bldg. Rm. 301.
MEN OF ECU
Do not be left out of the upcom-
ing "Man of ECU" calendar.
Come by the Buccaneer office by
5:00 pm, Friday, Nov. 11 and pick
up your application. Judging will
be held at 7:30 in Jenkins Aud. For
more information call 757-6501.
HUNGER COALITION
The Oxfam America "Fast for a
World Harvest" is next week! If
you would like to participate you
are asked to go without eating on
Thursday, Nov. 18. and donate
your money to Oxfam American to
support self help development pro
jects in the poorest areas of
Africa, Asia and Latin American.
Look for the table in front of the
Supply Store and the Booth in
Mendenhall on the 17th and 18th.
For more into call 752-4216.
Together we can make the world a
better place to live.
PEACE COMMITTEE
Our world spends 1 million a
minute on military spending - we
now have 60,000 nuclear weapons
on our planet. Does this outrage
you? Then join the activities of
The Greenville Peace Committee.
We meet Friday night at 6:30 pm
at 610 So. Elm St. For more info
call 758 4906
FACILITIES
CLOSED
Memorial Gymnasium facilities
including the pool, equipment
check-out room, weight room and
gymnasium will close at 6:00 pm
on wed Nov. 24th. Minges Col
eseum weight room and swimm-
ing pool will not open on Wed
Nov. 24th. All facilities will
resume normal operations on
Mon Nov. 29th.
TWIRLERS
The Tar River Twirlers invite
ECU students, faculty and staff to
the weekly square dance instruc
tion on Thursdays from 7:30 9:30
at Welcome Middle School (on
highway 1113 toward Bethel).
Beginning level dance instruction
will provide an opportunity for
anyone interested to be oriented to
square dancing, so come on out
and swing your partner There will
be no fee or obligation for atten-
ding in November. Further infor
mation is available by calling G.
Hamilton at 757 6961.
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines. There are 33
units per line. Each letter, punc-
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end of line if word
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac-
cepted over the phone. We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
75C per line or fraction of a line.
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lower case letters.
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SCHOLARSHIPS
The School of Art is offering ten
scholarships for undergraduate
art students of the junior and
senior rank. Eight scholarships
are in the amount of $250 each.
Two scholarships, established by
Don and Jack Edwards of the
University Book Exchange, are in
the amount of S500 each. To
qualify, a student must have a
GPA of 3.5 in art. and an overall of
3.0. Slides of five works (name, ti
tie, media, and size) must accom
pany the scholarship application
form. Application forms may be
obtained from the School of Art Of-
fice. The deadline for all com
pieted application material is
November 30.
THE EARLY
YEARS
The members of the Historic
Site and Museum Development
Class of the Department of History
cordially invite you to view the ex
hibit "East Carolina: The Early
Years, 1907-1934" The exhibit is
located in the main lobby of the
Spillman Building and can be
viewed from November 4 18. it
was created in celebration of the
75th Anniversary of the institution.
PHI KAPPA PHI
"Toward the New Millennium:
Challenges and Dreams will be
the theme of the eighth annual
ECU Phi Kappa Phi symposium to
be held on campus in early
February, of 83. A call for both
faculty and student papers suppor-
ting this theme, which deals witn
the future, has been issued. In an-
ticipation of the new millennium,
papers are invited to deal with a
wide range of topics ranging from
discussions of the near future will
or may hold. Faculty are invited,
at this time, to submit abstracts of
approximately one page with a
deadline for submission of
November 15 Papers selected will
be announced by November 24
Student papers directed toward
the same theme are invited, two of
which will be selected tor a award
of $100 each. The best student
paper submitted will be included
in the symposium program. Both
faculty and student papers are to
be submitted to Dr. J. W. Byrd,
Department of Physics.
PARTY WITH
THE POMS!
The ECU Pom Pon girls are nav
ing a happy hour Sunday.
November 14th at Pantana Bobs,
it starts at 9:00 with reduced
prices on beer all nigni
CANOETRIP
The outdoor recreation center
operated by the Dept. of
intramural Recreational services
is sponsoring a morning canoe trip
on Sat Nov. 13. The trip is
suitable for beginning or advanced
canoers. Trip participants will
meet behind Memorial Gym at
9:00 am on the 13th. The trip wil be
a leisurely paddle down the Tar
River lasting approximately 2
hours. Participants should arrive
back at Memorial Gym by 12.30
pm. Advance registration and
payment is due by 4:00 pm on
Thursday, Nov. 11. For regisfra
tion and more info please call or
stop by Rm. 113 in Memorial Gym
(757-6911).
FREE BEER
Don't miss ECU'S last pep rally.
Attend the William � Mary vs ECU
pep rally at Sportsworrd, behind
Fosdicks Seafood Thursday night
Nov. 11 7:30-10:00 and receive a
free beer at the Elbo later on that
night. There will be a bus pick-up
in front of Belk Dorm at 7:00. Join
ECU cheerleaders for competi
tions, prizes and 'Heaven on
Wheels' this Thursday at 7:30
SIGMA BROTHERS
Attention Sigma Big Brothers:
There will be an organizational
meeting Thrusday, Nov. 11 at 7 JO
pm at the Sigma House.
PRINT AUCTION
The seventh Annual Print Auc-
tion, sponsored byt he ECU print
group, will be held, November 21
at 7 pm There will be original
rints by ECU students, faculty.
Alumni-Intaglios, woodcuts, paper
castings, collographs, lithographs,
serigraphs. Bidding prices on ail
prints start at $5. So the public can
purchase some good prints at
bargain rates at the same time
help us provide tor studio needs,
workshops guest lectures. All
prints go on preview outside the
Auditorium from 2-7 pm the night
of the auction.
RECIPES
Students, faculty and staff are
invited to submit their favorite
recipes to be compiled into a
cookbok of ECU'S favorite recipes.
Ten of the final entries will be
selected for the BAKE OFF.
which the date will be announced
later. The recipes win be judged
on I) originality 2)appearance and
3)taste. The grand prize will be
dinner for two at Darryl's
Restaurant. Submit your recipes
in designated boxes located at
Mendenhall, Student Supply Store
and selected Dormitories. For any
additional information call
750-3272 or 757 1920. Come on ECU-
get involved.
YOU CAN
HELP
50,000 people die every day from
starvation! If you would like to
find out how YOU CAN HELP stop
these tragedies from happening,
you �rt invited to an End Hunger
Breifing to be held on Tuesday.
November 16, from 3 to 7 p.m. in
the Coffeehouse in Mendenhall.
For more information on this im-
portant please call Steve Dear at
752 878 or Jennifer Baugham at
355 6855
AMBASSADORS
Mark your calendars for our
General Meeting on Wednesday.
Nov. 17 at 5:00 It will be in the
Mendenhall Multi-Purpose Room
We have aiot of important and
"fun" items to talk about, so
ptease make plans to attend this
important meeting.
BETA KAPPA
ALPHA
Beta Kappa Alpha, the banking
and finance fraternity, will have
its next meeting Tuesday.
November 16 in Rawl Bldg. Room
130. Mr. Bill Reagan from North
State Savings and Loan will speak
on thrift intstitution's operating
environment and employment op-
portunities. Membership is open to
all business majors and a"
members are encouraged to at
tend.
1
AHEA
Will hold irs monthly meeting
on Monday. November 15. 198J2 at
5:00 in the Vanlandingham room
in the Home Economics Building
Guest speaker will be Ms Cookie
Chandler on "Creating Your Own
Job All members are urged to
attend. Dont forget to bring a can-
ned food for the Thanksgiving
Basket for a needy family.
RESIDENCE LIFE
The Department of Residence
Life is accepting applications for
Resident Advisors for Spring
Semester Applications can be ob
tained from me Residence Ha"
Directors, r� Coordinators and
the Residence Life Office The
deadline for completed appiica
tions is November 19.
GRE
The Graduate Record Examina-
tion will be offerea at East
Carolina University on Saturday.
December 11. 1982. Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to Educational Testing
Service. Box 96 R. Princeton. NJ
08540. Applications may be obtain-
ed from the ECU Testing Center.
Room 105. Speight Building.
CIRCLE K
On November 16. Circle K will
meet at me Boy's Club at 6 X to
discuss the Boy's Club project.
Other topics to be covered include
the elec'ion of a new vice-
president and the drawing for the
dinner at the Beef Bam All
members and interested persons
�rt urged to attend Plan to meet
in front of Mendenhall at 6 00 and
we will go as a group
SPECIAL
EDUCATION
On Nov. 22, 1912 in room 129
Speight at 4:00 there win be a pro-
gram of much interest As our
November program meeting
SCEC has invited Special Educa
tion Directors from different
school systems to talk about meir
system and job requirements
Please attend it win be to your ad
vantage
The East Carolinian
Published every Tuesoa� a"C
Thursday during me acaoe .
year and every Weonescav Our
ing the summer
The East Carolinian is me ot
ficiai newspaper c4 Eas
Carolina University. ow�ec
operated- anc puonsneo Mr arx:
by me students of Eas' Ca-oi.na
University
Subscription Rate �� yearly
Toe East Carolmtan office
arw located i� the OM Soum
Building on the campus of ECU
Greenville. N.C.
POSTMASTER Send address
changes �o The Eas' Car - m
Old South Building. ECU Green-
ville. NC 27834
Telephone: 7S7-6J66. 637 ���
ApD
CA.
Bl CM
1 S
BacM
t-e : �
u �
ST
CONCERT
On Nov X. 1982 Student Counc!
for Exceptional Cmwren will hos'
the Casweii Sp.r.f S.ngers tor a
Christmas concert The conce�-
wiii begin at 3 34 p m
Auditorium 244 Menoenhait Shj
aent Center Everyone is invited
and welcome! 11 Come out anc ge
into me Christmas spirit early
illlHIIIM
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COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SHELL1 SERVICE
610 Greenville Blvd.
756-3023 �24 HRS.
24 hour Towing Service
I-Haul Rentals
Available
ECUMed Students Auxiffiary
YARD & BAKE SALE
Sat Nov. 13
7:00 A.M12:00
110 FARMHOUSE PLACE
SINGLETON SUBDIVISION
J. A. UNIFORMS
SHOPS
Bring this ad for
107o OFF
on the purchase of
one of our lab coats!
All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes, shoes,
and hose. Also � used ECU nurses
uniforms. Trade-ins allowed.
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive.
Near Hollowell's Drug and old hospital.
SEND A BALLOON!
SEND A SMILE!
O
V
IRTHt
Choose from an assortment of
?ate aad mylar balloons Pmc
Mm, Saoooy to Sanffette!)
Qr mail a balloon in � box!
We'll ship aaywhere in the
USA � SM.9S
Jefferson
Florist. Inc.
West 5th St. Ext.
Near Hospital
752-6195
MJUUUQonuuui.M moon
muni
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Sunday
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Ladies-Free All Night
5C Draft while it
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'til 11:30
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a

Maw it comae to the food at Taco
Bell there's really only one echool
of thought What a difference!
To begin with, your order's made
up freeh from the best ingredients
ThaTs different And irs all served
up piping hot to be sure you get all of
the delicious flavor Thafs different
You also get served fast, which
means that our schedule will keep
you on your That's different.
And you get it all at the terrific
Taco Be price ThaTs realty different
Plus, where efse do you find food
with deliciously different names like
Taco Supreme- Burrito Supreme,
and Enchirito.? Each one a far cry
from the usual fast food fare (not to
mention whatever that is they serve
m the cafeteria)
So cut out the coupon, then cut
out for Taco Sell and see for your-
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JUNG
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gOUTH
Fellowship
Students are invited to attend Bible
Studies of I John with Prof. Grace
Eilenburg � Monday, November
15, 8 to 10 P.M Room 247
Mendenhall.
Refreshments served each meeting.
KYF meets bi-weekly �
For information call 756-2080
Sponsored by area Full Gospel Churches
t
-��� � �IhOTtfW
'h.W.a�M -�-





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER II. 1982
Corny Catalog
Campus
MILWAUKEE, WI
(CPS) � In addition to
their usual armful of
textbooks, course
catalogs, and new class
schedules, students at
Mount Mary College
are also toting around
curious little red books
these days.
The admissions of-
fice at the private, all-
women, Roman
Catholic college also
keeps several copies of
the small paperback on
hand, as does the cam
pus minister.
But the book,
Welcome to Mount
Merry College, is hard-
missm
I:
One of the best films
I've ever seen;
you'll never forget it
-Jeffrey Lyons,
CBS RadioWPIX-TV
PG
A UNIVERSAL PICTURE
C 1962 UNIVERSAL ClTV STUDIOS INC
FRI & SAT 5, 7:15, 9:30 p.m.
ADMISSION: ID & ACTIVITY CARD
OR MSC MEMBERSHIP
ly official. Outlining
courses ranging from
Gastronomical
Geometry to Playboy
Philosophy and
describing a faculty
made up of burnt-out
academicians and sex-
ual deviants, it isn't ex-
actly something the Mt.
Mary's staff ordinarily
uses to guide the
students.
In fact, the book
comes from far-away
New York and its
authors, trying to pro-
duce a parody of Mt.
Mary's catalog, had
never heard of the real
Mount Mary College.
The authors � two
of the original people
who started to write
The Official Preppy
Handbook but who
sold their interests in
the project to Lisa
Birnbach early on �
concocted their Mount
Merry College as a
private, eastern school.
But the fictional cam-
pus, all concerned, is
not unlike the real,
small Wisconsin private
school whose name is
mocked in the title.
"We just decided to
set out and do a spoof
of the traditional col-
lege catalog explains
co-author Mason
Wiley. "We read
through every college
catalog we could get
our hands on, looked at
course titles and
descriptions, and then
just went crazy creating
something of our
own
Co-author Carol
Wallace remembers
"really getting into the
swing of it" when she
read through the
catalog for Brigham
Young University and
spotted some courses
on "the selection of
large and small ap-
pliances and choosing
the right cookware
Sometimes, Wiley
explains, writing a
satirical course title was
as easy as changing a
word in the original
version. One school,
for instance, "offered a
course titled 'Women
In Antiquity and all
we did was come up
with a course titled
'Women and Antiquity
� an examination of
the causes and dynmics
of the affinity between
women and antiques
"After we got some
ideas for courses
Wiley says, "we decid-
ed to create a model
college to build the
catalog around. It
seemed a private,
Catholic school that
took itself too seriously
would be perfect
The authors picked
the all-too-real name
for their book
"because we wanted
something that had sex-
ual connotation,
something a litle
religious and something
humorous Wiley
says.
Peppered with black
and white snapshots of
students making out,
nuns playing guitars,
and physical education
teacher Mary Dyche
nonchalantly messag-
ing a female student's
breast while pinning a
medal on her, the book
lampoons just about
every thing that
private, religious col-
leges have always held
sacred.
"In a way Wilev
admits, "the book
became not so much a
arodv, but also a
small little novel about
this mythical college
somewhere. V e try to
suggest a relationship
between the instru -
and their classes. It
seemed appropriate to
have a lesbian teach
physical education. 01
to have the camj-
chaplam having an �
fair with the prev
dent
Wiley says college . I
ficials are typical I
little intimidated
when they first look
through Welcome to
Mount Merry, but mos
"end up chucklin
after they really get ii
it
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i





Site lEaat (Earoltnfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, o-m������
Mike Hughes. && em
WAVERLY MERRITT, Director of liT, ClNDY PLEASANTS, �m �iar
Robert Rucks, ���� Ma Greg Rideout, � ��
ALI AFRASHTEH, Credit Manage STEVE BACHNER, Entertainment Editor
Stephanie Groon, etmmm mm Juliana Fahrbach, �gn
JONI GUTHRIE, r�mco Supervisor MIKE DAVIS, Production Manager
November 11, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Video Games
New Diseases For The '80s
Some of us have been expecting it
for a long time. And now, it has
come�
Speaking before a group of
psychiatrists and clinicians at the
University of Pittsburgh (in Penn-
sylvania), U.S. Surgeon General C.
Everett Koop revealed Tuesday that
the nation's latest heart-throb,
video games, may just be
"hazardous to the health" of
America's youth.
"More and more people are
beginning to understand" the
adverse effects video games on pre-
teen and teenagers, Koop said.
"They are into it body and soul.
Their body language is tremendous,
and everything is 'zap' the enemy.
There's nothing constuctive in the
games.
"Everything is eliminate, kill,
destroy; let's get up and do it fast
He described the video-game
symptoms as
tensions,
sleeplessness in kids and dreams
that have to do with the things they
have been doing all day
Although Koop's adverse
estimates may � in some minds �
be accurate, his knowledge of the
primary purpose of video games is,
to say the least, questionable. In
fact, I wonder if he even
understands what the games are all
about.
Would he have the nation's youth
lay back unprepared, like proverbial
sitting ducks, just awaiting the im-
pending galactic disaster?
What happens in 10, maybe 20
years, when martians and other
alien invaders actually do invade
our humble planet? Would Koop
prefer that we be caught with our
asbestos pants down? Well, not me.
I consider a few bucks worth of
tokens a week as a fairly reasonable
price to pay for future security.
Think about it: Say it's 1993, and
one day, you're traveling home to
your family unit and your warm,
cozy double-wide MCP cone, when
all of a sudden, you find yourself
caught in the crossfire of three,
maybe four enemy star-fighters.
What would happen if you didn't
know how to hyperspace? I don't
even want to think about it.
And as if that's not enough, Dr.
Koop has the audacity to maintain
that video games have "no con-
structive" value whatsoever.
Presumably, then, he fails to grasp
the chivalric concept of Donkey
Kong, or even Frogger. Or,
perhaps, he would rather see Fay
Wray condemned to a life of pro-
stitution at the lusty hands of a
gigantic gorilla, or a lovely young
female toad squashed under the
monstrous Good-Year Arriva of a
road-hog milk truck:
Personally, I think his attitude is
sick.
Furthermore, Dr. Koop's
knowledge of the symptomology of
video games leaves much to be
desired. Sure, there are kids who
can't sleep at night after a full day
at the arcades. But, unlike Koop's
theories, sleeplessness is not due to
some fear of fuseballs, mutants or
spiders. These baggy-eyed kids are
merely going through the natural
stage of lamentation over low
scores, which Dr. Koop, a pediatri-
cian, should realize is just part of
growing up.
And to have the -nerve to say
video games offer no socially-
redeeming value is, at best, absurd.
Why, the tactical and strategic
lessons to be learned from
Defender, Zaxxon and Galaga alone
are practically overwhelming.
Besides, they all beat the hell out
of checkers.
One would think Dr. Koop
should be proud of the preparedness
of today's youth and of their will-
ingness to take to heart this coun-
try's � and this world's � defense.
After all, they could be out smok-
ing cigarettes.
i-Campus Forum
The Kremlin Payroll
Over the past few months, I've grown
incessantly tired at reading the pro-
Soviet propaganda in The East Caroli-
nian. One should notice how they always
follow the mainstream of the Kremlin.
The one underlying factor of all com-
munist propaganda is to blame the U.S.
always, and enthrone the Soviet Union
as the "prince of peace The writings
of Patrick O'Neill and Jay Stone should
cause anyone with at least one ounce of
patriotism to turn sick.
From their pens come forth writings
that would rile any KGB agent. The
main thrust of the Russian plan is to
destroy the neutron bomb, the B-l
bomber, the MX missile, etc Why do
all the peace groups only criticize the
U.S. and never the Soviets? This fact
alone should make one ask whose side
the peace group is on.
The Russians are using slave labor to
build the Siberian pipeline, and their
arms buildup is the greatest in history.
Why don't Pat, Jay and the peace
groups write on this? I'll tell you why:
They're too busy writing on "U.S.
atrocities In my opinion, trying to
keep the world free of Soviet com-
munism is no atrocity.
I'm tired of our way of life and our
country being assaulted by this paper.
Our country is correct in rebuilding its
military might. This might will be need-
ed to protect the world against the ever
growing Soviet threat. A final note: If
the Greenville Peace Committee, Patrick
O'Neill and Jay Stone like Russia so
much, why don't they move there? I'm
more than willing to buy their airline
ticket.
Paul S. Hamilton
Senior, Business
Fifty-thousand people die each day
from dramatic starvation; this should be
the concern of everyone.
I'm glad to see that some people on
ECU'S campus are taking action to stop
this tragedy. I will be getting involved by
taking part in the "Ending Hunger
Briefing" on Nov. 16. I urge others to
join me.
Theresa Dulski
Junior, Occupational Therapy
No Real Increase
The East Carolinian of Nov. 4carried
an article about my becoming chairman
of the Department of Elementary
Education. I thank you for a well-
written article. I appreciate The East
Carolinian's interest in university facul-
ty members and department heads.
I hope you will allow me to point out
that it is somewhat misleading to say
that I plan "to increase the faculty
The Department of Elementary Educa-
tion has a quota of IS faculty members,
including the chairman. At present, two
positions are vacant. During the last two
years, the department has lost four peo-
ple through retirement and one through
resignation. It would be appropriate,
therefore, to say that we are still in the
process of '�replacing" faculty
members. No increase in faculty allot-
ment is anticipated. New programs, such
as a proposed middle school master's
degree, would utilize current faculty
allotments.
Dr. Amos Clark, Chairman
Department of Elementary Ed.
rercKHYHAMAlESSTDYDURHEAUH
19m mmmrMN commission
ftrtttOWWttWfc
Soviets In Control Of Peace Movement
Out For World Takeover
By KEITH BRITTAIN
The Soviet Union is, to put it simply, out
to take over the world. Its current method
of achieving this goal is the peace move-
ment.
It is a well known fact that the peace and
nuclear freeze movements are part of a
brilliantly-orchestrated campaign by the
KGB. The Russians have recognized that
they cannot defeat America because of its
current military buildup. The Reagan ad-
ministration is on a realistic and steadfast
course to ensure world peace. The current
U.S. re-armament is the means by which
peace can be achieved.
America is, at present, planning to
deploy 572 Pershing II missiles in Europe
to counter the Soviet SS-20s. If the KGB
can bring about a nuclear freeze, Russia
will retain its nuclear superiority.
An example: Vadim Leonov (who was
posing as a journalist) was recently
deported for being the link between the
Kremlin and the "peace groups" in
Holland. On being deported, Leonov
made a very embarassing statement: "If
Moscow decides that 50,000 demonstrators
must take to the streets in Holland, they
will take to the streets Do they also have
this power in Washington?
The Soviets fear new American
weaponry and have made necessary ad-
justments to destroy them. The neutron
bomb, MX missile and the B-l bomber
have been the targets.
The driving force in the Russian pro-
paganda campaign is peace groups. The
World Peace Council is a communist front
group. Its.president is Indian Communist
Romesh Chandra. The council has been
expelled from France and Austria because
of subversive activities. The WPC has
never waivered from the Kremlin
mainstream.
The U.S. Peace Council is led by
Michael Myerson, a longtime communist
functionary. The USPC has lobbied exten-
sively against the B-l bomber. Russia
understands that the B-52s are archaic and
cannot deliver an effective nuclear attack.
When the B-l was scrapped, Soviet Presi-
dent Breznev awarded Myerson a "medal
of peace Thus, chalk another victory for
the KGB under the Carter administration.
Even the grassroots, or local peace
groups, strictly adhere to Kremlin pro-
paganda. One should notice that they
never criticize Russia, only the United
States. In the last few years, NATO has
deployed no new middle-range weapons.
NATO even went a step further, and as a
peace initiative, withdrew 1,000 nuclear
weapons. The Soviets answered this peace
initiative by deploring more than 750 new
nuclear warheads and advanced SS-20s.
At latest count, Russia has 1,398
ICBMs, compared to the United States'
1,052. The U.S.S.R. has 5,540 warheads
on these missiles, compared to 1,052 for
the U.S It is very apparent that now is the
time to build our nuclear arsenal and con-
ventional weapons. In fact, it has been
estimated that the Soviets could have
possibly blackmailed the U.S. by 1990.
Despite the massive Soviet build-up, the
U.S. is always portrayed as the aggressor.
This is a major focal point of Soviet
policy, enhanced by excellent use of pro-
paganda. This "distorted reality" has suc-
ceeded in enlisting the support of such
liberals as Edward Kennedy, who supports
the nuclear freeze � not realizing the
Soviet benefits of this noble cause.
Russia has termed peace protestors and
nuclear freeze activists as "unwitting
dupes They confuse morals and self-
righteousness with reality. They do not see
that they are simply puppets of the KGB.
In a recent speech, the Secretary of
Defense Casper Weinberger warned
against the nuclear freeze. He said it would
lessen both the determent against a Soviet
first strike and the Russians' incentive to
agree to deep cuts in nuclear weapons
Reagan has proposed.
In fact, the U.S. did freeze its force
levels during detente (the 1970s). From
1966 to 1982, the Soviets built 60 new
ballistic missile submarines, while the U.S.
built none. A Russian negotiator for the
SALT I treaty suggested to his superiors
that they start some nuclear reductions. He
was shocked when he was told "the weak
Americans have signed this treaty to cut
their weapons; it is now time to build
ours
A major victory for the KGB was the
cancellation of the neutron bomb. Tass
(the Soviet news agency) issued the state-
ment: "Baptist ministers in Russia are
against the neutron bomb This state-
ment was issued to play on President
Carter's sympathy.
On Feb. 23, 1981, Breznev issued an im-
mediate call for a nuclear freeze that would
leave Western Europe vulnerable to the
relentlessly expanding communist forces.
Common logic tells one that anything sup-
ported by Russia is only for the benefit of
Russia. The Kremlin fears the U.S. build-
up and will do anything to thwart it.
Closer to home, the nuclear freeze is
supported by Edith Webberand ttw Green-
ville Peace (3mTiiitex.rteyT shotld kno
that our country and our way of life is
threatened by this proposal. It would
literally sign our dependents' death war-
rants. All the activists parading under the
"banner of Christianity" should also
realize that their right to public worship
would be denied by a communist govern-
ment.
Recently, some Western tourists were ar-
rested in Red Square for unfurling a peace
banner. The fact that Russia is behind the
peace and nuclear freeze movement is fully
documented. (Yuri S. Kaprolov represents
himself as a counselor at the Soviet Em-
bassy in Washington. Actually, he is
known to be a KGB agent as well as a ma-
jor organizer of the U.S. peace movement.
These two facts alone should cause one to
ask questions.)
It is time for us to stand up against these
activists and fight to preserve our way of
life.
It is estimated that there are at least
5,000 KGB agents here in the United
States. Why are the peace groups making
their work so much easier?
U.S. Economy Slipping, Thurow Says
By JAY STONE
I was happy to note that in last Tues-
day's edition, Sam Silva's letter pointed
out that there is, indeed, more to Lester
Thurow's ideas than a return to Keynesian
economics. The original article failed to go
into the specifics of Thurow's proposals
for reasons of space; however, because of
Mr. Silva's inquiry, this space is now
available to elaborate.
To begin with, Thurow maintains:
"Where the U.S. economy had once
generated the world's highest standard of
living, it is now well down the list and slip-
ping farther each year. Leaving the rich
Middle East shiekdoms aside, we stood
fifth among the nations of the world in
per-capita GNP in 1978, having been sur-
passed by Switzerland, Denmark, West
Germany and Sweden. Switzerland, which
stood first, actually had a per-capita GNP
45 percent higher than ours. And on the
outside, the world's fastest economic run-
ner, Japan, was advancing rapidly with a
per-capita GNP of only seven percent
below ours. In our entire history, we have
never grown even half as rapidly as the
Japanese.
"The time has come when we must begin
to study these countries and learn from
their successes. Every one of them has
more government involvement in their
economy than we do in ours
Some of the specific forms that Thurow'
recommends for government involvement
are:
� The foundation of a national investment
committee, which will channel funds into
"sunrise" industries (those which show
promise of benefitting the national
economy), and out of "sunset" industries
(those which are failing, obsolete or ineffi-
cient),
� Government jobs to provide for full
employment, and
� Closing of tax loopholes as well as a pro-
gressive income tax, which would be levied
to move us toward our general equity
goals.
As a solution to environmental pollu-
tion, Thurow has proposed a system of
taxes which would raise the price of
polluting goods and services to a level con-
sistent with the "shadow price" we place
on a clean environment and, hence,
discourage their production.
As with pollution efforts, an increase in
health and safety will raise the price of
those goods which are dangerous to pro-
duce. He also recommends generously
compensating individuals who legitimately
lose when projects are undertaken in the
public interest. Otherwise, their only
recourse will be to stop government from
carrying out the programs that threaten
them
Hunger Greatest Peace Threat
"The day that hunger is eradicated from
the earth, there will be the greatest spiritual
explosion the world has even known.
Humanity cannot imagine the joy that will
burst into the world on the day of that
great revolution
Federico Garcia Lorca
By PAT O'NEILL
Lorca, Spanish poet and dramatist,
lived in the early 1900s, yet his dream that
a "great revolution" would take place to
feed the starving masses has never come.
Today, the problem of world hunger is
more apparent than ever; according to UN
statistics, 50,000 people die each day from
starvation, and the prospects of a hunger-
free world are not hopeful.
Unfortunately, hunger, starvation and
the death of children (The Hunger Project
reports that 28 people � 21 of them
children � die each minute from hunger)
are usually ones most of us would rather
ignore than confront.
In 1980, the Presidential Commission
Report on World Hunger concluded that
hunger represents the greatest threat to
world peace that exists today. As the
schism between the haves and the have-
nots widens, the pressure becomes greater.
At present, the U.S. uses more than 75
percent of the grain it produces to feed its
livestock. Most animals in the United
States eat better than half the population
of the world.
Next Tuesday and Thursday the ECU
Hunger Coalition and the Greenville
Hunger Project will be sponsoring events
calling attention to this "hidden
holocaust" and looking for ways to end it.
All of us are welcome to join them in their
efforts to make the "spiritual explosion"
that Federico Lorca spoke of more than 50
years ago a reality.
'a
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flDBE EALTH SION
ver
.ed to his superiors
11 .iear reductions. He
was told "the weak
ltd this treat) to cut
now time to build
H r :ne KGB was the
r:utron bomb. Tass
�icy) issued tht state-
:rs in Russia are
"�omb This state-
on President
It �vne issued an im-
lear freeze that would
e uinerable to the
Ig communist forces.
jne that anything sup-
nl for the benefit ot
lears the U.S. build-
line to thwart it.
nuclear freeze is
f'ebberand ttor Green-
je.T&ey shotjld know-
Id our way o' life is
proposal. It would
Icendents' death war-
p parading under the
anit" should also
:t to public worship
communist govern-
ern tourists were ar-
t :r unfurling a peace
Russia is behind the
'zq movement is fully
Kaprolov represents
�r at the Soviet Em-
)n. Actually, he is
igent as well as a ma-
il. S. peace movement.
should cause one to
tand up against these
preserve our way of
there are at least
here in th�. United
)eace groups making
kasier?
Says
Idow price" we place
jnment and, hence,
)uction.
rfforts, an increase in
raise the price of
re dangerous to pro-
)mmends generously
luals who legitimately
Ire undertaken in the
jherwise, their only
fop government from
grams that threaten
Threat
t of us would rather
sidential Commission
unger concluded that
ie greatest threat to
fxists today. As the
haves and the have-
Isure becomes greater.
IS. uses more than 75
it produces to feed its
mals in the United
half the population
Thursday the ECU
ind the Greenville
I be sponsoring events
to this "hidden
ng for ways to end it.
to join them in their
spiritual explosion"
poke of more than 50
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M






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
NOVEMBER II, 1982 Page6
AI And Tom Thriving
InPostSNL' TV Era
Stall Photos By GAkY PATTERSON
Clockwise from top: Tom Davis (foreground) interviews gay male prostitute Al Franken; Franken's Pete
Tagliani slings mud during campaign; East Carolinian Managing Editor Hughes chums with Franken.
By STEVE BACHNER and
MIKE HUGHES
TtratcM
A surging crowd of tastefully-attired comedy fanatics
had considerable trouble pushing through the narrow
doors of Hendrix Theatre Monday night to witness
show-biz history in the making They were not disap-
pointed.
Those irreverent, multi-talented, merrymakers Al
Franken and Tom Davis, combined their multi talents
and thrilled a sitting-room-only audience (of about 200)
with a barrage of recipes, interviews, political debates,
film clips, multiple-choice quizzes, surveys and plenty
of that home-spun charm and "warpth" that have
become the staple of the duo.
The team thrilled students and a few community folk
alike, with routines ranging from old Saturday Nite Live
schtick (Al Franken's horrendous rendering of a
terminally-ill stand-up comic), to their latest efforts, in-
cluding material previously showcased during guest ap-
pearances on Late Night with David Letterman (Advice
on How to Drive While Drunk and the Bob-and-Ray-
inspired "An Human Echo") and a few bits even we
hadn't seen.
At 8 p.m the comedy commenced abruptly with the
grand entrance of two empregnated housewives discuss-
ing the benefits of "stretching" a family food dollar by
devouring the afterbirth, a parody of TV's infamous
Hamburger Helper commercials.
Interspersed with diverse film clips of routines written
for the original Saturday Nite Live by the two (a send-
up dramatization, depicting a rabbi-performed circum-
cision in the back seat of an automobile that sports the
ultimate "smooth ride"), were: a down-on-his-luck
male prostitute working the Kinston, "gay district" and
Franken's impressive impersonations of PTLTGIF's
Jim Bakker and STONES' Mick Jagger, a gag that
depended perhaps too heavily on Al Franken's uncanny
resemblance to the rock legend.
Closing out the show in a familiar 60s tradition, the
duo encouraged the audience to join hands and voices in
singing "We Shall Overcome However, turned off by
a calculated lack of participation, Franken and Davis
exited in mock disgust.
But even after a full day of travelling, eating, drink-
ing, using the bathroom and just plain being funny, the
comedic pair were still looking forward to a night on the
town (almost as much as we were).
A trip to their motel revealed some pretty startling
differences between the two. Aside from some really
amazing physical dissimilarities, Al likes to relax after
the show with a chocolate malt and his favorite aerobic
dancing record. Tom does recreational drugs and listens
to Van Morrison tunes on his ghetto blaster.
Al likes waffles; Tom prefers recreational drugs.
Al plays racketball and tries to stay in shape; Tom
prefers recreational drugs.
Al boasts constantly of his 21-month-old daughter,
readily showing pictures to friends, relatives and dierse
passers-by. Tom prefers pop-up books based on
X-Rated films and rarely gives his real name to co-eds.
"1 do things to excess Tom explains, "but
somehow I don't get addicted
"Yeah Al agrees.
� � �
Naturally, at one time or another, comersation had
to turn to "the good of days" in New York with the
cast of the original Saturday Site Live. Although
Franken and Davis aren't generally recognized as hav-
ing gotten in on the ground floor, they were among the
show's first writers.
"We were out in L.A Al explains, "working at the
Comedy Store, when we heard Lome Michaels was get-
ting together a comedy show for NBC. We submitted a
demo tape And the rest is history
After the original cast unanymously decided to leave
the show in 1980 for other ventures, Franken and Davis
soon went on the college circuit, where they have con-
sistently entertained before full houses, making ther
ECU appearance a bit of a disappointment.
Both agree with the thousands of other Americans
who feel the new SNL is only a shell of its former self.
"We don't watch it Tom reveals.
"Yeah Al adds.
Finally, when asked what, by now, must be a familiar
question, "Would you ever consider a reunion with the
original cast?" Davis summed up their positions suc-
cinctly: "Only if John Belushi'll do it
ECGC Speaks Out With Answers To Questions
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff U riler
Last year Mark Zumbach, one of the founding
members of the East Carolina Gay Community (ECG
C) noted that the American Medical Association (AM A)
had removed homosexuality from its list of diseases, but
that homophobia; the irrational fear of homosexuality
was still considered a disease.
The ECGC has responded to homophobia by forming
a speakers bureau which offers gay men and women,
most of them ECU students, as speakers to lead discus-
sions at meetings or in classrooms about the subject of
hmosexuality. They hope to dispel the myths that many
people attach to homosexuality by giving them the op-
portunity to meet and speak to gay adults.
Christine O'Donnell, an ECU instructor, took a vote
in her Introduction to Sociology class and by a "clear
consensus" her students opted to invite speakers from
the ECGC to their class.
Despite the fact that it was a Friday class, the atten-
dance was much higher than usual when the ECGC
representatives came to do their program. There was an
obvious air of tension and lots of nervous energy as the
students were awaiting Christine's introduction of the
two women whoicagrie to adrfrjessher class For the next
50 minutes the whispered rimarkslfiterspersecl with gig-
gles could be heard every few seconds as one student
after another student used laughter to deal with a
sometimes uncomfortable situation.
Ginger and Robin, both dressed in female attire
(possibly to the shock of some of the students who had
stereotyped images of gay women looking and behaving
like men) looked just like everybody else. It was doubt-
ful that anyone in the classroom would have been able
to pick them out of a crowd as being gay.
Robin opened by randomly asking three studnts to
tell a little something about themselves and she and
Ginger followed by doing the same thing. The object of
the exercise was to show that for the most part, all
students � including gay ones � had similar
backgrounds, similar hopes and anxieties about the
future, and similar interests. Except for sexual
preference, Robin and Ginger told the students that they
were just like everyone else.
"Nothing happened, that I know of, to make me
gay said Robin, "All I know is that I am (gay) and
I'm happy
Ginger said being gay was not a matter of choice for
her, but that it was liberating when she made her choice
and finally admitted her gayness to herself. She added
that living a "split role" � living as a straight but really
being gay was very difficult. Ginger admitted to liking
sports, but noted that this was not the case with many
gay women she knew.
Both pointed out the results of a Kinsey study that
concluded that very few people were 'totally straight' or
'totally gay' and that gay people numbered over 20
million in the United States.
"Have you ever dated a man?" was the first question
from the audience. Ginger and Robin both said yes, but
admitted to being happier now that they were both
dating women.
Another student asked if they would ever like to have
families and if so would they adopt children? Yes was
the answer to both questions:
"God made Adam and Eve, not Adam and Adam
said one female student who identified herself as a
Catholic. She added that her religion did not approve of
homosexuality and she wanted to know if Ginger or
Robin just "dropped out" of their religions because
they were gay
Ginger, who was also raised a Catholic, said she
didn't feel as if she or any gay person should stop prac-
ticing their faith because they were gay. Neither she nor
Robin wanted to discuss the religious question at length
because both felt it was a personal individual matter.
One student wanted to know how their parents had
reacted to the fact that their child was gay. Robin
responded, "1 told them about two years agoit caused
a lot of problems. My mom couldn't deal with it she
said adding that her father was able to handle the news
better.
Statistics show that most children raised by gay
parents grow up to be heterosexual, said Ginger respon-
ding to another question about the family environment.
"My parents are both straight and look at me Ginger
added causing a round of laughter.
"How did you know you were gay?" came another
question which Ginger answered first, "I dated men for
a long time she said, "I didn't understand what I was
See ECGC, Page 7
Orthomolecular Medicine Valid
New Treatment Shunned By Old Professionals
This is the first of two parts. Watch
for the second installment in next
Thursday's Style section.
By JAY STONE
SUff Writer
According to Nobel Laureate
Linus Pauling: "Orthomolecular
medicine is the treatment of disease
by varying the concentrations in the
human body of substances that are
normally present in the human body
and are required for health, such as
the vitamins and essential
minerals
At the present time or-
thomolecular medicine is exploring
a wide range of applications. In
light of a work entitled Nutrition,
Crime, and Delinquincy by Alex-
ander Schauss, Los Angeles County
is applying orthomolecular prin-
ciples to juvenile delinquincy and
criminal behavior. In conjunction
with this development researchers in
Illinois, New Jersey, and New York
have recently conducted studies
focusing on the connection between
nutrition and criminal behavior. In
Palo Alto, California Linus Pauling
is involved in research with vitamin
C and Cancer. Pauling claims,
among other things, that in a con-
trolled test, "Terminally ill cancer
patients receiving vitamin C lived an
average of seven times as long as pa-
tients not receiving vitamin C
therapy, after reaching the terminal
stage Other researchers are apply-
ing orthomolecular principles to
such diseases as arthritis, autism,
and even alchoholism. In addition it
is now accepted among much of the
medical profession that many, if not
most hyperactive children are suf-
fering from allergic reactions to cer-
tain foods or food additives. But
perhaps the most compelling facet
of orthomolecular medicine is the
treatment of schizophrenia and
other emotional disorders by the use
of vitamins, minerals, and a
prescribed diet. This mode of treat-
ment has, in fact, inspired a seperate
rubric-orthomolecular psychiatry �
under which it is housed.
Orthomolecular psychiatry,
however, like the field of or-
thomolecular medicine itself is a
subject of controversy. It has receiv-
ed a hail of criticism from establish-
ed organizations like the American
Psychiatric Association and the Na-
tional Institute of Mental Health. In
fact, in 1973 the APA formed a
special task force to investigate or-
thomolecular psychiatry and report
on its efficacy. This task force con-
lcuded that orthomolecular techni-
ques have no therapeutic value for
schizophrenia or other mental il-
lnesses. Orthomolecular doctors,
however, denounced the report as
biased and fraught with error. To
lend weight to their criticisms they
promptly issued a reply to the
"American psychiatric Association
Task Force Report On Or-
thomolecular Medicine and
Megavitamin Therapy" in which
they pointed to evidence of bias
among the members of the task
force and discussed errors in its
research and conclusions point by
point and page by page.
Promised Rethinking
This indictment of the task
force's findings has, orthomolecular
physicians point out, never been ad-
dressed or substantially refuted by
the APA or NIMH. In fact, accor-
ding to orthomolecular practitioner
Humphrey Osmonds, the NIMH
was promising to rethink its position
with regard to orthomolecular
medicine until their recent financial
crisis forced them to postpone doing
further research.
It is, however, the opinions of the
APA which have shaped the
outlooks of the professors at ECU
and the people who author the tex-
tbooks which students read.
For instance, a textbook entitled
Brain & Behavior which is used in
the psychology department says:
"From time to time, the chronic
and poorly understood nature of
schizophrenia has led to unfor-
tunate therapeutic fads and
misleading claims, and sometimes to
extreme measures taken to assist
desperate families of patients with
chronic schizophrenia. There have
been claims that massive doses of
vitamins C and B, and prticularly of
nicotinic acid, may be of some
benefit. There is no compelling
scientifically acceptable evidence
that such treatments are effective,
an their long-term safety is not
established
Another textbook which is
employed in the first level nutrition
course in the nutrition department,
Understanding Nutrition states:
"The hope that large doses of
niacin would cure schizophrenia has
led to some important research and
a whole new area of study-
orthomolecular psychiatry � but
the results so far have been disap-
pointing. There is no evidence that
large doses of niacin have any effect
whatever on mental disease other
than the dementia of pellegra
In response to the allegations
made by the authors of these texts
Aibrecht A. Meyer, Executive
Director of The Huxley Institute for
Biosocil Research said:
"These statements are simly in-
correct. There is a wealth of scien-
tifically sound research that has
been done substantiating the prin-
ciples that orthomolecular doctors
employ beginning with the work of
Abram Hoffer and Humphrey
Osmonds in the 1950s.The authors
of these textbooks have simply read
the work of the APA and the NIMH
and neglected to look any further
than that. What is more, the per-
jorative tone of some of their
writing would lead the reader to
believe that they do not even leave
the subject open to question. That is
very unscientific
Flutist Baker Performing Next Week
World-class flutist Julius Baker wiH perform on campus oa Mon-
day, November IS at t p.m. ia MeadeaaaM Student Center's Hen-
drix Theatre, laker is the third perfonaer ia the University Uaioas
'82-83 Artiste Series. Tickets far the New York Philharmonic
musician's prograai are available at the Central Ticket Office.
MeadeahaH at $2.5f far stadeats, $7.50 for faculty, staff aad
pabtk; ail tickets wiH he $7.5f at the door.
'el
Hei
It has
admissu
prisoner
8 p.m.
LAU
e
100
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Ihilharmonic
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staff and
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 11. 1982
ECGC Establishes Campus Speakers' Bureau
Herman Lecture Free
It has been announced that there will be no
admission charge for former Soviet
prisoner Victor Herman's lecture tonight at
8 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
Continued From Page 6
feeling I denied it
(my gayness) at first
Robin said she knew
from about the time she
was in first grade that
she was gay. "I knew
inside � I had the same
feelings that I have
now The other girls
would talk about Tom-
my (and say) 'he's so
cute' and I'd be think-
ing about Suzy
Robin recalled.
Another female stu-
dent told a story of her
brother being chased by
a 45 year-old man who
she said was gay.
"These gays can get
pretty violent A 45
year-old man chasing a
16 year-old boy �
that's kind of sick
said the student. No
question followed her
statement, but Ginger
interjected and
responded, "You're
right, that is sick She
went on to tell some
stories about times
when she had en-
countered straight men
who she said had
treated her in demean-
ing and degrading ways
when she was in a bar
and at other times.
The next student ask-
ed if there were any
biological factors, such
as chromosomes, that
could explain homosex-
uality. Ginger and
Robin didn't know of
any. "If someone came
to me and said they
would give me a pill
that would make me
straight � I wouldn't
take it said Ginger.
"Do you show any
affection in public?"
came another question.
"No came the
answer from both
women. "Basically,
because I value my
life added Ginger.
Someone else asked
if either of the women
had ever had a problem
with their roommates
because they were gay.
Ginger said yes that one
"non-gay" roommate
she had, had moved
out. "My roommates
were very understan-
ding Robin said.
"Is it hard to admit
you're gay?" asked
another student. "For
me it's easier to tell a
male said Ginger
because men would not
feel as threatened as a
woman would.
Both women said
they knew other gay
people who maintained
heterosexual relation-
ships to avoid the dif-
ficulties of being gay in
a straight world.
Ginger responded to
a question about bi-
sexuality. "Bi-sexuality
is a cop-out she said.
"A person says they're
bi-sexual instead of
really sitting down and
working on a relation-
ship Ginger felt that
a person would often
use bisexuality as an ex-
cuse for not forming a
lasting relationship
with a person.
"Why do you come
out of the closet?" ask-
ed another student.
"When I finally realiz-
ed who I was, I got
tired of hiding said
Robin. "It's not so
much that I kept lying
to other people, but I
kept lying to myself
added Ginger.
Both women said
they were doing the
"talks as they call
them, to help build a
sense of "unity" bet-
ween straights and gays
and to try to dispel
some of the
stereotypical images
associated with
homosexuality.
"Being gay is not my
life � it's just a part of
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
NOVEMBER 11, 1982 Page 8
Vengeful Pirates Ready To Prevail
B KEN BOLTON
Assistant Sports Editor
The ECU Pirates should have a
definite motive going into this
weekend's game with William and
Mary � revenge.
The Indians came to Ficklen
Stadium last year and pulled off an
upset in ECU's last game of the
year, 31-21. The Pirates were 5-5
coming into the game, and the loss
denied ECU a winning season.
In the 1981 game, senior quarter-
back Chris Garrity led the Indians
with 399 yards passing and four
touchdowns. Along the way, Garri-
ty completed 34 of 44 passes, in-
cluding a 41-yard touchdown strike
to Jeff Sanders on the last play of
the first half.
This year, the Pirates will travel
to Williamsburg, Va. to take on the
Indians, who currently have a
record o' 2-7.
William and Mary is similar to
ECU's last opponent, the Texas-
Arlington Mavericks, in that they
were predicted to have a good year
before the season started.
With 38 lettermen and 18 starters
returning from last year's team, the
Indians were predicted to have the
best team in their history and were
considered capable of beating
anyone on their schedule.
"William and Mary has had a
very disappointing season head
coach Ed Emory said at his weekly
press luncheon. "They felt before
the year began that they were ready
to have a great, great season. I'm
sure that they will try to do
something against us to regain some
respectability
One of Emory's main concerns is
the fact that the Indians have com-
pleted 59.2 percent of their passes.
Even though Garrity has graduated,
they have still passed for over 1600
yards.
"William and Mary does best
what we do worst defensively �
pass the football stated Emory.
"Our pass defense has not been one
of our strong points
They have two quarterbacks
(Yagiello and Murphy) who can
really throw the football. A lot of
points have been scored in our last
two games and I expect the same
will be true Saturday
In last week's game against
Texas-Arlington, Jeff Heath set two
school records for field goals.
Emory was quick to point out the
importance of the support elements:
the holder, the snapper and the rest
of the offensive line.
According to Emory, one person
who has not gotten enough credit is
snapper Whitley Wilkerson, who
Emory said "would give anybody
confidence
"If there was such a thing as an
All-American snapper, Whitley
would be it responded Emory.
"I've never seen the guy make a bad
snap
As much as the placekicker posi-
tion has been solid all year, kickoff
returns have not been a strong part
of the Pirates' game all season.
The loss of Jimmy Walden was
felt as much in this area as at
tailback. But Walden returned
kickoffs against UTA, and ECU
had some of its best field position of
the entire season.
"Jimmy's long return (44 yards)
when we were up only 10 points in
the second half may very well have
been a turning point in the game
said Emory.
The Pirates will take 66 players to
Williamsburg, and all who were
here last year definitely remember
the 1981 contest.
"I believe our guys will remember
that they cost us a winning season
last year, something we had to live
with for 12 long months com-
mented Emory. "I believe we have
the type of young men who are
totally committed to a winning
season and we can get that with a
victory over William and Mary
Photo By STANLEY LEAHY
1982-83 ECU Men's Basketball Team
Wyatt's Emergence Lifts Pirate Defense
To the good fortune of ECU's
defense, defensive end Curtis Wyatt
has emerged at the right place at the
tight time.
Two weeks ago at West Virginia,
Wyatt made a spectacular intercep-
tion and raced 73 yards from ECU's
own goal line, to the West Virginia
27, to stop a Mountaineer scoring
possibility. Wyatt referred to that as
fulfilling a big fantasy.
Last week against Texas-
Arlington, Wyatt suddenly found
himself in the starting lineup. And
he took the opportunity to make big
things happen.
"I thought Curtis Wyatt did some
line things for us noted coach Ed
Emory. "It was nice to see him step
right in ior Pegues and play so
well
Credited with nine hits, including
a major quarterback sack of minus
ten yards, one would have to say
that Wyatt had a successful start.
"Curtis is one of the most rapidly
improving players on our team
said defensive coordinator Norm
Parker. "I would have to say that
his forte is his great speed, combin-
ed with his strength. He has a
tendency to make the big play
Against the Mavericks, Wyatt in-
deed made one of those big plays.
Just before the first half ended,
UTA drove to the ECU seven yard
line. With second down and goal,
Wyatt burst through the offensive
line to dump UTA quarterback
Doyle Hightower for a big ten-yard
loss. That play, coupled with a third
down missed pass, resulted in UTA
getting only three points instead of a
possible seven.
The 6-2, 215-pound native of
Compton, CA, came to ECU by
way of Long Beach Junior College.
And even is just a reserve role until
the UTA game, Wyatt had worked
himself up to eighth on the overall
ECU tackle list.
"I personally feel that Wyatt
might have been the steal of the
1981-82 junior college crop noted
Emory. After Christmas last year, I
flew out to California and met Cur-
tis and his family. I immediately saw
that he was a young man of outstan-
ding character who is aiming for
high places in the world
But Wyatt is putting only one
thing first in his mind at present.
V-nf
Coach Ed Emory And Snapper Whitle Wilkerson
Harrison Cites
Identity Crisis
With the upcoming season just
around the corner, new head coach
Charlie Harrison has begun chisel-
ing the ice away and attempting to
warm up a team which is completely
new to his style of coaching and
system of play.
Harrison is confronting several
problems, but cited the major
stipulation as being the lack of iden-
tity the team has at this point.
"We're just 12 guys out there prac-
ticing right now he said, "but
after we begin defining certain roles,
our identity should emerge
The head coach only has two
seniors on the team this year, with
four juniors, three sophomores and
fouf'f reshmen making up this year's
roster.
Offensively, Harrison said the
players must learn to respect the
value of the basketball and treat it
as a valuable possession.
"Everybody wants to do the spec-
tacular he said. "You don't win
games by being flashy, you win
them by being sound
Cindy Pleasants
A Look Inside
"We just want to take one game
at a time said Wyatt. "We are
closer now than ever, and we all
have dedicated ourselves to trying
for a 7-4 season
Two games remain, and if Wyatt
continues to play as he has the last
two weeks, he and his teammates
are likely that 7-4 record as a reality.
Lady Pirates Stop
Canes In Exhibition
The Lady Pirates scrimmaged
against Louisburg College Tuesday
night and blew the Hurricanes
away, 68-54.
According to head coach Cathy
Andruzzi, the Bucs played well in
spurts, but have a great deal more to
work on before opening the season
against Fayetteville State on Nov.
22. "We're still not in shape she
said. "At the end of the game where
we were pulling away, we should
have been a lot more in control of
the game
A true believer in a strong defen-
sive game, Andruzzi was somewhat
disappointed in the Pirates' execu-
tion during the scrimmage. "We
were opening the sidelines too
much. We let them set the tempo in-
stead of setting it ourselves
Senior Lorraine Foster led the
Pirates in scoring with 20 points.
She also had seven assists. All-
America candidate Mary Denkler
popped in 18 points, while Loletha
Harrison finished with 10.
Freshman Sylvia Bragg scored nine
points, and Darlene Chancy added
six.
Louisburg's Clara Faison was the
Hurricanes' high scorer with 16
points to her credit.
n�to By OA�V PATTMSOM
ECU's Lorraine Foster Takes A Jumpshot
Harrison has especially been
pleased with sophomore guard
Barry Wright, a 6-5, 195-pound
native of Portsmouth, Va. "Wright
has been one of our most consistent
players he said.
And consistency is exactly what
Harrison is looking for. "Our kids
are gonna have to work at a consis-
tent pattern he said. "We're just
not consistent as this point
On defense, Harrison said the
team has a long ways to go. "We
just don't complete the plays, and
that includes rebounding he said.
"If you can ever get a team to play
defense for 20 seconds at a time,
that's all you have to do.
"We're not very big to begin
with, but I believe rebounding is just
going to get a loose ball. You have
to realize how precious that ball is.
"If you don't respect that ball,
you're gonna give up lay-ups
The Pirates open the season at
Duke University and play five of the
next seven ball games away, in-
cluding bouts at N.C. State and
Samford. "Our schedule is tough
he said. "There's no doubt about
that. Duke is talented but they're
very young. Samford went 10-1 last
year and we're playing them on their
homecoming
What about N.C. State? "We'll
always have the chance to win any
ball game Harrison said. "Maybe
we'll beat State, maybe we won't.
But I sure as hell want to be com-
petitive when we go up there
Harrison described himself as be-
ing a coach who not only expects
but demands the most out of his
players. "Some of these kids have
never been yelled at he said.
"When I do yell at them,it's nothing
personal. 1 just want them to be a
better basketball player.
"When I quit yelling, that's when
they should be worried. I won't yell
at anybody anymore if I don't think
there's any reason to
Point guard Tony Robinson aid
he has a lot o respect for coach
Harrison and returning guard Bruce
Peartree had nothing but praise for
his new coach. "Harrison is the type
of coach that ECU students and
fans hae been waiting for he
said. "He is a er exciting coach
and makes the team exciting to
watch
Harrison said he hopes the fans
will be supportive this year. "The
can come to the game and then go to
the Elbo or Papa Katz or
wherever he said. "If we could
just get 20-percent o the student
body to come out and watch, no
team's gonna want to come in here.
"If the fans come, our kids can
refuse to play if there are people out
there pulling for them
Coach Harrison said he is tired of
hearing that this is ACC countrv.
"East Carolina is the third largest
institution in this state he said.
"I'm proud of that, and 1 would
think others would take pride in
that.
� "What in the hell is everyone
ashamed of? There is nothing more
irritating to me than to see someone
support L'NC-Chapel Hill more
than they do ECU. It's just astoun-
ding to me. I don't understand wh
anyone would come to a school that
they weren't willing to support
Harrison said he felt like voung
people today hae changed. "Thev
are more soft and spoiled he said.
"Not many kids are that hungry.
"I grew up in a middle class home
and I usually got what I wanted
before I even asked, but 1 became
competitive because of my leg
(Harrison suffered from polio as a
child).
"When you're looked at dif-
ferently in a group situtation. it
makes you want to fight. You tr to
live vicariously. When 1 see a kid
that doesn't play hard, it makes me
sick.
"I always wanted to be an athlete
but I couldn't. He has two legs, and
it's not that I'm jealous. That's not
it at all, but if he has what it takes,
he should use it.
"He has to have more than poten-
tial because that means nothing
more to me than he just hasn't done
it yet
Harrison said he wants his players
to have more than memories, more
than "ambiguous victories and
vague defeats
"I want him to be successful, and
I want to have an effect on his life
he said. I know my coaches have
touched my life personally
There's no doubt that Harrison
has already begun to be an influen-
tial person in the lives of 13 players
and will continue to direct them
toward one common goal � to be
the ultimate competitor.
"They have to believe in
themselves he said. "We've got to
strive to get better in every game we
play.
"Success isn't gonna come over-
night
Wei
B I M
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Even ihoi
this country
voile I
from the w
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Daudson
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f
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 11, 1982
Weitzel One Of The Most Feared Hitters In The Country
By TAMMY
PARHAM
K'l Sports Info
Even though most of
this country's powerful
volleyball players come
from the west coast,
ECU head coach Lynn
Davidson knows that
she doesn't have to
look any farther than
right here in Greenville.
Davidson considers
L ady Pirate spiker
Stacey Weitzel to be
one of the strongest hit-
ters in this area.
"Stacey is one of the
few players that I've
seen who can hit
through a block the
coach explained. "I
think she can probably
hit as hard as the weast
coast players
During a 1981 Invita-
tional at N.C. State, a
study was taken on the
efficiency of hitters.
Weitzel's spike was
clocked at more than 45
m.p.h.
"I like hitting a
volleyball because it's
just you putting the ball
to the floor, not a bat
or a racquet. That's a
good feeling Weitzel
said.
The Pirate captain is
often referred to as the
team's most feared hit-
ter. "I'd rather be call-
ed a feared hitter than
just a power hitter,
because it takes finesse
and skill to put the ball
down Weitzel com-
mented.
But the 5-9, Severna
Park, MD native is not
just a hitter.
"Stacey is an all-
around player. She
does a good job in
every facet of the
game Davidson said.
The coach considers
Weitzel to be one of the
most consistent servers
on the team. "Her
serve is not easy to
return. She has good
control on the ball and
she places it well, too
Although Weitzel's
defensive and passing
skills are not as strong
as her offensive play,
Davidson feels that
Weitzel makes up the
difference with her
court intelligence.
. "Stacey is a gifted
athlete. She's a quick
learner and very in-
telligent player. That is
why she has become
one of our prominent
players
"I feel like I've final-
ly become a complete
player Wietzel said.
"I've been working a
lot harder this year. I
feel like I'v come a long
way
As a freshman,
Weitzel was named as
the team's outstanding
newcomer. Then, as a
sophomore, she was
named as the most
outstanding offensive
player when her role as
a hitter became more
important.
But for the last two
seasons, the senior has
taken on a leadership
position as the team
captain. "The players
look at her as a role
model. That's a big
responsibility David-
son explained. "She's
the type of player who
makes her presence felt
not only on the court
but off the court too.
That is why she was last
year's most valuable
player. She's a heart
player
Volleyball came to
an end Wednesday for
the Pirate standout,
and Davidson must fill
the empty spot, which
will be difficult.
"Stacey's position on
the team is going to be
hard to recruit for.
We're losing her offen-
sive power, her leader-
ship and her ex-
perience Davidson
said. "She will definite-
ly be missed
es
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10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 11, 1982
Volleyball Players
Lose To Wolfpack
By EDWARD
NICKLAS
Staff Writer
"I know we outplayd
them said ECU
volleyball coach Lynn
Davidson, reflection on
last night's loss to N.C.
State.
The Lady Pirates,
who were beaten 15-11,
10-15, 15-12, 15-13, re-
mained close the entire
match, losing the last
two games by a total of
only five points.
"When we were down
in tight situations
Davidson said, "we
hung in there and kept
fighting back She
added, "State didn't
play as well as they
could, but I think it was
because we did not let
them
According to David-
son, the match could
have easily turned out
differently. She said,
"We just couldn't get
the breaks at the crucial
points
Despite the loss,
Davidson paid tribute
to her team's effort.
"All of our kids played
an exceptional match.
Especially Dale La-
vant
The Lady Pirates,
now 24-16, closed out
their season Wednes-
day night when they
took on UNC-
Charlotte and the
University of South
Carolina at Lancaster.
CHAMPION OF THE SOAPS
The first soap opera trivia contest turned out
to be quite interesting as nine teams ended up
competing for the title of "Champion of the
Soaps In the preliminary rounds, teams com-
peted against each other in three different
heats. Teams showed much mental agony as
they racked their brains to remember who was
who and who did what when. The three teams
to make the finals are: Marie Wells and Lynn
Thornton; Celia Daniels and Karen Moore; and
the only male team to enter, Elton Boney and
Paul Sumrell. In the end, however, the real TV
buffs and Soap Opera Trivia Champions were
Marie Wells and Lynn Thornton.
Records Broken
Not only did the
ECU swim team begin
their season with a big
win over James
Madison Friday, but
two varsity records
were set as well.
The women's 400
medley relay team,
which consists of
Luanne Peura, Joanne
McCulley, Kaky
Wilson and Nan
George, set a new
school record with a
time of 4:09.7, which is
five seconds under the
national standard and
beat the old school
record by more than
two seconds.
One of the members
of the relay, Joanne
McCulley, also set a
varsity record in the
100 breaststroke.
"The James
Madison meet was a
fantastic win for us
said Pirate head coach
Rick Kobe. "Last year
the men only beat them
by six points, but this
year they won by 20
points
Besides the two varsi-
ty records, a number of
national cut times were
bettered during the
meet. Both the 400
freestyle and and 400
medley teams surpassed
the cuts.
Individually, Nan
George � 50 and 100
breaststroke, Kaky
Wilson � 100 fly and
100 breaststroke,
Joanne McCulley �
100 breaststroke, Nan-
cy James � 100
freestyle and Nancy
Ludwig � 200 IM,
were able to post times
better than the national
cuts.
CROWNING OF THE SWINGERS
Intramural tennis finally came to an end as
the final game in the men's independent divi-
sion was played.
Overall, 95 people participated in the event
this year. Winners were: LoraLee Linquist �
women's intermediate; DeAnna Morris �
women's open; Geoff Kokiko � men's open;
and Tom Kiehl � men's intermediate.
FINALE SET
The intramural co-rec flag football finals will
be played Thursday, Nov. 11 at 6:00. Several
teams still remain but Bod-Squad and Third
Regiment appear to be the spectators' picks for
the final game.
DAVE WEBER WATCH OUT
After three weeks of competiton, intramural
bowlers are still smashing the pins. Just for the
record, the defending champs, Alley Katz are
ranked No. 1 in the men's independent division
while Kappa Sigma and Jones Tin Pins round
out the top slot for the fraternity and residence
hall divisions respectively.
SOCCER PLAYOFFS BEGIN
The regular season of intramural soccer is
almost over, with the playoffs drawing near.
The finalized times on Nov. 15 and 16, which
are used as make-up days for rainouts are
posted. Playoff drawsheets will be up Wednes-
day morning with playoffs beginning Wednes-
day afternoon.
BUMP PLUS SET EQUALS CO-REC
SMASH
Co-rec volleyball got off to a smashing start
on Nov. 1. Games are played at Minges Col-
iseum from 8:30 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Monday-
Thursday. Playoffs will begin Nov. 23 and
finish after Thanksgiving break on Nov. 29th
and 30th.
RACQUETBALL TOURNAMENT SET
The times and pairings for the racquetball
singles tournament have been set. Play will con-
tinue for the next week and a half, with the
finals scheduled for Nov. 22.
HORSEBACK RIDING
The Outdoor Recreation Center, located in
113 Memorial Gym, is providing an opportuni-
ty for everyone to go horseback riding with
Sneaker Sam. Transportation is provided for
the Monday and Thursday afternoon trips,
which leave the gym at 3:40 p.m. and return at
5:30 p.m. The rates are $5.00 per hour, and due
by 2:30 p.m. on Monday and 4:00 p.m.
Wednesday for the Thursday trip.
Classifieds
PERSONAL
MIL A MO MBLL.O HOM ALL
the smutts oucs in the
LAB (MA, CMrK ane Susie tee).
An a wary Haaj Ma-a nnnn
tog front mm. Bnieyed wr vaca-
Men Mi Joa-ejH� las miimi
Map Nm ala green Down to still
cruising. Leaks Uka Ma ��
will aaaa � taw �art a Mil Lava
ya mm than Keuacnrome. Yea,
G.f�. Is ate up wit it. Sac ya on
Hill Straat.
MIKQMIWC.
HCV HCNOI: DUMP! Was it
ceMT Lav ya, H.r� C.P. O.H.
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL Typist wants to
type at Man. Reasonable rates;
m-Mat.
PROFESSIONAL Typingservice-
a-perianca quality work. IBM
typewriter. Call Laala Shiva.
gJHg ar Oall Jeiuer gMRfA
TYPINO TEAM papers.
ate Can 7SJ-47U.
WE
WANTED
�UV PLAYBOY, Belling
Ma�, Ouicatltver Record
EuftMMja. it Bast FRtk St.
FOR SALE
HELP WANTED EARN tra
travel andextra taaay ascampus
representative far student travel-
Call Mm at 417-m-tSss daily
417-S4S-MM.
HAND CRAFTED, rastie fur
eitwre at afterOaale stuUent
prices. For more iufomaatieu, can
Kias at 7SJ-S717.
MISC.
TYPING: MANUSCRIPTS,
papers, thesis. raaieaaMe rates.
Call 7S4-J7ML
li YEARS TYPING
rates, spaaing, punctuation and
trimmer corrections ere-
ef reaping Cindy t �m. p.m
3SS-M4A.
CRAZY ZACK S ROAOTRIP Nov.
I SW inc ludas reaad trip to Zacfcs
and laliashmanli an the way to
Rate. Half-price admission to
Zack's. Call Alpha Sigma Phi
gjEjj halers Nov. it
THERE WILL BE aa Ending
Warld Hunger Briefing en
November uth and a fast an the
lttli. Far more details call Jen
niter at 3S5-4SSS.
WANT TO HAVE FUN AND STAY
IN SHAPE at the same time?
Then he at the Meadanhall patie at
f:M p.m. on Taesday and
Tharsdays.
ECU FACULTY MEMBER seeks
mature housemate ta share
1 bedroom house two blacks from
campus. Own roam and bank- Rant
HMmontti plus shared utilities.
Available front 1 January Far in-
formation, write ta: 3M1 "O"
Street N.W. Wasbinntea, O.C.
7. FISHER SPEAKERS ml del SMs
lake to trade far cassette
Can 7J4-�77 ar The East
Carotiaiaa 7S7-SM4 and leave
THE FAST IS NEXT WEEK
SEE the announcements on pane
two for moe details.
FOR SALE: l�7l HONDA �� XL
DIRT OR STREET BIKE. Call
nmajaj man Thar.
NICE CRAY AND WHITE RAB-
BIT FUR JACKET FOR SALE $M
CALL WMgjL
WATERBEDS and heddaaa- one
half off! DON'T pay retail! We
have complete waterbeds as tow
as Slet.tS. Also bedding sets as law
as $7�.�S. came by Factory Mat
tress and Waterbed Outlet 7M
GreeaviHe Blvd. next to Sweet
Caroftnes. 3S5-7AM-
TWO GRE PREPARATION beaks
and one mat book lor sale T�-eo7.7
FOR SALE: 11 Caachman
31-foot trailer, excellent condition
All gas appliances, underpinned
avn. utilities S25. storms. Avail
Jan 1st price S2SW. Great for stu
dent call 7�-2S2 or l-�34-04J7 aft
.
FOR SALE IWS CHEVY IM
PALA. For more info, call
ISAdRSB.
missm
HAVE A PROBLEM?
NEED INFORMATION?
REAL Crisis Intervention,
24 HOUR SERVICE
312 E. 10th Street
758-HELP Greenville, N.C. 27834
QUALITY
SHOE REPAIR
v
?&m
SAAD'S
SHOE REPAIR
113 Grande Ave.
758 1228
TRIM YOUR FIGURE
YOUR BEST
LOOK, INC.
355 W4�
Lose 12-IS Pounds in 3 Weeks
Programs for Men A Women
� Medical Weight Control �
Nutritional Counseling
SKIN CARE
Individual Skin Analysis
Deep Pore Cleansing
Face A Body Waxing
Manicures and Pedicures
Complimentary Consultation
Check phone book for
discount coupon.
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN AJOaTTION: a difficult decl-
DEPENDON. sion that's mode easier by
the women of the Fleming Center. Counselors are
available day and night to support and under-
stand you. Your safety, comfort and privacy are
assured by the caring staff of the Homing Center.
SERVICES: � Tuesday � Saturday Abortion Ap-
pointments � 1 st 8c 2nd Trimester Abortions up to
18 Weeks � Free Pregnancy Tests � Very Early
Pregnancy Tests � All Inclusive Fees � insurance
Accepted � CALL 781-5550 DAY Oft NIGHT �
Health care, counseling TUP FLEMING
CENTER
and education for wo
men of all ages.
FAMOUS PIZZA
Dine in or Fast Free Delivery
HOT OVEN SUBS.
Lasagne. Spaghetti, Hambuigen
HAPPY HOUR 2 - Close I99
Pitcher 4Se Mugs
DAILY SPECIALS
ALL SMALL SUBS
NOT FOR la
DELIVERY
LET'S MAKE
A
DEAL.
ON
tOpr
SHIRTS & SWEATERS
AVDEN GOLF & CX. 746-3389
758-5982
2704 E. 10th St.
758-1033
Buck's
Gulf
Complete
Automotive Service
24 hr. Towing Service
Jartran Rentals Available
The Gifts Students. Faculty, Families
And Friends will all enjoy!
Praised by all reviews and readers!
The Hell You Say
By Charles Edwards (ECTC '35)
Best quality hardback Illustrated
Autographed Available at Student Store and
Book Barn (12.95) or (13.95) Mailed
anywhere from:
Old Sparta Press Box 6363, Raliegh, NC
27628 Third printing in first year!
Fun stories including ECTC ECC & ECU
and others you'll know or wish you had.
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM IJ-U
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
SltS.OO Pregnancy Test, Birth
Control, and Problem Pregnan-
cy Counseling. For further infor-
mation call S32-0S3S (Toll Free
Number esO-211 Mae) between t
A.M. and 5 P.M. Weekdays.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
f 17 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N. C.
Student Golf Special
Indian Trails
Country Club
Fairway Dr Griffon, N.C.
Please be our guest for
18 holes of golf for only
$6.00 for cart &
green fees
Monday-Friday
8a.m5p.m.
524-5485
$3
00
OFF
On Any Large Pizza With
Two Or More Topping
Expires November 30. 1982
GREENVILLE SQUARE
SHOPPING CENTER
703 E. GREENVILLE BLVD.
(New K Mart)
PHONE 756-9600
STEREO
SALE
SAVE BIG BUCKS ON
ONE OF A KINDS
LAST YEAR'S
MODELS-DEMOS
6302 6L, Trim Car Sneakers $75.00
AIWA-
HSPiY
7 Band 3 Watt Graphic
rtiio.ao
�203 6V� Con Car Sneakers S5 00
P
7111 la Deeh AM FM Caaaette
Dole Aato Bee $219 00
AD 3200 Hoaae Caaaetti Delbv B ft
C (240.00
ADRSO01 Hoca CeaestU Dolby
Auto Reverse $325 00
Walt � an Player at Phone $109 00
AUDIO CONTROL 1X52
$9900
Hmi Equalizer
JUNIOR EXECS
ENJOY YOUR J06 AND SPARE TIME TOO
SALARY
Starts $17,200 - $24,100 increasing
annually to $28,600 - $44,800 in four
years.
8
A11F1CATI0HS
ollege grads, all degrees and degree
levels considered. Recent grads looking
for first job as well as those
contemplating a job change (under age
34) are encouraged to apply. Required
to pass nental and physical exams.
BENEFITS
Club benefits including 18 hole golf
courses, swimming pools, beaches,
sailing and flying clubs. Full medical.
dental, unlimited sick leave. 30 days
annual paid vacation, post grad
education programs and retirement in 20
years!
JOB
"Positions are still available in the
following areas: Management (technical
and non-technical). Engineering,
Nuclear, Teaching, Intelligence,
Aviation Management, Diving, Pilots,
Finance, Personnel Management.
LOCATION
Immediate openings on both coasts and
the Gulf of Mexico - He pay relocation
expenses.
�AVY OFFICER PMKnHS
1001 atvaho Dr.
Raleigh. K 27W9
Call 1-800-662-7231
ar Landing Seafood;
Restaurant
vVv
HEALTH PROFESSIONS
SCHOLARSHIPS
If you're planning a career I
medicine you owe It to yourself 1
find out about the Air Force's
Health Professions Scholarship Pro-
gram.
Qualified U.S. Citizens can
receive scholarships for medical or
osteopathlc school.
Our scholarships Include:
Tuition
Require Books
Required Lab Fees
Required Equipment Rental
and More Than $550 Monthly Stlpenc
USAF Heanh Priliialiai �1-7SS-4134
1 "i tv i rtiTiinvr c Trrrr
105 Airport Road Greenville, N.C.
THURSDAY
i:
!
I

'
ALL YOU CAN EATjJ
V5
Or Combination of Any 2
Shrimp
Oysters
Flounder 3 C9
TrOUt only J
I ujitti Frnjnjdi Ftfoo Or
Potato. Coin
Hours:
L.
Sunday rhniThuraday llJtA.nl. -MP M.
Fitoeyanq Saturday 11:H A.M. to toM P.M
1� Airport Rood GroonviHo, M.C.
758-0327
Ha'MfMkntlw
Oft, So COM oy oVtO oUry Hollo.
ACCOM-
caowN-
JENSEN
JVC-
GFA-i 100 Watts Per Ch Pover Aaap
� 320 00
GFPPreaomp3O0 0O
CSC9S0 AM FM Caaaette Portable
$240 00
L-150A Toena 2 12" 3 Way Home
Speaker. 1525 00 e�
R-133 Tower 2-10 3 Way Home
vw .a- v
'vvvv
Bortquot FocHltioo Avoilable 758-0327
BobHorring,
KENWOOD-
SONV-
ONKYO-
RE-425 FM Caaaitte In Daaa Auto
Reverse Doibe $27 00
RE 518 Digital Caaaette Do I bv
A�toRe�er��SN5 00
KD-D4 Home Caaaette Dolby
Specteopenck Ind $255 00
KO-D3 Home Caaaette Doibs Music
Scan $175 00
RC-M60 FM Caaaette Portable 6 �,
Spa. $197 00
RX-40 40 Warts Per Ch Eq.M FM
Receiver $250 00
KT-tlSAM FM Teaser $175 00
KR 730 AM FM Receiver S4 Watts
$249 00
PS-LX4 Quartz Direct Drive Aato
Return Turntable159 00
TC-FX5 Caaaette Deck DoHh 2
Motor $210 00
PSFL5 Drawer Direct Drtve Tnm-
taMeStM.OO
STKUX3 SS Wotta Per Ch. Recetvet
$225.00
CP1260F FulK Auto Turntable
�2S7.M
TX 20 FM Receiver 30 Watts Per Ch
$249 00
AH Atari Video Carts $20 00
FIRST COME-FIRST GETS
Open Night!?TU 8:00
.aW - Jk �
Troao SfPhooo 754-2293
Sea-en Snun Saaaa
�mnamnnnmnmmmT f I f 11 f fUJJJJI
it.
t
� ��
�n�iw�mni
��-�m aiimassausaupafc





Title
The East Carolinian, November 11, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 11, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.230
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

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