The East Carolinian, November 9, 1982






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Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No,�
Tuesday, November 9,1982
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 10,000
PCB A rrests
ECU Student Released
Charges of "impeding traffic"
have been dismissed against ECU
student Theresa Alston who was ar-
rested last month during an anti-
PCB protest in Warren County.
Alston, 21, a senior in home
economics, was among over 500
people arrested during the six weeks
of demonstrations opposing the
Hunt administration decision to use
the Warren County site for a PCB
hazardous waste landfill.
Alston, who appeared in court for
about 90 minutes, said that the
charges against most of the
demonstrators were being dismiss-
ed. She was arrested along with 85
other demonstrators on Oct. 4 dur-
ing a protest in which she attempted
to block dump trucks full of PCB
contaminated soil that had been
scooped up from over 250 miles of
N.C. highways. The PCB had been
illegally dumped on the roadsides in
1979. "
According to Kenneth Ferruccio,
president of Warren County
Citizens Concerned About PCB,
only nine people are still appealing
their convictions while dozens of
others have received fines of $25 or
less and suspended sentences.
Ferruccio, arrested on four dif-
ferent occassions during the pro-
tests, said thatthe community (of
people living near the dump) has
never accepted the dump and does
not accept it now. There will be ten-
sion and conflictuntil the dump is
removed
More recently, over 200 people
took part in yet another protest
against the dump Saturday.
Under the theme "Hunt's experi-
ment has already failed the group
took part in a nine mile march from
the Warrenton Courthouse to the
landfill site. No one was arrested,
Ferruccio said.
The recent march was organized
to protest the fact that 750,000
gallons of water has accumulated in
the landfill, putting what protestors
claim is an extra six million pounds
of stress on the Fill's liner.
He further claims that "vast
amounts" of more secluded state
and federally owned land could
have been used for the dump site in-
'stead of picking an area so close to a
populated area. "It was the worst
possible site they could have chosen
from the standpoint of scientific
criteria Ferruccio said. "From the
standpoint of political criteria, they
thought it was an excellent choice
Ferruccio is planning to go on a
multi-state speaking tour with other
people who have opposed the dump
later this month. He hopes that the
tour will transform the "public
awareness that the situation has
generated into "political concern"
and "political pressure" to move
the Warren dump and discourage
the creation of others.
No Leads In The
Bizarre Shooting Of
Greenville Policeman
Who Is This Man?
Photo By STANLEY LEAKY
The football prognosticator, or is it? The man who is wearing the mask
may be the guy to finally help you break your local bookie. Let's hope
so.
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Slan Writer
There are still no leads in the case
of the bizarre shooting of a Green-
ville Police officer last Friday night.
C. Michael Futrell, 25, was shot in
the leg by a group of cult-like
assailants.
The assailants chanted "Pigs
must die" as they forced Futrell to
accompany them to Greenville's
Town Common near the Tar River
where the shooting occurred.
"We're basically at a total stand-
still in the case said Greenville
detective A.G. Whitaker, the officer
assigned to the case.
Whitaker said that there were no
leads or information as to the identi-
ty of the perpetrators. "To be total-
ly honest, we have no earthly idea
he added.
Futrell, who was shot below the
right knee-cap, was listed in
satisfactory condition at Pitt Coun-
ty Memorial Hospital on Monday.
He told The East Carolinian in a
telephone interview that he was feel-
ing better and expects to be released
near the end of the week.
He said that doctors wouldn't
know the full extent of his injuries
for a period of six to 10 weeks, but
that presently they don't foresee any
complications. 'It's just a matter of
time said Futrell, who will have to
wear a leg brace.
Futrell was abducted at gunpoint
by a group of four white males in a
green, beat-up station wagon. They
ordered him to get in their car at the
corner of Fourth Street and the
Evans Street Mall at approximately
8:40 p.m. Friday evening, as he was
reporting to his usual post with
Greenville's "downtown squad
The men had initially stopped
Futrell to ask directions but then
forced him into their car and drove
him down to the Town Common
near First Street.
According to Futrell, he was then
led by three of the men to a secluded
area on the commons while the
fourth suspect drove the car to the
area near the Greene Street bridge.
The three men, all identically
dressed in Army fatigues with
emblems showing a pig with a knife
through it on the backs of the
jackets, kept chanting "Pigs must
die" as they led Futrell to the area
where he was shot with his own ser-
vice revolver.
"I was afraid they would kill
me Futrell said. "I didn't think
See LOCAL, Page 5
University Wasting Money Through Phone Misuse By Staff
Recent reports have indicated that
students, faculty and staff members
have not been using the University's
reduced-rate long distance
telephone system properly, resulting
in an increased cost of over 50 per-
cent on some long distance calls.
ECU's telephones are tied into
what is called a DAIN (Dial Access
Inter-city Network) which entitles
users to discounts on both in-state
and out-of-state long distance calls.
Under the DAIN system, a person
making a long distance call must
ECU Athlete Gets Fine
And Suspended Sentence
For Pistol Possession
By GREG RIDEOUT
csKditor
ECU football player Jeff Pegues
pleaded guilty yesterday to illegal
possession of a firearm on campus
in Greenvillle District Court yester-
day.
Pegues, 20, was given a six month
suspended sentence, three years pro-
bation and ordered to pay a fine of
$100 plus court costs.
Pegues, who has been suspended
indefinitely from the football team,
was charged last Sunday night
following the accidental shooting of
another Pirate football player, red-
shirted, walk-on Steve Sellers.
Sellers was listed in stable condi-
tion yesterday after undergoing
another operation for damage to his
spleen, liver and colon, a hospital
spokesperson said.
According to police reports the
gun, a .25 caliber pistol, was ap-
parently given to him by his
girlfriend and was not registered
with the proper authorities in
Pegues hometown of Laurinburg,
N.C.
Head Football Coach Ed Emory
has removed Pegues from the train-
ing table, the special dining facility
where scholarship athletes eat. ECU
Sports Information Director Ken-
neth Smith said no action has been
taken on the condition of Pegues'
scholarship.
Associate Dean of Judiciary
James B. Mallory said Pegues has
been removed from the dorm, and
as far as he is concerned the matter
is officially closed.
Pegues and Sellers were team-
mates at Scotland County High
School. Sellers, a third-year
sophomore, attended Fayetteville
State University for two years
before coming to ECU.
dial "8" not "9" if they want to
receive the reduced charge. Anytime
a person dials "9" before dialing
the long distance number, the
university is charged the same rate
usually charged by Carolina
Telephone.
For example, a three-minute call
to New York City between the hours
of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. would cost
$1.43 from Greenville if the caller
uses a "9" before placing the call.
If an "8" is dialed first, the caller is
automatically tied into the DAIN
system which only charges 30 cents
per minute on out-of-state calls at
all hours, thereby making the same
call only 90 cents for a savings of
almost 40 percent.
Larger discounts are available on
in-stale long distance calls when the
DAIN system is used. A three
minute call to Charlotte, N.C. dur-
ing the same 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. time
slot would cost $1.27, versus only 36
cents with the DAIN discount,
which costs only 12 cents per minute
at all times.
According to ECU Business
Manager Julian Vainwright, who
oversees use of the phones, the
DAIN system is more economical in
most cases except when Carolina
Telephone's night rates are in effect
from 11 p.m. until 7 a.m. on
weeknights, all day Saturday and up
until 5 p.m. Sunday. At those hours
the rates are sometimes cheaper by
dialing "9" than using DAIN.
Vainwright encouraged long
distance phone users to "take ad-
vantage of the DAIN system and
to refer to the instruction manual in
the front of the ECU telephone
directory if more information is re-
quired.
Vainwright also pointed out that
anytime a call is made on the DAIN
system, the call is put on a timer
from the moment that the last digit
is dialed, giving the caller only 29
seconds to hang up the phone if a
busy signal is heard or there is no
answer. Vainwright noted that it
would be better if the caller redialed
a call as opposed to letting it ring
beyond the 29 second limit and
thereby be charged for a full one-
minute call.
"In order to terminate a call, the
receiver needs to be hung up for
over three seconds added Vain-
wright.
"With the programming
capabilities, we can give or deny ac-
cess to the DAIN system Vain-
wright said. He added that the class
of service for each department's
phone is centrally controled at the
system's main terminal in the base-
ment of Joyner Library and that, if
abused, the service could be discon-
tinued.
The DAIN system, as is the case
with all university phones, is for
"business purposes only
Art School's Accreditation Reevaluated
By DARRYL BROWN
Assistant News Editor
The ECU School of Art is being
reevaluated this week for its ac-
creditation to the National Associa-
tion of Schools of Art, one of the
most important organizations for
U.S. art schools. The school has
been "on hold" for the last few
years, according to Dean Richard
H. Laing, because of major ad-
ministrative changes in the school.
Representatives from NASA have
been evaluating the art school since
Sunday but Laing does not expect
the announcement of their decision
to be made until April of next year.
He doesn't predict any difficulty in
the School of Art receiving the ac-
creditation .
"I don't see any problem in get-
ting through the evaluation Laing
said.
The School of Art is currently
ranked in Division One, the top
division by the national association,
and is the only accredited art school
in North Carolina. Schools are nor-
mally reevaluated for the first five
years after acceptance by NASA
and then at least once every 10
years. ECU's art school has been ac-
credited since 1962.
The school has made some major
changes since the association's last
visit in 1976, including the appoint-
ment of Laing as dean. They have
reorganized the foundation or
freshman level courses and switched
from a two-day instructor schedule
to a three-day plan.
"That put the teachers in the
classroom more than before.and put
them in more contact with the
students Laing said.
He cited the art school's recent
change from a nine department
organization to a consolidation into
two large unit departments of Fine
Arts and Design as a positive factor.
"They (NASA) are all very happy
about that he said.
The school also made some last
minute preparations for the evalua-
tion. For the first time in recent
years, the annual faculty exhibition
that opened Sunday in Grey Gallery
included work by students. There
has been more student artwork
displayed throughout the Jenkins
Fline Arts Building and a recent hec-
tic clean up has improved the
building's appearance.
Surveys Permit Students To
Voice Opinions On Instructors
By STEVE DEAR
Staff Writer
Students are once again getting a
chance to evaluate their teachers.
All this week "Student Opinion of
Instruction Surveys" are being con-
ducted in every undergraduate and
graduate class with more than five
students.
"This is the students' opportunity
to participate in matting their opi-
nions known. Their opinions are
valuable said Robert Ussery,
director of the Department Institu-
tional Research, the department
conducting the survey.
According to Ussery, the ECU
governance codes require all faculty
members to be evaluated.
The results from each class survey
will be given to the respective in-
structors and their departmental
chairpersons at the beginning of
next semester.
The surveys are not mandatory.
Even so, Ussery reports that last fall
90 percent of the students par-
ticipated. Referring to last year's
survey, Ussery saidThe students
very seriously and very reliably pro-
vided their honest and thoughtful
opinions
The surveys provide reliable in-
formation about the quality of the
classes to the instructors and depart-
ment heads. "On specific courses, if
the student responses indicated
great dissatisfaction with a textbook
or lab, for example, that might be
used in evaluations Ussery said.
"Each survey also acts as one fac-
tor among others in determining in-
structor's tenures, salaries, and pro-
motions Ussery added.
An estimate of the survey's cost
to ECU was not available.
However, Ussery said that surveys
of this type usually cost the school
between $15,000 and $20,000.
The two faculty members who
receive the best evaluations will
receive awards of $500 each. The
awards are paid for by the Depart-
ment of Alumni Reflations. Last
year's winners were Madge
McGreth, assistant professor of
medical technology, and Dr. David
Giles of special education.
Oh! I Forgot It Was Cold Out
MMto �r CNA ����-�Y
This prostrate ECU student doesn't know whether Its cold or not. I hope he will consnlt Ms local weatherman to
find out if he's got the right scoop or not. Oh well!
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 9,1982
f
Announcements
S
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcement column,
please type it on an announcement
form and send it to The East
Carolinian in care of the produc
tion manager.
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications Building.
Flyers and handwritten copy on
odd-sized paper cannot be ac-
cepted.
There is no charge tor an-
nouncements, but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce-
ment will run as long as you want
and suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column for publicity.
The deadline for announcements
is 3 p.m. Monday for the Tuesday
paper and 3 p.m. Wednesdayy for
the Thursday paper. No an-
nouncements received after these
deadlines will be printed.
This space is available to all
campus organizations and depart-
ments.
POSITION FOR
INDT MAJOR
There is an opening with Long
Manufacturing Co. tor a Quality
Control Supervisor. This perma-
nent position involves setting up
and maintaining a quality control
program in Rumania for tractors
manufactured for Long. The star-
ting date in immediately and the
salary is negotiable. Contact Nan-
cy Filinow in the Co-op office, ext.
6979, for more information.
BAPTIST CHURCH
There is a bus route for students
who wish to attend Sunday service
at Sycamore Hill Baptist Church.
The bus leaves the church and
goes into the campus from W. 5th
St. by Cotton, Fleming, and other
dorms at 10:40 am; swinging back
on 5th, going to main campus in
back of dorms and swinging by
Belk Dorm, it leaves and goes
across campus to dorms on South
Side (of campus) no later than
10:50 am, arriving at church at
11:00.
SAB MEETING
There will be a meeting of the
Student Athletic Board tonight,
Nov 9, 1982 at 7:00 pm, in Rm 247
of Mendenhall Student Center.
PHILOSOPHY CLUB
There will be a meeting of the
Philosophy Club Wed Nov. 10, at
7:00 pm. Jeff Whisnant will pre
sent views on the philosophy of
nature. All interested persons
please attend this meeting.
CO-OP
Part-time co-op training posi-
tions are available with Buehler
Mfg. Co. in Kinston. These train-
ing positions could lead to full-
time opportunities in Production
Supervision. Production Control
or Purchasing in the new Buehler
plant in Raleigh beginning June,
1983. All interested INDT majors
contact Nancy Filinow in the Co-
op office, ext. 6979.
GEOLOGY CLUB
The East Carolina Geology Club
would like to invite all interested
people to come hear Dr. Alan
Glazner from UNC-Chapel Hill
speak on "The Tertiary Volcanics
of the Southwest U.S He will
speak Friday, Nov. 12 at 2:00 in
Graham Bldg. Rm. 301.
SGA
The positions of White Dorm
Representatives and Graduate
Vice-President are presently un-
filled. If interested in filing for
either position, pick up an applica-
tion in the Mendenhall SGA office,
interviews will be held Wednes-
day. Nov. 10th at 7:00 pm.
SIGMA BROTHERS
Attention Sigma Big Brothers:
There will be an organizational
meeting Thrusday, Nov. 11 at 7:30
pm at the Sigma House.
HKSKAJU H tWI'KUS
Improve your (Tides! Ruth SI .00 for
(he currcai. 306 pate, research
catilof. 11.278 papers on Tile, all
academic subjects.
Rnterrk AaHHaau 11)21 Waho
Avc. 706 Los Aaartcs. CA 90025
(2I3I447-S226.
CADP
CADP will have a meeting
Tues Nov. 9 at 500 pm in the se-
cond floor conference room in Er-
win. Old and new members are in-
vited.
P.E. MAJORS
All P.E. majors and prospective
majors are invited to attend our
next Majors Club meeting Tues
Nov. 9 at 4:30 in Rm. 13 Minges.
Get involved and take pride in
your major. Members in atten-
dance last meeting were: Jill
Cobb, Karen Lewis, Keith Cannon,
Marc Scruggs, Lori Brann, Keene
Samuels, Reggie Fly the, David
Dean, Jeff Speight, Lee Goldberg,
Vickie Biagini, Robert Jones,
Stuart Briley, Wenday Taylor, Bil-
ly Simmons and April Maxem.
CO-OP FOR BUSINESS
MAJORS
There are positions available
with the General Accounting Of
fice as an Evaluation Trainee.
Students must have completed 75
hours and be available for two
work periods beginning in the Spr-
ing 1983 semester. Conversion to
permanent employment after
graduation would be likely. For
more information contact Carolyn
Powell at the Co-op office, ext.
6979.
CATHOLIC
NEWMAN CENTER
The Catholic Newman Center
would like to invite everyone to
join in with us for celebrating
Mass every Sunday in the Biology
Lecture Hall starting at 12:30 and
every Wednesday at 5:00 at the
Catholic Newman Center located
down at the bottom of College Hill.
BAPTIST STUDENT
UNION
HEY! Do you enjoy friendly
fellowship, good friends and food,
and a chance to be yourself in this
"rat race" environment at ECU?
Then come join us at the Baptist
Student Union where we have din-
ners on Tuesdays at 5:30 for only
S1.75-PAUSE on Thursdays at
7:00 to allow us to take a break
after an almost fulfilling week,
and lots of people just like you who
enjoy others. Call 752-4646 if you
have any questions. Bob Clyde -
campus minister.
FRESHMEN
REGISTER
Freshman Registers may be
picked up in the Buccaneer office
on Tuesdays and Thursdays from
2:00 p.m. till 5:00 p.m. The Buc-
caneer Office is located on the se-
cond floor of the Publications
Building. NOTE: All Freshmen
Registers must be picked up by
October 20. Remember you have
already paid for this publication,
so why let your money go to waste.
SPECIAL
EDUCATION
On Nov. 22, 1982 in room 129
Speight at 4:00 there will be a pro-
gram of much interest. As our
November program meeting
SCEC has invited Special Educa-
tion Directors from different
school systems to talk about their
system and job requirements.
Please attend. It will be to your ad
vantage.
CONCERT
On Nov. 30,1982 Student Council
for Exceptional Children will host
the Caswell Spirit Singers for a
Christmas concert. The concert
will begin at 3.30 p.m. In
Auditorium 244 Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. Everyone is invited
and welcome Come out and get
into the Christmas spirit early.
YOU CAN
HELP
50,000 people die every day from
starvation I If you would like to
find out how YOU CAN HELP stop
these tragedies from happening,
you ere invited to an End Hunger
Breifing to be held on Tuesday,
November 16. from 3 to 7 p.m. in
the Coffeehouse in Mendenhall.
For more information on this im-
portant please call Steve Dear at
752 8786 or Jennifer Baugham at
355-6855.
FRISBEE
Learn new disc skills, play
ultimate, or just come to the bot
torn of College Hill Tuesdays and
Thursdays at 4:00 to throw frisbee
and enjoy these remaining
beautiful, warm autumn days.
Club meetings are Mondays at
8:00 in MSC, room 248. 1982
Natural Light Flying Disc Classic
Video will be shown at the Attic on
Wed. Nov 10.
RESUME
The career Planning and Place-
ment Service in the Bloxton House
is offering the following one hour
sessions to help you prepare your
own resume. November 10-2:00
p.m. and November 11-2:00 p.m.
Those seniors or graduate
students finishing this year and
planning to register with us are
especially urged to attend. You
may come to the Bloxton House at
either of tne above times.
PRC MAJORS
Seymour Johnson Air Force
Base in Goldsboro, NC has an
alternating Coop position
available for Spring semester in
the ir recreation department. The
position reequires a 2.0 GPA and
you must be wilting to work for
two terms. It is an excellent opor-
tunity for anyone interested in
gaining valuable work experience
in the area of recreation. Salary:
approximately 81,000 per month
gross. Contact Nancy Filinow in
the Co-op office, 313 Rawl,
757-6979, if you would like to apply
or want more information.
SCHOLARSHIPS
The School of Art is offering ten
scholarships for undergraduate
art students of the junior and
senior rank. Eight scholarships
are in the amount of $250 each.
Two scholarships, established by
Don and Jack Edwards of the
University Book Exchange, are in
the amount of 8500 each. To
qualify, a student must have a
GPA of 3.5 in art, and an overall of
3.0. Slides of five works (name, ti
tie, media, and size) must accom-
pany the scholarship application
form. Application forms may be
obtained from the School of Art Of-
fice. The deadline for all com-
pleted application material is
November 30.
THE EARLY
YEARS
The members of the Historic
Sit and Museum Development
Class of the Department of History
cordially Invite you to view the ex-
hibit "East Carolina: The Early
Years, 1907-1934 The exhibit is
located in the main lobby of the
Spillman Building and can be
viewed from November 4-18. It
was created in celebration of the
75th Anniversary of the Institution.
PHI SIGMA
TAU
There will be a Philosophy Club
meeting on Wednesday,
November 10 at 7:00 p.m. in
BD 313 The topic of discussion
will be "The Heraclitean Doctrine
of Flux" which will be presented
by Jeff Whisnant.
CO-OP POSITION
The U.S. Naval Academy in An
napolls, MD has a position open
for a Co-op student to work as a
programmer analyst. The student
must have a computer cscience
background and should be a
junior, the work experience is
alternating for two periods, the
first beginning on January 3,1982.
For more info contact Carolyn
Powell in the Co-op office, ext.
6979. Rawl 313.
ACT
The American College Testing
(ACT) will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday,
December 11, 1982. Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to ACT Registration, P.O.
Box 414, lowa City, Iowa 52240. Ap-
plications may be obtained from
the ECU Testing Center, Speight
Building, Room 105
CO-OP
Black and Decker in Tarboro
has an opening for a part-time ac-
counting clerk. The person must
be able to perform miscellaneous
accounting duties such as paying
invoices and general bookkeep
ing. Preferred is someone who can
operate a 10-key adding machine.
Employment would start as soon
as possible. For more info, call the
Co-op office, ext. 6979.
RECIPES
Students, faculty and staff are
invited to submit their favorite
recipes to be compiled into a
cookbok of ECU'S favorite recipes.
Ten of the final entries will be
selected for the BAKE OFF,
which the date will be announced
later. The recipes will be judged
on I) originality 2)appearance and
3)taste. The grand prize will be
dinner for two at Darryl's
Restaurant. Submit your recipes
in designated boxes located at
Mendenhall, Student Supply Store
and selected Dormitories. For any
additional information call
758 3272 or 757 1920. Come on ECU
get involved.
CLASSIFIED ADS
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use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines. There are 33
units per line. Each letter, punc-
tuation mark and word space
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doesn't fit. No ads will be ac-
cepted over the phone. We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
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lower case letters.
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CAROLINIAN office) b 2 p.m. Monday before
Tuesday paper aad Wednesday before Thursday
publication.
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GRE
The Graduate Record Examina-
tion wiH be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday,
December 11, 1982. Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to Educational Testing
Service, Box 966 R, Princeton, NJ
08540. Applications may be obtain-
ed from the ECU Testing Center,
Room 105, Speight Building.
LADIES OF
ECU
You must know a good looking
guy, then you should send him to
the Buccaneer to fill out an ap-
plication.
PHI SIGMA
PI
Tau Chapter of Phi Sigma Pi's
National Honor Fraternity will
hold its monthly business meeting
on Wednesday, November 10 in 132
Austin. The meeting will im-
mediately follow the 5:00 p.m.
pledge meeting. All brothers are
urged to attend.
CO-OP
The Coop office has a job open
ing for an accounting position
avaible with a local manufactur-
ing firm. Requires adding
machine experience and accoun
ting background. Interested
students should inquire at the Co-
op office, located in Rawl at room
313.
PSICHI
Psi ew presents another in-
teresting and informative meeting
Nov. 10 at 7:30 p.m. in Room 129
Speight. Mr. Dick Daves will
discuss the many ways Biofeed
back is used in today's society and
give a better insight into this topic.
Come and find out how Biofeed
back can help you in everyday life.
SCHOLARSHIPS
Scholarships are available for
School of Business majors.
Students interested in making ap-
plication should secure forms
from the Financial Aid Office or
one of the following department of-
fices in the School of Business: Ac-
counting - R325, Decision Sciences
R238, Finance - R343; Manage
ment - R137, Marketing R233. All
applications must be submitted to
Ruth Jones (R334), Chairman of
School of Business Scholarhips
Committee by November 30, 1982.
Final selection will be made by the
ECU Student Scholarhips,
Fellowships, and Financial Aid
Committee upon recommendation
of the Dean of the School of
Business. The Dean's recommen-
dation will be made from can-
didates selected by the School of
Business Scholarship Committee.
The applicant must express an in-
terest in insurance on the applica-
tion and the permanent residence
of a candidate for this scholarship
must be in Eastern NC (East of
Highway 1-95) or any county west
of Highway 1-95 in which Pittard
and Perry, Inc maintains an of-
fice.
GREEKS
Marajen! November 10, 8:00
p.m. in Jenkins Auditorium.
FREE BEER
Don't miss ECU'S last pep rally.
Attend the William Mary vs ECU
pep rally at Sportsworld, behind
Fosdicks Seafood Thursday night
Nov. 11 7:30-10:00 and receive a
tree beer at the Elbo later on that
night. There will be a bus pick-up
in front of Belk Dorm at 7:00. Join
ECU cheerleaders tor competi-
tions, prizes and 'Heaven on
Wheels' this Thursday at 7:30
CANOE TRIP
The outdoor recreation center
operated by the Dept. of
Intramural-Recreational services
is sponsoring a morning canoe trip
on Sat Nov. 13. The trip is
suitable for beginning or advanced
canoers. Trip participants will
meet behind Memorial Gym at
9:00 am on the 13th. The trip wil be
a leisurely paddle down the Tar
River lasting approximately 2
hours. Participants should arrive
back at Memorial Gym by 12 30
pm. Advance registration and
payment is due by 4:00 pm on
Thursday, Nov. 11. For registra
tion and more info please call or
stop by Rm. 183 in Memorial Gym
(757-6911).
PHI KAPPA PHI
"Toward the New Millennium:
Challenges and Dreams will be
the theme of the eighth annual
ECU-Phi Kappa Phi symposium to
be held on campus in early
February, of 83. A call for both
faculty and student papers suppor
ting this theme, which deals with
the future, has been issued, in an
ticipafion of the new millennium,
papers are invited to deal with a
wide range of topics ranging from
discussions of the near future will
or may hold. Faculty are invited,
at this time, to submit abstracts of
approximately one page with a .
deadline for submission of
November 15. Papers selected win
be announced by November 24.
Student papers directed toward
the same theme are invited, two of
which will be selected for a award
of $100 each. The best student
paper submitted will be included
in the symposium program. Both
faculty and student papers are to
be submitted to Dr. J W. Byrd.
Department of Physics.
HUNGER COALITION
The Oxfam America "Fast for a
World Harvest" is next week! if
you would like to participate you
are asked to go without eating on
Thursday, Nov. 18, and donate
your money to Oxfam American to
support self help development pro
jects in the poorest areas of
Africa, Asia and Latin American.
Look for the table in front of the
Supply Store and the Boom in
Mendenhall on the 17th and 18th.
For more info call 752 4216.
Together we can make the world a
better place to live.
PEACE COMMITTEE
Our world spends 1 million a
minute on military spending we
now have 60,000 nuclear weapons
on our planet. Does this outrage
you? Then join the activities of
The Greenville Peace Committee
We meet Friday night at 6:30 pm
at 610 So. Elm St. For more into
call 758 4906.
SMITHSONIAN
The Smithsonian institution is
offering 10 week graduate
research appointments in a varie
ty of areas. The graduate students
will conduct individual research
under staff's supervision. The sti-
pend for these fellowships is $2000
All interested graduate students
should contact hte Co op office, 313
Raw' ex� 6979
FRISBEE
1982 Natural Light Flying Disc
Classic Video will oe shown at the
Attic on Wed. Nov. 10. Free
beverage tor those wearing tour
nament shirts. Play ultimate at
the bottom of the hill on Tues. and
Thurs. at 4:00 the team is gen ing
hot and an ultimate tournament is
planned for a future date
The East Carolinian
Serving the campus community
since 1925
Published every Tuesday ana
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ing the summer.
The East Carolinian is the of
ticial newspaper of Eas'
Carolina university, owned
operated, and published for ana
by the students of East Carolina
University.
Subscription Rate: $20yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the OM South
Building on the campus of ECU.
Greenville, NC
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carolinian.
Old South Building, ECU Green
ville, NC 27834
Telephone: 7S7-4344. 437, 4309
B KEITH
Maff
Russia
using chemj
in 1967
"Yellov.
Nu
B PATRH
Nineteen
arrested Si
ing a d�
opposing
tions surri
launching
States'
nuclear
�1
MEN OF ECU
Do not be left out of the upcom
ing "Men of ECU" calendar
Come by the Buccaneer office By
5:00 pm. Friday, Nov 17 and pick
up your application All photos w.n
be taken on Sun , Nov 14 oetwee"
12:00 and 4:30 Call 757 6501 tor
more information
FACILITIES
CLOSED
Memorial Gymnasium facilities
including the pool, equipmen
check out room, weight room anc
gymnasium will close at 6.00 pm
on wed , Nov. 24th Minges Cci
eseum weight room ano swimm
mg pool will not ooen on Wed .
Nov. 24th. All facilities win
resume normal operations on
Mon . Nov 29th
s3.0(
s2.00
fl
WOMl
CAREI
DEPEr
rfts a
� : '
-I
3SSUKM
s evict1
"��Q " 1
SKI FLASH
Snowski registration for
Christmas Break Trip will be Nov
9 at 4:00 PM in Memorial Gym 108.
A $5 deposit will be accepted to
reserve your space. Call Jo
Saunders at 757-6000 if you need
more information.
Gl Camouflaged Fatigues and
T Shirts, Sleeping Bags,
Backpacks, Camping Equip
ment. Steel Toed Shoes, Dtslte
and Over 788 Different New and
Used Items. Cowboy
ARMY-NAVY
STORE "��
J. A. UNIFORMS
SHOPS
Bring this ad for
10 OFF
on the purchase of
one of our lab coats!
All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes, shoes,
and hose. Also � used ECU nurses
uniforms. Trade-ins allowed.
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive.
Near Hollowell's Drug and old hospital.
beI beef buy i
in greenville! i
22 ounce draft 85$, refill 50$; keep the cup. �
Wednesday night is college night at the Sandwich Game
After your first beer at regular price, each 22 ounce Sandwich "
Game Cup of draft is only 50c. Get your friends and come to
the Sandwich Game�the best beer buy, cheapest games, �
and finest sandwiches in town. ft
264 Bypass Behind Ramada Inn
South Park Shopning Center �Greenville
John's Flowers & Gifts
Pitt Plaza Shopping Center
SALE 25 OFF
on all gifts, plants and
dried silk arrangements
Buy now and
SA VEfor Christmas
Cash & Carry Only
Pitt Plaza Store Only
GOLF SPECIAL
Indian Trails
Country Club
Fairway Dr Griffon N.C.
Please be our guest for
18 holes of golf for only
$6.00 for cart &
green fees
Open MonFri.
8 a.m5 p.m.
524-S48S
DAILY SPECIALS AT
uBiU?)
Famous Foot Long Sandwichos
Ainu SHAK BMT (HAM, PEPPERONI, GENOA, BOLOGNA) & CHIPS
MON- AND A SMALL SODA FOR $2.09
TUES SNAK ROAST BEEP, BAG OP CHIPS, AND A SMALL SODA
1UB' POR $2.09
WEB SNAK MEATBALL, BAG OF CHIPS, AND A SMALL SODA POR
THURS. SNAK H.4J, BAG OF CHIPS AND A SU SODA FOR $1.89
cBi SNAK ALASKAN KING CRAB, BAG OF CHIPS, AND A SMALL
rKK SODA FOR $2.39
SPECIALS RUN FROM 11 AM. UNTIL 2 P.M. DAILY.
MUSIC TELEVISION EXPLOSION
PRESENTED BY RECORD BAR Cr ROCK 93
� ENTRY BLANK
QUESTIONS
1) Which Record Cham ha the most complete line of records tapes &
accessories1
2a) Which FM Radio Station plays your favorite music 24 hours a day7
2b) Which cable TV channel will be ptaymg your favorite muse m stereo
starting Nov. 14
3) In when Record Stow can you register to win a wild 93 second cassette
PRIZES:
Grand Pnze-93 second cassette run
OTHER PRIZES:
4 MTV Tour jackets. 10 MTV tote bags
100 MTV T-shirts. 10 MTV sweat-
shirts. 4 MTV baseball shirts
DRAWING: Friday Nov. 19. 1982 onW!TN.
Cassette Run: Sat Nov. 20. 1982 at 2 00 P
at the Record Bar
MTV is brought to you by: Tar Rwer Cable TV. Cable TV of GreenWte. New Bern
NAME.
ADDRESS.
Washington. Kmsson t Onton
TtLt�
Quarterilash Simulcast on MTV and Rock 93 Nov. 20. 1982






Chemical Warfare
KHIil
1N


Phillips, a policy Yellow Rain use by the Soviet us rh
analyst tor the Heritage Soviets, rhe people ol weapon. low "pn
tndation, has work Laos, Kampuchea It was stated that the w urned
doseh with State (formerly Cambodia) term "Yellow Rain" Ii
men! officials in and Afghanistan have came from the Hm � I �rered b
reports on
been the targets ot tribesmen in 1 a
pei
1 ti
)S, A
cited

i i
uclear Sub Christened; Group Protests
n t
on those arrested were da rhe oth - -
h the I s charged with disorderly told to app i
�nducl and all but one on
� e released Protest
One person, who eluded people ti
refused to give tier many states, oppose the
name, was still being Indent because ol the
teed
needed ���
ent ol
� ' tarfa i
.pur" I
� �
h, ii is no
I �
he com-
leld at Niantic Prison
Indent under the name lane I
Doc, pending hei court targets
appearance on Mon- powei
W at kins
Mac Ma
COUPON
AKORIIONs
MatJe 7 i
COUPON
�� 4& 4P :i���
&
GIANT PIZZA
ARGEPIZZ
,ii, ����??��
HEALTH PROFESSIONS
SCHOLARSHIPS
!f you're planning a career in
medicine you owe it to yourself to
find out about the Air Force's
Health Professions Scholarship Pro-
gram.
Qualified U.S. Citizens can
receive scholarships for medical or
osteopathic school.
Our scholarships include:
Tuition
Require Books
Required Lab Fees
Required Equipment Rental
and Mort Than $550 Monthly Stipend
Ifso
CHAMPAGNE JAM
LADIES!
'The Four Seasons

a
ME FLEMING
CENTER
k
AIM HIGH
f ATTENTION
� BSN CLASS OF
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� I
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sS
AIM HJvri
i
5

I
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I
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AH Polo &
Lacoste Frames
50 off
with purchase ot
prescription lens.
s
e
4
1
i
k
oupon musf
npan y o r d� r
I
pucians
31 S Par Vie Commons
Across from Doctors Park
Open �a m til 5 JO p m
Monday thru f "day
VISA
I
m
Stan
752 1446
luamananai
i
invites you ladies to
have all the "bubbly'
you can drink FREE
between 10-11 p.m.
Beginning Thursday, Nov. 11
Don't miss tbe "TOAST"
at 10:00
- . - . � � �
"The Four Seasons"
Restaurant & Lounge
301 Evans St. Mall
(Corner of 3rd St. a Evans
in basement of Minges Bldg.)
752-5476
SAV-A-TON
$009
ELF SERVICE
612 West Greenville Blvd.
Busch Beer
six pk.
Cigs
60C pk
Milk
$209
Anti-Freeze
gal.
OPEN 24 HRS.
1- i
FAMOUS PIZZA
v' Fast. Friendly Deliver
v
758-5982 or 5616
All Small
SUBS
$
1.99
NOT FOR DEI IN ER
Happi Hour 2 Close
1.99 Pitcher
45C Mug





2tfte Eaat (Earnltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, craiMm
Mike Hughes, ManamE.nior
If
WAVERLY MERRITT, BtaMW l m�
Robert Rucks, mm mw
Ali Afrashteh, rrn
Stephanie Groon, r n.rn mw
JONI GUTHRIE, Teilwual Supenisor
Cindy Pleasants, sports Editor
Greg Rideout, jmw
Steve Bachner, jam in�war
Juliana Fahrbach, 99 ���-
MlKE DAVIS, Production Manatter
College Press Service
November 9, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Noise Ordinance
Kagwe Proposal Still In Question
ITrtULD BE �vGtfItiS&
INSULT TD the; iKroueEio.
OFTKEAMERCrHPBDPLE
r3RAPREiH:HTTDENY
AWRERfl5�LWIcRcu?
eft
Yd) HWEtW
rCPNUJRSEtF,
Unlike its theoretical benefits,
Greenville's newly-proposed city or-
dinance, which calls for the imposi-
tion of "enforceable' noise limita-
tions on city events, may just be yet
another exercise in futility.
Despite the fact that the proposal
has not yet been finalized, its pre-
sent form calls for decibel limita-
tions to be placed on "any activities
where noise is a factor And
although limits would be variable
(inasmuch as time, location and
other factors), at no time could the
noise exceed 70 decibels � the
average noise level of a
"heavy-traffic" situation �
without a permit.
Naturally then, said permits
would be made readily available to
residents and students at a cost of $5
to $25, depending on this, that and
the other (several factors, many of
which border on the insane).
The purpose, in theory, of the or-
dinance is to provide city officials
with some absohite means of
deteriming legal and illegal noise.
With this in mind, however, it
would be interesting to discover just
how those officials plan to enforce
such a seemingly-vague law.
Will student social "functions"
now be subjected to uninvited
guests, crashing selected get-
togethers around the campus area
with an array of cords, meters and
assorted citations?
Will the city furnish the university
with a list of proverbial "Dos and
Don'ts" (perhaps a few examples or
some rough estimate of what con-
stitutes a noise level exceeding 70
decibels), or will students be ex-
pected to purchase their own party-
meters?
At this point, perhaps a few ex-
amples will suffice:
The noise rating for an
"average" library is 40 decibels. A
quiet office generally puts out 50
decibels; normal conversation, 60
decibels. Heavy trucks put out
about 90 decibels, 20 more than the
ordinance allows. So, provided no
one accidentally flips on his hair
dri?r, and no one's alarm goes off
during a party, everything should be
okay.
To the ordinance's credit,
however, it should be noted that
Pirate fans will still be allowed to
cheer at home sporting events. Also,
emergency vehicles will still retain
the right to use sirens; residents can
leave their sickles in the garage and
continue to cut their lawns with gas-
powered mowers, and airplanes fly-
ing over Greenville skies will
likewise be exempt (provided there
are no parties onboard).
But it is also necessary to
remember that ECU already has its
own permit clause governing the
noise levels on campus, a clause
which thus far has worked efficient-
ly.
With these considerations in
mind, determining the relative
benefits of the proposed ordinance
has, hopefully, been made
somewhat simpler.
'Real-Life' Drama An Endangered Species
Today's Television
I guess if 1 had to choose the one thing I
most like doing (excluding, of course, sing-
alongs with Boxcar Willie or hacking away
at the neighbors' trees with my amazing
Ginsu), it'd have to be watching television.
Hardly a day goes by that I don't relax in
front of the tube with a luke-warm Bud
and watch all my favorite stars.
But unlike some "others who 1 won't
mention (mainly because I don't know
who the hell they are), my love for TV
hasn't blinded me from realizing the
serious limitations and faults of today's
producers and directors. The problem is,
television nowadays just isn't real.
Take my favorite show, The Love Boat,
for instance. Now, as much as I love to
watch the hilarious antics of all the terrific
actors on that program each week, I can't
help but wonder who the producers think
they're fooling. I mean, just stop and con-
sider it for a minute: When was the last
time you saw Isaac, the "trusty"
bartender, steal a few bucks from
Gopher's "mad-money" drawer to sup-
port his $300-a-day heroin addiction?
And when was the last time Doc, the
bespectacled "stud" physician, performed
unnecessary surgery on some unsuspecting
Montezuma's Revenge victim?
And how many times have you seen
Julie, the bed-hopping cruise director, cry-
ing over the results of a positive Herpes
test?
How often does Vicky, the Captain's
prepubescent, illegitimate daughter, get a
zit?
Not too often, I'll bet.
But it isn't just today's television, either.
How about Leave it to Beaver, another TV
classic? When was the last time you saw
Eddie Haskell smuggle a joint upstairs past
a naive June Cleaver and turn on Wally
and the Beave?
And what about Ozzie and Harriet, a
couple who have two kids but who've slept
in separate rooms ever since they were
married?
You know what? Just once, I'd like to
see someone urinate on Tatoo or tell Mr.
Roarke to "enunciate
Just once, I'd like to see Gopher thrown
in some low-life Mexican jail for dealing
drugs to the little Puerto Vallarta locals.
Just once, I'd like the Captain to steer
the love boat off course and hit an iceberg.
Just once, I'd like the Beaver to bring
home one of Larry Mondello's father's
Playboy magazines and ask his mother to
elaborate.
Just once, I'd like to see a love triangle
with Doc, Isaac and Gopher.
�And just once, I'd like to hear Ward
Quaver say to his moroni� g�gia&
inquisitive wife, "Dammit, June, snut up.
can't you see I'm watching a football
game?"
Just once.
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes is a
plumber's helper from Flush Twice, S.C
where he also plays the auioharp in a local
rock band. Recent East Carolinian surveys
have revealed that he is a helluva nice guy.
U.S. Urbanites Getting The Pentagon Shaft
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
mr�K�n Journal
If you live in an urban metropolitan
area, as three out of four Americans do,
you are probably being hurt directly by
runaway Pentagon spending. According to
a new economic report, 176 of the 266
metropolitan areas in the United States pay
more in tax dollars destined for the
military than they get back in Pentagon
spending in their areas.
"The federal government says a study
by Employment Research Associates of
Lansing, Mich "acts as a giant syphon,
draining tax money out of 176
metropolitan areas into those which have
large military bases or very high military
contracts Hardest hit, according to a
study titled Bankrupting American Cities,
are municipalities in the industrialized
Northeast and Midwest. New York City is
expected to pay $9 billion more in military
taxes than it will get back in fiscal year
1983. Detroit will lose a cool $3 billion.
Most of the one-third of American cities
that gain more than they lose are in the
South or West. Albuquerque, Denver and
St. Loius, among others, benefit from con-
centrated military spending. Even so, ac-
cording to the ERA study, the gains are
smaller than they seem, since the Pentagon
largesse goes directly only to "a relatively
narrow group of military contracters and
employees Benefits to the communities
at large are ambiguous, argues Dr. James
Anderson, the report's author.
Not so the losses for cities whose dollars
are chewed up by the military maw. There
is that much less to spend on building and
maintaining roads, bridges, parks, schools
and libraries. The products of defense
spending � bombs, bullets, tanks � don't
re-enter the economy as consumer goods,
either. They benefit the average American
only in abstract � as ultra-expensive tools
with which to defend our "national securi-
ty
"The simplest conclusion which one
may draw about this military budget
writes Anderson, "is that at a time of an
acute and growing capital shortage in the
U.S and at a time of declining U.S. pro-
ductivity, more than $200 billion � about
$600 million per day � of U.S. capital
resources will be expended for unproduc-
tive and destructive purposes in the name
of national security
In the meanime, 2,000 miles of the still-
uncompleted interstate highway system
crumble each year for lack of proper
maintenance; nearly half of the bridges in
the U.S. need shoring up, and public
transportation systems are screeching to a
halt. All this while the automobile, con-
struction and steel industries suffer their
worst reversals since the Great Depression.
It is precisely those industries, of course,
which are concentrated in cities hit hardest
by the loss of tax dollars to the brass hats.
And it is those cities in which a
disproportionate share of poor Americans
live � both the underclass that has long
festered in city and countryside alike and
the New Poor of the Reagan era. Accor-
ding to the Census Bureau, more than two
million Americans fell below the poverty
line in 1981. Eight hundred thousand of
them were children.
For the New Poor, life is hard and get-
ting harder. Social services that could have
helped them survive have already been
sacrificed to the greater glory of the
military budget. President Reagan has not
cut federal spending � as he claimed he
would do � merely shifted spending from
human needs to the Pentagon. Military
spending is the only major part of the
budget that has grown in real terms �
beyond inflation � since Reagan and his
supply-side sidekicks took office.
"The conclusion writes Anderson in
Bankrupting the Cities, "is inescapable:
Accelerated military spending will result in
the impoverishment of major sectors of
American society and worsening budget
problems for most metropolitan areas
Sustained high military budgets will make
the U.S. a poorer, weaker and more divid-
ed nation
r Campus Forum
Student's Temporal Remembrances Off Base
Last week, a letter was written to this
column by James Aleo about an incident
that occurred on the ECU intramural field
last Monday night (11-1). He seemed very
dissatisfied with the promptness of the ser-
vice that was given to an injured player by
the Greenville Rescue Squad and the ECU
security department. Being the senior of-
ficial in charge that night, I would like to
correct a few statemets that were made by
Mr. Aleo:
� Aleo stated that the campus police "saw
fit to send a policeman to the scene; this
took nearly IS minutes I called the
security department via the "blue light
system" from Minges Coliseum at 9:49
p.m. It took me less than two minutes to
run back to the intramural field, which is
only about 200 yards away. When I arrived
back at the field, a security patrolman was
at the location. I feel that two minutes is a
very good response time.
� Aleo also stated that it took the rescue
squad 10 minutes to arrive at the scene.
The rescue squad was called at 9:52 and ar-
rived at the intramural field at 9:58. That's
six minutes response time. Not bad for a
rescue squad that has to drive through
downtown traffic and five stoplights!
� From the time I called the campus securi-
ty (9:49) to the time the rescue squad
departed with the injured party (10:03), a
period of 14 minutes had elapsed. Mr.
Aleo stated that it was at least 25 minutes.
� Mr. Aleo's suggestion that a confidential
code be given the intramural department
for use in emergency situations may be
good in theory, but how long will that code
stay confidential when it must be known
by virtually all staff, work-study students,
self-help students, athletic trainers and
security personnel employed by the in-
tramural department? All employees
would have to know the number, and they
change every semester.
I would like to thank the ECU security
department for their prompt actions that
night: first, as an intramural employee,
and second, as a student of this university.
I would also like to extend my appreciation
to the Greenville Rescue Squad for their
quick response that night and continued
support of the university. As an employee
and as a student, I feel that all parties in-
volved in the situation acted promptly and
correctly and I hope that if 1 am ever in
the shoes of the injured soccer player, I am
acted on in the same prompt manner.
Duane Grooms
GradPhys. Ed.
Baha'i Clarified
The Baha'i Association of ECU, and the
larger Greenville Baha'i Community, wish
to thank The East Carolinian for the
publicity we have recently received through
you.
Members of the association felt that a
few points in your most recent story (Oct.
14) needed to be clarified, though. It was
mentioned that Bill Jurney's parents are
Baha'is, and that "he has been one all his
life Unlike the children of the followers
of other religions, a child born to Baha'i
parents is not automatically a Baha'i. As
the story mentioned, "Baha'u'llah
established 15 as the age of maturity
What this means is that Baha'i parents are
to give their children a broad, spiritual
education, exposing them to the existence
and teachings of all the major prophets of
God.
Should the child desire to join the Baha'i
community, heshe has the opportunity to
do so once heshe reaches the age of 15.
This broad based religious training which
they receive enables children of Baha'is to
more deeply appreciate the value and truth
inherent in all the world's religions.
It is not possible to be a Baha'i and re-
ject Christ, or any of God's other
messengers. Nor is it possible to be a
Baha'i without first studying the faith and
being familiar with other belief systems,
then making an informed decision. This is
the principle of "independent investigation
of truth which Baha'is regard as essen-
tial to spiritual maturity.
Also, the decision to become a Baha'i
does not end the process of "independent
investigation" of other religions.
Baha'u'llah taught that Baha'is should
associate "with the people of religions with
joy and fragrance so we welcome
dialogue and cooperative ventures with
other religions. We extend our invitation
to students of other religious beliefs, as
well as any other interested individuals, to
come ot our meetings. We will meet at 5
pm. in room 212 Mendenhall on Wed
Nov. 17; and Wed Dec. 1, for our final
general meeting of the semester. The board
meets during alternate weeks.
We also welcome invitations from other
groups and classes on campus to attend
their meetings and discuss the Baha'i
teachings more broadly.
Again, thank you for your extensive and
accurate story.
For the Baha'i Association,
Karen S. Tarlo
Grad. Student, Nursing
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing ali points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
Pu
B MIKE
On Tut
noon, Nover
"Ending Hui
ing" will be I
in the coft(
Mendenhal
Center.
According
Corley, h
conductini
meeting, "Tl
gives the u
on world hi
Lod
Sho
Continued H
Id get bac
see mv wih
! "
Futrell
assailants.
allet,
members of
of cult. r�
didn't see
their men-
overlooked
talkie in
i
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T





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBERS 1982
ihey were
I'd like to
r tell Mr.
mer thrown
for dealing
trta locals.
tain to steer
an iceberg.
,er to bring
lo's father's
Is mother to
fove triangle
near ard
eternaUj-
ne. shut up;
a football
txhes is a
mice, v.C
rp in a local
'an surveys
n a nice auv.
igan and his
tice.
lAnderson in
inescapable:
will result in
sectors of
tiling budget
tan areas
:ts will make
more divid-
jdependent
Ireligions.
'is should
igions with
welcome
Itures with
invitation
Ibeliefs, as
iduals, to
meet at 5
on Wed
ir our final
The board
from other
to attend
Ihe Baha'i
tensive and
Issociation,
rn S. Tarlo
n. Nursing
les tellers
Mail or
id South
ibrarv.
Public Invited To Hunger Briefing
By MIKE HAMER
Staff Writer
On Tuesday after-
noon, November 16, an
"Ending Hunger Brief-
ing" will be presented
in the coffee-house at
Mendenhall Student
Center.
According to Marty
Corley, who will be
conducting the
meeting, "The briefing
gives the information
on world hunger that
has taken other people
an incredible amount
of time to put together.
"People who are too
busy to get all the facts
on hunger can come to
the briefing and be
brought up to date on
the current information
on world hunger
Corley said.
According to Ms.
Jennifer Baughn, a
local Hunger Project
coordinator who par-
ticipated in a briefing in
September, "The brief-
ing comes from the
viewpoint that hunger
can be stopped and
everyone can do a little
something about it.
"The briefing gives
people a sense of their
own power to make a
difference in the
world
The briefing will run
from 3:00 to 7:00 p.m.
and, according to
Local Officer Abducted;
Shot On Town Common
Baughn, "It's impor-
tant to make the com-
mitment to stay for the
entire session because
the briefing builds
upon itself. The last
half hour is the most
important part because
this is where people can
make their own per-
sonal commitment as to
what they can do to and
world hunger
On Thrusday, Nov.
18, the ECU Hunger
Coalition is sponsoring
this year's "Fast for a
World Harvest The
Hunger Coalition is
asking persons to go
without eating for one
day, or to skip one
meal, and donate their
food money to Oxfam
America to support
"self-help development
projects" in the poorest
areas of Asia, Africa
and Latin America.
Other events relating
to World Hunger will
be conducted during
the week of Nov. 15-19.
Anyone wanting
more information on
the fast can call
752-4216. Persons in-
terested in the Ending
Hunger Briefing should
call 355-6855.
How to follow Fellini.
Continued From Page 1
I'd get back home to
see my wife and fami-
ly
Futrell thinks the
assailants, who took his
wallet, might be
members of some kind
of cult, but that he
didn't see robbery as
their motive since they
overlooked a walkie-
talkie in his coat
pocket, which he used
to summon help after
the shooting. Futrell's
wallet and service
revolver were both
recovered near the
scene fo the crime.
Futrell, who has been
with the Greenvelle
Police since February,
said that the men were
very clam and didn't
appear to be under the
influence of drugs or
alcohol. They also vow-
ed to kill a policeman
the next time. The
twenty-five-year old of-
fice is the first
policeman to be shot in
Greenville since the
1950's.
Detective Whitaker
said the incident would
probably serve as a
motivation to other of-
ficers to be more alert-
� �
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Come To the ATTIC
WED. NOV. 10th
And get your Buddy In FREE. Then when you
get inside go to the Qltt Shop tor a FREE Qlft
You guessed It and receive a discount. Then
prepare yourself and your Buddy tor some of
the best 60's music In the South.
THURS NOV. 11th
INCONCERT
R.C.A. Recording Artist
flanycke.
WSTREET TALK
FRI. & SAT. - SUBWAY
Talk it over, over a cup of Orange Cappuccino. Creamy-rich, with
an orange twist, it's a little bit of la dolce into. And it's just one of six deliriously
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from General Foods
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AS MUCH A FEELING AS A FLAVOR
t 1962 Gene-al Fooos Corporation
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vou your choice of a comparable
item when available reflecting the
same savings or a ramchech wh.ch
�iii entitle you to purchase the
advertised item at the advertised
once withm 30 days
Items and Prices
Effective Wed Nov. 10.
thru Sat Nov 13. 1982
Copygnt 1982
Kroger Sav on
Quantity Rignts Reserved
None Soid o Dealers

&,
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J
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Begin At Kroger!
T.
K�

8:00 p.m.
Nov. 10, 1982
Jenkins Auditorium
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Y
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
NOVEMBERS 1982 Page 6
Ballet Theatre
Is Opening For
'8283 Series
A scene from American Ballet Theatre II production One in Five. The company is coming to campus Thursday, Nov. 18.
The East Carolina University
Unions Theatre Arts Series is proud
to begin its 1982-1983 season with
the world acclaimed American
Ballet Theatre II. The performance
is scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 18
at 8 p.m. in McGinnis Theatre.
American Ballet Theatre II,
originally Ballet Repertory Com-
pany, is a showcase for talented,
young dancers as a part of the
American Ballet Theatre's commit-
ment to bringing dance to a greater
number of locations. Mikhail
Baryshnikov, Artistic Director of
American Ballet Theatre, describes
American Ballet Theatre II "as
transforming talents of excellent
potential into performing artists
Perform they do. Critics world-
wide have praised the companies
astonishing versatility and extremely
consistent high quality perfor-
mances. Their program might in-
- elude a 19th century romantic
ballet, a classical pas de deux, a
modern dance work, and a contem-
porary ballet newly choreographed
specifically for the company. Since
it is a small company (8 women, 7
men), each member must be of
soloist caliber. American Ballet
Theatre II "alumni" comprise one-
third of American Ballet Theatre.
Others have gone on to dance with
the Joffrey Ballet, the National
Ballet of Canada, the New York Ci-
ty Ballet, and the Alvin Ailey
American Dance Comapny. No
wonder Clive Barnes has called it,
"The finest small classical company
in the United States
Tickets are on sale at the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. Tickets are $4 for ECU
students presenting their ECU ac-
tivity card and student ID. Faculty,
staff and public tickets are $8.
Those age 14 and under have
specially priced tickets at $5. All
tickets at the door will be $8.
For additional information con-
tact the Central Ticket Office at
757-6611, ext. 266. The hours of the
Central Ticket Office are Monday-
Friday 10a.m. to 4p.m.
Tickets are also on sale for Julius
Baker, well-known flutist.
'Sophisticated Ladies' Another Video Venture
By MIKE HAMER
Staff Writer
When I was fourteen years old, I talked two
classmates of mine into hitchhiking five miles up to the
Elks Club in Derby, Vermont, to hear the legendary
Duke Ellington and his orchestra. This was in 'he days
when the band was performing close to 300 dates a year,
and most of the players had passed middle age a while
back. Not too many people showed up, there may have
been more folks across the road at the Derby Port
Drive-In Theatre, but my friends and I knew that we
were listening to the best live music we'd ever heard.
Duke Ellington was a superb showman, even on such a
slow night, and the band was tight, as only a band that
played so much together could be tight. Even though 1
ended up walking five miles back to home and a wor-
ried, irate mother. That was an evening I'll never forget.
And so I was intrigued when I saw posters around cam-
pus advertising Sophisticated Ladies, a Broadway
tribute to Duke Ellington.
The show came to newly renovated Wright
Auditorium this past Friday evening, live from the
LaFontaine Theatre on Broadway. With its slick pro-
motion, and with the music of the great Duke Ellington,
the show had tremendous potential, which it did not en-
tirely fullfiil in this video broadcast.
The first half hour to forty-five minutes of the show
were spent in telling the audience how happy the pro-
ducers were to be doing a show revolving around Duke
Ellington. The viewer was told that this was a story
about a band. When the show did get underway,
however, it became obvious that this was a current
Broadway review,(is that the right word) and the band
was very much in the background.
This is not to say that the performances were not ex-
cellent. The singing and dancing of Paula Kelly, Hinton
Battle, Phyllis Hyman, Gregg Burge, Terri Klausner,
Calvin McRae, Leeta Galway and Lorraine Fields were
all of top quality and very stimulating. A couple of the
dance duets featuring Hinton Battle and Gregg Burge
were among the best that I have ever seen. Paula Kelly,
Phyllis Hyman and Terri Klausner gave vocal perfor-
mances that were professional.
The sound quality of the video improved as the show
developed. During the interviews at the beginning of the
show the sound was very bassy (boomy), and in the first
half of the show, some of the vocals were lost in the
mix. But these problems seemed to have been taken care
of after the intermission.
According to John Zieman of Campus Entertainment
Network, the video presentation comes in somewhere
between film and a live performance. Many people left
at the intermission. I don't know if they had expected
something different or if they were not satisfied with the
quality. For my part, the show did not compare with the
live performance of the Duke Ellington Orchestra under
the direction of Mercer Ellington in Hendrix Theatre a
few years ago. As a supplement to normal concert pro-
gramming, I think the video concerts are a good idea,
but I feel that tftket prices need to be dowrVfftere with
the movie prices and not up there with the concert
prices. The show was definitely not worth the originally
quoted price of $12 for a general admission ticket, een
though it was reported that Showtime viewers had to
pay up to $15 for a hookup for the play.
It was interesting that viewers were not exactly sure of
how to react to the show. Does one applaud the TV?
The Ninth Returns
Classic Performed For 75th Year
The first Greenville performance
of Beethoven's beloved Ninth Sym-
phony was November 11, 1973.
Now, nine years later, it will be
heard again in honor of the 75th
Anniversary of ECU.
On Sunday, November 14, at 3:15
p.m the East Carolina Symphony
Orchestra, combined choruses of
the ECU School of Music, the
Greenville Choral Society, and four
young professional soloists will join
forces to present Beethoven's Ninth
in Wright Auditorium on the ECU
campus.
The outstanding quartet of
singers engaged for this perfor-
mance includes Jane Williams,
soprano, and Gary Glaze, tenor, of
New York City; ECU alumnus Jane
Murray Dillard, mezzo-soprano, of
Charlotte; and Joseph M. Pate,
bass, of Philadelphia.
The combined forces, under con-
ductor Robert Hause, will number
almost 300 people and will include
music alumni returning to par-
ticipate in this special event.
According to Hause,
"Performances of this symphonic
masterwork are rare except in major
urban areas. East Carolina Univer-
sity is fortunate to have the quality
and quantity of performers needed
to produce this great masterpiece
The "Choral Symphony" con-
lcudes with a monumental move-
ment which combines the soloists,
chorus and symphony orchestra
proclaiming two of Beethoven's
ethical ideals: the universal
brotherhood of man through joy
and its basis in the love of an eternal
heavenly Father.
Tickets are $3 for adults, $2 for
students and senior citizens, and will
be available at the door or in ad-
vance from the ECU Central Ticket
Office, Mendenhall Student Center
(757-6611) between the hours of
10a.m. and 4p.m.
Gary Glaze has received interna-
tional acclaim for his tenor opera
roles with the New York City
Opera, the Netherlands Opera, the
Prague National Opera, and the
Teatro Colon in Buenos Aires. He
has appeared with the opera com-
panies of Sante Fe, Philadelphia,
San Antonio, Hawaii, Milwaukee,
Pittsburgh, and Colorado. Recent-
ly, he sang tne tenor roles in Ravel's
. 'enfant et les Sortileges in a Balan-
chine production premiering on
NET in the fall of 1981. In concert,
Glaze has sung as guest artist with
symphony orchestras in several ma-
jor American cities. In New York he
has been featured at Avery Fisher
Hall with the Little Orchestra Socie-
ty and Mostly Mozart Festival, at
Tully Hall with Calrion Concerts, at
Caramoor Festival and with Musica
Aeterna at the Metropolitan
Museum.He has also sung at
Carnegie Hall under the direction of
Richard Westenburg. Born in Pitt-
sburgh, Glaze earned his master's
degree at the University of
Michigan. He is a recipient of grants
from the Martha Baird Rockefeller
Foundation, Sullivan Foundation,
Corbett Foundation and The
Kathryn Long Trust of the
Metropolitan Opera.The Amster-
dam reviews named him "a
discovery of importance; an agile
lyric tenor with the silken-like
brilliance of the pure bel-canto
The credits of Jane Williams,
soprano, include major roles with
the Wolf Trap Opera Co the
Bronx Opera Co Sante Fe Opera,
Los Angeles Music Theatre Co
and The Opera Studio, Inc. A
graduate of California State Univer-
sity at Northridge, she has also sung
with the Los Angeles Lyric Ensem-
ble.
Jane Murray Dilliard, mezzo-
soprano, holds degrees from ECU.
She is currently Associate Professor
of Creative Arts at the University of
North Carolina at Charlotte where
she is the Director of Opera
Workshop and teaches voice. Mrs.
Dillard has numerous performances
with symphony orchestras in
Europe and the U.S. including
Radio RAI, Rome; Swiss Romande
Orchestra, Geneva; Mulhouse Sym-
phony Orchestra, Mulhouse,
France; Tampa Symphony, Tampa,
Florida; Charlotte Symphony, and
the N.C. Symphony. She has also
sung leading roles with many opera
companies in the U.S. and Europe.
Three Rockefeller grants, and
AAUW scholarship for Foreign
study, finalist in the Metropolitan
Opera Auditions and Regional win-
ner of the National Federation of
Music Clubs Young Artists Audi-
tions are among the awards that
Mrs. Dilliard has received. She has
been awarded the Outstanding
Alumni Award from ECU and was
selected as one of four outstanding
women teachers at UNCC for 1982.
Bass soloist Joseph M. Pate is a
native of Nashville, Tennessee. He
attended Trenton State College for
two years, then was accepted as a
full scholarship student at the
Academy of Vocal Arts in
Philadelphia. Mr. Pate has per-
formed extensively in the
Philadelphia area, both with the
Opera Company of Philadelphia
and in numerous roles at the
Academy of Vocal Arts, where he
will return this season as a guest
graduate singer to perform the role
of "CoUatinus" in The Rape of
Luc re tic at Philadelphia's famous
Walnut Street Theatre.
JazzBlues Duo Maggie Ree & Father Coming To Hendrix
Spartanburg, S.Cs jazzblues revival duo, fifteea-year-oid Maggie Ree Hughey and her father Bobby,
will perform in concert at Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix Theatre next Thursday, Nov. 18 at 9 p.m.
Maggie, who plays piano and sings, is accompanied by her father on the bass. The two have been dunlins'
as "an amazingly proficient team that sport the child prodigy-of-thc-century hi young Maggie Ree The
concert b free to ECU students, faculty and staff, aad n sponsored by the Student Unto Special Concerts
Committee.
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te
r
vomen, 7
st be of
in Ballet
se onc-
: Theatre.
: a nee uith
National
York Ci-
iin Aile
ipn. No
called it,
company
e Central
nhall Stu-
ECU
i c L ac-
) Faculty,
s
.der
$5 All
ation con-
Office at
urs of the
Monday-
It -or Julius
V?
omeu here
people left
id expected
lied usth the
lare with the
lestra under
i . Theatre a
joncert pro-
good idea,
. wtn
i .oncer;
ginall)
� . even
had to
ure of
e TV
i
drix
9 p.m.
scribed
The
oncerts
Former Prisoner Lecturing
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER. 1982
Victor Herman, a
former Soviet prisoner,
will speak in Hendrix
Theatre, Mendenhall
Student Center on
Thursday, November
11, 1982 at 8p.m. Her-
man's appearance is
under the sponsorhip
of the ECU Student
Union Minority Arts
Committee and is part
of the annual Jewish
and International
Festival.
Herman had the
misfortune of being a
foreigner in the Soviet
Union during the start
of the Stalin purges and
shen war seemed im-
minent. In order to pre-
vent even the slightest
possibility of foreign
influence, Stalin
developed the infamous
Gulag system of forced
labor camps; some
three hundred of the re-
maining American
Ford employees were
jailed in these camps,
including Herman in
1938. After spending
World War II chopping
down trees in remote
deep Russia, he was
released from the labor
camp in 1948 and exiled
to Krasnoyarsk, a town
in Siberia. There he met
a young gymnast, nam-
ed Galina, training at
the same athletic club
where he trained box-
ers; they were married
shortly after they met.
However, as a term in
his release, Herman
had been forbidden to
marry; consequently,
he was exiled further
north in Siberia, to the
Arctic village of
Yeniseyk. Upon his ar-
rival in this distant
village, he was told that
he would not be allow-
ed to live in the village,
but would have to sur-
vive as best he could in
the woods nearby. And
so he carved his shelter
out of the ice and sub-
sisted on the rats which
he managed to catch.
One day, much to his
surprise, his wife
Galina and their infant
daughter appeared at
his door; the pair had
made the trek from
Krasnoyarsk to
Yeniseyk on foot. The
family lived together in
the igloo for a year.
Finally exonerated in
1955, two years after
the death of Stalin,
Herman then faced a
twenty year struggle
through the serpentine
Soviet bureaucracy to
reclaim his American
citizenship. In 1976
Herman became the
only one of the 300 im-
prisoned Ford
employees to leave the
Soviet Union.
However, it wasn't un-
til 1979 that his wife
and two daughters were
allowed to join him in
America.
Herman now lives in
the Detroit area. He is
the author of two
books: Coming Out of
the Ice and Realities:
Wight and Paradox in
Hte Soviet Russia.
Coming Out of the Ice
was the subject of a re-
cent CBS dramatic
presentation focusing
on Herman's struggle.
It starred John Savage,
I
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U.S.D.A. INSPECTED
Former Soveit prisoner Victor Herman.
Willie Nelson, Ben
Cross and Fracesca An-
nis.In his lecture he
discusses his ex-
periences in Russia,
how the Russian mind
works, and how he
feels many of
America's problems
could be solved if
government officials
understood how
foreign leaders
thought.
Tickets for the lec-
ture are on sale at the
Central Ticket Office
and are priced at $2 for
ECU students and $5
for the public. All
tickets sold at the door
will be $5. For addi-
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LOCATED IN PARKING
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ARCADE BEHIND H.L. HODGES
ANNOUNCING!
The 2nd Annual
Speedeating Contest!
Can you beat our
champ's record of 2:58?
Stuff yourself on a
Pirates Treasure Chest!
(6 dips, 7 toppings, double works)
Time:
4:30 p.m. November 11th (Thurs.)
Place:
Heart's Delight
(your ice cream shop)
Prize:
11 Your name on our board.
2) Your enin fee returned! Be the winner!
3) A Pirates Treasure Chest
lo be eaten leisurel!
4) A part for the winner and three fnends.
.Please register by midnight Wednesday 1110!)
Pizza, inn
Greenville's Best Pizzas
Now Being Delivered
Most delivery pizzas lack in
true quality and have 'hidden'
delivery costs in the price-
Pi ZZA INN has changed
all that!
We sell our delivery
pizzas at Menu Prices!
No Surcharge. We also
give FREE Drinks with
our large and giant
pizzas. TRY US TODAY!
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
NOVEMBER 9, 1982
Page 8
Heath, Pirates Stampede Mavericks
By CINDY PLEASANTS
SpartofMMr
The Pirates gave their best road
performance of the season at the
University of Texas-Arlington this
past Saturday to top the Mavericks,
40-24.
Freshman standout Jeff Heath
kicked a record-breaking 58-yard
field goal late in the second quarter
to surpass Chuck Bushbeck's
49-yard mark, which was made in
19ol. Heath also booted three more
lengthy kicks of 53,48, and 42 yards
to ease by the record ECU set in
1978 for three field goals which, in-
cidently, was at UTA � the Pirates
first meeting ever with the
Mavericks.
"Jeff Heath was just
phemomenal said head coach Ed
Emory. "He's done a great job
kicking for us this year
After the Pirates suffered losses
at Missouri, Florida State and
Missouri, Emory was in much
higher spirits when the scrappy bout
with UTA was finally over. "It's
great to win that first one on the
road he said. "It was one of those
wild and woolly ones, but our of-
fense came through for us
ECU quarterback Kevin Ingram
started in his second game this year
and was apparently making up for
lost time. The Philadelphia native
completed 12 of 16 passes for 193
yards and scored a touchdown.
"Ingram played exceptionally
well said Emory. "His execution
was much better tonight (Saturday)
than it has ever been
The Pirates came out in the first
quarter displaying the intensity it
lacked against West Virginia. On
the first play, Ingram hit Carlton
Nelson for a 19-yard gain to more
the Bucs to the 49-yard line. Tony
Baker, who led the Pirates in
rushing with 117 yards, then ran up
midfield for six more yards.
Another Ingram pass to Nelson and
a pitch to Baker put the Pirates on
UTA's 44-yard line. The twosome
again penetrated toward the goal
line, with Nelson catching an
18-yard pass to land the Pirates on
the 26-yard line. ECU's Ernest
Byner then carried for eight yards to
score one of several ECU
touchdowns.
Now up 7-0, the Mavericks began
their surge to the other end of the
field. After being sidelined for six
pames with an injured knee, UTA's
number one quarterback Kraig
Hopkins was in calling the signals,
but his return was to be a short one.
Hopkins completed two of three
passes before being sacked by
ECU's Tony Smith for a 12-yard
loss. Injured on the play, Hopkins
was escorted off the field with a
hyper-extended knee.
Now with 4:42 remaining, Ingram
delivered a 19-yard pass to split end
Larry O'Roark to more the Bucs to
UTA's 44. Carlton Nelson then
caught an over-the-middle pass for
13-yard gain. Speedster Jimmy
Walden, making his presence know
after being out all season with a
knee injury, optioned around left
for a 15-yard run. On UTA's four-
yard line, Ingram kept to move the
Pirates ahead, 14-0.
ECU opened up the second
quarter with a seond and five situa-
tion on their own 25. Moving to the
Mavericks' 24-yard line, Ingram
found flanker Stuart Ramirez in the
endzone for a 32-yard pass and a
touchdown. A Heath kicked upped
the Pirates lead to 21-0 with more
than 13 minutes remaining in the
first half.
UTA battled to their 44-yard line,
but flanker Byron Williams fumbled
and ECU defensive end Jody Schulz
recovered and returned 25 yards.
The Mavericks, however, were
not the only ones capable of making
a mistake. On the very next play, In-
gram's pass was intercepted by
linebacker Noel Spraggins, who
sprinted for a 17-yard return to
ECU'S 32. Taking advantage of
ECU's error, fullback Robert
Johnson ran seven yards to put the
Mavericks on the board.
Now 21-7, the Pirates moved to
the 41-yard line to set Heath up for
a 58-yard field goal. Kicking in 16
mile per hour winds, Heath scored
three more points to make the score
24-7. The kick tied the NCAA
record for more field goals of 40 or
more yards in a single game.
"I just knew if I could get it up,
the wind would do it Heath said.
"I was relaxed and really did not
think abou the distance. I've been
trying to overpower the ball on
kicks. This time, I just kept it
smooth as with an extra point; the
same type motion Heath was
named as the ECAC Division-I co-
Rookie of the Week for his play.
UTA's kicker Scott Tennison also
came through for the Mavericks,
popping a 34-yard attempt to give
UTA three more points.
The Bucs wound up on UTA's
36-yard line with only a few seconds
left in the second quarter. Despite
his first successful long-range ef-
fort, Heath wasn't quite finished
yet. He boomed a 53 yard kick right
down the middle to give ECU a
whopping 27-10 lead as the second
quarter ended.
The beginning of the second half
appeared to be a complete reverse of
the first quarter, with the Mavericks
being the ones with fire burning in
Freshman Jeff Heath kicked four field goals at UTA to break two ECU
records.
their eyes.
UTA's Jlightower, along with
tailback Scotty Cauldwell, bursted
into an offensive explosion to place
the Mavericks' on the three-yard
line. Hightower faked a pitch and
ran in for six points. UTA gained 85
yards in just 10 plays on the scoring
drive.
Aware of the Mavericks' intensi-
ty, the Pirates headed for the end-
zone. Ingram connected with tight
end Norwood Vann for a 15-yard
gain, and Byner ran in two plays
later to give the Pirates a 34-17 lead.
With 6:51 seconds left in the third
quarter, the Mavericks forged ahead
to ECU's one-yard line, where
Caldwell ran in to put Texas just 10
points behind the Pirates, 34-24.
But two Heath field goals in the
second half secured ECU's lead,
giving the Pirates a win that has
been much needed and wanted.
"The biggest happiness was finally
getting that win on the road
Emory said. "I hope it's the first of
three road wins
UTA head coach Bud Elliot prais-
ed ECU for its execution. "That's a
better football team than we played
last week (McNeese State) he said.
"I feel like we played a good game
when you look at the whole thing.
They've lost to four good division
teams. . . .But the only division
I-AA teams they've played, they've
beaten. I feel like we battled them
hard
Offensively, the Bucs had 265
yards rushing, 208 yards passing
and 473 yards on total offense.
Although Emory was pleased
overall with the Pirates' offensive
showing, he wasn't as satisfied with
the defense. "Anytime you give up
24 points he said, "you have to be
disappointed with the defense. We
had some individuals who played
well, but we got a little nervous
when they cut it to ten points
All-America candidate Jody
Schulz, who was one of a few
players being observed by four pro-
fessional scouts, had ten hits against
UTA, a fumble and two quarter-
back sacks for a 23-yard loss.
The Bucs travel to William &
Mary this Saturday and after last
year, Emory said he doesn't think
the Pirates will have any difficulty
in preparing for this game. "1
believe our guys will remember that
William & Mary cost us a winning
season last year he said,
"something we had to live with for
12 long months
Gametime is 1:30 p.m.
E. CarotinTnaa-Ari.
23Fust Downs25
51-256Rushuuj-Y"ds51-22
208Passing Yards209
(-3)Return Yards34
17-13-2Passing34-15-0
3-39.7Punts5-384
1-0FUmbles Lost11
6-41Penalties1-5
East Carottaa14 137i�41
Texat-Ariiagioa0 10149-24
Scoring:
ECU � Byner. 8run (Heath kick)
ECU � Ingram.1 run (Heath kicki
ECU � Ramire. 32 pass from IngramHeath kick)
UTA � Ro. Johnson. " run (Tennison kickl
ECU - Heath. 58 FC
UTA � Tennison. 34 FG
ECU � Heaih 53 FC
UTA � Hightower. 3 run (Tennion ki.ki
ECU � Byner.run (Heath kick)
UTA � Caldwell. 1 run (Tennison kick!
ECU � Heath. 42 FG
ECU' � Heath.�5 FG
IndiMdual Main no
Rushing - ECL Baker 14-11 Bner 10-75, Wi
4-28. Branch 6-22. Ingram 13-12. Strwai: 2 3. Carat) 1 �
UTA: Cadell 21-84. Ro Johnson 10-S. Hopkins 2441,
Hightower 11-22. Brooks 1-14. Jackson 4-8. Ra Johnson
,1-7. Gray 1-3
Passing � ECL Ingram 16-12-2-193. Stewart 1-1-0-15.
LTA Hopkins 3-2-0-0. Hightower 16-6-0-116. Ja.i- -
150-93.
Receiving � ECL: Nelson 6-80. O'Roark 4-60. Ram na
1-32. Vann 2-36; LTA Lewis 3-�3. �'Shams J-66. Gray
2-31. Young 1-13. Brooks 1-24. Ra Johnson 1-5
Lady Basketball
Q
Squad
Probably the most difficult deci-
sion an accomplished athlete must
face is deciding where to attend col-
lege.
Hampered by phone calls, letters
and visits, the recruit must finally
choose the school that will be right
for her during the next four years of
her college life.
But what happens if the student
athlete finds out that she may not
have selected the school best suited
for her? Once again, she has to go
through the decision-making pro-
cess.
Last week, two former Lady
Pirate basketball players; Converse
A11-America Bridget Jenkins and
all-Southeastern Conference player
Eunice Hargett announced that they
would not be playing for ECU this
year.
Both scholarship players stated
different reasons for deciding to
turn in their purple and gold jerseys.
Jenkins, who was voted by the
Associated Press as North
Carolina's Basketball Player of The
Year, said she made a "rush deci-
sion" when she accepted an ECU
scholarship offer. "My mind was
set at Old Dominion she said,
"and I was talked into going here
(ECU) by friends and fans
Jenkins' sister, Alphelia Jenkins, is
presently playing basketball for
ODU.
Hargett, on the other hand, said
her decision to attend ECU was not
a hasty one. "It was my decision to
come here she said. "I decided to
quit because there was a personality
conflict between me and the
coach
According to Hargett, she has
been suffering abdominal pains the
entire year, which caused her to miss
several practices. "It didn't matter
what my excuse was Hargett said.
"She (Head baseketball coach
Cathy Andruzzi) said I was all talk
and no action
Andruzzi agreed that there was a
personality conflict between she and
Hargett. "She wanted to work and
I didn't she said. "We expect the
kids to give their best. We don't
want them to live in a mediocre ex-
istence. We want all they have to
�give us. Some kids will be able to
handle this while other kids won't
be able to handle it
Cindy Pleasants
A Look Inside
court. "I miss playing; the excite-
ment and everything Jenkins said.
"But I know I'm going the right
way. 1 just have to live up to it (her
decision) for a while until I can play
again
Hargett said that she will miss the
involvement with the team, but she
will not miss the practices.
"Sometimes you can go and do
everything right and somedays you
can't do anything right she said.
"I think they're (the players) are
scared to make mistakes
Jenkins added, "There's a dif-
ference in being scared of a person
and respectful of a person
But Andruzzi said the players bet-
ter be scared. "If you don't do your
job, you better be scared she said.
"There will not be any com-
promises. The players know what's
ahead of them and they must be
dedicated. When they step on that
court, it's all basketball. There ain't
no free lunch.
"We're human; everybody makes
mistakes, but I can tell whether a
person is taking her responsibility
seriously or not. If anyone's selfish,
the team deteriorates and we're not
successful
Last year, three players quit the
team and Andruzzi was left with
eight players. At the end of the
season, the team attended the
NCAA tournament. She now has 10
players and Andruzzi said she is not
worried at all about not having
enough players. "We surived with
eight, so you know we can survive
with 10
Hargett and Jenkins, meanwhile,
will concentrate on their studies thi$.
semester before transferring to
another college. Hargett, who hadha"
3.9 average in high school, said she
often resented being referred to as
the "smart athlete" on the team.
"They (teammates) didn't look at
me as a teammate, but they looked
at me as being the smart one she
said. "I just felt like an outsider
Andruzzi said she believes both
players would be able to fit into
another basketball program if they
so choose, but she is concentrating
on this program. "I've been here
four years and there are people who
really care about me. the kids and
the program she said. "They've
been very supportive of me
The coach said she wants a team
that will go out and give all they've
got. "I realize that we're very in-
tense, but that's why people have
been with us. They know that each
kid out there is giving it all they've
got. It's not a win-all situation with
me. I just want them to learn � to
become the best they can be
Unfortunately, two gifted athletes
will have to make a major decision
once again, and hopefully they will
both find where they belong. "I
didn't make the wrong decision
Hargett said, "I had to come here
and find out or else I would have
been miserable
Good luck to you both, Eunice
and Bridget, with all sincerity.
Hargett praised Andruzzi as being
a good coach who knows basket-
ball, but said she disagreed with her
philosophy of the way a coach-
player relationship should be. "I
think a player should have a little
say-so about what's going on
Andruzzi said a player must first
earn that right. "When you prove
yourself on the court, you can have
all the say you want. The door is
wide open. No one has any say-so
unless they earn the right both on
and off the court
After playing basketball for so
many years, both players agree that
they miss playing basketball, but
hope they won't have to wait too
long before they are back on the
Head basketball coach Catby Andruzzi said "aint nobody gonna get a free Lnncb" on her team
Carson Recruits Home - Grown Competitors
By HORACE McCORMICK
ECU Sports Info.
ECU head track coach Bill Car-
son is extremely optimistic about
the 1982-83 track forecast as he
enters his 17th season as head
coach. Thus far, the 45 year-old
coach has led his squad to three
team championships, eight runner-
up finishes, and one third-place per-
formance last year, shattering
ECU's long-standing 4 by 400 meter
relay record.
This year, coach Carson is quite
confident that the record will be
broken again with a few others,
possibly after the first meet of the
1982 indoor season.
One reason that Carson is excited
about the upcoming season is
because "North Carolina produced
its finest array of recruits ever this
past season according to Carson.
And although the head coach has
only three returning veterans, he has
managed to acquire the "cream of
the crop" of North Carolina's most
talented recruits; not just a few, but
several.
The three returning veterans who
will be guiding the sixteen freshmen
are juniors Keith Clark from San-
dys, Bermuda, Ray Dickerson from
Erie, Pa and senior Carlton Bell
from Tarboro, N.C. "I expect Bell
to break the present ECU 400-meter
indoor record of 47.76 seconds, set
by Calvin Austin in 1979 stated
Carson.
Bell has already participated on
three record-breaking indoor mile
relay teams. Veteran Keith Clarke
will be expected to add experience to
the mile relay team. Dickerson will
be providing experience to 800
meter races. "I also expect him to
do extremely well in the 500 meters
after recovering from an injury last
season adds Carson.
Coach Carson usually streamlines
his team towards prominence in the
relays and the quarter-mile. But
after noticing the abundance of
talent coming out of North
Carolina, he has decided to expand
his team into the field events,
specifically the long and triple
jumps.
Some of those recruits who have
now become Pirates are Chris
Brooks from Raleigh, Arthur Burks
of Fayetteville, and Donell Shep-
pard from Robersonville. Carson
added that the multi-talented
Brooks will be expected to par-
ticipate in the triple jump and con-
tribute considerably to the relay
teams, possibly as an anchor.
Carson signed four of the state's
premier hurdlers: Anthony White
from Chinquapin, Bryan
Southerland from Henderson and
Reuben Pierce and Tony James,
former teammates from Fayet-
teville.
As usual, Coach Carson was suc-
cessful in landing some outstanding
half and quarter milers and
sprinters, as well as field com-
petitors. 'Eddie Bradley from
Fayetteville and Willie Fuller from
Henderson will make tremendous
contributions to the four by 400 and
400 meter races stated Carson.
Carson is particular ly excited
about Bradley because of bis "come
and catch me" style of running.
Greg Richardson is expected to
develop his potential in the half-mile
by hanging onto the heels of veteran
half-miler Ray Dickerson.
The new Pirate sprinters will be
Erskine Evans from Greenville,
Rodney Blacknall from Henderson,
Jerry Brown of Wilmington and
Joseph Dingle. "All four are ex-
pected to turn out their stiffest com-
petition in the 200 meter races
Carson replied. Nathan McCorkle
will concentrate on the 60 meter
races, while also lending talent to
the 200 and 400 meters.
Along with Carson is new assis-
tant coach Wayne Miller to help
guide the Pirate tracksters. Carson
praised Miller as being highly
qualified. Miller received his BA in
Psychology from UNC at Chapel
Hill. The Mount Olive native ran
track for the Tar Heels for four con-
secutive seasons, culminating the
400 meter races in the ACC as an
Ail-American in 1981.
"Wayne is the kind of coach who
can actually practice with the
athletes and is going to be an impor-
tant key in our team's success this
season, and seasons to come Car-
son said.
"I've accumulated an abundance
of raw talent that needs to be
developed this year. There's going
to be rough competition within the
team itself for the open positions in
the 82-83 events stated Carson.
B
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 9, 1982 9
MS
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positions in
led Carson.
I
Booters Lose
Mark Hardy and Chip
Baker, with an assist by
David Skeffington.
Besides Lawrence's
score, the Seahawks
were led by Marcus
Martin and Dave
By KEN BOLTON
Assistant Sports Editor
The ECU soccer
team, Under the direc-
tion of first-year head
coach Robbie Church,
wrapped up another Karlson, who scored
season of Pirate soccer one goal apiece,
against UNC- Church was pleased
Wilmington Saturday with the performance
night. of his squad, but felt
Even though ECU that this game was a
lost to the Seahawks parallel of the Pirates'
3-2, the defeat could entire year. "We
not overshadow the played a great game
fine reason the Pirates Church stated. "But we
had during Church's came up short, which
first term. seems typical of our
The Pirates fell one season
victory short of the With Church's
school record for most guidance, the Pirates
wins in a season. Their employed an ag-
seven victories and ten gressive, attacking type
defeats tied the record of game in 1982. This
which was set in 1974 year's team broke the
and matched in 1980 school record for most
and 1981. goals in a season with
In the game against 37. The old mark was
UNC-Wilmington, the 30, which was set last
temperature was more year.
appropriate for a Hardy, a sophomore
bobsled run than a soc- from Morristown,
cer match. With N.J was the Pirate's
temperatures in the leader in goals scored
mid-thirties and a this season with a total
steady breeze blowing, of nine. Freshman
the Pirates and Doug Kelly was not far
Seahawks battled in behind with eight goals.
what was the final
game of the season for
both teams.
The score was tied
2-2 at the end of regula-
Coming into this
season, one of Chur-
ch's main concerns was
the goalie position. The
tion, and UNC-W won spot was shared by
it on a goal by junior freshman Tony
Mike Lawrence with a Rechner and Brian
little over 1:00 to go in Winchell, a four-year
the first overtime
period.
Both teams scored a
starter for the Pirates.
Winchell finished the
year with 73 saves and
goal in each half of two shutouts while
regulation play. ECU Rechner had 54 saves
goals were scored by and one shutout.
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Psekafe of 4 -11 Oi. Caae
Milwaukee
tUltr
11 Ouae
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lM Liquid
Why Pay M 29
�n�y fay M.SS
4$ Oi. � Utt fteak la Oil
Chicken
Of The Sea
Tuna
tttf Pa M.Of
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Trend Detergent
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IU. � Preiee Motto Cat Potatoes
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Macaroni
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Pricei �eed i! Sreentille Feed tart Store enl�
Brown & Serve
Rolls
S � 1HIBU HHIIWf !�� Of





"
10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 9, 1982
Swim Team Victorious, Bucs To Play
The ECU swim team
got their season off to
an impressive start with
a pair of victories over
James Madison in Har-
risonburg, Va. last Fri-
day afternoon.
The men's team won
69-48 and the women
won 61-52 with the aid
of a victory in the final
relay.
For the men, Stan
Williams was a double
winner with victories in
the 50-freestyle and the
100-freestyle.
Nan George was a
double winner for the
women as she took
both the 50 and the 100
freestyles. Even though
the Pirate women lost 8
of the 11 individual
events, wins in the two
relays enabled the
Pirates to defeat the
Dutchesses.
"Anytime you can
win at someone else's
pool, you can be real
pleased said first-
year head coach Rick
Kobe. "The men are
ahead of themselves in
terms of where they
were last year, and dit-
to for the women
ECU opens its home
schedule this Saturday
aftenoon at 2:00 p.m.
when the Old Domi-
nion Monarchs will in-
vade Minges Aquatic
Center.
The Lady Pirates will
scrimmage against
Louisburg College
tonight at 6:30 p.m.
Head coach Cathy
Andruzzi said the
scrimmage will help her
know more about the
team. "I wish we had a
crystal ball she said.
"I'd like to see what
will happen
Andruzzi said the
freshmen wil have to
play this season.
"We're young she
said, "and teaching
what they need to know
has been a challenge for
us.
Head coach Charlie
Harrison will unveil
this year's basketball
team on Nov. 17 when
the Pirates go up
against Charleton
University of Canada.
The game is set for
Minges Coliseum and
will begin at 7:30 p.m.
Overall, Harrison
has been pleased with
the team's showing so
far. "As I've said
before we have good
quickness from six or
seven players. After
that, there is a major
drop. So with what we
have done so far, it is
not too realistic under
this condition.
"I'm not surprised to
date nor am I disap-
pointed overall.
Classifieds
PERSONAL
WANTED: SOMEONE TO w� a
new FUJI Suprama Sieve lar
Christmas. If this interests yew,
tain to any fjjj Tau.
AJ NAVE yau aaar fraas Gaergia
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hoses art. Hava a happy B-dav;
ttava eternal clarity, and aim high.
Go Gorman. Lova ya. S.P O.F
J.S.
LESTER � Mr. Araiastan siad-
TYPING TEEM
thesis, ate Can 7H-e7�.
PROFESSIONAL typing- rush
afM done. ScftanNlic symaol ele-
mowt. CPE gjNjPfT attar �:� p.m.
TYPING: MANUSCRIPTS,
papors, thesis, roasanaMa rato.
Call 7SS-3740.
RIDES
NEED A �IOC ta N.J. mmr
Thanmsgtvtag. WIN pay haM ex
CaBm-aWS.
URGENTLY NCEO PLACE TO
STAY from aaar aail April WES.�
lliji i" va. If yaw Insaar afa
lamiry ama wiiwai ta rat a roam
'd like ta hava se-
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Pock CaM 7SO-WI7 ar Ttw East
Carolinian W-eJee aaal laa�e
FURNISHED EFFICIENCY
APARTMENT. Utilities i
caUTO-SSIl
LOSE WEIGHT.
7M-VSM.
HONEST! It
IVllSO
1 mjm.
10 YEARS TYPING
irimmir corrections. Pra-
otreading. ChMy am p.m.
3K-24M.
MUGS, Hoar ara Namctty aad
alcoholism alikef Michael
PREPPY: WALKING Hi the pack
Playing in tha laavas
Oinino at Darryl's
and hopping down (taps
Evan parents and the dance
These n i�st a faw things
That make you special to ma,
Lovo COWBOY
TIM MONEYHad a area! time
Halloween night. Sorry I had to
drop out of sight. Let's meet at the
Elba :M Sun. Night. GINGER.
FRED ASTAIRE: DUST off the
cobwebs on your dancin' shoes,
and lot's Boogie at Rosaball.
aad adiNaff
ENGLISH TUTOR:
writinf, rewriting
papers. Typing aad
also. Call 7$7-g�7. After S:W
Sawing and alterations-
maapapsiva, fast service. Call
7S7-0W7 after S:e�.
LOST AND
CRAZY ZACK'S ROAD TRIP Nov.
I m lacladai round trip ta Zacks
and) retroshments on Km way ta
Zacfc's.
ENGLISH PROFESSIONAL MAN
M soaks lady to ts far company
facial events exchange af ideas.
fun times, write PO ban Jltl,
Greenville or call �7-
ANVONE INTERESTED IN iogg-
FOR SALE: lt� HONDA IS KL
DIRT OR STREET GIKE. CaM
7sa-7QS Man Thar.
HICE GRAY AND WHITE RAE-
�IT FUR JACKET FOR SALE t$�
CALL 7S�-iP4.
FOR SALS
rmmn.
�GO I yaar old. Call
.11.
LADIES OF ECU � Know a as
i guyT See Ad on Page I
Tuesdays
at t:M p.m.
I Thursdays.
FOUND
WOMEN: KNOW A
gay far the "men af ECU"
Ear Escort Mas by tha Eacc-
canaar office by Friday at SGV-er
call 7S7-$�i. Gays daat be left
�it
THERE WILL BE an Ending
Warld Hangar briefing oa
Havsmbar 1Mb and a fast an the
Itth. Far snara details, call Jen-
nifer at 3S5-MS5.
FOR SALE
HAHO-CRAFTED. rustic fur-
niture at affordabla student
prices. For more information, call
Kim at 7S3-S717.
1 FISHER SPEAKERS model SMs
WATERBEDS aad
half oH! DONT aav �'� ��
have campUte waterbada as law
as Slof.M. Afsa bidding sets as law
as vn.n. Came by Factory Mat-
tress aad Waterhed Outlet 71
Greenville Blvd. neirt to Swaet
Caroline's. HHoM.
7S-lMmm Zoom Lens far Nlban-
Case i filtars-JX
TELECONVERTER -All lor
SIMS call 7M-7M art. 5
FOUHD:
CALCULATOR;
. call 757-471 before S.
POCKET
Volleyball Team Suffers Defeat "iffesvicEs- wanted
WE BUY PLAYBOY, Rolling
By EDWARD
NICKLAS
Staff Wnler
The ECU Lady
Pirate volleyball team,
possibly looking ahead
to an important match
tonight at N.C. State,
dropped two out of
three matches in the
Duke Quad Tourna-
ment Saturday.
ECU, now 24-15,
lost to Duke in the first
match 15-10, 7-15,
9-15. The Lady Pirates
regrouped and won
their second match
against Virginia 15-5,
14-6, 15-5. The
momentum did not
carry into the final
match, though, as ECU
lost to Georgia 15-7,
15-11.
Coach Lynn David-
son was particularly
disappointed with the
loss to the Lady Blue
Devils. "We lost our
intensity a little she
said, "and it allowed
them to go ahead the
last game
Davidson thought
that one reason why
ECU did not win the
tournament was that
they might have been
looking ahead to their
showdown match with
the Lady Wolf pack. At
any rate, she said,
"Overall these were
good matches to
prepare us for State. I
think we will be
ready
After their match
with N.C. State, the
Lady Pirates will con-
clude their season
-a. �, oe th.� PROFESSIOHAL Typist wants to stone Mag. Quicksilver Record
Wednesday as they at ���, s�onabta ratas;
travel to UNC- 7-u�.
Book exchange. MB East Fifth St.
�� HELP WAHTEDEARN free
rharlnttt- to nlav thf PROFESSIONAL Typing servica- travel and extra money as campus
lnariOlie lO piay me u ,� u, work. IBM representative far student travel.
University Of SOUth typewriter. CaM Lanie Shiva. call Jim at l7-ll-tjo daily
Carolina at Lancaster � �� -MS-ft- ��.
: No U.S. Jewelry j
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The best Pizza
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CURRENT MOVIESCPG) Sat7pm-�pm
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Bob Herring, Manager
1982 Department of University Unions
ACU-I All Campus Backgammon Tournament
The Tournament will be concJct
ECU, if sufficient participation permits, in the Association of Coflese Unkxts-lntemational
regional face-to-face tournaments to be held at the University of Tennessee on
February 10,11, and 12,1983.
HOW TO ENTER:
A registration form, available at the
Billiards Center at Mendenhall Student
Center, must be completed and submitted to
tne Supervisor on duty at the Center by Tues-
day, November 9.
ALL-CAMPUS TOURNAMENT
SCHEDULE:
�Thursday, November 11
�6:00 p.m. � MSC Multi-Purpose Room
�Double-elimination andor round-robin for
mat
�Each match will be played to a designated
point total
COSTS:
An entry fee of 11.00 is required and payable
at the tournament site.
The participants who will be going to Ten
nessee will have tha costs of lodging,
transportation, meals, and entry tees paid by
AAendenhatl Studet Center.
REQUIREMENTS:
Each participant will be required to snow
hisher ECU ID or driver's license and activi
ty card prior to the start of tt�e tournament.
The ACU-I backgammon Tournament
Rules win be used m the competition. Copies
of the rules �t available for use at the
Billiards Center. It is highly recommended
that all participants study the rules prior to
the tournament.
Each participant must have a 2.0 GPA. This
will be verified with the Registrar's Office.
Each participant is requested to bring a
backgammon board it possible.
AWARDS:
Trophies will be awarded to the first, se-
cond and third place finishers.
�"� �mMm0&9
MsVPWNiw11
:
-
' II IIM
i'A
i. v ii





Title
The East Carolinian, November 9, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 09, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.229
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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