The East Carolinian, November 4, 1982






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Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.19
Thursday, November 4,1982
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
City Council Proposes New Noise Ordinance
o wc knuo alert rirnnwioHopH that limit the noise when thev think
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Wrilfr
The city of Greenville has held
two public hearings to invite public
discussion on a recently proposed
noise ordinance which, if approved
by the full City Council, would have
a direct impact on the students of
East Carolina.
The noise ordinance would put
decibel limits, which would be
measured by a meter, on any ac-
tivities where loud noise was a fac-
tor. Limits would vary depending
on location, day of the week and
time, but under no circumstances
could the decibel limit exceed 70
without a permit, in which case the
limit would be 85 decibels. Cost of a
permit would vary anywhere from
$5 to $50 depending on factors
which have yet to be resolved.
In its present form the noise or-
dinance would even require permits
for activities that took place on
university owned property.
Vice Chancellor for Student Life
Elmer Meyer was among a group of
approximately 30 people who met
with McCarley at a hearing that was
held in Mendenhall last week.
Meyer told The East Carolinian
that he did not approve of the noise
ordinance in its present form
because he felt that the university
was already doing a responsible job
at controlling noise at campus func-
tions and that he was opposed en-
tirely to the permit clause.
In a letter to McCarley, Meyer
made these points of opposition:
"The need to apply for permits and
pay fees when events are held on
university property, events which
now must be registered with the
university and approved before tak-
ing place. The whole permit scheme,
and fees seems to be unnecessary to
fulfill the purposes of the or-
dinance
Meyer sent a copy of the ECU
conference manual, which details
university rules and procedures, to
McCarley, which he says could easi-
ly have the essence of any noise or-
dinance added to its next edition.
During the hearing, McCarley
cited the TKE fraternity on 10th
Street as a major source of the noise
complaints that were being
reported. "The file of complaints
against the TKE's is extremely
thick
Associate Dean of Judiciary
James B. Mallory, who oversees the
activities of the Inter-Fraternity
Council, acknowledged that he had
gotten some complaints about
noise, but not very many.
Sister Helen Shondell, campus
minister at the Catholic Newman
Center, which is next door to the
TKE house, also acknowledged that
there was a definite improvement in
the levels of noise coming from her
neighbors.
Mallory agreed with Meyer that
permits should not be required for
on-campus events, but he did
however recognize the need for an
ordinance to be passed for the city
of Greenville because the present
laws regarding loud noise are not
enforceable. McCarley made the
same point during the hearing.
Mallory added that the source of
the noise problem ought to be
removed or the orginization respon-
sible has to be removed.
"They've got to have some way to
limit the noise when they think it's
too loud said ECU English stu-
dent Holly Gilliam, who is president
of the College Hill Area Residence
Council. Gilliam approved of the
basic idea of an ordinance, although
she claimed there was no problem at
all with noise complaints in Iwr
area.
"I was distressed in the amount it
will cost to get a permit said
another resident council president.
Danny White.
Meyer, who made a number of
amendment and change suggestions
at the hearing, said McCarley would
be notifying him before submitting
the final document.
Contributions Reach $500,000
Athletic Fund Hits Half Way
This Is The Lije
Photo ttv Sf AMLET LEAHY
One of ECU's finest takes advantage of Greenville's Indian summer and uses the unseasonably warm weather
to do a little relaxed studying.
By BOB MORGAN
Staff Writer
The ECU adminstration has
reached the halfway mark of
$500,000 in a drive to raise $1
million for the athletic department.
Started in early August, the cam-
paign is expected to be completed by
the end of 1982. It is being directed
by the office of Chancellor John
Ho well.
Dick Blake, Howell's assistant,
explained that the money is being
donated through a five-year plan
that is directed towards large con-
tributors in both the private and
public sectors. The money will be
given to the athletic department to
help support its budget.
Athletic Director Dr. Ken Karr
said this is an attempt by the univer-
sity to make ECU more competitive
in the division I-A level of the Na-
tional Collegiate Athletic Associa-
Protestors Blockade 'Department Of War'
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
A group of 200 people decided to
take their election day vote to the
Pentagon instead of the polls and as
a result 29 people were arrested in
what was billed as a blockade of the
Pentagon by organizers.
Under the theme: "If voting
could stop the arms race, voting
would be illegal the group took
part in various activities designed to.
disrupt the business as usual at-
mosphere of what they referred to
as the "department of war
The 29 people arrested included
many out of state residents. Most
demonstrators classified themselves
as "Christian Pacifists" who ob-
jected to the nuclear arms race.
Most were charged with
blocking access to a government
facility" as they chained themselves
to the doors of two entrances to the
Pentagon. Other protestors splat-
tered their own blood on the Pen-
tagon building, while another used
acid to deface the concrete. All were
released with out bail and given cita-
tions. They were told to appear in
court on Nov. 23.
"People really went at it with
great determination and non-
violence said long time peace ac-
tivist Elizabeth McAlister.
McAlister, who is the wife of
Catholic activist Philip Berrigan,
was one of the key organizers of the
protest. She and Berrigan live with
their three children in what they
refer to as a "resistance communi-
ty" called Jonah House in
Baltimore, Md.
"On election day, whatever your
vote, make it 'no' to nuclear an-
nihilation was the message of the
Baltimore community.
"The first Trident (the USS Ohio)
roams the seas armed for world
wide destruction said McAlister.
"The second (the USS Michigan)
heads soon for its home base. The
Pentagon schedules West European
deployment of Pershing II and
cruise for next year, first at Camiso,
Sicily
McAlister told The East Caroli-
nian that all the demonstrators were
completely aware of the conce-
quences of their actions and that
many were people who were involv-
ed in peace protests for the first
time. Some sympathetic lawyers
also provided their services free of
charge to those arrested.
The protest, which began at 7
a.m. and lasted till noon, included
vigils, distributing leaflets and
parading with banners.
McAlister informed those who
planned to be arrested that a jail
sentence was a real possibility and
that the consequences of being ar-
rested at the Pentagon often varied.
"We are best off following Gan-
dhi's advice: 'Expect the best and
prepare for the worst " McAlister
said.
tion. At the present, ECU is one of
90 schools in the nation who are
classified in this top category of in-
tercollegiate athletics.
To keep division I-A status, the
university has to meet certain finan-
cial requirements of the NCAA, in-
cluding the size of the athletic
department's operating budget. The
chancellor's office explains that the
purpose of the drive is an attempt to
help the university retain this status.
Currently, the athletic budget is
$2.4 million. In five years, the pro-
jection is for the budget to reach
$3.5 million, an increase of almost
50 percent.
"We are only buying time for the
next five years so we can get the pro-
gram rejuvinated and self-
sustainaing to be competitive at this
higher level Blake said.
In announcing the progress of the
fund raising drive, Howell said,
"We are extremely pleased with the
positive response we have received
in the first 90 days of the drive.
More than 80 businesses and in
dividuals have contributed the first
$500,000 of the goal.
"This favorable response reflects
the confidence held in the future of
our athletic program. It also shows
the strong feeling of support by
friends who have embraced East
Carolina and its goal over the
years
The administration announced
Tuesday that the Planters National
Bank and Trust Company has
pledged $10,000 towards the fund.
According to Blake, another in-
tention of the drive is to spur in-
creases in ticket sales for revenue
producing sports and membership
in the Pirate Club. The Pirate Club
annually raises money for the sup-
port of the athletic program.
Blake describes this undertaking
by the administration as a
"double-barrel dividend" for the
entire unversity. He feels it will not
only help sports but will also in-
crease the prominence of the dif-
ferent academic departments at
ECU.
"Strong athletics and academics
go hand in hand. We are not placing
one above the other by any means
but are shooting for quality and na-
tional prominence in everything we
do
Reagan 9s Campaign Fails
As Democrats Win Seats
In Congressional Elections
Honors Program To Hire Paid Director
By DARRYL BROWN
Assistant t�s Editor
The ECU Honors Program is
planning to hire a paid director next
year,according to Myra Cain, assis-
tant to the vice-chancellor for
academic affairs. The university is
set to conduct a national search for
the position �
Dr. David Sanders, coordinator
for the program, has managed the
department without pay for several
years and has seen tremendous
growth in the program's size.
"What we need most is a direc-
tor Sanders said.
Sanders noted that the program
has grown from about 12 students
with one special topics seminar in
1971 to a present enrollment of over
200 students with five seminars and
numerous honors sections of regular
classes.
The Honors Program is at present
for General College only and is open
to all ECU students with a 3.5 grade
point average or other interested
students with faculty approval.
Some university departments have
their own upper level honors pro-
grms.
Sanders would like to see all the
honors programs combined and ex-
panded to include upper level classes
and more honors sections. He noted
that the program has suffered from
lack of funding in the past. Cain
said there would be an operational
funding increase along with the
creation of the half-time director's
position.
"1 hope funding will mean only
good things Sanders said. He
noted that a paid director is needed
to recruit faculty and students and
to carry out the administrative
aspects of the program.
ECU has one of the strongest
seminar programs for its size of any
university in the country and puts
more emphasis on interdisciplinary
classes than most schools.
"These seminars are ideally team
taught (by two faculty
members), "Sanders said. Many
faculty who teach honors seminars
must do so in addition to their
regular teaching load.
Dr. Norman Kosenfeid, a pro-
fessor in the English department is a
long time supporter of the honors
program. "There's no reason we
shouldn't have participation across
the board. All schools should par-
ticipate Rosenfeld said.
Dr. Michael Bassman of the
foreign languages department is
another advocate of the program.
Bassman said that the program
"does for students what a
humanities degree does. It teaches
you how to think and exposes
students to a variety of ideas He
added that the program is less
restrictive than normal courses and
"gives students confidence
Sanders cited important recogn-
tion that the ECU program has
received. "We belong to National
Collegiate Honors Council, and
we're getting respect and attention
for our program
The program has also received
high marks from the Southern
Regional Honors Council and the
Southern Association of Colleges
and Universities, who encouraged
full funding for the program.
By EMILY CASEY
Sun Writer
Tuesday's election results, which
saw a strong performance by North
Carolina's Democratic candidates,
marked a serious blow to the
Republican party which had hoped
to win as many as five or more new
congressional seats.
Last week President Reagan came
to North Carolina to campaign for
GOP congressional candidates, tell-
ing North Carolina voters to "stay
the course" and continue to support
his policies.
Yesterday's midterm election
results, which could be viewed as a
democratic landslide, may be in-
dicative that North Carolinians have
another course they wish to follow.
Democrats swept nine out of North
Carolina's 11 congressional seats
with only the ninth and 10th District
incumbants, James T. Broyhill and
James G. Martin, keeping their
Republican seats.
Two Republican incumbants
Wiliam M. Hendon of the 11th
District and W. Eugene Johnston in
the sixth were defeated by
Democratic challengers.
Hendon, who was defeated by
Sec DEMOCRATS, Page 5
Reserve Board Member
To Lecture On Campus
By GREG R1DEOUT
NcwaEWtev
A Federal Reserve Board Gover-
nor and two North Carolina bank-
ing leaders will be the speakers at a
banking forum Nov. 9 from 1:30 to
3:30 p.m. in Mendenhall 244. The
Department of Finance will sponsor
the event.
Charles Partee, a member of the
Federal Reserve Board of Gover-
nors, will talk on the banking
regulations of the future, said
Department of Finance chairman
Bruce Wardrip. Partee is chairman
of the Federal Financial Institutions
Examination Council, a body
devoted to achieving greater unifor-
mity in supervision, examination
.and reports among the five agencies
regulating depository institutions.
Wardrip said that this was the
first time in his memory that a man
of Partee's stature has visited ECU.
He empashized the important
changes in the banking community
within the last 10 years and said
Partee, along with NCNB chairman
Thomas I. Storrs and BB&T
Charlotte metropolitan manager
Kelly S. King, will lead an open
discussion on these issues.
Storrs will be centering his talk on
the bank of the future, while King
will focus on everyday banking pro-
cedures affected by the new era of
deregulation.
The Federal Reserve Board of
See FED, Page 6
Alpha Sigma Phi gets its poiat across with a larger-than-life
a tea-cent piece. The fraternity was coUectiag for the March of
hi front of the Student Supply Store.
.i.t;
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 4, 1982
Announcements
SCHOLARSHIPS
Scholarships art available for
School of Business majors.
Students interested in making ap-
plication should secure forms
from the Financial Aid Office or
one of the following department of-
fices in the School of Business: Ac-
counting - R32S; Decision Sciences
R238; Finance - R343; Manage
ment - R137, Marketing - R223. All
applications must be submitted to
Ruth Jones (R334), Chairman of
Scnool of Business Scholarhips
Committee by November 30, 1981.
Final selection will be made by the
ECU Student Scholarhips,
Fellowships, and Financial Aid
Committee upon recommendation
of the Dean of the School of
Business. The Dean's recommen-
dation will be made from can-
didates selected by the School of
Business Scholarship Committee.
The applicant must express an in-
terest in insurance on the applica-
tion and the permanent residence
of a candidate for this scholarship
must be in Eastern NC (East of
Highway i -95; or any county west
of Highway I -95 in which Pittard
and Perry, Inc maintains an of-
fice.
BIBLE ISTRUTH
The bible is truth, it is not just
another good book, because it was
written by Men of God. (II
Timothy 3:16, II Peter 1:21). It is
not a book of negative laws; but
the heart of God giving us at-
titudes and principles to live by so
we can prosper, enjoy life, and
really help others. (II Timothy
3:16, John 10:10, I Timothy 6:17).
Come learn more of the truth of
God's word so you can change
your life for the better. Monday,
Oct. 18, at Mendenhall Student
Center, Rm. 242 at 7:30.
LADIES OF
ECU
You must know a good looking
guy. If so then turn to page 3.
UNIVERSITY
CLUB
The East Carolina University
Club, which is open to all faculty
and staff, is holding a "silent auc-
tion" and evening of wine and
chees on November 7, from 5-7
p.m. in the MSC.
Individuals and businesses in
the Greenville area have donated
the items to be auctioned off.
Chancellor John Howell will be the
auctioneer this year. All procedes
of the auction will benefit the
Lillian J. Jenkins scholarship
fund.
GREEKS
Marajen is here on Nov. 10 in
Jenkins Auditorium at 8:00 p.m.
GRE
The Graduate Record Examina-
tion will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday,
December 11, 1982. Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to Educational Testing
Service, Box 966-R, Princeton, NJ
08540. Applications may be obtain-
ed from the ECU Testing Center,
Room 105. Speight Building.
LSAT
The Law School Admission Test
(LSAT) will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday,
December 4, 1982. Application
blanks re to be completed and
mailed to Educational Testing
Service, Box 966-R, Princeton, NJ
08540. Registration deadline is
November 4, 1982. Registrations
postmarked after this date must
accompained by a $15, non-
refundable, late registration fee.
RESIDENCE LIFE
The Department of Residence
Life is accepting applications tor
Resident Advisors for Spring
Semester. Applications can be ob-
tained from the Residence Hall
Directors, Area Coordinators and
the Residence Life Office. The
deadline for completed applica-
tions is November 19.
FREE CASH
Forty-five minutes of your time
could land you 15.00! Graduate
students need participants to com-
plete survey forms for a
Marketing Research Project. A
drawing for a 85 (five dollar) door
prize will be held after each ses
sion. Come to the appropriate
room number in Rawl Building at
any one of these times: Monday,
Nov. 8: 10:00am, Rawl 201. Tues-
day, Nov. 9, 12:00 noon, Rawl 203
and 5:00 pm Rawl 203. Thursday,
Nov. ii. l 00 pm, Rawl 203.
RESUME
The career Planning and Place-
ment Service in the Bloxton House
is offering the following one hour
sessions to help you prepare your
own resume. November 10-2:00
p.m. and November 11-2:00 p.m.
Those seniors or graduate
students finishing this year and
planning to register with us are
especially urged to attend. You
may come to the Bloxton House at
either of the above times.
INTERVIEWING
The Career Planning and place-
ment Service in the Bloxton House
is offering these one hour sessions
to aid you in developing better in
terviewing skills for use in your
job search. You may select a time
from those listed ; November
10-3:30 p.m and November
11-3:30 p.m.
A film and discussion of inter-
viewing through the Career Plann-
ing and Placement Service will be
shared.
FRISBEE
Learn new disc skills, play
ultimate, or just come to the bot-
tom of College Hill Tuesdays and
Thursdays at 4:00 to throw frisbee
and enjoy these remaining
beautiful, warm autumn days.
Club meetings art Mondays at
8:00 in MSC, room 241. 1982
Natural Light Flying Disc Classic
Video will be shown at the Attic on
wed. Nov 10.
PHI KAPPA PHI
"Toward the New Millennium
Challenges and Dreams will be
the theme of the eighth annual
ECU Phi Kappa Phi symposium to
be held on campus in early
February, of 83. A call for both
faculty and student papers suppor-
ting this theme, which deals with
the future, has been Issued. In an-
ticipation of the new millennium,
papers are invited to deal with a
wide range of topics ranging from
discussions of the near future will
or may hold. Faculty are invited,
at this time, to submit abstracts of
approximately one page with a
deadline for submission of
November 15. Papers selected will
be announced by November 24.
Student papers directed toward
the same theme art invited, two of
which will be selected for a award
of 8100 each. The best student
paper submitted will be included
in the symposium program. Both
faculty and student papers are to
be submitted to Dr. J. W. Byrd,
Department of Physics.
CO-OP FOR BUSINESS
MAJORS
There are positions available
with the General Accounting Of-
fice as an Evaluation Trainee.
Students must have completed 75
hours and be available for two
work periods beginning in the Spr-
ing 1983 semester. Conversion to
permanent employment after
graduation would be likely. For
more information contact Carolyn
Powell at the Co-op office, ext.
6979.
BAKE SALE
On Nov. 8, 1982 SCEC will hold a
bake sale in front of the Student
Supply Store from 8:30 a.m. to4:00
p.m. Please support Student Coun-
cil tor Exeptional Children and
buy something good to eat
ART CONTEST
The REBEL is conducting an art
contest open to all current ECU
students. There will be first prizes
of $50 in seven categories and a
$150 best-in-show prize. Prize
money is provided by the Attic and
Budweiser. The seven categories
are: painting sculpture,
ceramics, drawing,
photoghraphy, design (meals,
wood, fibers), and graphic art and
illustration.
Bring entries to Jenkins 1325 on
November 5 with a one dollar en-
try fee tor each piece. Limit two
entries per artist. Entries should
be ready for exhibition. All 2-D
work must be prepared for hang-
ing and framed or matted and
acetated. All Sculpture must be
self-supporting.
Winners will be notified on Mon-
day, November 8. Non-winning ar-
tists must pick up their work on
Monday before 4:00. Artists must
sign a form giving the REBEL
staff permission to move their
work to the Greenville Museum of
Art. If artists do not wish to
release REBEL staff from all
liability, they should move their
own work that Monday.
CATHOLIC
NEWMAN CENTER
The Catholic Newman Center
would like to invite everyone to
join in with us for celebrating
Mass every Sunday in the Biology
Lecture Hall starting at 12:30 and
every Wednesday at 5:00 at the
Catholic Newman Center located
down at the bottom of College Hill.
4-H
There will be an important Col-
legiate 4-H Club meeting Monday
evening at 7:30 in Room 247 of
Mendenhall student Center. We
will be finalizing plans for the An-
tique Car show on Nov. 13 so
please try to attend. For questions
call Denise or Teri at 758-8887.
CAR WASH
The Alpah Tau Pledge class of
the Kappa Sigma Fraternity is
holding a car wash Saturday,
November 6, from 10:00 a.m. to
5:00 p.m. at the Cash n-Carry
located on 14th Street. Wash and
dry the outside of your car for $2.
SPECIAL
EDUCATION
On Nov. 22, 1982 in room 129
Speight at 4:00 there wilt be a pro-
gram of much interest. As our
November program meeting
SCEC has invited Special Educa-
tion Directors from different
school systems to talk about their
system and job requirements.
Please attend. It will be to your ad-
vantage.
POSITION FOR
INDTMAJOR
There is an opening with Long
Manufacturing, Co. for a Quality
Control Supervisor. This perma-
nent position involves setting up
and maintaining a quality control
program in Rumania for tractors
manufactured for Long. The star-
ting date in immediately and the
salary is negotiable. Contact Nan-
cy Fillnow in the Co-op office, ext.
6979, for more information.
MODELING
The ECU Commercial Art
Departyment would like to invite
all interested persons (male and
Female) to attend our model
cataloging photo sessions to be
held on Wednesday, November 3
and Thursday, November 4 from
7-10 p.m. in the lighting studio of
Jenkins Art Building. We will be
photographing and cataloging
anyone interested In modeling for
fashion ads and layouts. All
photographs will be filed and
cataloged for future reference. All
models chosen will be paid by the
hour for their participation.
CO-OP
Part-time co-op training posi-
tions are available with Buehler
Mfg. Co. in Kinston. These train-
ing positions could lead to full-
time opportunities in Production
Supervision. Production Control
or Purchasing in the new Buehler
plant In Raleigh beginning June,
1983. All interested INDT majors
contact Nancy Fillnow in the Co-
op office, ext. 6979.
WOMEN'S RUGBY
Its still not too late to play.
Anyone interested in playing
womens rubgy needs to report to
practices Tuesday thru Thursday
at 4:00. We practice behind the
Allied Health (Belk) building. Ab-
solutely no previous experience is
required.
SCHOLARSHIPS
The School of Art is offering ten
scholarships for undergraduate
art students of the junior and
senior rank. Eight scholarships
are in the amount of $250 each.
Two scholarships, established by
Don and Jack Edwards of the
University Book Exchange, are in
the amount of $500 each. To
qualify, a student must have a
GPA of 3.5 in art, and an overall of
3.0. Slides of five works (name, ti-
tle, media, and size) must accom-
pany the scholarship application
form. Application forms may be
obtained from the School of Art Of-
fice. The deadline for all com-
pleted application material is
November 30.
SLC
The ECU Sign Language Club
will hold its regular bimonthly
covered dish supper and meeting
on Sunday, Nov. 7 at Mendenhall
Student Center Room 221. The sup-
per will begin at 6.00 p.m. with a
short business meeting and cap
tioned film to follow.
The meal and meeting are open
to any interested student, faculty
member, or a member of the com-
munity. You do not need to know
Sign Lnguage to attend, but
students who are taking sign
language classes or who have
taken them in the past are en-
couraged to attend. The purpose of
the SLC is to allow sign language
students and hearing impaired
students and community
members to socialize and develop
communication skills.
We hope to sac you there.
PHI BETA
LAMBDA TO
HOSTCONFERENCE
Omicron Chapter of Phi Beta
Lambda will host the Fall
Membership Training Conference
for hte State Chapter on Saturday,
November 6. Advance registration
indicates that over 150 members
from 20 colleges in North Carolina
will attend. All meetings art
scheduled for Mendenhall Student
Center.
FRESHMEN
REGISTER
Freshman Registers may be
picked up in the Buccaneer office
on Tuesdays and Thursdays from
2:00 p.m. till 5:00 p.m. The Buc-
caneer Office is located on the se-
cond floor of the Publications
Building. NOTE: All Freshmen
Registers must be picked up by
October 20. Remember you have
already paid for this publication,
so why let your money go to waste.
SMITHSONIAN
The Smithsonian institution is
offering 10-week graduate
research appointments in a varie-
ty of areas. The graduate students
will conduct inedivldual research
under staff's supervision. The sti-
pend for these fellowships is $2000.
All interested graduate students
should contact hte Co-op office, 313
Rawl, ext. 6979.
SIERRA CLUB
Interested in canoeng,
backpacking and conservation?
Our meeting this month concerns
conservation of our beaches and
coastal resources. Coming outings
will be described. We meet in
basement of First Presbyterian
church, corner of 14th and Elm at
� p.m. Monday, Nov. 0. You will be
welcome.
FRISBEE
192 Natural Light Flying Disc
Classic Video will be shown at the
Attic on Wed. Nov. 10. Free
beverage for those wearing tour-
nament shirts. Play ultimate at
the bottom of the hill on Tues. and
Thurs. at 4:00 - the team is getting
hot and an ultimate tournament is
planned for a future date.
SCEC
There will be a business meeting
of SCEC on Nov. 8, 192 at 4:00
pm. in Room 129 Speight. Please
attend.
RECIPES
Students, faculty and staff are
invited to submit their favorite
recipes to be compiled into a
cookbok of ECU'S favorite recipes.
Ten of the final entries will be
selected for the BAKE-OFF,
which the date will be announced
later. The recipes will be judged
on I) originality 2)appearance and
3)taste. The grand prize will be
dinner for two at Darryl's
Restaurant. Submit your recipes
in designated boxes located at
Mendenhall, Student Supply Store
and selected Dormitories. For any
additional information- call
758-3272 or 757-1920. Come on ECU-
get involved.
CONCERTS
COMMITTEE
The ECU Student union Special
Concerts Committee will present
Duke Ellington's "Sophisticated
Ladies" live via-satellite from
Broadway on November 5. The
program will take place in Wright
Auditorium.
Tickets for the show art on sale
at the Central Ticket Offices and
are priced at $6 for ECU students,
$9 for ECU faculty and staff and
-$12 for the public. For additional
information contact the Central
Ticket Office at 757-6611, ext. 266.
YOU CAN
HELP
50,000 people die every day from
Starvation) If you would like to
find out how YOU CAN HELP stop
these tragedies from happening,
you art invited to an End Hunger
Breifing to be hew on Tuesday,
November 16, from 3 to 7 p.m. in
the Coffeehouse In Mendenhall.
For more information on this im-
portant please call Steve Dear at
752 8786 or Jennifer Baugham at
355-655.
DRAMATIC
STARVATION
The ECU Hunger Coalition is
trying to put a stop to Ihis
holocaust. Come to our important
meeting tonight at 7:30 p.m. at 9S3
E. 10th Street. Call for more infer
mation 752-4216.
WOMEN
A meeting for women interested
in forming a chapter of the
American Association of Universi-
ty women will be held Thursday,
November 4 at 7:30 p.m. in the
community room at First
American Savings & Loan
(formerly East Federal Savings &
loan) in Greenville.
CO-OP
The co-op office has available an
opportunity witht he Federal Law
Enforcement Training Center in
its Criminal Justice intern Pro-
gram. The internship runs from
January 3 through March 11 and is
located in Glynco, Georgia, for
more information contact Nancy
Fillnow in the Co-op office, ext.
6979.
CO�OP JOB
Burroughs Wellcome in Green-
ville has an alternating Co-op posi-
tion open in its Validation Depart-
ment. The job will be far two
terms beginning in January, 1983.
INDT students with some
background in math, physics,
computers, electricity, and
chemistry and who hav good
writing skills shou 3 contact Nan-
cy Fillnow in the Co-op office, ext.
6979.
ZETA BETA
TAU
There will be a pledge class in
auction Nov. 4 at 6:00 and coat and
tie is required, it will be held in
Mendenhall Conference room on
the second floor. Monthly dues are
due at this time. There will be an
executive board meeting at 5:30.
Orders for jerseys and hooded
sweatshirts will be taken. Please
bring money or check if you are in
forested in getting one. All
members must attend.
CO-OP
Black and Decker in Tarboro
has an opening for a part-time ac
counting clerk. The person must
be able to perform miscellaneous
accounting duties such as paying
invoices and general bookkeep
ing. Preferred is someone who can
operate a 10-key adding machine.
Employment would start as soon
as possible. For more info, call the
Co-op office, ext 6979
SKI FLASH
Snowski regisrtation for
Christmas Break Trip will be Nov
9 at 4:00 PM in Memorial Gym 108.
A $5 deposit will be accepted to
reserve your space. Call Jo
Saunders at 757-6000 if you need
more information.
FRISBEE
1982 Natural Light Flying Disc
Classic Video wil be shown at the
Attic Wednesday, Nov. 10. Come
out and play ultimate Tuesday and
Thursday at 4:00 at the bottome of
the hill. Hey Tony, how about an
ultimate tournament!? We've got
the best team we've ever had �
Wonder if we could beat state?
CONCERT
The ECU Percussion Ensemble
will present a concert on Monday,
Nov. 8,1982 at 8:15p.m. in the A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall. The concert
will feature music of George
Frock, Warren Benson, Mitchell
Peters, as well as transcriptions of
music by Stravinsky and Debussy.
The concert is free and open to the
public.
$1 MILLION
PER MINUTE
Our world spends $1 million a
minute on military spending � we
now have 60,000 nuclear weapons
on our planet. Does this,outrage
you? Then join in the acthitfcs of
The Greenville Peace committee.
We meet Friday nights at 6:30
p.m. at 610 South Elm St. For
more information call 758-4906.
PSICHI
Psi Chi presents another in-
teresting and Informative meeting
Nov. 10 at 7:30 p.m. in Room 129
Speight. Mr. Dick Daves will
discuss the many ways Biofeed-
back is used In today's society and
give a better insight into this topic.
Come and find out how Biofeed-
back can help you in everyday life.
HEALTH CAREERS
DAY
Nurses, medical techs, physical
therapists. occupational
therapists, social workers, and
slap majors representatives
from various hospitals and health
agencies will be on campus to talk
with you about employment
possibilities! Different
organizations will be here on the
following dates: November 5 -
Nursing building 9:45-1:00 p.m
November 8 - Allied Health
Biulding 1 30 - 4:30 p.m.
Mark your calendar and tell
another friend about this in case
they do not see the announcement.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Our fiext meeting will be held on
Thursday, Nov. 4th in
Mendenhall's room 244 at 7 p.m. A
meeting for those going to State
Convention will be held im-
mediately following.
ACT
The American College Testing
(ACT) will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday.
December 11, 1982. Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to ACT Registration, P.O.
Box 414, Iowa City. Iowa 52240. Ap
plications may be obtained from
the ECU Testing Center, Speight
Building, Room 105
CHEMISTRY MAJORS
Burroughs Wellcome in
Research Triangle Park has an
alternating co-op position open for
a chemistry major. The tob will in-
volve working with chemistry
researchers and begins in January
1983 running for about six months.
All interested chemistry majors
with at least two semesters of
organic chemistry should contact
Nancy Fillnow in the Co-op office,
ext. 6979.
CONCERT
On Nov. 30, 1982 Student Council
for Exceptional Children will host
the Caswell Spirit Singers for a
Christmas concert. The concert
will begin at 3:30 p.m. in
Auditorium 244 Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. Everyone is invited
and welcome Come out and get
into the Christmas spirit early.
FRISBEE
Weather permitting, we win be
at the bottom of college hill today,
and every Tues. and Thurs. at
4:00. Look for the frisbee club in
the Homecoming parade. 1982
Natural Light Flying Disc Classic
Video will be shown at the Attic
Wed. Nov. 10. Club meetings are
Monday nights 8:00 in Mendenhall
Room 248; anyone interested in
frisbee is urged to attend.
SIG-EP
BROTHERS
Thank you for accepting us as
Little Sisters into your great
fraternity. Fraternally devoted.
Little Sisters!
CO-OP
Automatic Data Processing in
Charlotte has a co-op position open
for a CSC1 major, undergraduate
or graduate. The job will involve
technical support and operating
systems. Students should have
analytical skills and a background
in Assembler, Compiler, Coboi.
and RPG languages. The alter
nating position will run from
January May. For more info con
tact Carolyn Powell in me Co-op
of ice, ext. 6979, Rawl 313.
CO-OP
The Co-op office has a job open
ing for an accounting position
avaible with a local manufactur
ing firm. Requires adding
-nachine experience and accoun-
ting background. Interested
students should inquire at the Co-
op office, located in Rawl at room
313.
PRC MAJORS
Seymour Johnson Air Force
Base in Goldsboro, NC has an
alternating Co-op position
available tor Spring semester in
the ir recreation department The
position reequires a 2.0 GPA and
you must be willing to work for
two terms. It is an excellent opor
tunity for anyone interested in
gaining valuable work experience
in the area of recreation Salary:
approximately $1,000 per monrh
gross. Contact Nancy Fillnow in
the Coop office. 313 Rawl,
757 6979. it you would like to apply
or want more information
NCSL
The Norm Carolina Student
Legislature will be holding a
membership screening meeting,
Monday night. Nov. 8 in room 238
at Mendenhall Student Center
The meeting will start at 6 p.m.
and all interested persons are in-
vited to come and learn about me
NCSL.
NCSL
The North Carolina Student
Legislature will hold its weekly
meeting Monday night in
Mendenhall Student Center. Room
248. The meeting will start at 7
p.m. All members and interested
persons are encouraged to attend.
CO-OP POSITION
The U.S. Naval Academy in An
napoiis, MD has a posiNen open
for a Co-op student to work as a .
programmer analyst. Tne-stubent
must have a computer cscience
background and should be a
junior, the work experience is
alternating for two periods, the
first beginning on January 3. 1982
For more info contact Carolyn
Powell in the Co-op office, ext
6979 Rawl 313.
TUTOR
Phi Sigma Pi, the National
Honor Fraternity is offering tutors
tor a variety of General College
subjects at competitive rates, it
you are in need of a tutor call
752 3022 for more information.
BACKGAMMON
TOURNAMENT
If you love backgammon ana
fancy yourself pretty gooo. men
sign up ��� for the 1982 Depart
ment of university Unions ACU-i
All Campus Backgammon Tour
namenf. The tournament will be
conducted to determine the twe
winners who will represent ECU.
if sufficient participation permits
in the Association of College
Unions International reg-c-a
face to-face tournaments to be
held at the University of Ten
nessee on February 10. II. ana 12.
1983.
interested persons may pick up
a registration form at the Biiiiaros
Center at Mendenhall Stuoen
Center. The form must be com
Dieted and submitted to the super
visor on duty at the center t�
Tues Nov. 9.
The tournament will beam or
Thurs . Nov 11 at 6 p.m in the
MSC Multi-Purpose Room
Double-elimination andor round
robin format win be usea Eac-
match will be played to a
designated point total
An entry tee of SI is required anc
payable at the tournament 'e
The participants who will be going
to Tennessee will have the costs o�
lodging, transportation, meals
and entry fees paid by Menaenhan
Student Center
Each participant will be re
quired to show his-her ECU ID or
driver's license ana activity cara
prior to the start of the 'ourna
ment The ACU I Backgammon
Tournament Rules will be used m
the competition Copies of the
rules are available tor use at the
Billiards Center it is - ; .
recommended that all par
ticipents study tte rules prior to
the tournament. Each participant
must have a 2.0 GPA. This win be
verified with the Registrars Of
f ice. Each participant is requestec
to bring a backgammon board H
possible
Trophies will be awaroea to me
first, second and third place
finishers.
IBM CO�OP
IBM in Charlotte and Greenville
have alternating co-op positions
tor CSCI or mam maiors The
work in Charlotte involves pro
gramming while the Greenville
tob includes general training with
me company The positions are �o
start in January Contact Carolyn
Powell in the Co-op ott.ee. ext
6979 Rawl 313. for more into
DUKE POWER
Duke Power m Charlotte has a
co op position open tor a program
mer analyst. The job is alternating
tor two periods, the first beginning
January 3, 1982. Interested CSCi
or math majors, preferably
juniors with a GPA of at least 2 0
and a fairly strong computer
background, chould contact
Carolyn Powell m the Co op office
ext. 6979, Rawl 313
ANNOUNCEMENTS
It you or your organizat-or
would tike to have an item printed
in the announcement column
please type it on an announcement
form ana send it to The Eas"
Carolinian in care of the produc
tion manager
Announcement forms are
available at the Eas' Carolinian
office in the Publications Building
Flyers and handwritten fopy on
odd-sized paper cannot 't� ac
cepfedV
There is no charge tor an
nouncements. but space s often
limited. Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you want
and suggest mat you do not rely
solely on this column tor publicity.
The deadline for announcements
is 3 p.m. Monday for me Tuesday
paper and 3 p.m. Wednesaayy for
the Thursday paper No an
nouncements received after mese
deadlines will be printed
This space is available to an
campus organizations and depart
ments.
Duke Ellington's
tm mon
TC'iaM
'SATELLITE PRESENTATION
WITH
E.C. U. STUDENT UNION
FRIDAY, NOV. 5th, 1962 � 9:30 p.m. � WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
STUDENTS $3.00 � FACULTYSTAFF $5.00 � GENERAL PUBLIC S12.0Q
DOORS OPEN 45 MINUTES EARLY � COLLEGE I.D. REQUIRED
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT The Mendenhall
Student Center-Central Ticket Office
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
PRODUCED BY
Rl AU l
H
A series of
lectures spot
the ECU
of Library
Alumni Asl
kicked off its I
program witt
on "Library
for the Han
held last
night.
"It was i
program
Lo
Do
B 1 R M I N
Ala. (L'Pl)
cigarettes d
result in a ci
tar and nicd
sumed by si
cording to
presented
by scientist
American
Society
meeting.
U.S. Depa
Agriculture
from Athensl
people who
cigarettes p
on their smo
a result, in hi
much tar ai
as smokers
cigarettes.
The rese?
Dr. Witliai
zhauer, Dr.
tvk and Rot
of the USD
co Safety
Unit � defi�!
cigarettes as
three t
milligrams
They sa
though tar
levels in cigs
dropped si
over the ias
Ol Camovoi
T-Skirti. l
Backpacks. c�
ment. Steel Te
and Over rm Oil
Used Items.
ARMY-
STORE
SHOE


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sa;
SHOE
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 4, 1982 3
iMMON
tMENT
Sckgammon and
Iretty good, then
lt'ie 1982 Depart
Itv Unions ACUI
bkgammon Tour
Lmament will be
termtne the two
represent ECU,
Ic oation permits,
ltion of College
t.onal regional
rnamenrs to be
liversity of Ten
10. 11 and 12.
ions may pick up
r at the Billiards
enhall Student
must be com
tied to the super
the center by
Ir wii begin on
I �T 6 p.m in the
urD0se Room
lo � ana or round
III oe usea Each
Diayed to a
J lota)
Is is required and
Itvurnament site
1 who will be going
I "ave the costs ot
�ortation. meals
pu by Menoenhali
pi W will be re
is er ECU ID or
a activity card
I ot the fourna
Backgammon
a oe used in
Copies ot the
e tor use at the
it is htgnly
�ha' an par
e rules prior to
J Each participant
GPA This will be
Registrar s Of
Jipant is requested
immon board if
awarded to the
: th.rd place
to�OP
a and Greenviile
co-op positions
�n maiors The
t involves pro
the Greenville
rai training with
positions are to
Contact Carolyn
op off.ce ext
Tvore 'nto.
POWER
Charlc'te has a
I tor a program
00 isal'ernahng
Ime trst beginning
Interested CSC I
Kri oreterably
JPA of at least 2.0
I S'rong computer
cnoulo contact
Jin the Co op office.
ICEMENTS
cur organization
e an item printed
hcement column,
an announcement
t to The East
��e of the produc
forms are
Eas� Carolinian
locations Building
�ritten copy on
cannot be ac
charge for an
bu' space is often
Ifore, we cannot
your announce
long as vou want
it you oo not rely
llumn for publicity.
fcr announcements
��or the Tuesday
Aeonesoayy for
aper No an-
eived after these
printed
�s available to all
b' ens and depart
Handicapped Give Lecture
A series of monthly
lectures sponsored by
the ECU Department
of Library and its
Alumni Association
kicked off its 1982-1983
program with a lecture
on "Library Problems
for the Handicapped"
held last Wednesday
night.
"It was an excellent
program said Dr.
Donald E. Collins,
associate professor in
the Department of
Library Science and
coordinator Of the lec-
ture series. "People get
a lot more out of
something if they hear
it from a handicapped
person Collins add-
ed, referring to the
panel of three disabled
ECU students who
presented the program.
The lecture was
designed to give
librarians, teachers and
interested persons the
opportunity to hear
handicapped students
relate their experiences
in doing library
research.
ECU English student
Mary Susan Menius
represented hearing im-
Low Tar Cigarettes
Don 9t Help Smokers
paired library users.
Richard Hartness, a
chemistry major spoke
on the problems of the
blind and history
graduate student
Richard Burke spoke
on the difficulties of
wheelchair bound
library users.
Hartness mentioned
that just familiarizing
himself with the library
and knowing his way
around was difficult.
He also spoke of the
special needs, such as
auditory aids and
reading material in
Braille, that blind peo-
ple have.
quire ramps to gain en-
trance to them. He
noted that card
catalogues and book
shelves are often out of
the reach of wheelchair
students. He added his
wish that library
employees would be
more sensitive to the
special needs of disabl-
ed students.
Another lecture deal-
ing with the same sub-
ject will be held on Dec.
2 in Room 221 of the
ECU library sciences
department, Joyner
Library. The speakers
will be Charles Fox and
Penny Hornsby of the
N.C. Regional Library
218 Arlington Blvd.
756-6001
Downtown
752-4156
SPORTING GOODS
BIRMINGHAM,
Ala. (UPI) � Low-tar
cigarettes don't really
result in a cutdown of
tar and nicotine con-
sumed by smokers, ac-
cording to a report
presented Wednesday
by scientists at an
American Chemical
Society regional
meeting.
U.S. Department of
Agriculture scientists
from Athens, Ga said
people who like low-tar
cigarettes puff harder
on their smokes and, as
a result, inhale about as
much tar and nicotine
as smokers of regular
cigarettes.
The researchers �
Dr. William Schlot-
zhauer, Dr. O.T. Chor-
tyk and Robert Martin
of the USDA's Tobac-
co Safety Research
Unit � defined low-tar
cigarettes as those with
three to seven
milligrams of tar.
They said even
though tar and nicotine
levels in cigarettes have
dropped significantly
over the last 30 years,
the volume of smoke
inhaled by the average
smoker has increased
appreciably during the
same period.
"The duration of the
puff and puff frequen-
cy have also increas-
ed said Chortyk.
"Our laboratory
results indicate that as a
consequence of this
change in smoking
behavior, many
smokers are inhaling a
lot more tar and
nicotine than is in-
dicated by the Federal
Trade Commission
figures calculated for
these cigarettes he
said.
The scientists used
smoking machines to
simulate various smok-
ing behaviors and then
analyzed the com-
ponents of inhaled
smoke. Several brands
of low-tar cigarettes
were tested.
"When we increase
the puff volume from
35 milliliters � the
average volume for a
smoker of 30 years ago
� to 48 milliliters � a
typical volume for a
smoker of today's low-
tar cigarettes � we find
a dramatic increase in
the levels of certain in-
haled smoke com-
ponents said Chor-
tyk.
He explained that
smoke contains
thousands of
chemicals, many of
which are known to be
hazardous to human
health, and the levels of
many of these
chemicals increased
with the increased puff
volume.
Smoking machines
were also used to study
the effects of
simultaneously increas-
ing puff volume, dura-
tion and frequency.
Results of that study
indicate today's
average low-tar
cigarette smoker, with
some exceptions, in-
hales about as much tar
and nicotine as does the
average smoker who
smokes higher tar
cigarettes.
Burke mentioned the for the Blind and
fact that libraries are Physically Handicap-
"built high" and re- ped in Raleigh.
All Polo &
Lacoste Frames
50 off
with purchase of
prescription lens.
(This coupon Mint
accompany orter)
V5ttTci
pucians
31S Park view Cammoai
Across trow Doctors Park
Open t a.mtil S: JO p.m.
Mo�ay Mm-m PrMay
752-144
SWEAT SHOP SPECIAL
SWEATS BY RUSSELL
ALL SWEATS 507o POLYESTER, 50 COTTON;
OVER 15 .COLORS TO CHOOSE FROM: YELLOW,
LIME, PINK, LAVENDER, WHITE, COLUMBIA
BLUE, NAVY, GOLD, PURPLE, CARDINAL, KELLY,
DARK GREEN, TURQUOISE, ROSE, ARMY GREEN,
GRAY.
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ALLSWEAT PANTS - REG. $8.95
ELASTIC WAIST WITH DRAWSTRING,
HEMMED ELASTICIZED LEGS.
ALL CREWNECK SWEATSHIRTS - REG. $8.95
FULL CUT PATTERN, CREW NECK,
SET-IN SLEEVES, RIBBED NECK, CUFF, WAIST.
$1.00 OFF WTTHTHCCOUfOM.
XlThoodedpulloverjackets -
REG. $1.50
FULL-CUT PATTERN, SET-IN SLEEVES,
HOODED, RIBBED CUFFS AND WAIST,
MUFF POCKET.
$2.00 OFF WITH THIS COUPON
CUP THESE COUPONS FOR YOUR NEXT PURCHASE.
OFFER EXPIRES 111382
Ol Camouflaged Fatigues and
T-Shirts, Sleeping Bags,
Backpacks, Camping Equip-
ment, Steel Toed Shoes, Dishes
and Over 7(0 Different New and
Used Items. Cowboy Boots,
SI.S.
ARMY-NAVY
STORE ,m��
QUALITY
SHOE REPAIR
SAADS
SHOKRKPAIR
113 Grande Ave.
758 1228
Mitchell's Hair Styling Salon
r
i
i
i
i
i
i
is offering a
Body Wave Special
Bring this coupon in
and get $3.00 off
the price of
any body wave.
Spec, good thru Nov. 10,1982
l
l
l
I
I
I
Pitt Plaza Shopping Center
Phone - 756-2950 or 756-4042
When it comes to the food at Taco
Bell there's really only one school
of thought. What a difference!
To begin with, your order's made
up fresh from the best ingredients.
That's different. And it's all served
up piping hot to be sure you get all of
the delicious flavor. That's different.
You also get served fast, which
means that our schedule will keep
you on yours. That's different.
And you get it all at the terrific
Taco BelL price. That's really different.
Plus, where else do you find food
with deliciously different names like
Taco Supreme Burrito Supreme,
and Enchirito.? Each one a far cry
from the usual fast food fare (not to
mention whatever that is they serve
in the cafeteria).
So cut out the coupon, then cut
out for Taco Bell and see for your-
self what a difference we make.
sr
r
��
&

THIS COUPON GOOD FOR A
1
please present this
coupon when ordering.
limit: one coupon
per person
pa
Free Taco
Wrm ThePurchase OfOne At Regular Price.
Cri�p com tortilla. Fre�h pound beef. Lettuce and real cheddar cheese.
tbcoAbelu
GOOD ONLY AT 319 L(ar�xtrYaleBoutevanl Grecartlc
HOT GOOD WITH
ANY OTHER OFFER.
OFFER EXPtRES
October 31, 982
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�fte �0t (Hwculinim
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, ow mmo
Mike Hughes. ,��.�,���
WAVERLY MERRITT. Orrctor of Advertising
Robert Rucks, mmm ���
ALI AFRASHTEH. Crtdk Manager
Stephanie Groon, arc "
JONl GUTHRIE. TechnKa! Supervisor
Cindy Pleasants, spomEdnor
Greg Rideout, ����
STEVE BACHNER, Entertainment Editor
Juliana Fahrbach, saw-
Mike Davis, production Mmv-
November 4, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Law's Long Arm
Reagan Deputizes Financial Aides
In what has become almost a
characteristic move for the Reagan
administration, the President
recently signed into law a bill mak-
ing college financial aid offices an
extension of the Selective Service.
If the above makes little or no
sense to you, don't feel alone; it's
questionable whether Reagan
understands the concept himself.
What the new law actually means
is that from this point onward, col-
lege and university financial aid of-
fices in the United States must
receive adequate proof that male
petitioners have registered with the
Selective Service before those
students are granted financial aid
benef
Naturally, most of the worrying
at this time is anticipatory, since the
government hasn't yet told the of-
fices what they have to do to imple-
ment the law. However, some
speculation has arisen that financial
aid offices around the nation will
soon be equipped with surplus Ar-
my M-16s "to further the cause of
justice
As if college aid offices don't
have enough to do, now they have
to play Matt Dillon and company,
the long-arm of the law.
This latest development has
nothing whatsoever to do with the
legality or morality of draft registra-
tion. That is an entirely different
question.
In theory, the new law is
presumably an effort on the part of
the Reagan administration to
"crack down" on non-registrants
by denying them the benefits en-
joyed by their law-abiding peers �
a standard American enforcement
technique. In fact, however, the
legislation only goes to further ex-
emplify that administration's lack
of ability in dealing with law en-
forcement.
Perhaps they are right in denying
non-registrants financial aid. After
all, most other felons aren't eligible
for too many federal benefits.
But what the Reagan administra-
tion seems to have forgotten �
aside from a proper implementation
plan � is that in trying to enforce
the new law, financial aid offices
may just be breaking another, an
older civil rights law. Title IX of the
Higher Education Amendments of
1972 forbids discrimination in col-
leges on the basis of gender. And
the new law forces financial aid of-
fices to place a condition on men's
educations that they don't have to
place on women's, since at present,
women do not have to register for
the draft.
Does our illustrious President feel
that he is somehow above the law?
Perhaps his plan is like those of so
many other chief executives before
him: to enact legislation that will
serve only to bog down a federal
court system which is already suf-
fering from the overload of diverse
other cases pending.
All legal considerations aside,
though, the new financial aid law is
little more than an admission of in-
competence by the federal govern-
ment. Since the Reagan administra-
tion consistently opts for the pick-
and-choose method of prosecution,
they have opened themselves up to
criticism.
Furthermore, what is $13 million
of tax-payers' money (the average
annual Selective Service budget) be-
ing used for if the federal govern-
ment has to rely on such asinine tac-
tics to enforce its draft registration
laws?
As on every other controversial
issue, a split has emerged between
those who support the law and those
opposed to it. Edward Marsh,
financial aid director at Florida
State University maintains that op-
posing the legislation would be like
opposing God and country,
mom and apple pie
Apparently, not too many
students in Tallahassee crowd the
financial aid office on campus dur-
ing the first month of every
semester.
However, other institutions, like
Earlham College in Indiana, are
vocally opposed. Earlham Financial
Aid Director Kathy Malutich claims
that while the school will make an
attempt to enforce the law, she and
her co-workers will also strive to
find and develop new campus pro-
grams to create "like aid" for any
"serious" registration resister cut
off from federal student aid for
military reasons.
Campus Incident Raises Questions
Considering Handgun Laws
By STEVE DEAR
Well, it happened again. An ECU stu-
dent � this time it was sophomore Steve
Sellers � was shot with a handgun on cam-
pus last Sunday night. Several years ago, a
student committed suicide in his Aycock
dormitory room using a handgun, not to
mention the armed robberies that took
place "years ago acording to Joseph
Calder, director if the ECU Department of
Public Safety.
The first question that came to my mind
when I heard the news of Sunday night's
tragedy was, "What was a student doing
with a handgun in the first place?"
So, Jeff Pagues, the student who ac-
cidentally shot his friend Sellers while
"horsing around obtained the gun from
his girlfriend. Why does she have a gun?
For protection?
I am amazed at the naive view people
sometimes have � that possessing a han-
dgun can actually be a beneficial, protec-
tive measure in making them more secure.
Unfortunately, owning a handgun, for
those who own them for "protective" pur-
poses, not only gives people a false feeling
of security but docs more harm than good.
Fact: For every time a handgun is used
in households against a burglar in the
United States, at least six innocent victims
are killed, according to Handgun Control
Inc a national organization calling for
stricter handgun control laws.
Fact: In 1979, Great Britain, with a
population of more than 54 million, had
only eight (that's eight!) handgun-related
deaths; West Germany had only 42; Japan,
48; Canada, 52; and Switzerland, 34. All
of these countries enforce strict handgun
control laws However, about 22,000 peo-
ple die from bullet wounds brought about
by people with handguns every year in the
U.S and the numbers are increasing.
In North Carolina alone, a far number
more homicides occur annually than in all
five of those foreign countries combined.
In 1980, North Carolina had 275 handgun-
related homicides.
Why do our citizens continue to allow
such an incredible amount of attrocity to
occur every year? And why was it possible
for a man who was later legally considered
to be insane to easily buy a handgun and
use it to shoot the President? The primitive
arguments by organizations, such as the
National Rifle Association's citing of their
"right to bear arms become absurdities
in light of episodes like Sunday night's
shooting.
Although on Tuesday, Caiifomians re-
jected an amendment calling for stricter
handgun controls, this at least shows that
people are beginning to take the problerrr
seriously.
This amendment should set a precedent
for all the country to follow. In a sense, if
more communities like ours do not de-
mand our government to make and en-
force stricter handgun control laws for
handguns of any size, then we will be
responsible for the deaths of innocent
citizens.
Is Jeff Pegues solely guilty of assault
with a deadly weapon, or are the people of
this country guilty of allowing tragedies
like this to become realities by not having
stricter handgun control laws? I choose the
latter.
Both Parties Ignore "Real9 Issues
'Staying The Curse?'
By PAT O'NEILL
Well, the votes are counted, and the
GOP has received a new message from the
American people. Reaganomics is a
failure! Reagan came to North Carolina
last week to stump for his boys, but none
of them managed to come up with a vic-
tory.
Throughout the mid-term campaign, he
kept telling the voters to "stay the
course but instead, the voters took a
detour. The Republicans blew a fortune on
campaigns, and as usual. North Carolina's
own Congressional Club kept up its mud-
slinging-and-lies approach. Despite all the
unscrupulous attempts of the Republicans,
everything still came up Democrat.
So, what does all this mean? From the
standpoint of a "radical" like myself, pro-
bably not much. When I glance at the
voting records of North Carolina con-
gressmen (let's not mention our senators),
I can't help but think there isn't much dif-
ference between Republicans and
Democrats. Even my own Democratic
Congressman Walter B Jones, who was
re-elected in a landslide, couldn't bring
himself to support the bi-lateral nuclear
freeze.
North Carolina Democratic represen-
tatives in Washington consistently vote
against human needs programs and for in-
creases in the military budget. Lobbying
organizations, like Bread for the World
(anti-hunger lobby) and the Coalition for a
New Foreign and Military Policy
(anti-military build-up lobby) continually
show the dismal voting records of North
Carolina's national reps on the issues that
really count.
All considered, I must admit that my
faith and hope in the legislative process
(creating a framework for a more peaceful
and just world) is very weak.
The issues that I consider most impor-
tant � the ones that affect life and death
daily � have received virtually no con-
sideration from the major parties. I don't
expect to see any dramatic changes in U.S.
policy regarding military spending or
human needs because of Tuesday's vote.
So, as a result, I plan to take Reagan's
advice. I'm going to "stay the course
But I'm quite sure it's not the course he
had in mind.
r
Campus Forum
Lack Of Communication Poses Serious Threat Of Danger
On Monday night, at 9:37, one Robert
Poolc, a player on the Scott "Booty
Crew" soccer team, was painfully � as
well as seriously � injured when pushed
unintentionally into the upright post of
the other team's soccer goal. Although
no bleeding resulted from the injury,
Poole suffered from severe abdominal
pains and was unable to continue the
contest.
Unsure of (Poole's) injury, an alert
student trainer and an official supervisor
acted patiently yet as quickly and effec-
tively as was in their power to alert the
Pitt County Rescue Squad via the cam-
pus police "Blue Light" system. The call
for help was made within five minutes of
the accident. However, this was the only
efficient link in a three-link chain of
events.
The campus police department, un-
sure of the accident's validity, saw fit to
send a patrolman to the accident scene;
this took nearly 15 minutes. Once at the
scene, the patrolman made the call for
the rescue squad, which took another 10
minutes to arrive.
Suppose Poole had been bleeding pro-
fusely, or was in shock or unconscious,
or was bleeding internally? The 25
minutes taken to assess the situation
could have been the difference between
his life and death.
Agreed, the police do receive some
calls from foolish student pranksters
who get their kicks from making false
"Blue Light" calls. Also agreed, the in-
tramural recreational services, acting on
a limited budget, cannot afford to put
an ambulance on every field for every
event. But something can be done.
A confidential code can be arranged
between the police and the intramural
department, for instance. This would
eliminate the 15 minutes wasted in sen-
ding a patrolman to assess the situation.
There are certainly other solutions to
this problem, although this one strikes
me as the most efficient, or, at least, the
least expensive method.
Certainly, this one letter, based on
this one incident, dealing with this one
complaint, won't move too many moun-
tains, but the actions of many students
can. What is needed is for students,
spectators and participants of in-
tramural sports to bring their complaints
to a stronger, more powerful voice, our
voice, the Student Government Associa-
tion. If this fails to bring results, we
must merge together again, as one
group, and voice a complaint to the ad-
ministrators involved with intramural
sports themselves.
If you think of this subject as
preposterous or foolish, imagine
yourself in Robert Poole's shoes Mon-
day, Nov. 1: in severe pain, unsure of
your injury, and waiting, and wonder-
ing, and waiting, and wondering
James Aleo
Homecoming
Thank You's
With the end of the 1982 homecoming
activities, it is time to recognize those in-
dividuals who volunteered their time to
make it all a reality. True, there were
flaws and faults; criticisms and com-
plaints were made known from day one.
However, compliments have come in
too, and these have made it all wor-
thwhile! To those of you who suffered
from our errors, our sincere apologies.
We are putting everything together now
so that those individuals who volunteer
to do next year's homecoming can gain
from our experiences. We have all gain-
ed a tremendous amount of knowledge
useful in minimizing any future pro-
blems, and certainly, terminating many
of those experienced this year.
Thank you's this year can go to many
individuals: merchants who helped us,
service fraternities and sororities who
helped inflate 1,644 purple and gold
balloons, the wonderful students who
dressed as clowns to pats out those
balloons, and many others who caught
on to the spirit and lent a helping hand.
To the students of the Student
Homecoming Committee, many of you
gave far beyond the call of duty as did
your committee members. Thank you:
Stuart Fulghum (Bands and Parade),
Lauri Daughtry (Parade), Larry Clayton
(Half-time), Cathy Edwards
(Entertainment), Jesse Riggs (Publicity),
Suzanne Wilson (Decorations), and
Monica Forties (Secretary). A thank you
also to my co-adviser, Mr. C.C. Rowe,
who handled a lot of technical ar-
rangements. And last, a very big thank
you to Regiiia Hardee, who chaired the
committee and who worked extremely
diligently coordinating the plans, who
rolled with the punches, and who said to
me just ence, "You said this would be
easy Again, thank you all for making
the weekend work and Homecoming '82
the success it was. Now let's evaluate
and begin next year's planning
Jon Curtis, Co-Adviser
Student Homecoming Committee
Smokeont
I am happy to be back this year as Pitt
County Chairman of the Great
American Smokeojit. Again, we
volunteers are preparing to make Nov.
18, 1982, our sixth annual "smokeless
Thursday
Last year, the Gallup survey showed
that more than 16 million Americans
participated in the Great American
Smokeout, and nearly five million didn't
smoke for 24 hours. Just under three
million cigarette smokers were still not
smoking one to 11 days later.
I invite the students, faculty and staff
at ECU to join us in this fantastic
smokeout campaign. Who knows,
maybe this will be the time you quit for
good!
Good luck on Nov. 18. Hooray for
quitters, and Hooray for the American
Cancer Society.
Joan Boudreaux
Pin County i
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing ail points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major ami
P,
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 4. 1982
S
precedent
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Ig tragedies
not having
choose the
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comes letters
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he Old South
W Library.
Iron, all letters
major and
one number
or(s).
PBS Filming Draws Low Local Attendance
By PATRICK
04NEILL
Staff Writer
Low attendance
didn't decrease the en-
thusiasm of audience
participants in last
week's two-part
"North Carolina Town
Meeting" television
series that was filmed in
ECU'S Jenkins Fine
Arts Center.
The two-28 minute
programs, which will
be aired by the Univer-
sity of North Carolina
Center for Public
Television in about a
month, were filmed
before audience crowds
producers and camera
crews to scan the art
building for students or
anyone else who would
be willing to fill a seat
in the almost empty
auditorium.
The programs were
of approximately 25 to designed to encourage
30 people.
Poor publicity was
generally cited as the
reason for the low tur-
nout which prompted
television dialogue bet
ween panalists and
citizens on the "critical
issues" facing North
Carolinians today. The
topics chosen for
Greenville were "The
Plight of The Farmer"
on Wednesday night
and 'Justice For The
Rich, and Justice For
The Poor" on Thurs-
day night.
Each segment includ-
ed a panal of three local
residents who respond-
ed to audience ques-
tions or question from
the shows host Reese
Democrats Take Elections While
Ike Andrews Fends Off Cobey
Continued From Page 1
James M. Clark, lost
by less than one percen-
tage point. Democrat
C. Robin Britt outpoll-
ed Johnston by less
than 10 percent in
another race the GOP
didn't expect to lose.
Margins of victory
were also close in
several other races in-
cluding the hotly con-
tested fourth district
race between Ike F. An-
drews, the incumbant
Democrat, and his
Congresional Club-
backed opponent
William Cobey Jr the
Chapel Hill
Republican.
Cobey who ran on a
"support the presi-
dent" platform seemed
closer to victory after
Andrews' arrest and
conviction on drunk
driving charges last
month.
Cobey, who spent
over $500,000 on his
campaign, primarily
through television and
radio advertising, could
not overcome the hard
fought comeback cam-
paigning of the usually
low key Andrews. "1
couldn't be more pleas-
ed said Andrews who
added that "people
here just more and
more have a great
resentment of the Con-
gresional Club
In another race
which was expected to
be close, newcomer
Democrat l.T. "Tim"
Valentine easily out-
polled Republican
Challenger John W.
"Jack" Marin. Valen-
tine said that he was
"relieved, elated and
tired" after his win. He
won the seat being
vacated by conservative
Democrat
tain.
L.H. Foun-
In other races,
democrats were also
able to outpoll
Republicans. Third
district incumbant
Charles O. Whitley
easily won what was
supposed to be a tight
race against his
Republican challenger
Eugene "Red"
McDaniel.
Edwards.
The Wednesday
evening panal included
Winterville farmer
Kenneth Dews, Pitt
County Agricultural
Extension Service
Chairman Leroy
James, and R.T. (Bud)
Forrest, regional direc-
tor of the Federal Crop
Insurance Corporation.
The three responded
to questions on a range
of issues concerning
farming in Pitt County
and other eastern N.C.
areas. It was noted that
because of the financial
risks, farming was no
longer attracting many
young people and that
the average age of the
farming population in
the U.S. was continu-
ing to rise. The average
age of a U.S. farmer is
now said to be between
57 and 58 years.
It was also noted that
schools are no longer
offering as much voca-
tional training for
future farmers as in the
past.
Lack of markets for
produced goods and
the difficulty of acquir-
ing funds were men-
tioned as major pro-
blems contributing to
the difficulties facing
farmers. Lending agen-
cies presently consider
loans to farmers too
risky.
On Thursday evenig
the panalists included
the Rev. B.B. Felder of
Greenville's Cor-
nerstone Baptist
Church, former
Superior Court Judge
Robert D. Rouse Jr.
and District Attorney
Nancy Barnhill
Aycock.
Questions from the
audience first took on a
global scope which
seemed to stymie the
panalists who openly
admitted their ig-
norance. Later ques-
tions concerning the
plights of blacks and
poor people who
receive harsh treatment
from the justice system
were raised.
Various members of
the audience cited cases
where rich people
would use their in-
fluences or money to
circumvent the legal
system, while
minorities or poor peo-
ple would in turn
receive harsh sentences
for similar or less
severe offenses.
Meeting" series is one
of the Center's public
affairs programs based
on results of the annual
ascertainment survey of
community leaders to
determine problems
and needs which are of
statewide concern.
Similar town meeting
programs are scheduled
to be filmed in Raleigh
and Boone.
The

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 4, 1982
A
j
1
Clark Heads Education Dept.
By ANTHONY BOYD
Staff Writer
A long time native of
Greenville and
graduate of ECU has
been named chairman
of the Department ipf
Elementary Education.
Dr. Amos Clark,
who was appointed
Oct. 1, says of his new
position, "It's much
more demanding; that
fact means it's a
challenge and that's a
positive factor Dr.
Clark has served as ac-
ting chairman of the
department since the
retirement of Dr. Frank
Arwood last May.
As chairman, Dr.
Clark plans to
strengthen the elemen-
tary education depart-
ment's new six-year
programs and develop
new courses.
He received his
bachelors and masters
degrees from ECU
when it was called the
East Carolina Teachers
College, in 1948. After
serving 10 years as a
teacher and principal in
the Wilmington and
New Bern school
systems, Dr. Clark
went on to Duke
University where he
Student Recipes Wanted
For Campus Cookbook
received his doctorate
in education.
The new chairman
feels that, "Anyone
(faculty) in the school
of education should
have had experience on
the public school
teaching level He
says working in the
classroom has changed
in recent years. "If I
went back I would find
that it was quite dif-
ferent. The department
tries to give their
students a realistic pic-
ture of what it's like in
the classroom.
By PATRICK (SDA) in the Depart-
O'NEILL ment of Food, Nutri-
tion, Institution
Staff Writer . ' .
Management has an-
The ECU Student nounced a recipe con-
Dietetic Association test which will be used
Fed Representative
Speaks To Public
On Future Banking
Continued From Page 1
Governors is a seven-
man regulatory com-
mission, independent
of the three branches of
government, that
regulates United States
monetary policy.
Before Partee's ap-
pointment to the
board, he had been a
member of the boards's
staff. For six years
before going to
Washington, D.C he
was associated with
Northern Trust Com-
pany of Chicago.
Wardrep urges all
faculty, staff, students
and the general public
to attend the lecture. "I
feel it would be
beneficial to all who at-
tend.
as a way to accumulate
recipe selections to be
published this spring in
a cookbook titled
"East Carolina's
Favorite Recipes
According to SDA
President Vicki Marder
"Anyone affiliated
with the university" is
eligible to submit an
unlimited number of
recipes for the contest.
Ten entries will be
chosen for a bake-off
at a later date. "The
recipes will be judged
on originality, ap-
pearence and taste
said Marder.
First prize in the
Bake-off will be a din-
ner for two at Darryl's.
Recipe collection boxes
are located at several
spots around campus.
Entries must be in by
Nov. 12.
"Enrollment is a
third of what it was 10
years ago Dr. Clark
says. He attributes this
to a lack of jobs, low
salaries and the fact
that women are going
into different fields.
Teaching, according to
Dr. Clark, is basically a
supply and demand
field.
"Job opportunities
for intermediate educa-
tion majors is good.
Employment prospects
for an early education
major are not good.
Despite the decline in
department enrollment
and lack of job oppor-
tunities, Dr. Clark
plans to increase the
faculty and add some
needed programs.
One of the newest in-
novations in the
classroom is the micro-
computer. Dr. Clark
plans to hold
workshops to prepare
department members
for working with com-
puters. "Students are
going to need to know
more about this; it's
one of the coming
needs Dr. Clark says.
"However, you can't
replace the human fac-
tor in the classroom
IS MUS
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All types of uniforms at reasonable
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
NOVEMBER 4. 1982 Pate 7
So Who's Coming To Campus?
That's Right, Me, Al Franken
ad
rare no,
CATSUP
Old SNL comedy team Al Franken and Tom Davis.
The irreverent comedywriting
team of Al Franken and Tom Davis
found an avid cult following in the
early days of the old Saturday Nite
Live. Since those days, their comedy
has become slightly less accessible
but no less irreverent.
Franken and Davis now TV guest
spots and college campuses, which is
what brings them to Hendrix
Theatre this Monday, November 8,
at 8 p.m.
A representative of the Jack
Daniels Distilleries lectures on What
to Do If You're Drunk and You Ab-
solutely Have to DriveDrive a
big American car; put something
substantial between you and
whatever it is you're going to hit
Two pregnant women meet on a
TV commercial and discuss plans
for their first meal after the birth �
to be, in fact, the afterbir-
th "Placenta Helper lets you
stretch your placenta into a tasty
casserole
World War II is announced on
the Six O'clock News; 85 million
Americans are dead, but the
weather and sports are reported as
usualWell, Barn, we think the
knee's gonna be all right
If the comic visions of Al Franken
and Tom Davis seem a bit twisted,
they're merely a shade more bent
than the bleak tableaus that you see
on the nightly news. Indeed,
shading and subtlety are the finely
honed tools that separate Franken
and Davis from other comedians in
the trade.
Most people know Al Franken
and Tom Davis from their five-year
stint as writers and performers on
NBC's original Saturday Nite Live.
There they introduced viewers to the
Coneheads, to Weekend Update's
"Point-Counterpoint" ("Jane, you
ignorant slut") and the Al Franken
decade.
They created most of SNL's
political sketches � "Nixon's Final
Days the Three Mile Island
"Pepsi Syndrome" parody and the
Jimmy Carter phone-in (where the
President receives a call from a
young man in the throws of an acid
trip and talks him down). They also
wrote many of the show's parody
commercials, including an ad for
"Royal Deluxe II a car so smooth
a rabbi can circumsize a baby in the
back seat.
Currently, Al and Tom have
taken their act on .he road, perfor-
ming their unique two-man sketches
at nightclubs and college campuses
around the country. Their style is
dry and deadpan, in the sly, silly
fashion of their comic idols Bob and
Ray. But their subject matter tends
to be more raw and controversial,
'Lightning' Wells A Versatile
Performer Who Enjoys Work
By MIKE HAMER
Staff riler
Mike "Lightning" Wells is a
Greenville musician and ECU
graduate who has won the respect of
traditional music lovers and musi-
cians throughout the state for his ex-
tensive repertoire of songs in such
diverse fields as blues, old-time
music, bluegrass, gospel, western
swing, and country. Mike and 1 got
together for supper the other even-
ing and talked about his involve-
ment in music as a performer, a
recreational therapist, and a collec-
tor of old and rare recordings.
Mike Wells will be playing in
Durham on Nov. 13 at the
Somethyme Restaurant and with
Home Town Boys at the Opry
House on Nov. 17 as part of the
Tobacco Show.
An Interview With
Mike Wells
EC: Mike, can you tell me about
some of the places yoU've played
out of the area?
WELLS: Well, I've played at the
West Point Military Academy this
past January. 1 played by myself as
part of a revue which included the
Green Grass Cloggers, Phil and
Gaye Johnson, Jay and Lynn
Ungar, and the Hudson Valley Hot-
shots. We also did a show at a
pulbic school in Manhattan, and we
did a show with Pete Secger, too.
I also played at the South
Carolina Peach Festival in Gaffney,
S.C. this summer, as well as, at the
Sunday in the Park in Asheville,
N.C. I've played with the Home
Town Boys the past two summers
here in Greenville.
EC: Haven't you played at the
Eno River Folk Festival a few
times?
WELLS: No, I just played there
this past summer for the first time.
EC: Didn't you play at the
Philadelphia Folk Festival one year?
WELLS: No, I stayed up and
jammed with Taj Mahal there,
though. Not everyone stays up late
at those festivals, but if you stay up
late you can play with anyone �
which is one way that folk music is
so neat because you can play with
anybody � everyone's ap-
proachable.
EC: Who are some of the acts you
have opened for?
WELLS: Well, I've done some
shows for the Carolina Area Friends
of Folkmusic, Bluegrass, and Blues.
They're out of Durham. I've opened
up for George Gritzbach once, and I
opened up for James Cotten here in
Greenville at the Roxy a few years
back. The Home Town Boys just
backed up Mac Wiseman at the
Pender Park Bluegrass Festival a
couple of weeks ago. I also warmed
up for the Irish group, Touchstone,
in 1981. This was aired on Village
Cable in Chapel Hill and Durham.
EC: Which are your favorite
places to play, Ligntning?
WELLS: I like to play in small
places. I don't know, I guess I like
McDibbs in Black Mountain, and
the Trawl Door in Oriental. 1 also
like the Somethyme in Durham and
the New Deli and the Phoenix Room
here in Greenville.
EC: What are some of the
memorable gigs you've had?
WELLS: Hm, one time a guy
stuck a $5 bill in my guitar and I
said, "Wow, I ought to meet this
guy Then when I met him I found
out he was real crazy. I played at
Sudi's in Durham one time and this
girl requested "Death Letter Blues"
and when I played it for her she
started crying. I apologized, but she
said it was OK. I made eight dollars
that night plus the sole of someone's
shoe for my soul music.
WELLS: When I played in
Chapel Hill they used to pass the
hat. I got all kinds of stuff � gold
Burt Is Sharky, A Tough Cop With A Great Set Of Lips
Rrt RpvnnirR one of today's most popular screen acton, stan In and unknown who hat taken over Atlanta's underworld. Seaotiful
SmTimJSm Ttanday night at 7 p.m. and Frl- moaWactrem Rachel Ward (pictnred .hove with Reynold.) c
TjjSSTr 5?7:15 and 9:30 p.m. in Mendenlnll Stn- The film b sponsored hy the Stndent Union Ftfu Co�itke.
Seit Center'sHLdrixThetn Reynold, play, an nndercover cop �. b free with ID and activity card or MSC nhanhip.
demoted to the vice squad and hot on the trail of The Ace, an
placing them in the vanguard of to-
day's frank, irreverent comedy, so
popular, as Al puts it "among to-
day's gullible young poeple
By hitting the road, Franken and
Davis are, in a way, returning to
their roots. They first met in 1968 as
high school students in Minnestoa,
where they teamed up and started
doing stand-up comedy. Upon
graduation, Al entered Harvard and
majored in behavioral sciences �
anthropology, sociology,
psychology. "What else you gonna
major in at a party school?" he
recalled.
Meanwhile, Tom dropped out
of school and majored in
misbehavioral sciences, bumming
around the world, working as a
short order cook, assembling spray
guns, occasionally playing Santa
See ZANY, Page 8
wedding rings, silver dollars, I got
some other neat things that I can't
remember.
EC: How did you get started play-
ing music?
WELLS: I learned to play har-
monica in the third grade, stuff like
"Oh Susanna "Good Night
Ladies "Old Black Joe" was a
hard one. I played in my third grade
talent show in Cleveland. I got ex-
cited and swung my arm back and
the harp flew out of my hand and
hit the wall and broke.
WELLS: When I was 13 I played
harp and tambourine and sang in a
group in Goldsboro called "The
Unknowns After the band broke
up I decided to learn to play the
guitar.
After that, I got more into folk
music, into people like Bob Dylan,
and Woody Guthrie. I learned
fingerpicking from Dave Van Ronk.
One of the first songs I learned to
play on the guitar was "Baltimore
to Washington" by Woody Guthrie.
In fact, I just taught that song to a
friend who's learning to play guitar.
When I was in highschool in
Goldsboro I played at coffeehouses
at school and on the base.
EC: Mike, when' did you first
See SINGS, Page 8
School of Music percussion ensemble hangs ont a little Debussy.
Percussion Ensemble
Features Suites By
Debussy, Stravinsky
A varied concert of percussion
music will be presented by the ECU
Percussion Ensemble Monday,
Nov. 8, at 8:15 p.m. in the Fletcher
Music Center Recital Hall.
Included on the program are
"Fanfare for Double Percussion
Trio" by George Frock, a Robinson
transcription of Debussy's "The
Girl with the Flaxen Hair "A La
Nanigo" by Mitchell Peters, War-
ren Benson's "Three Pieces for Per-
cussion Quartet" and a Freeman
transcription of four movements
from Stravinsky's Suites Nos. 1 and
2.
The concert is free and open to
the public.
Bill Freeman, a graduate student
at ECU from Coweta, Ok la is con-
ductor of the Percussion Ensemble.
Members include the following
percussion students in the ECU
School of Music:
Shawn Carson and Darla
Richards of Greenville, Phil Chap-
man of Wingate, Stoney Crump of
Hillsborough, Beth Faircloth of
Stedman, Vannie Parker of Fayet-
teville, David McCollum of East
Bend, Lee Lane of Wilmington,
Lorri Holland of Pittsboro and Jen-
nifer Courtney of Lancaster, Va.
A public reception scheduled for
Sunday, Nov. 7, at 7:30 p.m. will
open the annual exhibiton of ECU's
faculty and student art in the Gray
Gallery on campus.
The reception will be catered ad
feature music by performers from
the ECU School of Music. All in-
terested persons are invited to at-
tend.
The facultystudent art exhibi-
tion, a display of recent works in
various media, will continue
through Nov. 30.
Gray Gallery, located in the east
wing of the Jenkins Fine Arts
Center on the main campus, is open
each weekday from 10 a.m. until 5
p.m. and on Sundays from 1 to 4
p.m.
The Student Union Films Com-
mittee, in conjunction with Stewart-
Everett Theatres, is now offering
discount tickets to films shown in
any North Carolina Stewart-Everett
theatre.
Campus Notes
The tickets are $2 (at least one
dollar less than the usual non-
matinee price) and can be purchased
at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center.
The discount tickets are available
to students, faculty, staff and the
general public.
Playing here this week at Stewart-
Everett owned Plaza Cinema is
Jinxed, First Blood and Halloween
HI: Season of the Witch. Starting
Friday is Sorceress.
At the Stewart-Everett owned
Park Theatre this week is Sorceress.
Starting Friday at the Park is Good-
bye Cruel World the late show Fri-
day and Saturday night at 11:15
p.m. is Kung Fu Zombie.
The Student Union Coffeehouse
Committee sponsors Mule Train
Gold this Friday night from 9 until
11 in the Coffeehouse, located in the
basement of Mendenhall Student
Center. The band performs a reper-
toire of old time tunes "guaranteed
to make just about anyone
nostalgic
On Saturday night in the Cof-
feehouse the committee presents
well-liked blues artist Richard
Henry. Henry will perform from 9
until 11 p.m.
Admission for each show is $.50.
Jerry F. Lotterhos of Greenville
has been named third place winner
in a national poetry contest con-
ducted by the magazine, The Pro-
fessional Poet, for a poem entitled
"Alone The poem was one of a
selection of six submitted by Lot-
terhos in the first poetry contest he
has ever entered.
A volume of Lotterhos poetry
entitled People Tunes is to be
published in November by
Woodsmoke Publications.
Lotterhos, native of Bogahim,
Louisiana, is a professor in the
School of Allied Health and Social
Professions at ECU tad hi director
of ECU'S Center for Alcohol and

. ,l II m 11 �! "�" '� !j��





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 4, 1982

Wells Sings The Blues
Continued From Page 7
start to play the blues?
WELLS: It was about the same
time. I first got into leadbelly and
then I got into people like Blind
Lemon Jefferson, Blind Blake,
Robert Johnson. In the city blues, I
got into Muddy Waters and Howlin
Wolf. I also got into Jimmie
Rodgers around this time.
EC: How did you find out about
all these people?
WELLS: I got started on the city
folk music and followed it
backwards to the roots. I used to
ride to Raleigh an go to the Record
Bar to pick up records. I went on a
class trip to New York and got some
records there. I started getting into
collecting and listening to 78 s when
I was in high school. A friend's dad-
dy had several stacks of hillbilly 78 s
that I got turned on to. At that time
I didn't like western swing music
because I thought it was too com-
mercial.
I used to pick up 78 s whenever I
heard of anybody who had some. I
guess I've been picking them up
since then.
EC: When did you first start play-
ing in clubs?
WELLS: I started when I was go-
ing to school in Chapel Hill. I was
supposed to play with a friend,
Dave Childers, and he didn't show
up for the job and so I did it myself
and the manager asked me to come
back, and pretty soon I was playing
on Saturday nights. The name of the
place was the "Endangered
Species At that time I was listen-
ing to a lot of blues in Chapel Hill
because a fellow named Bruse
Bastin, who came over from
England, was putting on some big
blues shows.
EC: Did you come to Greenville
from Chapel Hill?
WELLS: No, I moved back to
Goldsboro and worked in con-
struciton for a couple of years. I
played a lot of mandolin and was
getting into bluegrass and old-time
music. Rich Harkness and Fred
Scott taught me a lot about old time
music at that time. I moved to
Greenville when I decided to get a
degree in recreation therapy.
EC: What made you get in-
terested in recreation therapy?
WELLS: I'd been playing for some
senior citizens parties in Goldsboro
and Tarboro and I enjoyed doing
that type of thing.
EC: How long did you study at
ECU?
WELLS: Two years, I got a BS in
recreational therapy.
EC: How did you like the rec.
therapy dept. at ECU?
WELLS: It's one of the best in
the area. When 1 was in the depart-
ment people were coming here from
up north. It's a specialized field.
The department said that people
could find jobs all over the country.
EC: Were you inspired by any of
the professors?
WELLS: Dr. Ralph Steele and
Karen Hancock. She keeps in touch
with what is going on in the field �
she stays current.
EC: I know you're working as a
rec. therapist out at Pitt Memorial.
Just what do you do?
WELLS: I'm the therapeutic
recreation leader. I hold sessions
during the day and I have one even-
ing session. Our goal is to return the
person to their normal leisure
lifestyle as much as possible, or we
teach new leisure skills or new at-
titudes about leisure. You know, we
have to teach some people how to
appreciate leisure � wf teach them
to think aobut how they're using
their time.
EC: Do you relate your rec.
therapy work with your perform-
ing?
WELLS: Yep, you're looking for
response, and when something
works, it clicks, and it's really sali
fying. In both you try to do things
that people can respond to. Ideally,
at the hospital, we do things that
people can do themselves as much as
possible. Of course, music is kind of
different.
EC: Lightning, how do you like
to think about your role as a musi-
cian?
WELLS: I like having a big reper-
toire so I can sing all night � sort of
like a minstrel. I like being in any
kind of audience and being able to
do stuff that just about anybody can
relate to. I like being able to ask for
requests for old songs. When I start
playing, I can sort of tell what the
group wants to hear.
EC: Do you ever think about
moving to a city to play?
WELLS: I don't know. I don't
know if I could live in a city.
EC: Who are some of your big-
gest influences?
WELLS: My two favorite
guitarists are Rev. Gary Davis and
Blind Blake, as far as ragtime �
Charlie Patton and Rovert Johnson
for slide. I like Jimmie Rodgers as
far as the blues influence on country
music. I like to think of him as the
man who brought blues into country
music. All of those blues yodels he
did are just blues lines. He recorded
some with Louis Armstrong and
with some of the black jug bands.
I like Uncle Dave Macon for old-
time music. The Stanley Brothers
Zany Comics Al & Tom
Buzz In From Remulak;
Earthlings In A Frenzy
Mike 'Lightning Weils
are my favorite bluegrass group,
and I like Hank Williams and
George Jones in the country music.
Howlin Wolf and Muddy Waters
arc my favorites for city blues. I like
Elmore James and Sonny Boy
Williamson and Little Walter, too.
EC: I know you have a pretty ex-
tensive record colection. Have you
ever thought of doing a radio show?
WELLS: I don't know � it's so
specialized � I don't know about
the marked for old music around
here. Triangle Slim is doing a show
in Chapel Hill, but he ususally has
some kind of trouble with it.
EC: Can you tell me something
about your collection?
WELLS: I have enough of certain
kinds of music so I like to make
tapes of certain old artists or old
styles like old time fiddle music,
western swing, R&B, city blues,
country musicSometimes I make
tapes from my collection for other
musicians.
EC: What have you been listen-
ing to lately?
WELLS: I've been getting into
rhythm and blues lately, and early
jazz � stuff I didn't like earlier like
the Boswell Sisters and Cab
Calloway.
Continued From Page 7
Claus at Christmas. Each summer
the boys returned to Minnesota and
developed their act at a small club in
Minneapolis.
During Al's senior year, Tom hit-
chhiked to Harvard where he hid
out in his partner's dorm room and
ate Salisbury steak pilfered from the
dining hall. Since Tom attended no
classes and lived mainly on borrow-
ed money, stolen drugs, and easy
women, he was usually mistaken for
a student. On weekends the two
drove to New York City and per-
formed at the Improvisation. "We
weren't famous, but the place was
says Tom. "We were performing
there at the same time as guys like
Jimmy 'Dynomite' Walker, Andy
'Taxi' Kaufman, Gabe 'Kotter'
Kaplan and Freddie 'Blew His
Brains Out' Prinze
In 1973, Al and Tom moved to
Los Angeles and devoted themselves
to their act. They played the Com-
edy Store, they played Vegas and
Reno, they played every campus and
concert that came their way. And
when, in 1975, producer Lome
Michaels hired them to write for an
experimental late night comedy
show he was putting together for
NBC, Franken and Davis moved
back East.
Saturday Nite Live was a runaway
smash. More important, it sent
shock waves through the industry, it
expanded the limits of television
comedy and tapped a reservoir of
young talents previously ignored by
the networks. As principal writers,
Franken and Davis played a major
role in the show's success. Each won
two Emmys for SNL and a third for
a Paul Simon special produced by
Michaels.
Despite their appearance and a
few annoying habits, Franken and
Davis enjoy a close professional and
personal relationship with Michaels,
and when the producer decided to
leave SNL after the 1979-1980
� season, Al and Tom left with him.
Michaels hired them along with
fellow SNL writer Jim Downey, to
write a feature-length movie for his
new Broadway Pictures company
and MGM. The film is entitled
Nineteen Eighty-Five, and is to be
directed by Michaels, his first major
project since Saturday Nite Live.
"It's a parody of grim, negative
Utopia Tom explains. "Like
Logan's Run, 1984 and Soyient
Green
"And Ordinary People, " adds
Al.
Both Franken and Davis reside in
Manhatten. Al, 30, lives on the Up-
per West Side with his wife Franni
and their baby daughter Thomasin
Davis Franken. At press time, Tom,
29, was still living in Greenwich
Village with Emily Prager, former
actress on The Edge of Night and
currently a writer for Penthouse
magazine.
Tickets will be available at the
Central Ticket Office, MSC,
Monday-Friday, 10 a.m4 p.m.
Tickets are $3 for students and $5
for faculty and staff; all tickets sold
at the door the night of the show
will be $5.
Backgammon
Tournament!
See
announcements
for details.
Backgammon
Tournament!
2704 E. 10th St.
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the women of the Fleming Center Counselors are
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stand you. Your safety, comfort and privacy are
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SERVICES: � Tuesday � Saturday Abortion Ap-
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Do you want to be
included in the upcoming
calendar featuring the
best looking males from
East Carolina
University?
If so come by the
Buccaneer Office
from 2-5 M-F
and pick up an application.
� You must be a full
time male student
atECU �
For more information call
757-6501 after 2:00
Monday-Friday
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I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
NOVEMBER 4, 1982
Page 9
Bucs Head For The Lone Star State
By KEN BOL TON
Auislam Sports Editor
The ECU Pirates have been in a
unique situation' all year, with an
undefeated record at home and a
winless slate en the road.
As head coacn Ed Emory put it,
being even is not too bad.
"How many times in your life
have you wanted to be even?'
Emory rhetorically asked members
of the media at his weekly press lun-
cheon. "A lot of folks fight and
claw their whole lives just trying to
get back to even, and a lot never
do
The Pirates saw their record even-
ed at 4-4 following Saturday's loss
at West Virginia, which was the first
of four away games in a row.
The Mountaineers jumped out to
a quick 21-0 lead after the first nine
minutes of play. Big plays in the
spree were a Pirate fumble deep in
their own territory and a pass in-
terference call which Emory felt
shoudn't have been made.
"The defense gave them one
touchdown, the offense gave them
one, and the officials gave them
one Emory said. "But you have
to remember that we played the last
51 minutes without giving up a
touchdown
After returning to Greenville, the
team fell victim to the Halloween at-
mosphere Sunday night. While
"horsing around" in their Belk
dorm room, Steve Sellers was ac-
cidentally shot in the abdomen by
teammate Jeff Pegues.
According to Emory, Pegues was
charged by campus authorities with
illegal possession of a weapon on
campus and released on an
unsecured bond. He was also asked
to move out of the dorm and was
suspended from the team indefinite-
ly.
Defensive end Jody Schulz, who
has worked with a rescue squad in
his hometown the past seven, sum-
mers, was on the scene quickly and
wrapped Sellers in a blanket. Schulz
then rushed him to Pitt County
Memorial Hospital.
"It was very, very poor judge-
ment on Pegues part said Emory.
"But maybe a tragic accident like
this will pull the team closer
together
Emory and the rest of the team
will have to forget this weekend's
accident, as well as the West
Virginia game, and concentrate on
Texas-Arlington, next week's oppo-
nent in The Lone Star State.
This will be the first time that
ECU has travelled to Arlington. The
two teams have met once, with the
Pirates winning 23-17 in the 1978
contest at Ficklen Stadium. In fact,
ECU has travelled to the state of
Texas only once in its history�in
1970 when the Pirates lost to West
Texas State 42-30.
Before the season, Texas-
Arlington was picked to defend
their championship in the Southland
Conference. But the Mavericks lost
starting quarterback Craig Hopkins
in the second game of the year and
have been falling ever since, as
shown by their present 2-6 record.
Hopkins is expected to make his
return against the Pirates, a fact
which concerned Emory.
The Mavericks feature a talented
tailback in Scotty Caldwell, who
Emory said "may be the best in the
state of Texas So far this season,
Caldwell has averaged over 100
yards per game and has over 300
yards in pass receptions.
With a defensive line that
averages 244 pounds per man, the
Mavericks will be a tough test for
the Pirates' offense.
"They are the biggest football
team that we have faced Emory
stated. "The kids are impressive-
looking and their stats are good. It's
a situation where they could come
alive at any time, and it scares me to
death
ECU interception leader Clint
Harris has now picked off a pass in
three consecutive games. Against
West Virginia, Harris returned an
interception 29 yards, leaving him
24 yards off the school record for
interception return yardage of 275
held by Reggie Pinkney (1973-76).
Harris has 12 career interceptions.
Emory announced that Kevin In-
gram, who did not play against
WVU because of a bruised sternum,
will start this week at quarterback in
place of Greg Stewart. Ingram has
had an excellent week of practice,
according to the coaches, and will
be looked for to provide some spark
to the Pirate offense.
Punting has been somewhat of a
problem area for ECU this season.
If a bright spot existed at West
Virginia, in was in this area. Jeff
Bolch, a freshman from Hickory,
boomed six punts for an average of
41.8 yards, including a SO-yarder.
With the season coming down to
the backstretch, Emory will be
counting heavily on the Pirate
seniors for leadership.
ECU will start eight seniors this
Saturday, which are: Carlton
Nelson and Tom Carnes on offense;
Jody Schulz, Mark Ervin, Amos
Twitty, Gerald Sykes, Sam Norris
and Smokey Norris on defense.
"The seniors are very committed
to having a winning season
Emory responded. "They have been
accepting a great deal of respon-
sibility and are showing great
leadership this year
Branch Makes Change
ECU SPORTS INFO.
"A.C. Collins told me about a
nephew of his down in Florida
head coach Ed Emory recalled,
"and naturally we were interested in
any of A.Cs kin, so we took a look
at him
Anthony Collins was an outstan-
ding back at ECU and now plays for
the New England Patriots. His
nephew, however, wasn't exactly
what Emory was looking for at that
time, but things soon changed. "I
saw a guy who was about 5-10, 170
pounds. We looked at some of his
high school film, and at that time we
made the decision not to recruit
Reggie Branch.
"About nine months later I was
over in the weight-training center
and I saw this guy that looked like
Charles Atlas � I didn't even
recognize him, but it was Reggie
Branch's story is definitely one of
dramatic change. Graduating in
1980 from Seminole High School in
Sanford, Fla Branch was a block-
ing back who never scored a
touchdown in high school.
This season against Florida State,
he started against the Seminoles and
tied with tailback Earnet Byner for
top rushing yardage with 77 yards.
In the homecoming game, Branch
led all Pirate rushers against Illinois
State with 109 yards and a
touchdwon � his first 100-yard
game ever and first career
touchdown.
"When I first came up to ECU
with my Uncle A.C, I was only
weighing around 170. When ECU
didn't recruit me, I went up to West
Virginia State for a scholarship, but
I broke my ankle before the season
(1980), and WVS didn't have the
caliber program I was looking for
anyhow.
"All this time I had really been
working out with weights real hard.
My high school weight coach Bill
weights in the summer after I
graduated
After leaving WVS, Branch was
all ready to attend New Mexico
State with a scholarship. But before
his departure, Branch made a stop
in Greenville to see his uncle.
"He (Collins) was getting ready
McDaniel and running back coach
Emory Blake got me into lifting
Reggie Branch
to go to the Patriot's camp, so we
both were working out at the
weight-training complex
That's where Branch met Emory.
"I didn't even know who he was
he said. "He talked to me a while,
and after he left Anthony asked me
if i knew who that was. I said no,
and he told me that that was the
head coach.
"Then Coach Emory asked me if
I wanted to play ball for ECU. I was
set to go to New Mexico, but since
A.C. had come here, I decided to go
to East Carolina. I'm glad I did
Branch had to sit out a year as a
red-shirt because he was a transfer,
but he is still just a freshman
eligibility-wise. He got the starting
call against Florida State after both
tailbacks went down with injuries
and starting fullback Earnet Byner
was moved to tailback to fill in.
So far this season Branch is third
among Pirate Rushers with 301 total
yards, despite limited playing time
during the first five games. He
averages 5.5 yards per carry, and
almost all of those yards have been
up the middle, the kind of tough
yards the coaches depend on Branch
to get.
"Reggie Branch has been one of
our most pleasant surprises on of-
fense offensive coordinator Larry
Beck is h said. "He is the ideal
fullback. He is helping to give us the
inside running game we need.
"He has the size, the strength
(Branch bench presses 450 pounds)
and the speed (4.5 in the 40)
necessary to run inside the guards.
That is the kind of bruising, hard-
nosed running � running through
arm tackles, breaking tackles � that
is Reggie's forte
Emory added that Branch has
gotten so big and powerful that he
has lost some of his flexibility as a
result. "Yeah, I do think I need to
work on flexibility Branch admit-
ted. "In the Illinois State game, for
example, I ran over to Ernie (Ernest
Byner) and said 'Hey, I'm gonna
break one today. I just know
"Well, I did break loose for
about 30 yards once, but a couple of
times I broke through the line and
really felt like I should have busted
it, but I sort of tightened up, instead
of stretching out and striding. That
comes from being too tight, not
flexible enough
But after smoothing out a few
areas in his game, Branch just may
follow in his uncle's footsteps.
n�l By GAMY PATTERSON
ECU eaarterfcack Kevin Ingram makes his move against WVU last weekend. Ingram is expected to
start Saturday against Texas-Arlington.
Autry: "A Great Technician"
ECU SPORTS INFO.
"Jeff Autry has good speed and
agility ECU head football coach
Ed Emory said. "He is a very
dedicated weight-lifter and a good
student. His only problem is his
ability to hold his weight
Autry, who started the first four
games this season at offensive tackle
for the Pirates, has had a long bout
with a severe flu-type bronchitis.
"I've lost about 20-25 pounds
because of it. I feel better now than
I have for a long time. You really
miss those 25 pounds when you start
running into 275-pound guys
Autry is now weighing in at 228
pounds � down from the 250
pounds he started with at the begin-
ning of the season . He stands 6-3,
so he is looking rather skinny beside
280-pound Terry Long, who is the
other starting tackle Autry lines up
with.
Although Autry is somewhat
light, especially now for an offen-
sive lineman, he has a lot of com-
pensating factors, according to of-
fensive line coach John Zernhelt.
"Jeff is a great technician he
said. "It's true, he's not that big,
but for our type of offense he
doesn't need to be that big. We run
a Finesse type of offense. We trap
and run outside a lot. So we almost
never ask Jeff to block one-on-one.
Jeff Autry
Zernhelt said he wants the tackles
to out-finesse their man, instead of
trying to bowl them over. "Jeff has
good speed and quickness but most
importantly, he is a hard worker,
especially on technique he added.
Autry went to high school in Co -
ington, Ga where he was mainly a
linebacker. The ECU connection
was made through Coach Emory
when he was an assistant at Georgia
Tech. Autry, who was named Best
Offensive Lineman at Newton
Country his senior year (1979),
caught Emory's eye.
Autry finished high school early
and came to ECU in the spring of
1980. He was injured and red-
shirted that year. In 1981, Autry
saw limited action as a freshman,
playing on the second and third
teams. But last spring he really came
on, and this season he started the
first four games at left tackle. Then
he caught the flu.
Autry, however, has recovered
and whatever the outcome may be,
he seems to be well on his way to
having a bright future at ECU.
Pirates Lose Closing Match
All-America Candidate Jody Scfcabt
The ECU men's tennis team
travelled to Atlantic Christian Col-
lege Monday and lost their first
match of the fall season, 7-2.
In singles, Pirate Don Rutledge
won in a tough three-set match
against Randy Pate; 6-7, 6-4 and
6-3.
In doubles, ECU's Paul Owen
and Cole King edged past Chuck
Burns and Pate, 9-8.
"Playing ACC gave us an oppor-
tunity to play against some of the
best head coach Patricia Sherman
said. "We found some things to
work on and to be ready for ACC
next spring.
"I was very impressed this fall
and was really pleased with the per-
formance of the team. I'm looking
forward to a super spring season
Now 2-1, the Pirates do not have
any more fall matches and will meet
ACC again on March 1.
In other singles matches, John
Sturen (ACC) def. Ted Lepper, 6-4,
6-2; Kristen Eriksson (ACC) def.
Galen Treble, 6-4, 7-6; Frederick
Teinstrand (ACC) def. Paul Owen,
6-3, 6-3; and Chuck Burns def. Jeff
Farfour, 6-3, 6-3.
In the remaining doubles mat-
ches, John Sturen and Greg de
Freitas (ACC) def. Lepper and
Rutledge. 8-2, and Feinstrand and
Friksson (ACC) def. Trebel and
Creech, 6-4, 6-1.
Soccer Game At Ficklen
The ECU-UNC-Wilmington soc-
cer match will be played on Satur-
day night, Nov. 6 at 7 p.m instead
of the originally scheduled time for
Sunday, Nov. 7.
The Pirates, now 7-9, will be at-
tempting to break the school record
for the most wins in a single season.
The mark of seven was set in 1974
(7-4), 1980 (7-14-1) and in 1981
(7-9-1).
The match is the team's season
finale and was switched because of
the enthusiastic response shown last
season when ECU played North
Carolina State in Ficklen Stadium.
ECU students, children under 12
years of age, and high school soccer
players and coaches will be admitted
free of charge. Adult admission is
$1.00.





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 4, 1982
Tar Heels To Face Tigers Classifieds
CHARLOTTE,
N.C. (UPI) � Last
week's loss to
Maryland changed a lot
of things about North
Carolina's football
season, including the
stakes in this weekend's
game against Clemson.
This was supposed to
be the weekend for
14th-ranked Clemson
and 13th-ranked North
Carolina to battle it out
for the Atlantic Coast
Conference football
championship. Instead
the Tar Heels will be
struggling to keep their
hopes alive of at least
getting a share of the
conference title.
With 17th-ranked
Maryland in the
driver's seat by virtue
of a 4-0 league record,
defending national and
conference champion
Clemson will attempt
to increase its league
record to 4-0. That
would set the stage for
a showdown between
0
the Tigers and
Maryland next week
that would likely decide
the championship.
With a win over the
Tigers, North Carolina
would have to wait for
someone to defeat
Maryland opening the
way for a possible tie
for the league title.
"We're not out of
the chase yet said Tar
Heel Coach Dick
Crum, whose team was
thumped 31-24 by
Maryland. "But we're
certainly not in a great
position. We've got to
win the rest of our
games and hope so-
meone can knock off
Maryland
In other conference
action this weekend,
Duke and Wake Forest
meet in Durham in a
game both teams need
in the struggle for a
winning season.
Maryland, which has
emerged in the top 20
for the first time this
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season, is at home
against Miami, and
Virginia travels to
Georgia Tech. North
Carolina State could
secure itself a winning
season with a victory at
6th-ranked Penn State
and possibly save the
job of Coach Monte
Kiffin.
Among the in-
dependents South
Carolina tries to
recover from a 33-3 loss
to North Carolina State
at home against 11th
ranked Florida State.
Last week's loss to
Maryland is going
down in the books at
North Carolina as just
"one of those days
"Last Saturday was
just one of those days
where nothing went
right said Crum.
"We didn't play well
and Maryland played
great. Give them all the
credit for a job well
done. Now we've just
got to pick ourselves
back up and get ready
for Clemson
The Tar Heels
rushing defense, rank-
ed last week as the tops
in the nation, broke
down against
Maryland's strong run-
ning attack, and the
Tar Heels could see
more of the same
Saturday. Led by
tailback Cliff Austin,
the Tigers are averaging
272.3 yards per game
against opponents on
the ground and getting
better every week.
Clemson will also
have the benefit of a
week of to prepare as
well as the homefield
advantage although
that hasn't accounted
for much in this series.
Since 1970, the Tar
Heels are 4-2 in Death
Valley.
PERSONAL
WANTED: SOMEONE TO win a
new FUJI Supreme Bicycle for
Christmas. If this interests you.
talk to any Phi Tau.
VICTORIA WONDERS how you
can smell roses in the sky.
The crop is not done when Dec. is
nigh.
Crops are in a cycle which always
has a season.
Vicky wonders how such "tall"
roses have grown beyond reason.
JERRY HAS A MESSAGE FOR
YOU: Tom, Jodi, Steve, Oave,
Sue. Marsha, Elanor, Chris, Bob,
Vernon, the Oak St. boys and Bob
and Phil. The SKY WAS YELLOW
and THE SUN WAS BLUE. 2:30
Friday.
DAVID: WB wants you to go to
AB; are Rose's red? I know a
secret!
LOST: OCT. 31, Jack; last seen
rolling down Student Street with a
smile on his face. Appeared to be
pretty well lit. Any info concerning
his whereabouts, please call
7SI LOSERS
ONLY LOSERS eat club sand-
wiches for lunch.
ROOMMATE
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL Typist wants to
type at home. Reasonable rates;
7St 340.
PROFESSIONAL Typing service
experience, quality work, IBM
typewriter. Call Lame Shivt.
750-5301 or Gail Joiner 754-1041.
TYPING TERM papers, resumes,
thesis, etc. Call 753-4733.
PROFESSIONAL typing rush
jobs done. Scientific symbol ele-
ment. Call gMW after 5:30 p.m.
TYPING: MANUSCRIPTS,
papers, thesis, reasonable rates.
Call 754-3740.
LOST AND
FOUND
FOUND: POCKET
CALCULATOR; owner must ioen
tify. call 757-4071 fee Applewhite.
WANTED
WE BUY PLAYBOY. Railing
Stone Mag. Quicksilver Record
Book Exchange. 100 East Fifth St.
WANTED: USED LP's.
REWARD: CASH OR TRADE
Quicksilver Records. MM Cast
Fifth St.
MISC.
LAMM O �CO - ���� � ��
ntMM an P� 3.
LOSE WEIGHT
758-0530.
HONEST)
RIDES
PROFESSIONAL RESUMES
TYPED AT A REASONABLE
PRICE. 751-4035. ASK FOR JON!
YOU'LL BE GLAD YOU DID.
NEED RIDE from Washington,
NC to ECU MonFri 7:00
a.m. 4:00 p.m. Call Joe. (010)
�44447l collect, nights. Desire to
share expenses.
CRAZY ZACK'S ROAD TRIP PMrv
tt (to includes reaed trip te Zaefcs
and refreshment an the wary to
Raleifjpv Half-price admlsslan !�
Zaek's. Call AJaa $�� �
751-1073 before Hay. U.
IT DONT Mean a ����� H � ��
got tfcat swing)- Sophisticated
Latfias. Friday, av. �� WnJt
Auditorium.
SIR DUKE. I'll be the eae sashay-
ing dawn the aisle at
Sophist oca ted Lad res. Friday Nov.
sth. sea r� JdQtttw.
Take Mm "A" TRAIN, but get
there Friday ���� Mr Owe Ell-
ington's sogonstocaiad Laosas in
Wright Auditorium.
40 DUKE ELlNGTON's tunes and
big band sound, live from Broad-
way. Sophisticated Ladies, Fri-
day. November 5th. Wright
Auditorium
FORSALE
HAMO-CRAFT�0. rustic fur-
niture �t affordable student
.rtcdS P�r mare information, call
Kim at 753-5717.
t FISHER SH�KI� ����� �
vieU tike M trad �w cassane
pec. Call 7S-�077 � � ��'
Carolinian 7$7-J4 �� Ma�e
FURNISHED EFFICIENCY
APARTMENT. Utlllttas Mchjddd -
across from ciwaw. TSO-MBS.
FOR SALE: 1070 HONDA ISO XL
DIRT OR STREET BIKE Call
70-0700 Man Tnor.
FOR SALE: Yamaha US. Great
MPG law miHMHja axe. candltion
S3S0. Call 750-30TI7.
NICE GRAY AND WHITE RAB
�IT FUR JACKET FOR SALE �S0
CALL 7Sn.
WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share furnished 2 bedroom apart-
ment energy efficient; half rent,
half utilities. Call 754 4207.
Carolina Opry House
presents
IN CONCERT
w�
Fri Nov. 12
With Special Guest �
Cimmaron
Doors Open 7:30-8:15 for
Advance Ticket Holders Only
For Further Information �
Call 758-3943
Every THURS. NIGHT
is beat the clock nite
with 25C beer.
Monday, November 8,1982
8:00 PM
Hendrix Theatre, Mendenhall
Student Center, ECU Campus
j- - - i
xi.
mmvzmw&Jii
MM ���
' �aaaad -�J �; ��
Tickets: ECU Students $3.00
Faculty & Staff $5.00
Public $5.00
The Original Writers of Saturday Nite Live
Originators of the Coneheads, Point-Counterpoint and the Al Franken Decade
FRANKEN & DAVIS
Tickets Available At Central Ticket Office
Mendenhall
Tickets at the Door $5.00
PnmntBd by ECU Special Bmm
A




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RAMADA INN
Pagentry Hall - 301 E. Greenville Blvd. (US 264 By-pass)
GREENVILLE, N. CAROLINA
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12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 4, 1982
Sneaker Sam Sez



Intramural Tournaments Scheduled
The Co-Rec Champions Crowned. .
The World Series of Co-Rec Soft-
ball was played last week between
the Bombers and Lumber-N-
Lightening. The Lumber-N-
Lightening team, led by Bobby Hill
and Maureen Buck, held true to
their namesake by contributing hit
after hit to pile up a total of 14 runs.
The Bombers bombed the ball very
deep into the outfield but always to
an opposing team member. Con-
gratulations to Lumber-N-
Lightening on their 14-4 victory.
The Super Bowl of Co-Rec Foot-
ball
The Super Bowl is about to hit the
intramural flag football field.
That's right, the playoffs for co-rec
competition are about to begin.
Some of the top poll picks include
the Bod Squad, Elizabeth City
Animals, Football Furies and The
Spoilers. Play will begin on Wednes-
day, November 3. Pick your
favorite team and join the In-
tramural Department in the Super
Bowl.
Soccer Update
Several teams prove to be World
Cup class as the intramural soccer
season kicks its way into the second
week of competition. The Umstead
Jockettes appear to be standouts in
the women's Division. In the men's
Division, the Slay Hippies appear to
be the team to beat among the
residence halls, as do the Omni
among the independents and the
Kappa Alpha team among the
fraternities.
The Lanes Are Hot
Many bowlers have hit the fast-
paced lanes in the past week attemp-
ting to prove that they are the best
"pro-ams After two complete
weeks of bowling, Alley Katz and
Bull City Boat People No. 3 led the
men's Independent Division while
Scott Gutterballs and Jones Strikers
tie the men's Residence Hall Divi-
sion. The Fraternity Division sees
Phi Kappa Tau leading all other
teams while Umstead Pinheads fin-
sish out in top honors for the
women.
A High Scoring Affair
If you want to see a fast-paced
sport that involves intricate skills
from almost every type of activity,
come watch Team Handball being
played at Memorial Gym. Action
TRIM YOUR FIGURE
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Lose 1215 Pounds in 3 Weeks
Programs for Men & Women
� Medical Weight Control �
Nutritional Counseling
SKIN CARE
Individual Skin Analysis
Deep Pore Cleansing
Face & Body Waxing
Manicures and Pedicures
Complimentary Consultation
'Check phone book lor
discount coupon.
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 16
WEtKS
AT� rfTHEWEXPENSE
$185 00 Pregnancy Test, Birth
Control and Problem Pregnan
cy Counseling. For further infor
malion call 832 0535 (Toll Free
Number 800 221-2568) between 9
AM and 5 P M. Weekdays.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh. N. C.
Modern
Laundromats
Close to
Campus
m
10th St. Across from
Krispy Kreme (752-6117)
14th St. 1 Block from
the "Hill" (752-9636)
WASH
HOUSE
�Large capacity washers
�Lots Dryer
�Color TV's with cable
�Video Games
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� 10th St. � Open24hrs.
�Attendants
r
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Introductory Offer
FREE WASH wthis coupon
Limit 1 coupon per visit.
Coupon expires 1031
�T
I
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I
J
got under way this week and already
several teams appear to be favorites.
The Ballslingers and the Kappa
Alpha "A" team are "Sneaker
Sam's" picks to be in the finals on
the men's championship. The
Heartbreakers are devastating in the
women's division. Come catch a
glimpse of the high scoring affair.
Tennis Tournament Finals Set
In the semifinal match of the
Men's Open Tennis Singles, Kevin
Burke defeated Geoff Kokiko 6-2,
2-6, 6-3. This sets the stage for the
championship match to be played
Friuay, November 5 at 1:00 on the
Minges Courts. In the men's in-
termediate singles, Tom Kiehl is
undefeated as he advances into the
final round.
Racquetball Tournament Under-
way
A reminder that all entrants must
play at least four matches prior to
Monday, November 8 to be eligible
for the single elimination tourna-
ment to begin Tuesday, November
9. Norman Dunn, Jack Crouch and
Paul Hughes appear to be most
competitive in the Men's Open Divi-
sion; while Gary Owens and Lonnie
Stafford are strong contenders in
the Men's Intermediate Division. In
the Women's Open, Amanda
Wiscovitch and Carmen Greene lead
the field, while Patti Hubbell and
Michele Mascotti appear to be
challengers in the Women's In-
termediate. Stay tuned for tourna-
ment progress and results.
Adapted Recreation
We are currently running three
activities for the impaired students
on campus. Recreational swimming
is being held on Wednesday even-
ings from 7:30 to 9:30. Swimming
assistants are available for instruc-
tion. Transportation is provided
from Slay Residence Hall.
On Tuesday afternoons from 4:00
to 6:00, lanes 7 and 8 in the
Mendenhall Student Center are
reserved for handicapped students
to enjoy bowling.
Horseback riding is being offered
at Ram Horn Stables on Monday
afternoons from 5:30 to 6:00.
Transportation is provided.
If you would like more informa-
tion on these activities, please con-
tact the intramural office.
The Lady Pirates will scrimmage against Louisburg College at 6:30 p.m.
WE PAY IMMFOIATE CASH FOR:
CLASS � WEDDING BANDS
� VCNDS
AL: GO. Oi SliVER
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CHN J. CRYSTAL
rINE WATCHES
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(hapmony house south) Pr ONF 752-3866
YC PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALE
OPEN 24 HOURS DRIVE THRU WINDOW
Special:
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2 ribs, fries, slaw & biscuit
on Wed. only
11-2 p.m. and 5-9 p.m.
OLD FASHIONED HOMEMADE
BREAD PUDDING.
only
25C
1011 Charles Street � 752-1373 1 Block from Campus
The Medical Store
2205 W. 5th St. P.O. Box 59
Greenville. N.C. 27834
MEDICAL STUDENTS
BARBECUEBASH
MONDAY, NOV. 8th
4 P.MUNTIL
FREE FOOD
DIA G1WOS TIC SE T SHOW
SHOW MED SCHOOL ID
PHONE 757-3490 or 1-800-682-3633
2 East Carolina Medical Supply Co.
uV
Hi
MonFri. 8 a.m5 p.m.
aws
FINE
FOODS
Georgetown Shoppes � Across from Girls' Dorms
Inflation fighter. To help peo-
ple's shrinking budgets, Pharo's has
slashed their prices on the following
items:
Hamburgers 60C Cheeseburger 80C
Big Boy 1.45 Bad Boy '2.45
Hot DogsbOC Foot Longs $1.25
Also featuring Pharo's famous 31 item salad bar and
other fabulous sandwiches. Best food in town � now
with best prices!
PARENTS NIGHT OUT
Buy Large Pizza for the Kids and
Get Smvll Pizza for Yourself FREE
FEED 6 PEOPLE FOR ONLY $8.90
Only SI .50 a Person. With free Cokes, Too!
Offer Expires
November 4
Bead-bordered
wedding bands -
For her or for him.
Sleekly narrow, smoothly wide.
Available in 18K white gold,
18K yellow gold,
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or platinum.
From �7500
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s





Title
The East Carolinian, November 4, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 04, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.228
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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