The East Carolinian, November 2, 1982






a
Wat iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.tt
Tuesday, November 2,1982
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Med School Dedication
Governor Visits Greenville
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
N.C. Gov. James B. Hunt was in
Greenville this past Friday to
dedicate ECU Medical School's new
building.
Hunt was on hand, with other of-
ficials, to do the official ribbon-
cutting for the $26 million Brody
Medical Sciences Bulding which will
serve as the new home of ECU's
medical school.
"I know that the dedication of
this maginificant home for the ECU
School of Medicine is something
that many commited people worked
long and hard for Hunt said.
"We can be proud of the beautiful
medical complex for it is truly the
lifeblood of eastern North
Carolina
The building, which stands nine
stories high and includes 451,000
square feet,was dedicated before a
crowd of over 1000 people.
Also on hand for the celebration
were ECU Chancellor John M.
Howell and former chancellor Dr.
Leo Jenkins, who is the man often
recognized as the person responsible
for bringing a medical school to
ECU.
Jenkins praised Hunt for his ef-
forts to bring the medical school to
ECU. Hunt returned the praise after
Jenkins introduced him to the
gathering. The crowd responded
with a standing ovation for Jenkins.
Hunt also gave general praise to
everyone who played a role in
creating the medical school and the
new facility. "The Brody Medical
Sciences Building is proof of how
much can be accomplished when
people of vision believe in a mission
of mercy and work hard to make it a
reality
permanent home the medical school
has had since its inception in 1975.
Construction of the facility has been
going on since 1979.
ECU Medical School Dean
William Laupus led a delegation of
ECU officials also on hand for the
dedication festivities. Laupus told
the audience that the medical school
would continue its committment to
the goals of providing family physi-
cians, opportunities for minorities
and a regional health care system.
The building was named in honor
of the Brody family of Kinston
which gave a grant of $1.5 million to
the ECU Medical Foundation in
1979.
The dedication marked the end of
many long years of struggle that
revolved around the effort to bring
a school of medicine to the eastern
part of the state � a struggle that
The Brody Complex is the first many thought would not be won.
"We relied on the truth .
merely showed this need
Jenkins.
'We knew the people of North
Carolina would defend the truth
Hunt praised the "quality of
care" that newborn infants receive
in the medical school's intensive
care center located in the hospital.
He cited statistics that showed
North Carolina's infant mortality
rate had declined by 20 percent in
the last five years.
"The training and care going on
here is providing us with medical
professionals who are well trained in
meeting all the needs of North
Carolina's families, from the very
youngest to the very oldest Hunt
said. "I believe eastern North
Carolina has as bright a future as
any area in the nation, and I com-
mend and I thank all of you who
have made it happen
Photo By STANLEY LEAKY
Gov. James B. Hunt
Plans for all departments that 40-acre tract of land, have been go-
have had to relocate their offices in ing on for several months. Much
the new building, which is built on a progress has been reported.
'Amnesty' Group Reports Worldwide Human Rights Violations
The 1982 report of Amnesty In-
ternational charged some govern-
ments use floggings, beatings with
barbed wire, sexual abuse, amputa-
tions and psychological tactics such
as mock executions to torture
prisoners.
The report of the London-based
human rights organization
documented human rights situations
in 121 countries and said that both
torture and execution were being us-
ed against political prisoners.
The organization, which won the
Nobel Peace Prize in 1980, express-
ed urgent concern about alleged
political killings by the governments
of El Salvador, Syria and Libya.
"The report makes clear to us
that there are human rights viola-
tions all over the world said North
Carolina Amnesty International
chapter member Kin Hennis. Hen-
nis is the North Carolina coor-
dinator of Amnesty's anti-capital
punishment program which is based
in Raleigh.
Other political killings � those
ouside the legal process � were car-
ried out by Guatemala, Uganda, the
Philippines, Pakistan, India, In-
donesia, Afghanistan and Iraq, the
group said.
Thousands of other executions
were carried out around the world,
with more than half of the 3,278
killings recorded by Amneasty dur-
ing 1981 by Iran's extremist Islamic
regime of Ayatollah Ruhollah Kho-
meini.
Amnesty said the 2,616 people ex-
ecuted in Iran included children.
More than 90 percent of the killings
took place after the ousting of
moderate President Abolhassan
Bani-Sadr in June of last year.
The report quoted Tehran pro-
secutor general Assadollah Iajevardi
as saying, "Even if a 12-year-old is
found participating in an armed
demonstration, he will be shot. The
age doesn't matter
Iran's prisons were also cited for
torture, including whippings with
cables, banging heads against con-
crete walls and mock executions.
The report said prisoners in the
"ironing room" of Tehran's Evin
prison were tied to beds and had
their backs, buttocks and soles of
their feet burned with irons.
Interrogators in the "basement of
truth" at Evin prison used cigarettes
to burn prisoners. tions (those not carried out by legal
Similar allegations were made procedures such as after a fair trial)
against Turkey where military rule are an increasing problem around
was imposed in 1980. Other coun- the world today Hennis said,
tries, such as Spain and Uganda, "We especially see this in Central
employed similar torture tactics. America, Iran and Syria as stated in
"I think that extra-legal execu- the report
U.S. Supreme Court To Rule
On Nuclear Issue, Layoff Policy
ECU Football Player Injured
By Gunshot In Dorm Accident
By GREG RIDEOUT
News Editor
An ECU football player is listed
in guarded condition at Pitt County
Memorial Hospital after being shot
accidentally by another football
player Sunday night in Belk
Residence Hall.
Steve Sellers, a sophomore walk-
on from Laurinburg, was shot once
by junior defensive end Jeff Pegues
while "horsing around" at about 10
p.m. in Sellers room, according to
Ken Smith of sports information.
Sellers, 20, was rushed to PCMH
by teammate Jody Shulz where he
underwent surgery for about three
hours for damage to the spleen, liver
and colon.
According to head coach Ed
Emory, the team had just returned Emory said Pegues and Sellers
to the dorm after the weekly team were classmates at Scotland County
meeting in the Biology building High School. Sellers then went to
when Pegues, Sellers and other Fayetteville State University for two
teammates began to fool around in years before joining his high school
Sellers' suite at Belk dorm. Pegues teammate, Pegues, at ECU.
began to wave around a .25 caliber
pistol he had gotten from his
girlfriend. He went to the bathroom
adjacent to the suite and fired one
bullet. He then came back to the
Sellers' room, and then while wav-
ing the gun around it discharged,
hitting Sellers in the abdomen.
Pegues has been charged by the
university police with illegal posses-
sion of a firearm and released on an
unsecured bond. Possession of a
firearm in the dorms is prohibited
by North Carolina law.
Pegues has been suspended from
the Pirate football team indefinite-
ly, pending a full investigation of
the incident.
Associate Dean of Judiciary
James B. Mallory said a quick, full
investigation of the matter will be
conducted, and action will be taken.
At a meeting of the Quarterback
Club last night, Emory said that
Sellers is expected to move from the
critical care unit to the intensive care
unit today. He also said the bullet is
still lodged inside of Sellers.
WASHINGTON (UPI) � The
Supreme Court agreed today to
tackle a crucial question raised by
the Three Mile Island nuclear acci-
dent whether people's fears must
be weighed before restarting an un-
damaged unit at the plant.
The justices next year will ex-
amine a ruling that for the first time
would make the Nuclear Regulatory
Commission consider the
psychological stress on people
"fears of recurring catastrophe"
before permitting a nuclear plant to
operate.
The high court's announcement
coincided with release of a safety
study for the Nuclear Regulatory
Commission that says a core
meltdown at a nuclear power plant
in a major population area could
kill more than 100,000 people.
Nuclear power supporters and the
government warn the ruling in the
Three Mile Island case reaches far
beyond the site of the nation's worst
nuclear accident at the plant at Mid-
dletown, Pa and could slow or halt
the licensing of nuclear plants across
the country.
The justices also agreed today to
examine the last hired, first fired job
policy used by most companies and
cities during layoffs, and said they
will consider whether legislatures
can begin their sessions with a
prayer led by a state-paid chaplain.
The question of who should be
fired first in hard economic times is
being raised by the Boston
Firefighters Union, which is appeal-
ing a ruling allowing the fire depart-
ment to keep black and Hispanic
firemen while laying off whites with
more seniority.
The state of Nebraska is appeal-
ing a ruling that found it is un-
constitutional to use tax money to
pay the legislature's chaplain and to
print prayer books.
In other actions as the court open-
ed the second month of its term, the
justices:
� Agreed to clarify the rights of
suspected criminals during police in-
terrogations.
� Promised to consider whether ser-
vicemen may sue their officers for
money damages for alleged viola-
tions of constitutional rights.
� Accepted for argument a case over
illegitimate children's rights to
receive Social Security benefits.
SOULS President Maxwell Quits;
Vice President Battle To Take Over
From Suff Reports
The President of the Society of
United Liberal Students, Ron Max-
well, resigned from his post Monday
as head of ECU's largest minority
organization.
According to the new SOULS
president, ECU student Barbara
Battle, Maxwell cited an increased
workload in his classes as the reason
for leaving his post. "I'm sorry that
he resigned Battle said. "It was
just something he had to do
"I feel I'm capable of assuming
the new role because of my past ex-
perience in the organization Bat-
tle said. Battle is a senior in business
education and has been active in
SOULS for four years.
"It was a total shock to me said
Jackie Rowe, president of the ECU
Chapter of the National Association
for the Advancement of Colored
People. "I didn't know he did it
Rowe expressed her confidence in
Battle as the new president. She
noted that because of Battle's ex-
perience as past secretary and cur-
rent vice president of SOULS, she
would be able to perform the duties
required by the position.
"I hate that the transition had to
take place in the the middle of the
semester, but we're going to carry
on as planned Battle said. She
plans to appoint a new vice presi-
dent and ask the general body for
Former President Calls
Helms One Of 'Few Nuts'
In Upcoming Memoirs
Wioto-lv SCOTT LARSON
Halloween Downtown
Students had a choice of more parties than they could handle over the Halloween weekend. Many students took
advantage of the celebration in downtown Greenville over the holiday.
From Suff and Wire Reports
In a section of Former President
Jimmy Carter's soon-to-be-released
memoirs, Carter refers to N.C.
Republican Senator Jesse Helms as
one of a 'few nuts" in the Senate.
In his book, Keeping Faith:
Memoirs of a President, to be
published today by Bantam Books,
there is a section in which Carter
discussed efforts to get bi-partisan
support for the treaties which subse-
quently were approved by Congress,
to return control of the Panama
Canal to Panama.
Carter quotes from his diary a
discussion he had with former Presi-
dent Gerald Ford, Henry Kissinger
and Republican Senator Howard
Baker of Tenn.
He quotes from his diary that
"Ford, Kissinger, and Baker all
gave me encouraging reports on
their attitude concerning th Panama
Canal TreatyWe sent all the
senators a telegram urging them not
to speak out against the treaty until
they know the details of the agree-
ment. Apparently it worked with
most f them except a few nuts like
their approval of her choice.
Maxwell, who has been heavily
involved in numerous campus extra-
curricular programs and activities,
including his position as last year's
student union president, could not
be reached for comment.
Sperm Bank
Popular Near
University
ATHENS, Ga. (CPS) � A sperm
bank that opened next door to the
University of Georgia recently had
so many first-day student donors
that it had to stop taking new ap-
plicants for two tweeks.
Sperm bank manager Donald Zeh
attributes the run on his bank to
easy money. The bank, a branch of
Xytex Corp based in Augusta,
Ga pays donors $20 each. Zeh says
students could make a donation
every two days.
"We find we're getting a pretty
good individual who has no other
way of getting extra money he
says.
Xytex opened by the campus with
an eye on Georgia's 20,000 students
because of the demand for semen
from educated people. "Would you
want the sperm of a college graduate
or someone with an IQ of 60?" he
asks.
Zeh, for one, couldn't be happier
about the turnout. "We want to get
as much acceptability in the corn-
Senator Strom Thurmond (R-S.C.) munity and among the student body
and Jesse Helms (as possible)
t
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 2, 1982
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
if you or your organization
would like to have an Item printed
in the announcement column,
please type It on an announcement
form and send it to The East
Carolinian in car of the produc-
tion manager.
Announcement forms are
available at me East Carolinian
office in the Publications Building.
Flyers and handwritten copy on
odd sized paper cannot be ac-
cepted.
There is no charge for an
nouncements, but space is often
limited. Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce-
ment will run as long as you want
and suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column for publicity.
The deadline for announcements
is 3 p.m. Monday for me Tuesday
paper and 3 p.m. Wednesdayy for
the Thursday paper. No an
nouncements received after these
deadlines will be printed.
This space is available to all
campus organizations and depart-
ments.
BAKE SALE
Phi Alpha Theta will sponsor a
Bake Sale Wednesday. November
3 in Brewster BA 314 beside the
History office) from 9:00 a.m. un
til 2:00 p.m. Brownies, cookies,
cakes, and other goodies will be
sold. Everyone is welcome. Come
out and support the History Honor
Society.
PHI ETA
SIGMA
The Phi Eta Sigma Freshman
Honor Society will meet on Tues-
day. November 2, at 5:00 p.m. The
meeting will be held at the
Western Sizzling located on East
10th street. All members are urg
ed to attend.
UNIVERSITY
CLUB
The East Carolina University
Club, which is open to all faculty
and staff, is holding a "silent auc
f'on" and evening of wine and
chees on November 7, from 5-7
p.m. in the MSC
individuals and businesses in
the Greenville area have donated
tne items to be auctioned off.
Chancellor John Howell will be the
auctioneer this year. All procedes
of the auction will benefit the
Lillian J. Jenkins .scholarship
fund.
PSICHI
The National Honor Society of
Psychology will hold a meeting on
Wednesday November 10 at 7:30
p.m. in room 129 Speight. Mr. Dick
Daves will speak on the topic of
Bio-t.edback. All interested per
sons are urged to attend.
BAHA'I
The Baha'l association of ECU
will hold their bi-weekly fireside
Wednesday evening November 3
in 212 MSC. At 5:00 p.m. for about
an hour. Anyone who finds discus-
sion of world religions of interest
is welcome.
GREEKS
Marajen. More than Music
RESUME
The career Planning and Place
ment Service in the Bloxton House
is offering the following one hour
sessions to help you prepare your
own resume. November 102:00
p.m. and November 11 2:00 p.m.
Those seniors or graduate
students finishing this year and
planning to register with us are
especially urged to attend. You
may come to the Bloxton House at
either of the above times.
FRISBEE
Learn new disc skills, play
ultimate, or just come to the bot-
tom of College Hill Tuesdays and
Thursdays at 4:00 to throw frisbee
and enjoy these remaining
beautiful, warm autumn days.
Club meetings are Mondays at
8:00 in MSC. room 248. 1982
Natural Light Flying Disc Classic
Video will be shown at the Attic on
Wed. Nov 10.
PHI KAPPA PHI
"Toward the New Millennium:
Challenges and Dreams will be
the theme of the eighth annual
ECU Phi Kappa Phi symposium to
be held on campus In early
February, of 83. A call for both
faculty and student papers suppor-
ting this theme, which deals with
the future, has been issued. In an-
ticipation of the new millennium,
papers are invited to deal with a
wide range of topics ranging from
discussions of the near future will
or may hold. Faculty are invited,
at this time, to submit abstracts of
approximately one page with a
deadline for submission of
November 15. Papers selected will
be announced by November 24J
Student papers directed toward
the same theme are invited, two of
which will be selected for a award
of 5100 each. The best student
paper submitted will be included
in the symposium program. Both
faculty and student papers are to
be submitted to Dr. J. W. Byrd,
Department of Physics.
INTERVIEWING
The Career Planning and place
ment Service in the Bloxton House
is offering these one hour sessions
to aid you in developing better in-
terviewing skills for use in your
job search. You may select a time
from those listed , November
10-3:30 p.m and November
11 3:30 p.m.
A film and discussion of inter
viewing through the Career Plann
ing and Placement Service will be
shared
CO-OP FOR BUSINESS
MAJORS
There are positions available
with the General Accounting Of-
fice as an Evaluation Trainee.
Students must have completed 75
hours and be available for two
work periods beginning in the Spr-
ing 1983 semester. Conversion to
permanent employment after
graduation would be likely. For
more information contact Carolyn
Powell at the Co op office, ext.
6979
GRE
The Graduate Record Examina
tion will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday,
December 11, 1982. Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to Educational Testing
Service, Box 966 R, Princeton, NJ
08540. Applications may be obtain
ed from the ECU Testing Center,
Room 105, Speight Building.
LSAT
The Law School Admission Test
(LSAT) will be ottered at East
Carolina University on Saturday,
December 4, 1982. Application
blanks re to be completed and
mailed to Educational Testing
Service, Box 966-R. Princeton, NJ
08540. Registration deadline is
November 4, 1982. Registrations
postmarked after this date must
accompained by. a S15, non-
refundable, late registration fee.
FRATERNITY
PROJECT
On Wednesday, November 3, the
pledges and brothers of Alpha
Sigma Phi fraternity will be spon-
soring a faund raising project for
March of Dimes of Eastern North
Carolina The public is urged to
support Alpha Sigma Phi fraterni
ty and March of Dimes by
donating at booths in and around
the campus area. Let the Alpha
Sig's show you how tar a dime will
go in Greenville.
ART CONTEST
The REBEL is conducting an art
contest open to all current ECU
students. There will be first prizes
of $50 in seven categories and a
$150 best in show prize Prize
money is provided by the Attic and
Budweiser. The seven categories
are: painting sculpture,
ceramics, drawing,
photoghraphy, design (meals,
wood, fibers), and graphic art and
illustration.
Bring entries to Jenkins 1325 on
November 5 with a one dollar en-
try tee for each piece Limit two
entries per artist Entries should
be ready for exhibition. All 2D
work must be prepared for hang
ing and framed or matted and
acetated. All Sculpture must be
self supporting.
Winners will be notified on Mon
day, November 8. Non winning ar
tists must pick up their work on
Monday before 4:00. Artists must
sign a form giving the REBEL
staff permission to move their
work to the Greenville Museum of
Art. If artists do not wish to
release REBEL staff from all
liability, they should move their
own work that Monday.
CATHOLIC
NEWMAN CENTER
The Catholic Newman Center
would like to invite everyone to
join in with us for celebrating
Mass every Sunday in the Biology
Lecture Hall starting at 12:30 and
every Wednesday at 5:00 at the
Catholic Newman Center located
down at the bottom of College Hill.
The Catholic Newman Center is
having a Burger and Beer Bash 111
and you are invited. It will be held
Sunday October 24 at 2:30 till
whenever. It will be held at the
Newman Center, 953 E. 10th
Street, located at the bottom of the
Hill. We will supply the beer,
burgers, hotdogs and soda. Please
bring a salad or dessert, and a $1
donation. Hope to see you there.
POSITION FOR
INDT MAJOR
There is an opening with Long
Manufacturing Co. for a Quality
Control Supervisor. This perma
nent position involves setting up
and maintaining a quality control
program in Rumania for tractors
manufactured for Long. Tne star-
ting date in immediately and the
salary is negotiable. Contact Nan-
cy Fillnow in the Co-op office, ext.
6979, for more information.
MODELING
The ECU Commercial Art-
Departyment would like to invite
all interested persons (male and
Female) to attend our model
cataloging photo sessions to be
held on Wednesday, November 3
and Thursday, November 4 from
7-10 p.m. in the lighting studio of
Jenkins Art Building. We will be
photographing and catologing
anyone interested in modeling for
fashion ads and layouts. All
photographs will be filed and
cataloged tor future reference. All
models chosen will be paid by the
hour for their participation.
CO-OP
Part-time co-op training posi-
tions are available with Buehler
Mfg. Co. in Kinston. These train
ing positions could lead to full-
time opportunities in Production
Supervision. Production Control
or Purchasing in the new Buehler
plant in Raleigh beginning June,
1983. All interested INDT majors
contact Nancy Fillnow in the Co-
op office, ext. 6979.
WOMEN'S RUGBY
its still not too late to play.
Anyone interested in playing
womens rubgy needs to report to
practices Tuesday thru Thursday
at 4.00. We practice behind the
Allied Health (Beik) building. Ab
solutely no previous experience is
required.
SCHOLARSHIPS
The School of Art is offering ten
scholarships for undergraduate
art students of the junior and
senior rank. Eight scholarships
are in tne amount of $250 each.
Two scholarships, established by
Don and Jack Edwards of tne
University Book Exchange, are in
the amount of $500 each. To
qualify, a student must have a
GPA of 3.5 in art, and an overall of
3.0. Slides of five works (name, ti-
tle, media, and size) must accom-
pany the scholarship application
form. Application forms may be
obtained from the School of Art Of-
fice. The deadline for all com-
pleted application material is
November 30.
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines. There are 33
units per line. Each letter, punc-
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end of line if word
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac-
cepted over the phone. We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
75 per line or fraction of a line.
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lower case letters.
Return la MKDIA BOARD office (Ml KAST
CAROLINIAN office) b? 2 p.m. Monday before
Tends? aiaer �nd Wedaetasy before TtMrsfay
pubKcalioa.
Name
Address.
City State.
No lines
.Zip.
Phone.
.at 75C per line S.
.No. insertions.
1





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J
i I
SKI FLASH
Snowski regisrtation for
Christmas Break Trip will be Nov
9 at 4:00 PM in Memorial Gym 108.
A 85 deposit will be accepted to
reserve your space. Call Jo
Saunders at 757-6000 if you need
more information.
FRESHMEN
REGISTER
Freshman Registers may be
picked up in the Buccaneer office
on Tuesdays and Thursdays from
2:00 p.m. till 5:00 p.m. The Buc-
caneer Office is located on the se-
cond floor of the Publications
Building. NOTE: All Freshmen
Registers must be picked up by
October 20. Remember you have
already paid for this publication,
so why let your money go to waste.
SMITHSONIAN
The Smithsonian institution is
offering 10-week graduate
research appointments in a varie-
ty of areas. The graduate students
will conduct inedividual research
under staff's supervision. The sti-
pend for these fellowships is S2000.
All interested graduate students
should contact hte Co-op office, 313
Rawi, ext. 6979.
RECIPES
Students, faculty and staff �re
invited to submit their favorite
recipes to be compiled into a
cookbok of ECU'S favorite recipes.
Ten of tne final entries will be
selected for the BAKE OFF,
which the date will be announced
later. The recipes will be judged
on I) originality 2)appearance and
3)taste. The grand prize will be
dinner for two at Darryl's
Restaurant. Submit your recipes
in designated boxes located at
Mendenhall, Student Supply Store
and selected Dormitories. For any
additional information call
758-3272 or 757-1920. Come on ECU
get involved.
CONCERTS
COMMITTEE
The ECU Student Union Special
Concerts Committee will present
Duke Ellington's "Sophisticated
Ladies" live via satellite from
Broadway on November 5. The
program will take place in Wright
Auditorium.
Tickets for the show are on sale
at the Central Ticket Offices and
are priced at S6 tor ECU students.
$9 for ECU faculty and staff and
$12 tor the public. For additional
information contact the Central
Ticket Office at 757 6611. ext 266
WOMEN
A meeting tor women interested
in forming a chapter of the
American Association of Universi-
ty Women will be held Thursday,
November 4 at 7:30 p.m. in tne
community room at First
American Savings & Loan
(formerly East Federal Savings &
loan) in Greenville.
CO-OP
The coop office has available an
opportunity wittit he Federal Law
Enforcement Training Center in
its Criminal Justice intern Pro-
gram. The internship runs from
January 3 through March 11 and is
located in Glynco, Georgia, for
more information contact Nancy
Fillnow in the Co-op office, ext.
6979.
CO�OP JOB
Burroughs Wellcome in Green
ville has an at'ernating Co op posi
tion open in its Validation Depart
ment. The job will be tor two
terms beginning in January, 1983.
INDT students with some
background in math, physics,
computers, electricity, and
chemistry and who rtav good
writing skills should contact Nan
cy Fillnow in the Co-op office, ext.
6979.
CO-OP
Black and Decker in Tarboro
has an opening for a part time ac-
counting clerk The person must
be able to perform miscellaneous
accounting duties such as paying
invoices and general bookkeep-
ing. Preferred is someone who can
operate a 10-key adding machine
Employment would start as soon
as possible. For more info, call the
Co-op office, ext. 6979
CO-OP
Automatic Data Processing in
Charlotte has a co-op position open
for a CSC i major, undergraduate
or graduate. The job will involve
technical support and operating
systems Students should have
analytical skills and a background
in Assembler. Compiler, Coboi
and RPG languages The alter
nating position will run from
January-May. For more info . con
tact Carolyn Powell in the Co-op
of ice ext. 6979. Rawl 313.
CO-OP
The Co op office has a iOb open
ing for an accounting position
avaible with a local manufactur
ing firm Requires adding
machine experience and accoun
ting background. Interested
students should inquire at the Co-
op office, located in Rawl at room
313
The East Carolinian
Smi� 'e emmpus LtmMu�tt
finer 1925
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ing tne summer.
The East Carolinian is the of
licial newspaper of East
Carolina university, owned,
operated, and published for and
by the students of East Carolina
University.
Subscription Rate: SM yearly
The East Carolinian aftices
�rt located in the Old Shut
Building on the campus of ECU.
Greenville. N.C.
POSTMASTER Sena address
changes to The East Carolinian.
Old South Building, ECU Green
ville. NC nm
757-6366. 6367. 6389
BAPTIST STUDENT
UNION
HEY! Do you enjoy friendly
fellowship, good friends and food,
and a chance to be yourself in this
"rat race" environment at ECU?
Then come join us at the Baptist
Student Union where we have din-
ners on Tuesdays at 5:30 for only
SI.75 PAUSE on Thursdays at
7:00 to allow us to take a break
after an almost fulfilling week,
and lots of people just like you who
enjoy others. Call 752-4646 if you
have any questions. Bob Clyde -
campus minister.
SCIENCE MAJORS
Have you ever tried till you died,
to get an answer to come and felt
so dumb& Well, come around and
take a look, browse through our
old and new science books. The
A.C.S.S.A. is having a reference
book sale in the conference room
of Flanagan November 2 and
November 3 between 11:00 and
5:00! Prices will be negotiable.
See you there!
FRISBEE
1982 Natural Light Flying Disc
Classic Video wil be shown at the
Attic Wednesday, Nov. 10. Come
out and play ultimate Tuesday and
Thursday at 4:00 at the bortome of
the hill. Hey Tony, how about an
ultimate tournament!? We've gel
the best team we've ever had �
Wonder if we could beat state?
CORRECTIONS
AND SOCIAL
WORK
First annual pie throw to be held
Mon Nov. 1 at 5:00 on front lawn
at Allied Helth. Money will be used
to support licensing of Sociasl
Workers. Cream pies will be auc-
tioned to tnrow at professors. A
"Welcome to the Department"
party to be held immediately
following. Get in on the fun and
help the cause.
PITT COUNTY
HUMAt$�SOCIETY
The Pitt County Humane Society
will have a table at the Carolina
East Mall on Saturday, October
30, 1982. Free printed material
about spaying and neutering and
other animal issus will be
available. Local veterinarians will
be on hand from 1:00 to ca. 330
p.m. to answe ny questions you
may have about animal health.
Biked oods, teeshirts, hats and
memberships to the Humane
Society will be on sale, as will raf-
fle tickets for si.00 each. Raffle
prizes include every hour from
10:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Grand
drawing is at 8:30 p.m.
HEALTH CAREERS
DAY
Nurses, medical techs, physical
therapists, occupational
therapists, social workers, and
Slap majors, representatives
from various hospitals and health
agencies will be on campus to talk
with you about employment
possibilities! Different
organizaitons will be here on the
following dates: November 5
Nursing building 9:45-1:00 p.m
November 8 Allied Health
Biulding 1:30 - 4:30 p.m.
Mark your calendar and tell
another friend about this in case
they do not see the announcement
GAMMA BETA PHI
Our next meeting will be held on
Thursday, Nov. 4tn in
Mendenhall's room 244 at 7 p.m. A
meeting for those going to State
Convention will be held im-
mediately following.
ACT
The American College Testing
(ACT) will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday,
December 11, 1982. Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to ACT Registration, P.O.
Box 414, Iowa City, Iowa 52240. Ap-
plications may be obtained from
the ECU Testing Center, Speight
Building, Room 105
CHEMISTRY MAJORS
Burroughs Wellcome in
Research Triangle Park has an
alternating coop position open for
a chemistry major. The job will in-
volve working with chemistry
researchers and begins in January
1983 running for about six months.
All interested chemistry majors
with at least two semesters of
organic chemistry should contact
Nancy Fillnow in the Co-op office.
ext. 6979
AMBASSADORS
There will be a general meeting
of the ECU ambassadors on Nov
3, 1982 Wednesday, it will take
place int he Mendenhall Multi-
purpose room at 5:00 p.m. Please
make plans to attend this impor-
tant meeting.
FRISBEE
Weather permitting, we will be
at the bottom of college hill today,
and every Tues. and Thurs. at
4:00. Look for the frisbee club in
the Homecoming parade. 1982
Natural Light Flying Disc Classic
Video will be shown at the Attic
Wed. Nov. 10. Club meetings are
Monday nignts 8 00 in Mendenhall
Room 248; anyone interested in
frisbee is urged to attend.
PRC MAJORS
Seymour Johnson Air Force
Base in Goldsboro. NC has an
alternating Coop position
available for Spring semester in
the ir recreation department. The
position reequires a 2.0 GPA and
you must be willing to work for
two terms. It is an excellent opor
tunity for anyone interested in
gaining valuable work experience
in the area of recreation. Salary:
approximately SI .000 per month
gross. Contact Nancy Fillnow in
the Co-op office. 313 Rawl,
757-6979. if you would like to apply
or want more information.
ILO
Tne international Language
Organization will be meeting on
November 3 at 300 in BC 305. The
plans for me Noche Lafina will be
discussed. All members are en
couraged to attend this meeting.
All interested persons are
welcome to attend the meeting.
You do not have to be a Foreign
Language major or minor to at
tend.
DUKE POWER
Duke Power in Charlotte has a
co op position open tor a program
mer analyst The job is alternating
for two periods, the first beginning
January 3. 1982 Interested CSO
or math majors, preferably
luniors with a GPA of at least 2 0
and a fairly strong computer
background, cnoutd contac
Carolyn Powefl in me Co-op office,
ext 6979. Rawl 313
IBM CO�OP
IBM tn Charlotte and Greenville
have alternating co-op positions
for CSC l or math majors. The
work in Charlotte involves pro-
gramming while me Greenville
job includes general training with
the company. The positions �rt to
start in January Contact Carolyn
Powell in the Co-op office, ext.
6979, Rawl 313. for more info
COMMUNION
A student Episcopal service of
Holy Communion will be
celebrated on Tuesday, Nov. 2. in
the chapel of St. Paul's Episcopal
Church, 406 4th Street (one block
from Garrett Oorm). The ser
vicewili be at 5 30 p.rr with the
. Episcopal ChapUtn. th� Hew BiU
Hadden. celebrating. Supper will
follow.
CO-OP POSITION
The U.S. Naval Academy in An
napciiS. MD has a position open
for a Co op student to work as a
programmer analyst The student
must have a computer "cscience
background and should be a
junior, the work experience is
alternating for two periods, the
first beginning on January 3. 1982.
For more info contact Carolyn
Powell in tne Co-op office, ext.
6979 Rawl 313
Duke Ellington's
uvt mon
PRESENTATION
WITH
E.C. U. STUDENT UNION
FRIDAY, NOV. 5th, 1982 � 9:30 p.m. � WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
STUDENTS $6.00 � FACULTYSTAFF $9.00 � GENERAL PUBLIC $12.0
DOORS OPEN 45 MINUTES EARLY � COLLEGE I.D. REQUIRED
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT The Mendenhall
l Student Center-Central Ticket Office
i PRODUCED BY �
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
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THE EAST CAROLININ NOVEMBER 1982
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Catholic Bishops Condemn Nuclear Weapons
Fy PATRICK O'NEILL
Sl�fl Wriler
The contents of a
proposed pastoral letter
calling any first use of
nuclear weapons irra-
tional and immoral was
released last week by a
committee of Roman
Catholic bishops.
"We find the moral
responsibility of begin-
ning nuclear war not
justified by rational
political objectives
the bishops said. If
adopted by the Na-
tional Conference of
Catholic Bishops, the
pastoral letter would be
its first sweeping con-
demnation of nuclear
arms.
"Thank God we're
finally coming to grips
with something that is
staring us in the face
and has the power to
destroy us, as well as
the whole planet said
Bishop Joseph
Gossman, Catholic
Bishop for the Diocese
of Raleigh.
Gossman told The
East Carolinian that
the Bishop's letter was
only a "draft state-
ment" and that it could
still be modified at a
later date. "We will
debate this in mid-
November in
Washington, D.C
Gossman asserted.
Comedian's Show Shocks Alumni
GAINESVILLE,
Fla. (CPS) � Come-
dian Robin Williams'
"crude" and "smutty"
performance at the
University of Florida's
homecoming show has
moved some prominent
alumni to swear off
next year's show, and
university officials to
trv to censor the shows
in the future.
A number of alumni,
including the chief
justice of the state
supreme court, walked
out of the show.
"It left a bad taste in
my mouth complains
Jack McGriff, a
University of Florida
alumnus and former
member of the state
board of regents. "It
probably was the dir-
tiest, filthiest, crudest
exhibition of supposed
humor
Williams' act was
filled with drug and
sex-related one-liners.
At one point, he bor-
rowed a camera from a
member of the au-
dience, and put it down
Health Career Day Held;
Employers Seek Students
By DARRYL BROWN
vsiii�m N�$ Edilor
Two Health Careers
Days will be held this
week for students
entering health-related
occupations. Over 60
prospective employers
will be on campus Fri-
day, Nov. 5 and Mon-
day, Nov. 8 to let
students meet represen-
tatives from various in-
stitutions and explore
career opportunities.
The first meeting will
be located in the nurs-
ing building from 9:45
a.m. to 1 p.m. The se-
cond will be held at the
allied health building
from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.
Booths will be set up in
the h a 11 w a v s and
students are encourag-
ed to stop by and inter-
v i e w the various
representatives and
even pick up job ap-
plications.
Many of the
employers are looking
primarily for nurses but
opprotunities are
available in most
health-related fields,
including physical
therapy, occupational
therapy and medical
technology. Seniors are
urged to visit the
meeting but any level
student may obtain in-
formation.
Display booths will
be set up by hospitals
and other health care
agencies from
throughout North
Carolina and the
Southeast. Some
employers come from
as far away as Florida,
Illinois, Washington,
D.C and Maryland.
Institutions represented
include Johns Hopkins
Hospital, North
Carolina Memorial and
Duke hospitals,
Georgetown University
Medical Center and the
U.S. Air Force Nurse
Corps.
The Health Career
Days are sponsored by
the Career Planning
and Placement Service
in conjunction with the
School of Nursing and
the School of Allied
Health and Social Pro-
fessions.
his pants to take a pic-
cure of what he referred
to as "Mr. Happy
Since the show,
which drew 65,000 peo-
ple to the football
stadium as part of the
homecoming weekend,
student affairs vice
president Art Sandeen
says he's been swamped
with official and unof-
ficial complaints about
the show.
"I guess it was just a
classic generation con-
flict he says. "My
hunch is that the ma-
jority of students liked
it. I suppose that I'm
an old fogey, but I
didn't like it
Worse yet, important
alumni like McGriff
and chief justice James
Alderman said they
wouldn't attend Gator
Growl, as the show is
called, again until it
was cleaned up.
"You just don't go
to a place where you
don't enjoy going
Alderman explains.
To make sure it
doesn't happen again,
Sandeen says the
university will try to
censor the show in the
future. He plans to
meet with members of
Blue Key � the select
honorary society that
stages the show � to
work out ways of
reclaiming the event.
Sandeen wasn't sure
exactly what might be
done. He suggested
previewing the student
skits and celebrity show
before they're perform-
ed.
Last year, some at-
tendees were similarly
offended by Rodney
Dangerfield's show,
but the response wasn't
nearly as vocal as this
year.
"The show was not
written with the
distinguished alumni or
the 10-year-old child in
mind says Growl
producer Scott Zeiger.
"We thought it hit the
majority of our au-
dience. Personally, I
thought it was
hysterical
Show ads, he points
out, did urge "parental
discretion
Gossman noted that
he personally saw no
justification for the
first use of nuclear
weapons under any cir-
cumstances. "I don't
see how you could
possibly justify that
(first use) based on the
ordinarily moral and
ethical principals that
we say we believe in as
Roman Catholics
For years, the policy
of the United States
and its allies has held
that nuclear weapons
might be needed to stop
a Soviet conventional
attack. The Reagan ad-
ministration vigorously
has upheld that policy.
No Christian can
rightfully carry out
orders or policies
deliberately aimed at
killing non-
combatants, the
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bishops said.
The bishops cast
strong doubt on the
Reagan administra-
tion's policy of nuclear
deterrance, contending
that the nature of the
deterrent in the nuclear
age has raised the most
severe moral questions.
The bishops said the
issue of nuclear warfare
and deterrence raised
signifigant questions
that required the up-
most care, not a
business as usual ap-
proach.
He agreed with the
letter that citing deter-
rence as the excuse for
further weapons pro-
duction was not a
viable excuse. The
bishops said they could
not approve of every
weapon system,
stragetic doctrine or
policy initiative ad-
vanced in the name of
deterrence.
The bishops contend
that new moral issues
have surfaced as a
result of the present
destructive power of
nuclear weapons. "In
the nuclear arsenals of
the United States or the
Soviet Union alone,
there exists a capacity
to do something no
other age could im-
agine: We can threaten
the created order
"Today the destruc-
tive potential of the
nuclear powers
threatens the sovereign-
ty of God over the
world he has brought
into being. We could
destroy his work
Gossman believes
that the United Nations
is not able to deal effec-
tively with the nuclear
weapons issue because
it has "another agenda.
It (the nuclear weapons
issue) gets lost because
of the third world pro-
blem Gossman said.
He also added that
the issue of high
military spending is
often overlooked in
Congress and that
debating is often focus-
ed on comparatively
less urgent issues, thus
taking important atten-
tion away from the
military spending ques-
tion.
"We're so busy put-
ting trillions of dollars
into our military
budget said
Gossman, "that we end
up fighting oer a tiny
(issue) which is peanuts
compared to the total
military budeet
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3Uie laat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, ow �����-
Mike Hughes, .��,���,��'
WAVERLY MERRITT, D.W�-o.Mrfvrrto�,g ClNDY PLEASANTS, Sports Editor
Robert Rucks, ��� ������ Greg Rideout, mm Eduor
ALl AFRASHTEH, Credit Manager STEVE BACHNER, Entertainment Editor
Stephanie Groon, artutoMo-Mr Juliana Fahrbach, style Editor
JONI GUTHRIE, Technical Supervisor MlKE DAVIS, Production Manager
NOVEMBER 2, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Brody Building
Technology Brings New Demands
Now that the gala ribbon-cutting
ceremony is history for East
Carolina's Brody Medical Sciences
Building, the university appears to
be entering into yet another phase
of development and service in
eastern North Carolina, a phase
which, like those before, will be
characterized primarily by increas-
ing demands � by both the univer-
sity and the public.
In this, the tail end of ECU's 75th
year, it is at times interesting �
and, indeed, necessary � to con-
sider the university's changing role
thus far. What started out in 1907 as
an area teachers college with virtual-
ly a handful of hopeful students has
since blossomed into the educa-
tional, medical and cultural center
for eastern North Carolina. Today,
as we all well know, the campus is
populated by 13,400 students in
diverse programs, while ECU's ex-
tension courses reach another
20,000.
And with that tremendous growth
in student body, facilities and out-
put (including all that growth en-
tails) has, of course, come an in-
creasing demand in Greenville and
in all of eastern North Carolina � a
demand East Carolina graduates in
the past have well met � for
knowlegde, commitment and will-
ingness to serve.
Practically since the school's in-
ception, ECU students have
graduated and become prominent
citizens in all walks of life in Green-
ville and other areas of the state and
nation.
Naturally, then, this latest addi-
tion to educational opportunity at
ECU typifies the fine heritage of ex-
cellence and service this university
has had with the local community.
The people of East Carolina owe
special thanks to those who, so
generously, have made the Brody
Medical Sciences Building a reality.
But our verbal thanks alone is not
enough. As our 75th-anniversary
slogan implies, we have a promise to
fulfill. The service does not � and
cannot � stop here. Community
reimbursement is a necessary part of
the cycle.
Choosing The 'Lesser Evil9
Lines For The Polls
On Voting In 1982
Each weeknight, "For my information
I tune-in with my favorite libation.
"For my listening enjoyment
They discuss unemployment
And the president's latest vacation.
There I watch as a humble newscaster
Gives results of the daily disaster:
They've proposed a new bill
Up on Capitol Hill
To bring on our demise that much faster.
"Since Reagan has taken the reigns
A Democrat from Boston disdains,
"The White House is rotten
(He seems to've forgotten
His party's own savior from Plains.)
"We're beating the pants off inflation
Says a GOP organization
But when prices start dropping,
Old people go shopping,
And load up on canned Ken-L-Ration.
The Democrats reak insurrection,
While Republicans show misdirection.
So, to all others running
I can say, without punning,
Good luck in this Tuesday's election!
Mike Hughes
Just The Way It Is
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes is poet
laureate at the Velvet Jones School of
Technology in Tyrone County, N.C. At
present, his hobbies include competition
target spitting, playing the violin like a
guitar and running cattle across the
Wyoming prairie. He also enjoys Elvis
Presley movies, chasing small dogs onto
busy highways and eating Stewart sand-
wiches at Fast Fare. But perhaps his
favorite avocation is collecting tire-
flattened toads and making lunch.
His favorite television shows are The
Love Boat, Leave It To Beaver, The Secret
Powers Of Matthew Star and The Ernest
Angley Hour, although Gilligan's Island,
Hazel and Ozzie and Harriet aren't far
behind at all.
Among his favorite performers are: Bar-
bara Billingsly (as June Cleaver), Russell
Johnson fas the Professor) and Gilbert
Lard (a deafmute healed regularly by
Ernest Angley).
In music, he's always liked Frank
Sinatra, especially his earlier cuts with Jim
Morrison. But his extensive 45-rpm record
collection also includes such favorites as
Burl Ives' version of "Heavy Metal not
to mention Christmas albums by Ace Can-
non, Robert Plant and the Who.
His favorite authors are columnists
Hosea and Micah, humorist James Joyce
and novelist Pat O'Neill.
His favorite poets are Williams Word-
sworth, Blake and Shakespeare, John
Keats and Raoul the Natureboy, whose
finest works (including "Man From Nan-
tucket") have appeared in sundry stalls
across campus.
He enjoys nightly entertainment by the
comedy team of Roger Mudd and Tom
Brokaw.
Once a year, he makes an annual junket
down 1-95 to South of the Border, where
he vacations at the luxurious Pedro Hotel
and plays in the Burrito Classic putt-putt
tournament, vying for the coveted lock-
pick to the city.
He is intrigued by Ronco TV commer-
cials and frequently shops by mail (just ask
his girlfriend).
Among his favorite athletes are former
Dallas Cowboy Jackie Smith and NCAA
basketball star Freddy Brown of
Georgetown, both of whom have cost him
a lot of money.
He also enjoys the fine selection of inter-
national foods in the machines at
Mendenhall and frequently loses quarters
in them. His favorite snack is comprised of
a stale moonpie, a package of
"four-corner" Nabs and a vanilla "rock
'n' roll" cookie, all washed down with an
orange soda.
Just for fun, he enjoys attending SGA
meetings and proofreading back issues of
The East Carolinian for typos.
GnuwBmOHat'Me&
I5NT THAI CUTE.P6AR? 00NI0R SAM
A JOB AS A DOOReAN P6M6R
Campus Foniifi"
N&O's ACC-Bias Hits ECU P.D.Q.
Attention News and Observer:
May I ask a question? How long must
East Carolina University persevere? It
wasn't enough that the university had to
be stereotyped as a pit of alcoholism and
a wild frolicking campus. It seems
you've decided to thrust the blade right
through our athletic program as well.
What kind of attitude prevails in the
almighty Piedmont, that you have to
bombast the efforts by our university in
its thriving to obtain growth and in-
dividuality? It seems that the area has
been blinded by the ACC stereotype for
so long that I don't believe it can actual-
ly perceive the thought of another
creative and progressive university grow-
ing up in our great state. Is there such a
"phobia" concerning the growth com-
ing down here that it frightens our
western counterparts? From the time we
became a university, to the struggle for a
medical school (which has helped lead to
the development of a much-needed
medical center for the eastern populace),
and now this, we seem to face a
challenge in our struggle for growth.
The article on partying really helped
the university's image and couldn't have
come at a better time. At the time, ECU
had been directing a campaign for alum-
ni support through contributions, but
thanks to you, who wants to support a
"campus bar?" I'm sure it really pleased
potential job recruiters and students
who may be considering ECU as a
source of employees and as a potential
future educational choice.
And our football team? Ever since the
program proved it could match up with
the ACC, the ACC has decided to look
elsewhere for new opponents. UNC feels
that they need to stay away from so
many in-state opponents and play a
more nationally-oriented schedule for
recognition. So what if ECU doesn't
play a lot of teams from around this
area. We're playing around the country,
and people are hearing about a part of
North Carolina.
The next time you print something
about ECU, I think it ought to be an
apology. I doubt, however, if you even
have the guts to do so! In my opinion, I
see the N&O just drifting along in its
own "limbo of the Piedmont and they
wouldn't recognize the name of a fine
university if it were printed on its own
front page!
Randal L. Ziglar
Grad. Student
Credit Where Due
I am writing this letter to the students,
faculty and staff of East Carolina
University. As president of the College
Hill Area Residence Council, it is my job
to make sure that our council serves the
students of College Hill. Not only do we
try to provide educational programs and
entertainment for our students, but we
also want to help out other organiza-
tions or ECU activities whenever possi-
ble. One of the ways we have helped is to
release purple and gold balloons at the
pre-game show of homecoming. This
year, we decided to do it again, since the
students appreciated it so much last
year. Unfortunately, no announcement
was made at Saturday's game to give
credit for this activity. If the Homecom-
ing Committee wants the continued sup-
port of the student body to help with the
homecoming activities, then they should
be ready to recognize these specific
organizations which do participate in
homecoming.
CHARC has been in the past and will
continue to be very supportive of as
many ECU projects as is realistically
possible. The only thing we would like to
ask for in return is a little credit where it
is due. At this time, I would like to rein-
force this idea by thanking everyone on
the College Hill Area Residence Coun-
cil, from the individuals who actually
blew up the 1,600 balloons released this
year, all the way to the individuals who
help make up and support the council.
Thank you, CHARC, for a job very well
done.
Holly Gilliam
CHARC President
Competition Without
Recognition
I would like to pose a question to the
staff of The East Carolinian: What is the
purpose of a school newspaper?
To me, the purpose of a school
newspaper is to report educational
events pertaining to the school as well as
local and national events which affect
the student body. However, one such
event did not qualify for coverage in The
East Carolinian. This event was East
Carolina University Band Day.
As a member of the ECU Marching
Pirates, I was appalled to see no
coverage whatsoever pertaining to this
educational event. Thousands of
students from North Carolina and
Virginia came to Ficklen Stadium to
compete for honors which they received
only through hours of daily rehearsal.
With the students came many dedicated
parents, without whose help the bands
could not have outstanding educational
programs.
One of the most educational ex-
periences one can have is to be in a mar-
ching band. In a band, one learns how to
function effectively within a group and
to take (personal) responsibility in order
to achieve. We can observe this from the
stands of a football stadium in a band
performance. The dicipline alone will
stay with you for the. rest of your life.
I do not wish to cause any hard feel-
ings toward anyone; however, I do feel
that the thousands of high school
students who came to our school for
such an educational event should get the
recognition they deserve. I sincerely
hope that in the future, The East Caroli-
nian staff will recognize these students in
their efforts and possibly provide some
space for an article.
Paul A. Orsett
Sophomore, Music
Yellow Rain
Some of you have recently seen
posters on campus and read the article in
The East Carolinian on Yellow Rain.
Yellow Rain is a highly-poisonous
chemical warfare weapon. The USA
does not possess it, but the USSR has us-
ed it to crush opponents in Yemen,
Laos, Kampuchea and Afghanistan. In
fact, the Kremlin has even used it against
its own people.
Victims caught in a Yellow Rjjnat
tack suffer agomsng-syanptappE
eluding the flowing of Blood from alt
body openings, the vomiting of blood,
violent convulsions and painful death.
Yellow rain, in other words, can be a
major terror weapon.
Last week, two posters announcing a
campus discussion of Yellow Rain had
to be replaced because they had been
torn down by person(s) unknown. Let's
hope that these incidents indicate the at-
titude of only a few students at ECU and
that most want to know about this
dangerous weapon, potentially as life-
threatening as nuclear warfare.
As chairman of the College
Republicans. I am announcing a discus-
sion on Yellow Rain to which all are in-
vited. There is no charge for admittance.
The meeting will be at 3 p.m Wed
Nov. 3 (244 Mendenhall); and 7:30
p.m Wed Nov. 3 (221 Mendenhall).
The speaker will be James A. Phillips, a
well-known expert on chemical warfare.
Join the College Republicans in learn-
ing more on this issue. Remember, to be
silent on Yellow Rain is to support it.
Dennis Kilcoyne
Sophomore, Pol. Sri.
Economic Ills
I was very pleased to note that an arti-
cle appeared in The East Carolinian
outlining some of Lester Thurow's
criticisms of our current economic crisis.
Unfortunately (perhaps for reasons of
space) nothing in the way of specific
cures for our economic ills was sug-
gested, and I am familiar enough with
this. economist to know that specific
solutions are made clearly available in
his work.
I hope that Jay Stone or some other
staff writer for The East Carolinian has
the wherewithal to do a follow-up on
that very informative article. It is a
mistake to think that Thurow's theories
on economic revitalization are merely a
vague carbon copy of Kenisian prin-
ciples and the liberalism of the past.
Sam Suva
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U.N. Faces Threat Of Possible Block Of Israel
Y
By JACK ANDERSON
and JOE SPEAR
WASHINGTON � The United Nations
could well be facing one of the most
serious crises in its turbulent 37-year
history. Here's why:
Several hardline Arab countries have an-
nounced they will try to block the accep-
tance of Israel's credentials to the General
Assembly for the session that has just con-
vened. If the effort succeeds, the Reagan
administration will cut U.S. contributions
to the United Nations and refuse to take
part in the General Assembly as long as
Israel is denied membership.
Such drastic measures could mean the
beginning of the end for the world body.
The leaders in the Arab move against
Israel are Iraq, Libya, Syria and the
Palestine Liberation Organization. All
they need is a simple majority of the
General Assembly, and they are lobbying
behind the scenes to line up other Moslem'
and Third World nations.
Unfortunately, the United States can no
longer count on the solid bloc of Latin
American support in the United Nations.
Many Latin American countries that
regularly vote with the United States are
still upset at the way the Reagan ad-
ministration sided with the British in the
Falklands Islands dispute.
Nevertheless, the United States is deter-
mined to block the action against Israel.
Cables have been sent from the state
department to the U.S. embassies around
the world, instructing American am-
bassadors to let their host government
know how strongly the White House feels
about the issue.
Our sources say that the administration
is prepared to withhold financial support
and boycott the General Assembly. The
United States would continue to par-
ticipate in the Security Council and retain
its veto.
The American taxpayers contribute
about $1 billion a year to the United Na-
tions � one-quarter of the assembly's en-
tire budget and far more than any other
country's contribution.
In short, without the United States,
there would be no United Nations.
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THF FAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 2, 1982
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Hunger Group
Gives Donations
To Relief Funds
The GreenvilleECU
Hunger Coalition held
a press conference last
Thursday and
presented $700 checks
to two local hunger
relief organizations for
their work in the
Greenville area.
The two checks
represented one-fourth
of the money that was
raised during last spr-
ing's "CROPWALK
for Humanity Only
25 percent can be
designated for a local
project.
Catholic Campus
Minister Sister Helen
Shondell made the
presentations to
representatives of the
Greenville offices of
the Salvation Army and
Catholic Social Ser-
vices. Both groups do
hunger relief work with
local lower income
residents in Greenville
and Pitt County.
"We have probably
10 or 15, sometimes 20,
families a day coming
to us said Mrs. Ma-
jor Ronald Davis, who
works with her hus-
band at the Greenville
Office of the Salvation
Army. "We certainly
could use it
"I think it's ter-
rific said Catholic
Social Service
Representative Lucille
Gorham. "We were
down to the penny, and
this will really help to
feed the needy in this
area Gorham added
that she had just lent
$55 of her own money
to a needy family
because Social Services
had no funds left.
"We serve anybody
who comes added
another volunteer with
Catholic Social Services
Mrs. Evelyn Silva.
"Almost everyone who
comes to us wants
food All of their
relief work is done by
volunteers.
Last year's walk was
the eleventh year of the
event, and it raised
close to $6,000 � most
of it comi. g from local
residents and
businesses.
East Carolina
University Chancellor
John M. Howell and
Mrs. Leo Jenkins serv-
ed as last year's
honorary chairpersons
for the 20-kilometer
trek. Sister Shondell
said she was grateful
for their support.
The Hunger Coali-
tion asked that anyone
who knows of local
farmers with any excess
of food, such as
potatoes, which were
abundant this year to
call the Salvation Army
or Catholic Social Ser-
vices.
March of
Dimes
(BIRTH DEFECTS FOUNDATION!
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13-16
WEEKS
AT 1-uKTHER EXPENSE
S185.00 Pregnancy Test, Birth
Control, and Problem Pregnan-
cy Counseling. For further infor-
mation call 831-0535 (Toll Free
Number 800-221-2568) between 9
A.M. and 5 P.M. Weekdays.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
717 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N.C
li�Tl
USDA Choice Beef Round Whole
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These prices good thru
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, USDA Chelee Beef Rene'
Lb 178 i Sirloin Tip Roast
White
Potatoes
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u10
Pickife of 12 - 12 Oi. Cot
1.S liter - Noerty BarioooY Raieo, Rot Rut
Piak ekahlit. Cm.IIi Blue
Gallo Wine
1.5 liter - Birf RMm, Chihllt, Rom
Paul Masson
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States,
College
Graduates
BECOME A LAWYERS ASSISTANT.
� Program approved by American Bar Association.
� Day or Evening classes available.
� Employment assistance.
A Representative from the National Center for Paralegal
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Placement Office to meet interested students. For more
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
NOVEMBER 2, 1982
Page 6
'Mikado' The
Perfect Present
For 75th Year
By JULIANA FAHRBACH
Style Kdilor
What a treat the East Carolina
Playhouse and the School of Music
has given us: a diamond for ECU's
75th anniversary, a superb presenta-
tion of Gilbert and Sullivan's
Mikado.
As I sat in the audience the cur-
tain rose on the palace courtyard of
the Lord High Executioner of
Titipu. Various Japanese nobles,
while scurrying about the stage,
identify themselves with the chorus,
"If you want to know who we are,
we are gentlemen of Japan
Soon, a wandering minstrel nam-
ed Nanki-Poo (in reality, the son of
the Mikado) rushes in inquiring
after Yum-Yum, giving the explana-
tion that years earlier he had seen
her and had fallen deeply in love
with her. Alas, Pish-Tush (a noble
lord) tells him that, as before, Yum-
Yum is engaged to Ko-Ko. Nanki-
Poo's eyes alight because he has
heard that Ko-Ko has been conde-
mend to death for flirting. Pish-
Tush informs him that not only has
Ko-Ko been pardoned, but he is
now Lord High Executioner and is
to marry Yum-Yum that very day.
The arrival of Ko-Ko is announc-
ed. He is seeking advice from Pooh-
Bah, who comes haughtily on the
scene. We learn that Pooh-Bah
possesses every title imaginable
from Lord Chancellor of the Exche-
quer to coroner and each of these
titles support is for sale to the
highest bidder.
After Pooh-Bah's invaluable ad-
vice Ko-Ko comments on his power
as Lord High Executioner saying,
"I've got a little list of society's
offenders who might be well
underground
A host of Japanese school girls
flutter in and we see the beautiful
Yum-Yum and her two friends,
Peep-Bo and Pitti-Sing, which form
"Three Little Maids from School
Soon, everyone tactfully departs
leaving Nanki-Poo to declare his
love to Yum-Yum. In the process he
tells Yum-Yum his true identity and
explains his reason for disguise to
avoid marrying Katisha, an elderly
See 'MIKADO Page 7
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
The "gentlemen of Japan" dance in the palace courtyard of the Lord High Executioner in this scene from The Mikado.
Once Frustrated SPYS Already Over Foreigner
By MARK MEHLER
Tkc Record
NEW YORK � You already heard one side. That
was Mick Jones, the leader of Foreigner, explaining
how the group had fired bassist Ed Gagliardi (in 1979)
and keyboardist Al Greenwood (a year later) because
they were not making a sufficient contribution to the
band's oeuvre.
"The idea of SPYS (who opened for .38 Special at
this year's homecoming concert at ECU) is as a creative
outlet for everyone connected with it says Gagliardi
of his new quintet. "This is the direct opposite of the
way it was in Foreigner, which started out as a group
and ended up a vehicle for one man (Jones). Eventually,
it was totally closed off to me and Al. I think I'm a pret-
ty good bass player, but in Foreigner, it got to the point
where I didn't know if I could piay at all; I was beaten
down, frustrated
Adds Greenwood: "I look at a song like 'Don't Run
My Life' (on SPYS' debut album) as being 'Feels Like
The First Time' or 'Cold As Ice It's completely fresh,
like Foreigner in the beginning. Before the good feelings
were negated
Joining Greenwood and Gagliardi in SPYS, whose
self-titled debut LP has been slow off the boards, are
three young musicians from New York: John Blanco, a
classically-trained singer who co-founded the band two
years ago; John DiGaudio, the guitarist and co-
founder; and Billy Milne, the drummer and a former
member of Billy Falcon's band, who joined SPYS in
1981.
Though the ex-Foreigner members have known a rock
'n' roll life the other three can only dream of, Gagliardi
insists the thoughts and feelings of the individual SPYS
are of a piece. "Al and I want what they want he says
of the others. "That is, satisfaction. We're musicians,
we need self-fulfillment, to believe in what we're doing.
You can be making a lot of money, as we did, and not
be satisfied
Greenwood and Gagliardi take considerable pains to
distance SPYS from their old combo � spiritually and
musically. Gagliardi, for one, says SPYS' music is
Music
"more melodic and adventurous" than Foreigner's.
"Listen to the way John DiGaudio splits the high end
of a Rickenbacker on 'Into the Night " he challenges.
"Foreigner would never chance something like that.
When we put a bridge in a song, it's a release that really
releases, not just a connection between parts. You look
at a vocalist like John Blanco; he's a trained choral
singer. He did 106 voices in the middle of 'Danger I
can't see how anyone can call us a mainstream band
Nevertheless, there are strong similarities between
Foreigner and SPYS, among them a healthy dose of
power chording and an element of misogny ("You can
dress up like the ladies on the TV aiming for the ma-
jor leagues but you're no Cheryl Tiegs").
"Ed and I have a few fans from Foreigner, I suppose,
and we'd like to see them get interested in what we're
doing now concedes Greenwood, "But there has been
one thing we've tried to make explicit from the very
beginning: we won't ride on Foreigner's back
SPYS developed out of a close friendship between
Blanco, DiGaudio and Gagliardi. While in Foreigner,
Gagliardi produced demos for Harpy, the local club
band Blanco and DiGaudio were fronting at the time.
After leaving Foreigner, Gagliardi took a year off,
"keeping pretty much to myself.
"I knew I wanted to stay in rock 'n' roll somehow
he says, "but I didn't know if I wanted to play in a bar
band or be Mick Jones I mean Mick Jagger. Anyway,
I chose to be neither one. I just didn't want to be in a
situation where anyone could dominate anyone else
At about the time Gagliardi was emerging from his
self-imposed exile, Harpy was self-destructing. The
three comrades soon began rehearsing and writing as
SPYS. Milne joined after completing his stint with
Falcon's band. Gagliardi hit on Greenwood almost im-
mediately after the latter had departed Foreigner. "I got
him rip-roaring drunk on saki and zombies laughs
Gagliardi. Actually, it took a bit more convincing that
that, but in the spring of 1981, Greenwood became the
fifth member of the band.
"At that point, it was back to shopping demos says
Greenwood. Last winter, they recorded their first album
for EMI at Electric Lady Studios in New York.
They had taken the first step, but Greenwood and
Gagliardi prefer to reminisce about playing in Green-
wood's cold, moldy basement, warmed by a kerosene
heater and feeling that it's nice to be in control of your
fate. "Sometimes muses Gagliardi, "Al and I will just
look at each other and smile.
"Billy and John Blanco and John DiGaudio might
look up to us as guys who've been at a certain level, but
at the same time, Al and I will look to them as people
who know what it's like to be normal. That's something
I still have to learn
"The best feeling I've had in rock concludes Green-
wood, "is knowing that some D-minor chord that I had
laying around ended up in a SPYS song. It feels good to
say that's my bit. Basically, that's what it means to be in
a real group.
A Bleary Mirage
Mac Offering Is Out Of Focus
Fleetwood Mac
Mirage
Record Reviews
Broadway's 'Sophisticated Ladies' Next Campus Video
Following their icebreaking experimental concert (featuring rock group Devo live and in 3-D), the Cam-
pus Entertainment Network, in conjunction with the Student Union Special Concerto Committee, will
make history with its next big-screen video event this Friday night, Nov. 5, at 9:30 p.m when it
telecasts the hit musical Sophisticated Ladies to ECU's Wright Auditorium live-via-satellite from
Broadway. This marks the first time that a Broadway show will be telecast live during its current run.
The tribute to Duke Ellington contains some of his most famous songs, including "Satin Doll
"Caravan "A Train and "It Don't Mean a Thing The sound for the production will be broadcast
to campus in stereo. Tickets are $6 for students, $9 for faculty and star, $12 for the general public, and
$12 at the door; they are available at the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student Center.
Does anybody remember popular music before Fleet-
wood Mac?
In the dim past existed groups comprised totally of
raggedy looking men who often shouted and jumped
when the feeling of the moment so moved them. They
had spontaneity and emotion, which the Mac are almost
entirely lacking.
Mirage is alright if you want to be lulled to sleep after
a tough day, or you need some faint noise to underscore
a little idle chatter in anticipation of romance. Beyond
that, no dice.
The songs are forgettable and repetitious. Stevie
Nicks, for all her prima donna sensuality, seems to be
singing from the other room on the mix.
Fans will no doubt rejoice over Mirage, but I think
they'll wish their copy of Rumours wasn't so old.
Joe Jackson
Night and Day
Joe Jackson proves once again that he's one of the
most innovative musicians recording today. He also
moves closer to his dream of Duke Ellington or Hoagy
Carmichael serenity, particularly on the Day side of the
album.
The lyrically beautiful "Breaking Us in Two" could
break a biology instructor's heart (if that's possible).
"A Slow Song" is a slap to the machinery of the
popular music business that often precludes art and
romance for the sake of the almighty dollar.
The Night side is super-polished uptown dance music,
but with the lyrics of Joe Jackson it becomes poetic
social observation with a beat.
Jackson hasn't settled into a complacent groove like
so many of his contemporaries; let's hope he doesn't,
because his search through musical experiment seems to
get better and better.
Jimi Hendrix
The Jimi Hendrix Concerts
Most of the posthumous releases on behalf of artists
by their companies are pitiful attempts to grab a few
more bucks before time erases the memory (and,
therefore, the dollar potential) of the snuffed
"property But that's not the case this time.
Jimi Hendrix was so sweeping an innovator and so
prolific a stylist that even 12 years after his death his
music and records are appreciated as much as they were
during his life. Bands don't play Hendrix songs very
often. Most guitar players can't begin to touch him, and
never will for that matter.
Mike Jeffrey, Jimi's former manager, said that when
he first saw Jimi playing in a small club in New York, he
knew that he was a genius: somewhere between
Beethoven and John Lee Hooker
This album captures all the fire and intensity of Hen-
drix in performance. There are great versions of "Red
House" and "Voodoo Chile plus a soaring "Little
Wing" that'll make you throw your Eric Clapton
records out the window.
Eleven songs in all, and all of it Hendrix at his guitar
burning best.
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OW,
a bar
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The
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laughs
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ime the
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Green-
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rk Perkinson
'Mikado' A t McGinnis
Continued From Page 6
lady of his father's
court.
Another twist is in-
troduced when Ko-Ko
receives a letter from
the Mikado stating that
no one has been ex-
ecuted in a year and the
office of Lord High Ex-
ecutioner will be
abolished if someone is
not decapitated within
the week. Enter Nanki-
Poo who is bent on kill-
ing himself because he
cannot have Yum-
Yum. Ko-Ko manages
to persuade him not to
kill himself, but to be
executed by Lord High
Executioner. Nanki-
Poo agrees in exchange
for Yum-Yum's hand
in marriage and Ko-Ko
agrees.
Everyone rejoices,
but the gaiety is cut
short by the arrival of
Katisha, Nanki-Poo's
elderly fiance. She
threatens to reveal
Nanki-Poo's true iden-
tity, but when she
begins to unmask him
the chorus interrupts by
singing loudly and
drowning out her voice.
The marriage of
Nanki-Poo to Yum-
Yum seems imminent
when a law concerning
the wives of beheaded
husbands is discovered.
It seems that the spouse
of a beheaded man
must be buried alive
with him. "A rather
Yum-Yum complains,
"stuffy way to die
All decisions come to
a halt with the arrival
of the Mikado. To save
themselves, Ko-Ko,
Pitti-Sing and Pooh-
Bah decide to pretend
Nanki-Poo has been ex-
ecuted so they inform
the Mikado that a
beheading has taken
place. Pooh-Bah, Ko-
Ko and Pitti-Sing give
all of the gory details.
All is well until
Katisha discovers from
the death certificate
that it was her fiance
who was decapitated.
The Mikado is in
despair and proclaims
that those who kill an
heir to the throne are to
be put to death
themselves. The
Mikado declares this
story cannot have a
happy ending because
"virtue is triumphant
only in a theatrical per-
formance
Knowing of their fate
Pooh-Bah, Pitti-Sing
and Ko-Ko decide that
the only solution is for
Ko-Ko to marry
Katisha so that Nanki-
Poo can show that he is
indeed alive. Ko-Ko is
forced to agree and
Katisha accepts him as
her husband.
When the Mikado
returns the groups ex-
plains the
"non-execution" and
everyone lifts their
voices in a rousing ren-
dition of "For He Has
Gone And Married
Yum-Yum The cur-
tain calls follow.
All of the stars shine
brilliantly as gems set in
a stunning broach.
Frederick Johnson,
who we have seen
previously in Showboat
and Die Fledermaus,
gives an excellent per-
formance as Nanki-
Poo, mastering his dif-
ficult musical numbers
with ease and convinc-
ing the audience that he
is indeed deserving of
true love.
Pooh-Bah, who
claims that he can trace
his ancestory "back to
a globule is played by
versatile ECU graduate
Steven Williford.
Pooh-Bah says, "I am
a particularly haughty
person I can't help it.
I was born sneering I
am sure that the au-
dience believed every
word of this as they
were captivated by Mr.
Williford's deliciously
arrogant Pooh-Bah.
His enslavement by
money is heard loud
and clear when he is
asked to say hello to
Yum-Yum, Pitti-Sing
and Peep-Bo, and so he
replies, "How-de-do
v
$
119
Reg. $189.95
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lt L � B,L 'Clean burning �.��. .tphon
rSj f- .Odorle. .Ideal lo. large ��as brt"
ALL WE ASK IS - COMPARE!
Lay away Now.
Also Located In Raleigh. 2741 E. 1 Oth
Wilmington & Laurinburg 758-2080
IO-�MonFri.
10-3 Sat. fift r"
Colonial Heights
Shopping Center
little girls noting on
the side that he, "is not
used to saying how-de-
do to anyone under the
rank of stockbroker
Oh what a delight
Steven "Pooh-Bah"
Williford affords!
Jay Fox (seen this
summer as a fine
Master of Ceremonies
in the Summer Theatre
production of Cabaret)
portrays the twity Ko-
Ko, Lord High Execu-
tioner. Mr. Fox has a
lilt to his step and ob-
viously a song in his
heart. By the end of the
performance you are
simply addicted to him.
Katisha is at first
seen as evil, but Dianne
H. Pickett makes sure
you know that she
yearns only for love. If
you see the perfor-
mance then you'll be
absolutely positive that
she does indeed have a
"breathtaking elbow
As for the "three
maids from school
school has taught them
well. Yum-Yum is love-
ly as played by Denise
Miller. Sandra Jean
Landers plays Pitti-
Sing well, allowing the
audience to see that she
is more than just a gig-
gling school girl. As
Peep-Bo, Amie Keyse is
a nice addition to make
the trio.
Gerald E. Murphy
Jr. as Pish-Tush is truly
a noble lord and Anton
T. Wesley stands tall as
the omnipotent
Mikado, a genuine
tower of strength with a
voice to match.
Gregory Quick, as the
attendant to Ko-Ko,
helps make Ko-Ko's en-
trance a grand affair.
Paul Baker, is, to say
the least, a perfect um-
brella bearer.
Much credit must go
to the chorus of school
girls and the Japanese
nobles who added a
piece which made the
puzzle complete. These
men and women per-
formed the excellent
choreography with a
flair!
The Japanese
costumes were colorful
and lively, each faithful
to the period with some
inspired original
touches.
The sets and lighting
were also superbly done
with each hue and tone
blending to form a rich
visual presentation.
Tonight marks the
last performance of
The Mikado. For ticket
information, call the
McGinnis Theatre box
office at 757-6390.
All I can say is
"Bravo Thank you
East Carolina
Playhouse and School
of Music. This produc-
tion is a true celebra-
tion of the ac-
compiishements of
ECU in our 75th year.
Franken & Davis Coming
Old Saturday Nite Live comedy team Franken
and Davis will appear in Hendrix Theatre Mon-
day, Nov. 8, at 8 p.m. Tickets at the Central
Ticket Office are S3 for students, $5 for faculty,
staff and public, and $5 at the door.
���-�?������
ATTIC
WEDNESDAY
College Nite
with
NO VACANCY
75C Adm. for Students
THURSDAY
LADIES' LIGHT NITE
All Ladies' admitted
for $1.00
4(K 50 6CK beverages
for Ladies
NO VACANCY
�??������
JaKcKananKEtE
Travel
with
ECU
to the
Big
Apple
Nov. 24-Nov. 28,1982
Spend your Thanksgiving holiday in style on Broadway,
at Macy's Parade, shopping, & touring the city. Space is
limited & time is drawing near. For more info, contact
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Center.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 2. 1982
I
AOvt HTiS�0
UM POL'C v
Each of
iDwow tn
in etto od.
advortood Itoma Is
in
rsf
�dtobor
Mtoat �A
ootoo I
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT NOV. 6, AT ASP IN GREENVILLE, NX.
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
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�. . - �
-V





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
NOVEMBER 2, 1982 Page 8
Ga.

Lack Of Intensity Costs Pirates Loss
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Sporls Editor
After West Virginia was shut out
(24-0) the previous week by rivaling
Penn State, East Carolina knew
they would find a vengeful-seeking,
frustrated team in Morgantown,
West Va.
As it turned out, ECU just hap-
pened to be the victims for the
Mountaineer predators.
West Virginia scored three
touchdwons in the first quarter for a
21-point lead and booted three field
goals in the second half to roll over
ECU, 30-3. Freshman Jeff Heath
kicked a 30-yard field goal in the se-
cond quarter to put ECU on the
scoreboard.
The Pirates also scored three
points against WVU in last year's
game, which the Mountaineers won
20-3. But that was the only similari-
ty to be found in the two meetings.
In the '81 confrontation, ECU gave
up one field goal in the fourth
quarter.
The Pirates have taken pride in
their defensive team this season, but
head coach Ed Emory wasn't feeling
too proud at halftime. The head
coach described the loss as the
"most disappointing game I've had
all year
"We didn't play with the intensity
and enthusiasm that we've been
playing with he continued.
"Every team this year said we've
been the most physical team they've
played. We just didn't play on our
heels
With WVU quarterback Jeff
Hostetler out with an injury, no.
two quarterback Kevin White made
his starting debut against ECU.
Although many felt as though the
loss of Hostetler was an advantage
for the Pirates, Emory didn't see it
that way. "We thought Kevin White
was going to come in trying and pro-
ve himself and establish a running
game
Emory's speculation proved to be
right. White did pass and with
Curlin Beck on the receiving end,
the duo scored two touchdowns in
the first quarter. Beck rushed for
105 yards in the first half and White
completed eight of 16 passes for 91
yards. "They came right out and
ran the ball he said. "It always
seems like we get a late start and end
up having to play catch-up. But they
are much better than last year �
probably twice better on defense
The Mountaineers leading 7-0 in
the first few minutes of play, ECU
cornerback Sam Norris intercepted
White's pass at ECU's 33-yardline,
but a pass interference was called
against the Pirates. "That call was
absolutely asinine Emory said,
"It's hard enough to play with 11
players, but it's much harder to play
with 17 or 18
Following the call, West Virginia
took advantage and scored after
King Harvey carried twice to put
WVU in the endzone.
With 6:02 remaining in the first
quarter, ECU fumbled on its own
10-yard line to give the Moun-
taineers a first and goal situation.
Two consecutive carries by Beck
gave West Virginia a 21-0 lead at the
end of the first half.
In the second quarter, ECU
defensive end Curtis Wyatt in-
tercepted a White pass at ECU's
four-yard line and returned 73 yards
to place the Pirates on WVU's 26.
Heath attempted a 47-yard field
goal but the kick was called wide
left.
A few minutes later, Heath
booted a 30-yard field goal to give
the Pirates three points, now mak-
ing the score 20-3.
In the second half of play, Emory
said the Pirates began moving the
ball better. "In the second quarter I
think the players started saying,
4hey, we can play with these guys
The Mountaineers, however, ap-
proached the second half with a dif-
ferent strategy in mind. "We made
an adjustment and they quit runn-
ing he said. "They changed our
personalities.
was trying to figure out why his
players didn't seem ready to play.
"We had a chance to score 28
points he said. "Maybe they
(players) just don't believe they are
in the same class � talent-wise as
West Virginia, but they are. West
Virginia didn't do anything spec-
tacular today (Saturday)
. With three games left on the
schedule, Emory said the Pirates
will have to play much better than
they did against West Virginia in
order to win. "We can't be 7-4 the
way we played today. But I'll tell
you this, we aren't no 30-3 program
behind West Virginia. I promise you
that
The Pirates travel to Texas-
Arlington this Saturday. Gametime
is 7:30 p.m.
�MM
Woi Vi
Scoring:
WVi � Beck. 8 run (fcood�de kick)
WVa � Harvey. 2 run (Woodside kick)
WVa � Beck. I run (Woods kick!
EC � Heath. 30 FG
WVa - Vkoodadc. 24 FG
WVi � Woodsxte. 25 FG
WVi � Woodside. 3� FG
� 3�t-3
21 � 3 � 3�
E.
14
43-122
138
123
18-9-1
6-41.8
3-3
7-�
WV
First Downs
Rushing
Passing Yards
Return Yards
Passing
Punts-Average
Fumbies-Lost
Penalties
26
51-270
172
26
32-19-2
4-51 5
1-0
7-3
Rushing - EC Bvner 16-68. Stewart 11-23. Branch 9-15.
Baker 4-8. Vann 2-9. Nebon 1-4; WVa Beck P 102. Harv
19-77. Wotflev 6-37. Bo ma 5-31. White 3-22. Drewery M.
Passing � EC: Stewart 18-9-1-138. WVa White
32-19-2-172.
Receiving � EC: Adams 3-53. Netson 1-16. Vann 2 51.
Branch 1-9. Byner 1-6. Pope 1-3; WVa: Miller 4-56. MuUen
4-48. Hollins 2 30. Beck 2-6. Harvev M, raugh 1-6. Watciak
M-H.
t
WVU'a Paul Woodside kicked a
24-yard field goal in the third
quarter and a 25- and 38-yard field
goal in the fourth to put the Moun-
taineers up, 30-3. The sophomore
set a school record of 27 career field
goals to surpass the previous mark
of 25. Woodside set four Peach
Bowl records last year.
"Paul Woodside is like money in
the bank, said WVU coach Don
Nehlen. "Anytime you get inside
the 30, he is just about automatic
Nehlen praised his team for being
ready to play against the Pirates.
"Their team had real good defen-
sive stats coming in he said. "I'm
glad we cam to play. You know
when you look at the teams we did
not rush against, nobody else has
rushed against them either
Coach Emory, on the other hand,
�y GARY PATTER SOU
ECU's Curtis Wyatt returns 73 yards after his interception against West Virginia.
An estimated 50,616 people attended the game last Saturday.
Black: Hard Work Paid Off
Ptiet ty GAUV PMTBBSO
ECU Tight End Lloyd Black
Andruzzi Optimistic
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Sports Editor
Everyone likes to think of an
athlete as being eager, hard-working
and willing to make a few sacrifices.
He must be a competitor in the
truest sense of the word.
And if anyone fits that descrip-
tion, it would have to be ECU tight
end Lloyd Black.
A previous all-stater from San-
ford, Black came to East Carolina
almost four years ago. Recruited
during the days of Pat Dye, Black
said he was mainly sought after
because of his catching ability.
After his arrival at ECU, Black
didn't play his freshman season and
was then redshirted his sophomore
year when he broke his foot. The
thought of missing another season
was hard for Black to accept � at
first, that is. "I was kind've disap-
pointed he said. " I really didn't
understand the redshirt rule and
how it could be a benefit to me, but
I realized that it could give me time
to become stronger
Black used his time wisely, know-
ing that he needed to become faster
and stronger. At 190 pounds as a
freshman, Black realized he needed
to get bigger after trying to fend off
former ECU standout George
Crump, who is now with the New
England Patriots.
So, the former Shrine Bowl
selectee began lifting weights. Black
now weighs in at 224 pounds and
runs the 40-yard dash in 4.8
seconds.
He bench-presses 313 pounds and
hang cleans 315 pounds.
Black splits most of his playing
time with fellow teammate Nor-
wood Vann, along with sophomore
Damon Pope.
"We roll on every play in practice
and whoever has the best week of
practice or played the best in the last
game will start he said.
Does the competition run high for
playing time? "Norwood and I are
the best of friends Black said.
"When he plays, I root for him.
When I play, he roots me on. We
compliment each other on the prac-
tice field
Black's coach, Ricky Bustle, has
nothing but praise for his player.
"It's hard to keep Lloyd Black from
playing he said. "He does
everything and you know he's going
to do it right. That counts for a lot.
Lloyd won't get you beat
When asked what he does best in
his position, Black said he always
tries to use his head. "I'll know who
to block he said. Against West
Virginia, the tight end graded 89
percent on assignments, but support
blocking is the main area that Black
feels he executes well. "They told us
to learn how to do it the best he
said, "and now I'm strong
enough
Since Black was on the team
before Emory arrived, he said he
has been able to see the growth of
the football program in the past
three years. "He's done a good
job he said. "He puts the player
first. That's just the way he is. And
he's worked hard to get the things
he has promised
One of those promises, according
to Black, was to devise a highly
competitive schedule at the request
of the players. "We wanted to play
big teams he said. "That's the on-
ly way to get better
Along with many of his team-
mates, Black was bothered by the
editorial column written by Joe
Tiede of The News and Observer,
who claimed that ECU did not
belong in Division-I-A and added
that the Pirates haven't been able to
beat, much less compete, with Divi-
sion I schools. "He doesn't see the
hard work Black said. "He has no
right, especially since coach Emory
has worked so hard to make this
program work. I thought the article
was in poor taste.
"I can say we should've won and
he can say we didn't, but we're still
as good as N.C. State and a lot of
schools in that area
As far as the losses that have been
suffered against Florida State,
Missouri and West Virginia, Black
believes there is also something to
gain by the experiences. "It just
takes time he said. "If we play
with them for so long, we're going
to eventually beat them.
"Besides, I don't think the people
in Greenville really want to watch us
play Division I-AA schools
Black, however, sometimes
wonders if the fans want to see the
Pirates play. "I think a lot of the
fans go to party. They're not really
concerned with the game. They said
they wanted to see some big teams
play here, but when we played
Miami last year, there seemed like
less than 20,000 people.
"At Florida State, there were
50,000 people at the end of the game
and it was a runaway. Like Emory
tells us, you're either with us or
against us, there is no in-between
Black was disappointed in the
teams' showing this past weekend at
West Virginia, but explained that
many times the players have a
tendency to lose some of their
motivation halfway through the
season. "We've been at it a long
time he said, "and everybody
looks forward to their freedom, but
not to the point of giving up foot-
ball
More than anything else. Black
said he will never forget the friend-
ships he has made with teammates
and especially with his suitemates:
John "Chubby" Floyd, John
"Chief'Robertson and Don "The
Fish" Jones. "They are the
greatest Black said.We've had a
lot of good times together and I fed
like we'll always keep in touch
With one more year of eligibility
after the '82 season. Black will once
again strive to make the most of his
potential. "I want to get stronger,
faster, more flexible and quicker
he said. "My goal is always to play
my best. Even when I'm playing se-
cond string, I want to be the best
second-string player I can be
Bustle is one coach who believes
in his player's abilities. "He's one
of the finest kids I've ever coach-
ed he said. "The reason that he
plays is because he is such a hard
worker
With four weeks of
pre-season women's
basketball practice
gone and. only two
short weeks remaining
until tipoff in Minges
Coliseum against
Fayetteville State
University, Lady Pirate
coach Cathy Andruzzi
finds herself anxious,
but cautious.
"We find ourselves
taking our time
teaching with this team
because we have so
many freshmen said
Andruzzi. "No
freshman comes totally
prepared to play college
basketball
As in the past, the
name of the Lady
Pirate game has been
defense, and this year is
no exception.
"Our defensive game
is our priority every-
day adds Andruzzi.
"Most of our time now
is spent on defense; in
fact, more than we an-
ticipated
Coming off a 17-10
1981-1982 season, in-
cluding a post-season
playoff berth in the
NCAA regional at
South Carolina, the
squad is set for its third
straight playoff ap-
pearance. Andruzzi is
taking things one step
at a time.
"The transition for
the new kids has shock-
ed them states An-
druzzi. "They are
talented, however. We
haven't seen it all yet.
They have ability and
they have talent. But
they are ahead of any
other freshman class
I've had.
"There have been no
real surprises offers
Andruzzi, "but I think
you can expect some
freshmen starters
Forward Mary
Denkler, after leading
the state of North
Carolina in 1981-82
with a 20.1 scoring
average, has been
selected as a pre-season
Honorable Mention
Ail-American by Street
And Smith's College
and Pro Basketball
magazine. She is the
only player listed from
North Carolina.
Denkler, a 6-0
senior, is listed among
the top 54 players in the
country. She scored in
doable figures in every
outing last season,
twice rutting, for 29
points, and average
eight rebounds per
game.
Volleyball Team Wins
21st Victory Of Year
By EDWARD NICKLAS
Stair Writer
Last Thursday, the ECU Lady
Pirate volleyball team beat. the
University of North Carolina at
Wilmington 15-12, 16-14, 11-15,
15-11, to raise their record to 21-12.
Despite the win, head coach Lynn
Davidson was hardly ecstatic with
her team's victory. "I am very
disappointed with the way we
played Davidson said. "We have
not played well since the South
Carolina tournament (Oct. 1st and
2nd)
The closeness of the match with
the Lady Seahawks, a team ECU
has handled rather easily in the past,
added to Davidson's frustrations.
"Something is just not there and I
can't figure out why she said.
"I've tried yelling and pleading with
them and it's just not working
I
If there was a bright spot in the
match, it was the play of Darlene
Hedges, who, according to David-
son, "came in and did a great job
blocking and intimidated UNC-W
immensely
��
ECU will get a chance to revert to
their old form when they play
Virginia Commonwealth and
George Mason Wednesday at VCU.
"It's up to the players to
straighten themselves out David-
son said. "They've got to get it
together because we have some
tough matches ahead
Lady Pirate Hitter Stacey Wctod
UNC-W
M0MM nagi
' I. I ����� - ' "
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Mayi
ATLANTA
Everytime it 1
Bill Curry fii
Georgia Tech'j
program bac
winning tra
meone throws
The Yellow
have really
enigma.
We're talkn
a team which
ago, Curry's fj
head coach,
then top-rank
Dame to a 3-
won only one
season; on.
opened last sej
a 24-21 u
Alabama, thei
of its other gz
This season
even more per
Latest case
was this past
when, just
after upsetti
nessee 31-21
many Tech
called their fii
in at last a d
Yellow Jacl
behind 21-0 n
half enroute ttj
loss to underdl
"We wor
players ery
to the Tennesl
and you sav�
they responds
Curry. "We
maintain that
turn going
Duke game. H
Soco
The ECL
team traveller
depths off The
State Saturdj
noon and were
by the Lniv
Central Flond
Centra Fk
2-0 at halftirm
goals scored
Franly. Gen
John Lint and
Fracisco.
The PiraH
goal was scor
Griff with aril
Here's some
adMce that coul
you 10.000 flavl
buds of savor I
mem. It's the
Sirloin Tips a:
Western
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Choice Sirloin
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NO.
B
includes in
kit, instrud
monttv ECU!
tat





THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 2, 1982
Ga. Tech's Curry Pushes Team
S
0 3 0 0�3
!1 0 3 6�30
23. Branch 9-15,
H k 102, Harve
I 22, Drcwer) 1-1.
P38 �a White
: I 16, Vann 2-51,
J-56, Mullen
v Wakzak
PATTERSON
there were
Jd of the game
Like Emory
r with us or
in-between
)inted in the
ist weekend at
Explained that
ers have a
me of their
through the
at it a long
id everybody
freedom, but
iving up foot-
else. Black
ket the friend-
Ith teammates
js suitemates:
loyd, John
la Don "The
ley are the
We've had a
her and I feel
tin touch
of eligibility
llack will once
le most of his
get stronger,
find quicker
klways to play
Jm playing se-
o be the best
lean be
who believes
bs. "He's one
e ever coach-
:ason that he
such a hard


ATLANTA (UPI) �
Everytime it looks like
Bill Curry finally has
Georgia Tech's football
program back on the
winning track, so-
meone throws a switch.
The Yellow Jackets
have really been an
enigma.
We're talking about
a team which two years
ago, Curry's first as its
head coach, played
then top-ranked Notre
Dame to a 3-3 tie but
won only one game all
season; one which
opened last season with
a 24-21 upset of
Alabama, then lost all
of its other games.
This season has been
even more perplexing.
Latest case in point
was this past Saturday
when, just one week
after upsetting Ten-
nessee 31-21 in what
many Tech followers
called their finest effort
in at last a decade, the
Yellow Jackets fell
behind 21-0 in the first
half enroute to a 38-21
loss to underdog Duke.
"We worked our
players very hard prior
to the Tennessee game
and you saw the way
they responded said
Curry. "We tried to
maintain that momen-
tum going into the
Duke game, but 1 could
tell in practice that it
just wasn't there.
"We're simply not
good enough to beat
anybody unless we play
the very best we can
said Curry. "I think
everybody now knows
that when we play well
we've got a chance but
when we don't we're
not going to win. There
are teams around that
can not play with inten-
sity, make mistakes and
still win. We're not one
of them
Georgia Tech is 4-4
at present and will be
favored to win two of
its remaining three
games at home against
Virginia and at Wake
Forest the next two
weeks.
Lose one of those
and the Yellow Jackets
will be doomed to their
fourth straight losing
campaign since they
close their season at
Georgia, a current con-
tender for the national
championship.
"It's obvious our
players have to be
pushed hard all the
time said Curry.
"You can't let up a
minute with this bunch.
We woke up too late
against Duke and when
we did we couldn't take
advantage of the situa-
tion. We aren't a
mature team
Time was when
Georgia Tech had one
of the best college
coaching situations in
America. The school
had only three head
coaches over the
63-year period when
John Heisman
(1904-1919), William
Alexander (1920-1944)
and Bobby Dodd
(1945-1966) reigned.
Dodd joked about
that one time when it
was suggested that
Tech might be con-
templating a coaching
change. "1 would re-
mind (then Tech Presi-
dent) Dr. Harrison
quipped Dodd, "that
Georgia Tech has had
only three coaches but
seven presidents
Things haven't been
the same since Dodd
(who remained as
athletic director for
another decade) retired
from coaching after the
'66 season.
His successor,
former defensive assis-
tant Bud Carson, lasted
only five years �
posting a break-even
27-27 mark with only
one outstanding season
(1970) and Carson's
successor, Bill Fulcher,
threw in the towel after
only two years.
At that point
Georgia Tech turned to
Pepper Rodgers. But
although Rodgers had
quarterbacked the
Jackets to some of their
greatest successes in the
early 50s, his often
bizarre behavior and
mode of dress turned
off the more conserva-
tive Tech alumni.
That brings us to Bill
Curry. A standout
center at Georgia Tech
during the early '60s
and then for 10 years in
the NFL, Curry had
served as an assistant to
Rodgers for one year
(1976), then spent the
next three as an assis-
tant to Bart Starr at
Green Bay.
Curry, tall, slim,
soft-spoken, fit the bill
more for the fact that
he reminded the more
influential alumni of a
young Bobby Dodd
than for his coaching
experience.
Whatever the reasons
for his hiring, Curry
returned to Georgia
Tech determined to
rebuild the Yellow
Jackets football for-
tunes.
"I don't pretend to
be a miracle worker
he said at the time.
"But if hard work and
dedication is what it
takes, we'll get the job
done
"With this team he
said, "you have to drag
it out of them. Push
and push again. At our
talent level, it's very
hard to win, especially
if your team isn't play-
ing the very best it is
capable of
Soccer Team In Florida
The ECU soccer
team travelled to the
depths of The Sunshine
State Saturday after-
noon and were defeated
by the University of
Central Florida 5-1.
Central Florida led
2-0 at halftime and had
goals scored by Chris
Franly, Gerry Stell,
John Lint and Matthew
Fracisco.
The Pirates' lone
goal was scored by Stan
Griff with an assist by
Chip Baker.
As ECU head coach
Robbie Church put it,
the difference between
the two teams wasn't as
great as the difference
between the two scores.
"It was a good game,
and it was a lot closer
than the final score in-
dicates said Church.
"Central Florida got
three goals in the last
minutes
Church pointed out
the excellent effort put
take a tip from
Western Sizzlin
Here's some good
advice that could give
you 10,000 flavor
buds of savory enjoy-
ment. It's the No. 3
Sirloin Tips at
Western
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Choice Sirloin
Tips sea-
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with onions and bell
peppers and served
with your choice of
potato. So come on in
and follow up on
some good advice at
Western Sizzlin.
NO. 3
SHUiOIN
onion.
Western
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Bausch & Lomb
Soft Lenses
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Includes initial eye examination, lenses, care
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too
(kUY FATTtMM
OPTOMCTWC
�Y�CAR�G�HI�R
OfOffMMnOMM
228 GREENVILLE BLVD.
TIPTON ANNEX
756-8404
Dr. Pt�r Hollls
NOW LOOKING GOOD
COSTS LESS
forth by Brian Win-
chell, who "played a
great game at goalie
Winchell, a 5-11,
165-pound senior from
Atlanta, took over at
goalie during mid-
season and has been a
solidifying force for the
Pirates.
ECU's final match of
the season will be
played Sunday after-
noon at 2:00 p.m. The
Pirates will take on
UNC-Wilmington at
home.
Located 1 mile past
Hasting's Ford on
10th St. extension
Tuesday, Wednesday
& Thursday
POPCORN
SHRIMP
295
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad may be substituted
for Slaw35c extra
OPEN 24 HOURS DRIVE THRU WINDOW
Special:
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11-2 p.m. and 5-9 p.m.
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DEDICATION
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COVERAGE
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KNOW-HOW
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W$Z 3Ea0t
Carolinian
MAKES THE DIFFERENCE
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
subscriptions
available now
Send money or check to:
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East Carolina University, Greenville, N. C. 27834
(or bring subscription form by office)
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Rates: Mvidml$2t
-y etrnMrV






10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 2, 1982
Pack To Meet Big Rival
Classifieds
RALEIGH, N.C.
(UPI) � The 11-game
North Carolina State-
Penn State series
becomes history this
weekend leaving behind
some bittersweet
memories for the
Wolfpack.
North Carolina State
has in recent years
played some ot its best
football against the
powerful Nittany
Lions, only to see the
effort go for naught.
In 1977, Ted Brown
ripped Penn State's
defense for a stadium
record 251 yards
rushing. The Lions still
prevailed 21-17.
In 1979 Scott Smith
scored on a two-yard
run and the Wolfpack
looked like they were
home free with a 7-6
lead. With one second
left on the clock, Herb
Menhardt booted a
stadium record 54-vard
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field goal that hit the
uprights and dropped
through lifting Penn
State to a 9-7 victory.
Last season the
Wolfpack led 9-7 in the
third quarter. The
Lions converted a key
fourth down play on a
fake punt, and pulled
off a 51-yard pass play
and blocked two kicks
to win 22-15.
"Our players really
enjoy playing Penn
State said Wolfpack
Coach Monte Kiffin,
whose team is 2-9
against the Lions in the
recent series. "I would
enjoy playing Penn
State if we could win a
few
Senior cornerback
Dee Dee Hoggard said
the team rver has a
problem getting up for
the Lions only to have
to come back down.
"It seems like every
year it's the same
thing said Hoggard.
"We play good, good,
good, and they get the
big play. I guess it's a
sign of a great team to
always get that big
break.
"I like playing
them Hoggard add-
ed. "Growing up I
always heard about
Penn State. It was like
they were a pro team or
something
After this game, the
series will resume for
two games in 1987. In
1984 the Wolfpack
begins a 10-year series
with Pitt, another
traditional national
power.
The 5-3 Wolfpack
stopped a two-game
losing streak with a win
over South Carolina
last week, but Kiffin
said it will take nothing
short of everything his
team can muster to
defeat the 7-1 Lions.
Gl Camouflaged Fatigues and
T-shirts, Sleeping Bags,
Backpacks, Camping Equip-
ment, Steel Toed Shoes, Dishes
and Over 700 Different New and
Used Items. Cowboy Boots.
S34.95.
ARMY-NAVY
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ABORTIONS
t-24 week terminations
App'fs. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
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Bring this ad for 20 j
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CALL 758-6266 Greenville Blvd.
STROWS
presents
THE PHANTOM FORECASTER
(the most accurate college football prediction sheet available)
Available
FREE
at the
following locations:
Overton's
Marsh's Surf N' Sea
AccuCopy
Sharpe's
Varsity Barber Shop
Sandwich Game
Arcade Variety & Grill
Sammy's Country Cooking
Pizza Transit Authority
Sharp's Formal Wear
Hodges
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Archie's Steaks
Pantana Bobs
Subway
Heart's Delight
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Mr. Gatti's
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"You can ask me the
same questions every
year about Penn State
and the answers would
always come out the
same Kiffin said.
The 33-3 drilling of
South Carolina has the
Wolfpack, at least tem-
porarily, on the upbeat.
"Our defense played
more like we want them
to play said Kiffin.
"I think our offense
moving the ball helps
our defense
The South Carolina
victory came at a
crucial time. After los-
ing to North Carolina,
the Wolfpack followed
with a loss to Clemson.
The
players then started
thinking about last year
when they lost six
straight after being
defeated by the Tar
Heels.
"It was kinda look-
ing like last year Kif-
fin said. "You can tell
your players over and
over again that it isn't,
but it's just not the
same until it happens
Starting tailback Joe
Mclntosh remains
questionable due to an
ankle injury he suffered
in the first quarter
against the Gamecocks.
In his absence
freshman Mike Miller
ran for 158 yards in 23
carries and three
touchdowns, but Kiffin
hopes to see his starter
back in the lineup.
"Joe was really com-
ing on before the in-
jury Kiffin said.
PERSONAL
TO ALL P.P CHILDREN. t
wart bad! I hear Quality Inn is
closed for repairs. You people are
savages! I Fraternally, COOKIE.
BUCKWHEAT Happy anniver-
sary! It's been a month and now
I'm sure that you're what I've
been looking for. I didn't plan it at
the start, but by tall break, you'd
won my heart. I know that others
think you're fine- too bad for
them, 'cause now you're mine
LOVE,SPAHKY.
WHO IS THE MOST
FLAT�CHESTED WOMAN ON
CAMPUS?
ROOMMATE
WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share apartment one block from
campus SIM a month plus one
third utilities. Cheryl 7SM�S�.
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL Typist wants to
type at home. Reasonable rates.
7S-U0.
PROFESSIONAL Typing service-
experience, quality work, IBM
typewriter. Call Lanie Shive.
7M-5301 or Gail Joiner 754-102.
TYPING TERM papers, resumes,
thesis, etc. Call 7S?-733.
PROFESSIONAL typing- rush
jobs done. Scientific symbol ele-
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TYPING: MANUSCRIPTS,
papers, thesis, reasonable rates.
Call 7S-37�.
LOSE WEIGHT HONEST
7M-tS30.
LOST AND
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CALCULATOR, owner must .den
tify, call 7S7-O072 for Applewhite.
WANTED
WE BUY PLAYBOY, Rolling
Stone Mag. Quicksilver Record
Book Exchange. 100 East Fifth St.
WANTED: USED LP'S.
REWARD: CASH OR TRADE.
Quicksilver Records. IM East
Fifth St.
MODELS NEEDED:
PHOTOGRAPHER needs models
for a variety of protects. Will pay
for travel and up to S7S an hour
based on experience. No ex-
perience is required. Send full-
length and full face photo or port
folio to: NEW DAWN
Photography M2E W. Lockhaven,
GoMsboro, NC 27S30.
RIDES
NEED RIDE from Washington,
NC to ECU MonFri 7 00
a.m. 4:00 p.m. Call Joe, (�!�)
�4�-�47i collect, nights. Desire to
share expenses.
MISC.
ANOTHER COUNTRY, another
culture. Picture yourself in Costa
Rica this spring carrying on your
ECU studies at low cost. Want to
know more? Dr. Baker, Brewster
AI24; Or. Bort, Brew. AMI; Of-Or.
Farr. Brew. Alia.
CRAZY ZACK'S ROAD TRIP Nov.
It tie includes round trip to Zacks
and refreshments on the way to
Raleigh. Half-price admission to
Zack's. Call Alpha Sigma Phi
752-1073 before Nov. 12.
IT DON'T Mean a thing if it ain't
got that swing - Sophisticated
Ladies, Friday, Nov. 5th, Wright
Auditorium.
SIR DUKE. I'll be the one sashay-
ing down the aisle at
Sophistocated Ladies, Friday Nov.
5th, see you Judith.
Take the "A" TRAIN, out get
there Friday night for Duke Ell
ingtoa's Sophistocated Ladies in
Wright Auditorium.
40 OUKE ELINGTON's tunes and
big band sound, live from Broad
way. Sophisticated Ladies. Fri-
day, November 5fh, Wright
Auditorium.
Dancing, singing and the big band
swinging, Ouke Ellington's
Sophisticated Ladies. Friday.
November 5th, Wright
Auditorium.
FOR SALE
HANDCRAFTED, rustic lur
niture at aflordable student
prices For more information, call
Kim at 752-5717.
2 FISHER SPEAKERS model 530s
would like to trade tor cassette
deck. Call 754 t�77 or The East
Carolinian 757-6344 and leave
message for Geep Johnson.
FURNISHED EFFICIENCY
APARTMENT. Utilities included
across from campus 7S� 2S�s.
FOR SALE: 171 HONDA 2S0 XL
DIRT OR STREET BIKE Call
75-7tlMon. Thur.
YOUR BSN IS WORTH AN
OFFICER'S COMMISSION
IN THE ARMY.
Your BSN means you're a professional. In the Army, it also
means you're an officer. You start as a full-fledged member of our
medical team. Write: Army Nurse Opportunities,
P.O. Box 7713, Burbank, CA 91510.
ARMY NURSE CORPS.
BEALLYOUCANBE.
J. A. UNIFORMS
SHOPS
Bring this ad for
10 OFF
on the purchase of
one of our lab coats!
All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes, shoes,
and hose. Also � used ECU nurses
uniforms. Trade-ins allowed.
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive.
Near Hollowell's Drug and old hospital
i
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re-
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Items and Prices
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 2, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 02, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.227
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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