The East Carolinian, October 28, 1982






�he �ast Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.?
Thursday, October 28,1982
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Financial Aid ljjj
Cuts May Be Coining ������
By DARRYL BROWN
Aufauat News Editor
The ECU Financial Aid Office
has received its final authorization
of funds for the 1982-83 school year
and yesterday received its new pay-
ment schedule for the current year.
Meanwhile, the Reagan administra-
tion announced its 1983-84 student
aid appropriations proposal.
Funds usually arrive at ECU
around July 1, and the Financial
Aid Office has been in a state of
uncertainty for months waiting for
the appropriations. "We're just
about caught up said Robert
Boudreaux, director of the office,
referring to student aid awards.
"We know where we're going
The office was forced to issue
emergency loans and tuition
deferments earlier this year when
students needed their funds to enter
school.
The Financial Aid Office did
receive a sufficient amount of funds
this year, Boudreaux said. He added
that it was less than the 1981-82
school year, but the cuts were not as
deep as expected.
Last week, Edward Elmendorf,
acting assistant secretary for
postsecondary education, announc-
ed the Reagan adminstration's stu-
dent aid proposal for the 1983-84
school year.
The proposal is similar to the plan
submitted last year by the ad-
ministration that was rejected by
Congress and calls for a 50-percent
cut in federal student aid programs.
According to Elmendorf, the ad-
minstration wants to abolish four
student aid programs: Auxilary
Loans, State Student Incentive
Grants, Supplemental Educational
Opprotunity Grants and National
Direct Student Loans.
The administration proposed
eliminating the same programs last
year, but Congress rejected the idea.
The administration did get rid of
Student Social Security, however.
According to Boudreaux, the ad-
ministration recommended $1.4
billion to be allocated for the Pell
Grant program next year, while the
House Appropriations Committee
wants to continue last year's figure
of approximately $2.4 billion. For
College Work Study the president
suggested $394 million while the
House committee recommeneded
$528 million.
See COLLEGE, Page 5
Reagan & Mondale
5 Campaign In N. C.
Wd
Art Can Be Tough
This stuggling young artist has to work a little harder than most
should have taken up the flute
By STANLEY LKARY
He
President Ronald Reagan was in
North Carolina Tuesday stumping
for the Republicans, and so was
former Vice President Walter Mon-
dale for the Democrats, as this fall's
election campaign trail winds down
to its last week of action before next
Tuesday's vote.
Reagan, who appeared at a rally
and closed GOP fundraiser in the
Raleigh civic center, spent approx-
imately four hours in North
Carolina to bolster the election cam-
paigns of several Republican can-
didates.
"You have great candidates he
said at a rally attended by more than
4,000 people. He encouraged the au-
dience to get out and work to assure
that they are elected.
Reagan, who also appeared
before 700 people at a $100-a-ticket
reception, urged support for GOP
congressional candidate Bill Cobey ,
Eugene "Red" McDaniel and
Republican incumbents William
Hendon and Eugene Johnston, who
face close races for re-election.
Mondale, who appeared at a press
conference in Greensboro, gave his
endorsement and support to
Democratic congressional candidate
Charles Britt and incumbent
Stephen L. Neal.
After the press conference, Mon-
dale attended a rally in Rockingham
County. Later, he returned to
Guilford County for a reception and
dinner.
"This is not tough medicine; it is
bad medicine Mondale said in
reference to Reagan's economic
policies during a 20-minute news
conference at Greensboro Regional
Airport.
With Neal and Britt standing
beside him, Mondale spoke of four
proposals to help the economy.
"We should slow down the rate
of growth in the defense spending,
repeal the third year of the tax cut,
propose and pass hospital cost con-
tainment legislation, and propose a
long-term agreement with the
federal reserve for moderate growth
in the economy Mondale said.
Reagan, who also discussed the
economic issues raised in the fall
campaigns, also appeared in a
private ceremony to present the
Presidential Medal of Freedom to
singer Kate Smith.
Early indications show that both
Reagan and Mondale could be
fighting it out in the 1984 presiden-
tial election.
Greenville To Be One Of Three N.C. Cities On PBS Program
� :�� a. tn mntinued to rise at the rate of 10 to Tonights program will begin
Greenville has been chosen as one
of the three cities in the state to host
a televised program on the current
social problems that have specific
impact on the citizens of North
Carolina.
The program, titled "North
Carolina Town Meeting is being
produced by the University of North
Carolina Center for Public Televi-
sion in Chapel Hill and being filmed
in the ECU Jenkins Fine Arts
Center. It was designed to give N.C.
citizens the opportunity to sound
off on the critical issues that they see
as facing North Carolinians today.
The Greenville program is ap-
"With its special blend of
agriculture, industry and education,
Greenville was a natural choice for
this initial, production said
Suzanne Navin, community rela-
she added because she feels they can (Bud) Forrest, regional director fo
better evaluate the overall mood of the Federal CROP Insurance Cor-
the people in general. poration as the panelists for
The top 10 problems determined Wednesdays program.
from the study were, in order of
tions officer with the UNC public significance, planning, education,
television network
Navin, who supervised the accer-
tainment study that determined the
topics for the programs, said that
the Federal Communications Com-
mission requires that this type of
study be done so that networks can
better respond to the wishes of the
viewers. She said it was a type of
"watchdog program" to make sure
social concerns, economy and in-
dustry, unemployment, govern-
ment, transportation, environment,
race and communication.
Navin said that planning refers to
things like sewage, water, and
related long term concerns. Social
Security benefits were included
under social concerns. The plight of
the farmer came out of the environ-
Dews told The East Carolinian
that farmers are having "severe pro-
blems, not only here locally, but
across the country. We have no
markets because they hav bottomed
out, and our production costs have
continued to rise at the rate of 10 to
12 percent a year
"Reagan keeps saying 4hang in
there and there are some of them
(farmers) who can no longer con-
tinue to hang Dews said.
He said he was pleased that the
program was done and that he felt it
probably enlightened a lot of people
to the severity of the problem.
Tonights program will begin at
7:30 p.m but people interested in
participating are asked to arrive at
7:15 pjn. The panelists for this
evenings program include the Rev.
B.B. Felder of Greenville's Cor-
nerstone Baptist Church, former
Superior Court Judge Robert D.
Rouse Jr and District Attorney
Thomas Haigwood.
pearing in two episodes which are local programs around topics of in
being staged in the form of a panel terest to the viewers
discussion. The first program titled
"The Plight of the Farmer" was
held last night. The second program
titled, "Justice For the Rich, and
Justice For the Poor" is being film-
ed tonight and the public is en-
couraged to attend.
that public television is building its ment category. Tonight's topic ap-
pears under the topic of race.
Navin priased the production
staff for their successful efforts at
Federation Protests Against Reagan
Outside Republican Rally In Raleigh
She noted that in her study she
isolated the 10 problems which she
felt were most common to North
Carolinians. "We asked them what
converting her study into a
workable program.
Winterville farmer Kenneth Dews
the problems, needs and interests appeared with the chairman of the
are in their cities Navin said. "I Pitt County Agricultural Extension
only interview community leaders Service, Leroy James, and R.T.
When President Reagan appeared
at a GOP rally in Raleigh on Tues-
day, he also was confronted by
more than 150 demonstrators who
were taking part in a Federation for
Progress-sponsored protest of his
policies.
"Reagan has no mandate in
North Carolina read a promo- that they were not just screaming
tional flier distributed by the New against Reagan but rather for things
York-based political action group like jobs, peace and equality.
Student Fined $250 For False Fire Alarm
By STEVE DEAR
Staff Writer
An ECU student has been fined
$250 by the Student Honor Council
for setting off a fire alarm in a
Aycock Dormitory.
At approximately 8:35 p.m. on
Sept. 29, freshman Curtis Hinton
pulled the handle on an alarm box in
Aycock dorm down. According to
Hinton, the glass part of the encase-
ment had been smashed and he was
curious to see if the alarm system
worked. After Hinton pulled the
handle down, an alarm sounded
throughout the dormitory and a
signal of the alarm was immediately
Public Safety.
After the department is
automatically signaled of a fire
alarm in a dormitory a public safety
officer is sent to investigate.
After an unsuccessful attempt at
resetting the alarm handle, Hinton
left the dormatory.
Doug Brannon, resident director
of Aycock Dormitory, started a
routine investigation of the false
alarm and was informed by a tipster
that Hinton was in the vicinity of
the alarm box at the time the alarm
was sounded. When Brannon asked
Instead of fining Hinton the usual
5-15 dollars, which Brannon calls
"a slap on the wrist and also in-
stead of handing the case over to ci-
ty officials, who could give Hinton a
maximum of six months in jail
andor a fine of $500, Brannon sent
the case to the Student Honor
Council.
According to SGA Attorney
which cites "Jobs, Peace and
Equality" as its major goals.
"We thought it was very impor-
tant to demonstrate in Helms'
backyard, to let people know that
there is opposition to the policies
coming out of the Congressional
Club and the Reagan administra-
tion said Ted Johnson, a coor-
dinator of the federation's Chapel
Harry Dest, the student public Hill chapter. "It's crucial to show
defender who represented Hinton,
said, "I think they are using Mr.
Hinton's case as an example to the
students � they're trying to set a
precedent
Dest said that Hinton said his act
was not volitious. "He did not mean
to set the alarm off
Hinton received the maximum
that Reagan, Helms, East and the
rest of them don't have the mandate
that they claim Johnson con-
tinued. "There is opposition �
there are poeple calling for jobs,
peace and equality
The federation, which sponsored
a similar protest earlier this month
when Vice President George Bush
General Mike Swaim the "typical" penalty possible from the Honor ���
punishment for defendents accused Council for an offense of this type, was in the area, held their peaceful
of setting off false alarms last
semester was five hours of work for
the university. "The days of letting
He has the option of performing
service work for the university at
minimum wage for 70 hours or pay-
him if he knew anything about the people off practically scott-free are ing the fine in cash.
incident, Hinton confessed to hav
sent to the ECU Department of ing pulled the alarm.
over as far as false alarms are con-
cerned Swaim added.
"I think it is very unfair Hinton
told The East Carolinian. "I didn't
think the alarm would go off, the
glass was already broken Hinton
stressed that he received the max-
imum fine even though another per-
son had damaged the encasement.
Referring to Hinton's fine,
Associate Dean of the Department
of Orientation and Judiciary James
B. Mallory added, "It's a step in the
right direction. I hope it let's all the
students know that the honor coun-
cil is not going to tolerate false
alarms
Director of Public Safety Joseph
rally outside the Raleigh Civic
Center, where Reagan was appear-
ing.
Johnson noted that the
demonstrators were representing a
lot more people and that they were
only the leadership of other
organizations. He also pointed out
Johnson said press coverage the
protest received from local televi-
sion stations was "pretty decent"
and that the gathering took placed
in an area of "high visibility
where they could be easily seen by
the Reagan supporters.
"Reagan says yes; we say no
was another message on their flier.
"Defeat Congressional Club Can-
didates" was written above the
names of GOP candidate Biil
Cobey, Jack Marin, "Red"
McDaniel and Eugene Johnson.
Reagan personally gave his support
to all four during his visit.
The group cited five points, which
they claimed were the result of
"Reaganism
� Millions of Americans with no
work,
� $1,500,000,000 (one trillion 500
million) for war preparations and
military aggression,
� Tax cuts for the truly wealthy,
� Crippling cuts in funds for
human needs, and
� Scapegoating and attacks on
minorities, women (and) gaysles-
bians.
Professor's Income
College Salaries Studied
According to a study released dean of the ECU's School of
earlier this month, engineering and Business. "Our average is more
business professors are the best-paid That's a low figure here
Bearden noted that accounting
and computer science professors
were in the greatest demand and
generally received the highest pay.
He further noted that there was a
Mad Dog Takes A Dive
�y STANL.BV LBAKY
t� it her all at the Elbo Room Tuesday night. Spectator's packed in to see the jetlo wrestling tonr-
event sponsered by Kappa Sigma fratermity.
public college teachers.
The survey, conducted jointly by
CaTdeTagaddtag, "TherVhave Appalachian Association and the
been so many false alarms the American Association of State Col-
system has become ineffective, leges and Universities, reported that
Nobody pays attention to the alarms full engineering and business pro-
anymore lessors averaged $32,481 last year.
Phillip Jordan, Hinton's room- That puts them some seven percen-
mate feels that "it's ridiculous to tage points ahead of the average col-
give a first offender a $250 fine lege professor, who last year made disapuncs were taken into con-
Prior to Monday night's judicial $30,739. skieratoon.
review there had been two fines in "That's not a surprising figure to
Aycock dormatory.
"marked variation" in faculty
salaries when such factors as years
of experience, extent of qualifica-
tions and demand for specific
me,
��
said Dr. James H. Bearden. See PROFESSORS, Page S
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 28, 1982
Announcements
AS PA
American Society of Personnel
Administration was chartered on
ECU campus Oct. 20. You still
have the opportunity to become a
member at the next meeting to be
held Oct. 30 at 3 pm in Rawl 107.
ASPA is for anyone interested In
the industrial relation field and
human resource management.
ASPA is a fast growing organisa-
tion, be a part of it.
CONGRATULATIONS
Alpha Xi Delta extends a warm
congratulation to one of their
newest members, Deiores Wor-
th ington. Del ores is the second
runner up on ECU'S homecoming
court. Deiores represented Cle-
ment dorm in the running.
PRC MAJORS
Seymour Johnson Air Force
Base in Goldsboro, NC has an
alternating Co-op position
available for Spring semester in
the ir recreation department. The
position reequires a 2.0 GPA and
you must be willing to work for
two terms. It is an excellent opor-
tunity for anyone interested in
gaining valuable work experience
in the area of recreation. Salary:
approximately SI,000 per month
gross. Contact Nancy Fillnow in
the Coop office, 313 Rawl,
757-6979, if you would like to apply
or want more information.
NTE STUDENTS
All candidates taking the NTE
on Saturday, October 30, 1982,
must have some means of positive
ID. I.E photobearing driver's
license, passport, student iden-
tification card, or they will be
refused admission to the test.
FRISBEE
Weather permitting, we will be
at the bottom of college hill today,
and every Tues and Thurs. at
4:00. Look for the frisbee club in
the Homecoming parade. 1982
Natural Light Flying Disc Classic
Video will be shown at the Attic
Wed. Nov. 10. Club meetings are
Monday nights-8:00 in Mendenhall
Room 248; anyone interested in
frisbee is urged to attend.
SCHOLARSHIPS
The School of Art is offering ten
scholarships for undergraduate
art students of the junior and
senior rank. Eight scholarships
are in the amount of S250 each.
Two scholarships, established by
Don and Jack Edwards of the
University Book Exchange, are in
the amount of S500 each. To
qualify, a student must have a
GPA of 3.5 in art, and an overall of
3.0. Slides of five works (name, ti-
tle, media, and size) must accom-
pany the scholarship application
form. Application forms may be
obtained from the School of Art Of
fice. The deadline for all com-
pleted application material is
November 30.
GREEKS
Mara jen Is Coming
FRESHMEN
REGISTER
Freshman Registers may be
picked up in the Buccaneer office
on Tuesdays and Thursdays from
2:00 p.m. till 5:00 p.m. The Buc-
caneer Office is located on the se-
cond floor of me Publications
Building. NOTE: All Freshmen
Registers must be picked up by
October 20. Remember you have
already paid for this publication,
so why let your money go to waste.
BRODY BUILDING
DEDICATION
ECU faculty, staff and students
are invited to a special open house
at the School of Medicine's Brody
Medical Sciences Building Mon-
day, Oct. 25 from 3:00 - 6:00 pm.
The tour is one of several special
events to be held to highlight the
dedication of the school's new 826
million facility.
ECU guests will be able to tour
teaching areas and research
laboratories and see many of the
building's special features, in-
cluding a biohazards containment
facility. Refreshments will be
served.
Gov. James B. Hunt jr. will be
the keynote speaker at the formal
dedication and ribbon cutting on
Oct. 29 at 4:00 pm. The ECU Wind
Ensemble under the direction of
Prof. Herbert L. Carter will per-
form.
Also scheduled during dedica
tion week are an open house for
Pitt County Memorial Hospital
employees on Oct. 26 and special
continuing medical education pro-
gram on calicum antagonists on
Oct 27.
PROSE
CONTEST
The REBEL is conducting a pro
se contest, open to all current ECU
students. First prize is 8125, se-
cond prize is 8100, and third prize
is $75. Prize money is provided by
the Attic and Budweiser. Submit
typed entries to the REBEL or
Media offices located in the
publications building. The
deadline is November 1, so get
busy. The winners will be publish-
ed in REBEL '83 and all outers
will be considered. A copy of the
rules is posted outside the REBEL
office if you have any questions.
POETRY
CONTEST
Need some extra money Enter
the REBEL poetry contest and
you could win the $90 first prize,
'70 second prize, or the $40 third
prize. Prize money is provived by
the Attic and Budweiser. The con
test is open to all current ECU
students, and all entries should be
submitted to the REBEL or Media
Board offices in the publications
building by November 1. Include a
cover sheet with your name, ad-
dress and telephone number. Win-
ners will be published in the
REBEL and all others will be con
sidered.
SMITHSONIAN
Tbe Smithsonian Institution is
offering 10-week graduate
research appointments in a varie-
ty of areas. The graduate students
will conduct inedlvidual research
under staff's supervision. The sti-
pend for these fellowships Is $2000.
All interested graduate students
should contact hte Co-op office. 313
Rawl, ext. 6979.
RECIPES
Students, faculty and staff are
invited to submit their favorite
recipes to be compiled into a
cookbok of ECU'S favorite recipes.
Ten of the final entries will be
selected for the BAKE-OFF,
which the date will be announced
later. The recipes will be judged
on I) originality 2)appearance and
3)taste. The grand prize will be
dinner for two at Darryl's
Restaurant. Submit your recipes
in designated, boxes located at
Mendenhall, Student Supply Store
and selected Dormitories. For any
additional information call
758-3272 or 757-1920. Come on ECU-
get involved.
CATHOLIC
NEWMAN CENTER
The Catholic Newman Center
would like to invite everyone to
join in with us for celebrating
Mass every Sunday in the Biology
Lecture Hall starting at 12:30 and
every Wednesday at 5:00 at the
Catholic Newman Center located
down at the bottom of College Hill.
The Catholic Newman Center is
having a Burger and Beer Bash 111
and you are invited. It will be held
Sunday October 24 at 2:30 till
whenever. It will be held at the
Newman Center, 953 E. 10th
Street, located at the bottom of the
Hill. We will supply the beer,
burgers, hotdogs and soda. Please
bring a salad or dessert, and a $1
donation. Hope to see you there.
BAPTIST STUDENT
UNION
HEY! Do you enjoy friendly
fellowship, good friends and food,
and a chance to be yourself in this
"rat race" environment at ECU?
Then come join us at the Baptist
Student Union where we have din-
ners on Tuesdays at 5:30 for only
$1.75 PAUSE on Thursdays at
7:00 to allow us to take a break
after an almost fulfilling week,
and lots of people just like you who
enjoy others. Call 752-4646 if you
Have any questions. Bob Clyde -
campus minister.
SCIENCE MAJORS
Have you ever tried till you died,
to get an answer to come and felt
so dumbs Well, come around and
take a look, browse through our
old and new science books. The
A.C.SS.A. is having a reference
book sale in the conference room
of Flanagan November 2 and
November 3 between 11:00 and
5:00! Prices will be negotiable.
See you there!
CONCERTS
COMMITTEE
The ECU Student Union Special
Concerts Committee will present
Duke Ellington's "Sophisticated
Ladies" live via-satellite from
Broadway on November 5. The
program will take place in Wright
Auditorium.
Tickets for the show are on sale
at the Central Ticket Offices and
are priced at 86 for ECU students,
$9 for ECU faculty and staff and
$12 for the public. For additional
information contact the Central
Ticket Office at 757-6611, ext. 266.
RACQUETBALL
An organizational meeting is to
be held in November 2,1982 at 7:30
in room 105 Memorial gym.
RacquetbaM players and
students interested in learning
how to play are urged to attend
this first meeting. Re-activation of
the R ball team is dependent upon
student interest. For more infor-
maifon call Amanda 752-9193.
HEALTH CAREERS
DAY
Nurses, medical techs, physical
therapists. occupational
therapists, social workers, and
slap majors.representatives
from various hospitals and health
agencies will be on campus to talk
with you about employment
possibilities! Different
organizaitons will be here on the
following dates: November 5
Nursing building 9.45 1:00 p.m
November 8 - Allied Health
Biulding 1:30 - 4:30 p.m.
Mark your calendar and tell
another friend about this in case
they do not see the announcement.
SIGMA TAU DELTA
English Department faculty and
Sigma Tau Delta members are In-
vited to a Halloween Party this
Thursday night, October 28, 8:00
p.m. at the Tar River Clubhouse.
Dates can come too! All party-
goers wh wish to participate in the
costume contest must dress up as
a literary character. The BEST
costume wins $25. Hope to see you
there!
CLASSIFIED ADS j
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tuation mark and word space j
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All ads must be prepaid. Enclose j
75� per line or fraction of a line.
Please print legibly! Use capital and j
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Rctara to MEDIA BOARD offlc �n EAST
CAROLINIAN office) by 2 p.m. Monday before
Tuesday eater aad Wedaoaay before Tbanday I
poMicauoa. I
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WOMEN
A meeting for women interested
in forming a chapter of the
American Association of Universi-
ty women will be held Thursday,
November 4 at 7:30 p.m. in the
community room at First
American Savings & Loan
(formerly East Federal Savings &
loan) in Greenville.
SKI FLASH
Snowski regisrtation for
Christmas Break Trip will be Nov
9 at 4:00 PM in Memorial Gym 108.
A $5 deposit will be accepted to
reserve your space. Call Jo
Saunders at 757-6000 if you need
more information.
PPHA
The Preprofesssional Health
Alliance (PPHA) will have a
meeting this Thursday, October
28,1982. This meeting will be held
at 5:30 p.m. at the Afro-American
Cultural Center. All members and
any other interested parties are
urged to attend.
ZETA BETA TAU
Congratulations to all the newly
elected officers of Zeta Beta Tau:
President - Howard Lipman, Vice
President- Scott A. Sutker,
Tressurer - David Denison,
Secretary - Thomas W. Lanphere,
Rush Chairman - Mike Friend.
Zeta Beta Tau is looking forward
to a successful year with these
new officers.
There will be a meeting Thurs-
day October 28 at 6:00 in
Mendenhall Student Center. Of-
ficers must be present at 5:30. All
members must attend. This is
your last chance to be a founding
father for ZBT
PHI KAPPA PHI
"Toward the New Millennium:
Challenges and Dreams will be
the theme of the eighth annual
ECU Phi Kappa Phi symposium to
be held on campus in early
February, of 83. A call for both
faculty and student papers supper
ting this theme, which deals with
the future, has been issued. In an-
ticipation of the new millennium,
papers are invited to deal with a
wide range of topics ranging from
discussions of the near future will
or may hold. Faculty are invited,
at this time, to submit abstracts of
approximately one page with a
deadline for submission of
November 15. Papers selected will
be announced by November 24.
Student papers directed toward
the same theme are invited, two of
which will be selected for a award
of $100 each. The best student
paper submitted will be included
in the symposium program. Both
faculty and student papers are to
be submitted to Dr. J. W. Byrd,
Department of Physics.
MODELING
The ECU Commercial Art
Departyment would like to invite
all interested persons (male and
Female) to attend our model
cataloging photo sessions to be
held on Wednesday, November 3
and Thursday, November 4 from
7-10 p.m. in the lighting studio of
Jenkins Art Building. We will be
photographing and cataloging
anyone interested in modeling for
fashion ads and layouts. All
photographs will be filed and
cataloged for future reference. All
models chosen will be paid by the
hour for their participation.
AMBASSADORS
There will be a general meeting
of the ECU ambassadors on Nov.
3, 1982 - Wednesday. It will take
place int he Mendenhall Multi-
purpose room at 5:00 p.m. Please
make plans to attend this impor-
tant meeting.
RHO�EPSILON
East Carolina's Real Estate
fraternity will meet this Thursday
October 29. at 5 p.m. in Rawl 101.
All interested students are urged
to attend.
RUGBY
Hey all you wild units, come and
witness the slaughter of William
and Mary by yours truly, the ECU
Rugby Club, at 1:00 p.m. on Hallo-
ween eve behind the Allied Health
Building. Remember, it takes
leather balls to play rugby.
WANTED
A Graduate student or faculty
member to become an advisor for
me ECU Lacrosse club. Please
call for more information after
6:00 o'clock 758-6914. Ask for Nick
Pell or Bill Jenkins, if no answer
call 758-1418 after 6 o'clock and ask
for Brad Brown.
WOMEN'S RUGBY
its still not too late to play.
Anyone interested in playing
womens rubgy needs to report to
practices Tuesday thru Thursday
at 4:00. We practice behind the
Allied Healtf (Belk) building. Ab
solutely no previous experience is
required.
ACT
The American College Testing
(ACT) will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday,
December 11, 1982. Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to ACT Registration, P.O.
Box 414, lowa City, Iowa 52240. Ap
plications may be obtained from
the ECU Testing Center, Speight
Building, Room 105
GRE
The Graduate Record Examina-
tion will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday,
December 11, 1982. Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to Educational Testing
Service. Box 966-R, Princeton, NJ
08540. Applications may be obtain
ed from the ECU Testing Center.
Room 105. Speight Building.
TUTOR
Phi Sigma Pi. the National
Honor Fraternity is offering tutors
for a variety of General College
subjects at competitive rates. If
you are in need of a tutor call
752-3022 for more information.
CO-OP
Black and Decker in Tarboro
has an opening for a part-time ac-
counting clerk. The person must
be able to perform miscellaneous
accounting duties such as paying
invoices and general bookkeep-
ing. Preferred is someone who can
operate a 10-key adding machine
Employment would start as soon
as possible. For more info, call the
Co-op office, ext. 6979.
PITT COUNTY
HUMANE SOCIETY
The Pitt County Humane Society
will have a table at the Carolina
East Mall on Saturday, October
30. 1982. Free printed material
about spaying and neutering and
other animal issus will be
available. Local veterinarians will
be on hand from 1:00 to ca. 3:30
p.m. to answer any questions you
may have about animal health.
Baked oods, teeshirts. hats and
memberships to the Humane
Society will be on sale, as will raf
fie tickets for $1.00 each. Raffle
prizes include every hour from
10:30 am to 8:30 p.m. Grand
drawirg is at 8:30 p.m.
CO-OP
The co-op office has available an
opportunity witht he Federal Law
Enforcement Training Center in
its Criminal Justice Intern Pro-
gram. The internship runs from
January 3 through March 11 and is
located in Glynco. Georgia, tor
more information contact Nancy
Fillnow in the Co-op office, ext.
6979.
LSAT
The Law School Admission Test
(LSAT) will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday.
December 4. 1982. Application
blanks re to be completed and
mailed to Educational Testing
Service, Box 966-R. Princeton. NJ
08540. Registration deadline is
November 4, 1982. Registrations
postmarked after this date must
accompanied by a $15. non
refundable, late registration fee.
CADP
The Campus Alcohol and Drug
Program will hold a meeting on
October 26 at 5:00 pm in the second
floor conference room of Erwin
Hall. Any student intersted in fur-
thering responsible attitudes
toward the use of chemical
substances s encouraged to at-
tend. For more information call
757793 or 757 6649.
The East Carolinian
Serving the campus community
sukt 1925
Published every Tuesday ana
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ing me summer.
The East Carolinian is the of
ficial newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned,
operated, and published for ana
by the students of East Carolina
University.
Subscription Rate: $20yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the OM Soutti
Building on me campus of ECU.
Greenville. N.C.
POSTMASTER: Send address
changes to The East Carolinian
Old South Building, ECU Green
ville. NC 27834
Telephone 757-6366.6367, t,W
LAUTARES JEWELERS, INC.
Professional Jewelers
Established 1912
Resetting, Repairing and Custom Design
All Work Done on Premises
414 Evans Street p)
Registered Jewelers. Certified Gemoiogist
CHEMISTRYPHYSICS
MATHENGINEERING
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The leading operator of nuclear reactors is currently seeking young
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and expected $40,000 salary in four years. Nuclear qualified of-
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engineering. Send resume to:
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1001 Navaho Dr.
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QUALITY HAIR DESIGNS
FOR MEN & WOMEN
(Affordable Prices)
Appointments Please � 752-2967
9-6 Monday-Friday � Saturday 9-3
ART CONTEST
The REBEL is conducting ar ar
contest open to all current ECU
students. There will be first prizes
of $50 in seven categories ana a
$150 best inshow prize. Prue
money is provided by me Attic ano
Budweiser. The seven categories
are: painting sculpture
ceramics, drawing
prtotoghraphy. design (meafs.
wood, fibers), and graphic art ano
illustration.
Bring entries to Jenkins 1325 or
November 5 with a one dollar en
try fee tor each piece Limit two
entries per artist. Entries snoulo
be ready for exhibition. Ail 2 D
work must be prepared tor nang
ing and framed or manec and
acetated. All Sculpture must be
self-supporting.
Winners will be notified on Mor
day, November 8. Non-winmng ar
fists must pick up their work on
Monday before 4:00. Artists mus'
sign a form giving me REBE-
staff permission to move Near
work to me Greenville Museum o
Art.
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TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE MEIDeNHAaSTUDEf CENTER, THE RECORD BA(PWPtea)
THE RECOROBAR (Carolina East Ms),APPLE RECORD?

EAST CAROLINA UNVERSITY
Nel
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"Mora
declared t
editorial ii
ing Star
Carolina
for their
testor Al
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Charns.
the moral!
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 28, 1982



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owned,
listed tor and
East Carolina
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PEST
. � ng an art
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sculpture.
drawing,
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Newspapers Oppose
Graduate's Rejection
"Moral leper is banished
declared the headline of a recent
editorial in the Wilmington Morn-
ing Star chastizing the North
Carolina Board of Law Examiners
for their denying of convicted pro-
testor Alex Charns to the North
Carolina Bar Association.
Charns, 26, a recent graduate of
the University of North
CarolinaChapel Hill School of
Law, was refused admittance to the
group, stemming from his arrest,
conviction and sentence to prison
for impeding traffic during a
demonstration against United States
training of El Salvadoran troops.
Since his denial earlier this
month, the backlash of opposition
to the decisions of a three-member
morals hearing panel has been
strong. Many North Carolina
newspapers have given editorial sup-
port to Charns, and media attention
has been heavy. "Incredible
numbers of people have been
volunteering their help Charns
told The East Caroinian. "I'm over-
whelmed. I can't believe the positive
response that so many people
came forward to speak out in my
defense
Charns, who earlier referred to
the morals hearing as a "political
and religious inquisition claims
that his denial stemmed not from his
so-called moral unfitness but
because of his political and religious
beliefs. "I'm being deprived of a
law license solely because of my
beliefs said Charns who calls
himself a Catholic pacifist.
Charns claims that he has
discovered at least two other at-
torneys who presently practice law
in North Carolina who also were
convicted of crimes of conscience,
yet they were admitted to the bar.
One of the two was charged with
resisting the draft during the Viet-
nam War, Charns said, which is a
felony. Charns' charge is a misde-
meanor.
"It just reinforces my belief that
the Board of Law Examiners is
primarily concerned with my
political ideology not with my
moral fitness to practice law
Charns said.
He referred to his arrest last
March at the Fort Bragg U.S. Army
Base as a "personal moral decision
saying 'no' to death � 'no' to kill-
ing Charns, who's still allowed an
appeal to the full 11-member Board
of Law Examiners, said he will take
his case all the way to the Supreme
Court if necessary. No date for his
appeal has yet been set.
Charns claims he was targeted for
denial because of his visiblity and
outspokeness on matters of cons-
cience and that the government is
using his case as a "scare tactic" to
discourage other poeple from speak-
ing out on similar issues.
"It's very important that people
don't become afraid because of my
situation Charns said. "One of
the problems with all the publicity
(given his case) is that people are
getting scared
He added that he believes the
United States is moving politically
toward a more right-wing conser-
vative position and that he is seeing
an increase in government repres-
sion and redbaiting similar to the
"McCarthyism" of the 50s. "Joe
McCarthy is alive and living in the
offices of the N.C. Board of Law
Examiners he said. "If people
don't stop this now, it will only get
worse
"My grandfather was sent to a
Nazi prison camp after being charg-
ed with high treason against the
Third Reich for smuggling Polish
Jews into Lithvania said Charns.
"My uncle was also caught by the
storm troopers, and they cut of
pieces of his ear bit by bit trying to
get him to divulge the names of
members of the Polish
underground. In light of that type
of family background, my en-
counter with the N.C. Board of Law
Examiners seems almost irrelevant.
My family broke the laws of Nazi
Germany but upheld the laws of
humanity. I hope I'm worhty of do-
ing the same thing
J. A. UNIFORMS
SHOPS
Bring this ad for
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on the purchase of
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prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes, shoes,
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attic ARE YOU
I READY?
THE REBEL WRITING CONTESTS
ARE HERE'
PROSE (FICTION OR NONFIC-
TION) OR POETRY!
ANY ECU STUDENT CAN ENTER!
$500 IN CASH PRIZES!
DEADLINE IS NOVEMBER 1, 1982!
Complete details and rules posted outside the
REBEL office, in the Publications Bldg. (Across
the sidewalk from the library.) All prize money
provided by our patrons � the ATTIC and
Budweiser.
REBEL
GET UGLY
and come to the
u��
25:
2I
Night Before Halloween Party
With Carolina Recording Artists
The Nicky Harris Band
Sat. Oct. 30 �
Wear your Costumes and you're eligible to
win big buck$$$. Come on out for a
honky-tonkin' blow-out
For more information call 758-3943.
IAZ.
Pizza
Transit
Authority,
Pick one good reason
why you should have your
Piiza delivered by Pizza
Transit Authority tonight!
You don't have to spend
'�' your time cooking your
dinner!
I You don't have to use your
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dinner down!
I I You don't have any dishes
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5�js
PARENTS NIGHT OUT
Buy Large Pizza for the Kids and
Get Small Pizza for Yourself FREE
FEED 6 PEOPLE FOR ONLY $8.90
Only $1.50 o Person. With free Cokes, Too!
Offer Expires November 4
Pi Kappa Phi
presents
"THE BIG EVENT -H"
Saturday, October 30 - 9:00-until
Halloween Party
Featuring
n
(The New "Kids" of Rock-n-Roll)
BYOB
ix Coolers O.K.
No Glass or Bottles.
PARTY AT: riKt
803 Hooker Rd.
"The House with the Lake"
TICKETS:
$2.00 in Advance$3.00 at Door
Get Your Advance Tickets From Any
Pi Kapp or Call 756-3540
COSTUME PRIZES
1st - $100
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3rd - $25
I.D. REQUIRED PROCEEDS NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION
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Stye �at GLwcBlinxun
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, gmm
Mike Hughes, �.�,� �,�,
WAVERLY MERRITT. Orator oj Adwtam, ClNDY PLEASANTS, SporU Editor
Robert Rucks, hMwp
ALI AFRASHTEH, ck, mmmi
Stephanie Groon, 0�
JONI GUTHRIE, Teck,l SMpery�or
Greg Rideout, �n&�,
Steve Bachner, mwmmmm.
Juliana Fahrbach, �. ����
MlKE DAVIS, Production Meagtr
liior
October 28, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
ECU Football
Victim Of 'Blatant' N&O Bias
It, indeed, seems unfortunate that
the News and Observer feels so
threatened by East Carolina Univer-
sity that we merit so much of their
space. If I didn't know better (and I
do), I'd swear that we are fast
becoming that newspaper's favorite
school to write about.
The most recent example of their
blatant bias occurred on page one of
Tuesday's sports section, in which
the N&O's illustrious Sports Editor
Joe Tiede carried on with line after
line of dubious remarks in an ob-
vious attempt to "put ECU in its
place
Unfortunately, for Mr. Tiede, his
column contained more inconsisten-
cies than are acceptable, even for
him.
He referred to ECU'S withdrawl
from the Southern Conference in
1977 as a "mistake saying that the
Pirates don't belong in NCAA Divi-
sion I-A. He not only questioned
the short- and long-range goals of
ECU's football program; he goes so
far as to doubt the existence of any
goals whatsoever.
But he also criticized the East
Carolina football program for
scheduling pushovers like East Ten-
nessee State and Illinois State, the
very same teams he would have
ECU play in Division I-AA.
Later on, he makes quite a
strange attempt at bringing about a
parallel to ECU's "mistake
Georgia Tech, Tiede believes, did
not benefit from pulling out of the
Southeastern Conference in the
1960s. Now, although I do agree
that having to schedule Carolina,
Clemson and Maryland every year
has made the earlygoing in the ACC
tough for the Yellowjackets. But
does Mr. Tiede honestly believe that
a yearly schedule of the likes of
Alabama, Georgia, Florida,
Auburn, Tennessee, etc would be
any easier? I hardly think it would.
"It makes no sense to schedule
opponents like Central Michigan,
Illinois State and Texas-Arlington
Tiede writes. "The Pirates play only
three of 11 games against teams
from their own area
The funny thing about that astute
observation is that Mr. Tiede knows
damn well why ECU can't schedule
more teams in this area. After all, it
was Carolina, not ECU, which ter-
minated that former annual rivalry.
And the same holds true for Duke.
Perhaps the Tarheels outclass the
Pirates; I give him that much. But if
they're (UNC) so intensely in-
terested in playing only the grid-
kings, then why have they scheduled
such "pushovers" as Army,
Vanderbilt or, of all schools, Bowl-
ing Green? Somehow, these football
powers just don't scheme to fit into
Carolina's "scheme of things Mr.
Tiede.
"East Carolina has practically no
chance of earning a bowl bid or a
national ranking he
philosophizes. Obviously, he
forgets ECU won the 1978 In-
dependence Bowl in Shreveport, La.
A minor bowl, admittedly, yet I
can't even remember the last time
his beloved Wolfpack, Bluedevils or
Cavaliers were even invited to play
in any postseason game.
East Carolina is a "building"
football program, in every sense of
the word (inasmuch as financial
resources, recruiting capability and
the like). And in so being, lean years
are a mere consequence. Tiede
seems to forget the lean year "a
glamour name like Notre Dame"
had under its new head coach in
1981.
He gives ECU a slim-to-none
chance of beating any of its Divi-
sion I-A opponents. Sure, 15th-
ranked Florida State beat us in
every way imaginable, not much
unlike Carolina's "stunning"
defeat a couple of years back at the
hands of Oklahoma. I, for one,
wasn't stunned. And how quickly
Mr. Tiede forgets the recent scare
the Pirates staged in Raleigh against
N.C. State. Seven points is hardly a
slim-to-none chance.
And finally, he offers, as if it
were some great consolation, the
fact that Division I-AA schools
compete for a national title. Let
Duke and Virginia play for a Divi
sion I-AA crown. We want to play
with the big boys.
ITENl: SESAME STREET'S FIRST
VIEWERS NOW
S, LETS S.A& ABOUT We INC
veuarY cp sue -atzwuc Particles
re
� �
Military Spending 'Absurd Behavior'
By PAT O'NEILL
"World military costs have risen to $600
billion a year � well over $1 million a
minute
When I saw these words, which were
released in a study published last week,
they sort of jumped off the page and hit
me in the face. It's just so hard for me to
conceptualize the meaning of such absurd
behavior.
Why does a group of human beings, all
living together on the same little planet,
want to make preparation for death their
No. 1 priority? Why does my own country
have to be the leader in this macabre
business?
The more I ponder these seemingly
logical questions, the more disoriented I
become, because the reality of these
thoughts leaves me with a lump in my
throat. I don't want to believe it � I can't
believe it!
Life is too precious, I think to myself;
certainly we'll all come to our senses
before it's too late. Everyone knows the
world can't go on if we continue to use $1
million worth of its resources per minute to
promote war, don't they?
I'm trying to maintain a semblance of
hope in the human species, but the signs of
the times tell me that our time is short and
our task arduous. And I'm aware of yet
another problem that discourages my
hope.
I see that many of the people on our
planet don't share my sense of urgency; in
fact, most of them seem to go about their
lives apparently oblivious to the events at.
hand. We appear to be aimlessly teetering
along the path to our demise, denying that
death is really so near.
Actually, it's all quite similar to the
stages of death that any terminally-ill
cancer patient goes through. Denial of
death is very common; it's an escape. Who
wants to admit the end anyway?
Unfortunately, in the nuclear age, this
type of defense mechanism is our greatest
enemy � even greater than the nuclear
arsenals, whose treachery we deny �
because all of us know what chronological-
ly follows denial acceptance.
When we accept this kind of death �
nuclear death � we are accepting mega-
death, a type unknown, never-before-
experienced. We must snap ourselves out
of this nightmare and work instead for life.
We must do this now, collectively, before
the paradoxical solace of acceptance
softens us all. . t rx
Dressing Up Like The 'Stars'
Shopping For Halloween
It being the Halloween season, I scraped
up the copper remains of my last four
paychecks the other day, and set out on my
annual ritual quest to find a suitable trick-
or-treating costume. Needless to say, I was
feeling pretty excited; my mother said T
could go out alone this year.
My first stop, Roses, was having a
clearance sale on their entire stock of Slim
Whitman costumes. But, like most of us, I
don't like to wear the same thing two years
in a row. I was looking for something a lit-
tle more political anyway. So, I fished
around the sparse shelves for a while, tried
on a "Ronnie Reagan" plastic mask
(which, by the way, didn't fit because so-
meone had errantly glued a foot in the
mouth hole) and decided there really
wasn't anything there I particularly
wanted.
The Issues & The Answers
By JAY STONE
Today, more than ever, complex and
demanding issues confront American
society and the world. How we choose to
deal with these problems will shape the
kind of world that we will live in and our
progeny will inherit. In many respects, we
are at a critical mass point. Fundamental
and extensive changes in our social institu-
tions are demanded in the present epoch if
we are to continue to live harmoniously
and to prosper.
The nuclear arms race, if carried on
unabated for the next 20 years, obviously
threatens humanity with destruction of an
unimaginable scale. The systematic
eradication of the environment (dumping
of toxic wastes, pesticides, wastes from
nuclear power plants, erosion of the ozone
layer, air pollution, desertification, and
the list goes on) also holds an ominous and
foreboding portent for us. Our economic
problems of unemployment, inflation and
the decline of the ability of American
manufacturers to compete with foreign
products is yet another problem deman-
ding action. All of these problems and
others, e.g energy, demand immediate
and decisive action. They will not be put
off until the next generation inherits them.
It is our generation that must confront
and deal with these problems. Although we
did not create them, they are now our pro-
blems. It is today's youth who will most
likely die in an impending nuclear war and
our generation which will reap the conse-
quences of the destruction of the environ-
ment and an obsolete political and
economic system. The young die in war,
and the young are disproportionately
unemployed.
Upon coming to this realization, our
first response is often denial; we simply ig-
nore all the problems and hope that they
go away. This response is what is common-
ly misdiagnosed as apathy. It is usually not
that we don't care; more often, we simply
don't understand the issue or see how it ap-
plies to us, so we feel helpless and
frustrated by it. In any case, this attitude
does not do anything about "solving" our
problems.
What does do something about solving
them is when we ban together, study our
problems and take action. Right now, we
are on the fringe of an exciting new era. If
we can simply keep from incinerating
ourselves with nuclear weapons or poison-
ing ourselves or suffering an economic col-
lapse we will likely see most of the major
problems that plague humanity solved in
our lifetime.
Tremendous strides are being made in
the elimination of hunger and disease. A
promising breakthrough in the production
of energy in the form of hydrogen (which
is essentially non-polluting and almost in-
exhaustible) was recently announced on
the CBS Evening News. Scientists are even
talking about significantly extending the
human life span. With the advent of the
space shuttle, mining the moon or
asteroids for raw materials is a real
possibility. We are discovering techniques
for enhancing memory and intelligence as
well as altering moods. In short, most of
the reasons why people have fought wars
will be eliminated within the next 25 years.
Why do we need to fight wars if there is
plenty for everyone? Why do we need
nuclear weapons if we don't fight wars?
We are, indeed, in the midst of a major
rennaissance, one like the world has never
even dreamt of! Yet, we are still partially
steeped in the Dark Ages. And we plod
along like lemmings.
It is up to the members of this genera-
tion to help purge the rest of society of its
old habits of fear and superstition so that
we may begin to explore our vast potential
for transformation and growth. This must
be undertaken immediately.
"Campus Forum
Mike Hughes
Just The Way It Is
I popped on over to K-Mart, which, I
might add, usually boasts Greenville's
finest selection of political Halloween get-
ups. But, once again, hundreds of other
"smart shoppers" had beat me to the best
deals. Damn! All that was left was a Ronco
"Tippy" O'Neill leisure costume, com-
plete with hair powder, empty fifth bottle
and flashing red nose (batteries not includ-
ed). But even that would have been okay
had it not been a "small I take a "large"
in Ronco.
Totally disgusted, I headed out to
Nichols. Now, I know what you're think-
ing. Hell, I've never really liked Nichols'
Halloween costumes either, but by this
time, I was getting incredibly desperate. I
had nothing to wear: I had forgot to feed
my Leonid Breznev eyebrows, and they
were dead; I'd tost one of the Nerf foot-
balls to my Dolly Parton costume, and my
official Fidel Castro cigar had been con-
fiscated by campus security. I was in a
bind.
Surprisingly, Nichols' shelves were pret-
ty well stocked with replicas of the outfits
worn by everyone's favorite political stars.
I tried on a Menachem Begin suit, but the
oversized head was so loose, I was afraid it
would fall off if I tried to move too fast.
So, I looked on the shelf to the right at the
Ariel Sharon costumes. They were pretty
nice, except they all had big red stains
down the front. And neither costume came
with instructions on how to use the ac-
cessory cluster bombs.
I strolled over to whert they stock the
ghoul outfits, so I could get a gander at
the Ted Kennedy suits. But unfortunately,
none of the life preservers fit.
I ambled over to the ornate Ferdinand
Marcos costumes, but I refuse to fork out
$600 for a stupid white shirt.
The James Watt "Natureboy" outfits
were all torn up and tattered; the
Ayatollah Khomeini executioners' veils
were pretty nice, but "far too revealing
the halos on all the Jesse Helms angel suits
were missing, and the entire shipment of
Lech Walesa union-made coveralls had
been confiscated, and no one knew where
they were.
I went home and started practicing up
on my yodelling.
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes, a senior from
Smryna, N.C, is a local novelist and
grocery-store stockboy. His most recent
and famous book, based on the plentious
excitement to be found here in Greenville,
is appropriately titled East Of Ayden.
'Parallel9 Runneth Perpendicular
On Oct. 26, the Campus Forum
printed a "modern parallel" to I Corin-
thians chapter 13. Because this writing
shows no real religious corrollation, and
because many principles in the writing
are anti-Biblical, the (letter) must be
challenged.
Open your Bible and take a look at I
Corinthians 13. It's about spiritual gifts,
prophecy and tongues, to name a few.
These gifts must be exercised in love.
That's what chapter 13 is about. What
it's not about is anything having to do
with nuclear arms and social problems,
as Mr. Skidmore suggests.
The main point here is not that the
ideas presented here do not pertain to
chapter 13; it is that many contradict the
Bible. And ideas that contradict the Bi-
ble cannot be called a "modern
parallel" to any part of it. For example,
the version says, "The ends always
justify the means Hitler's dream was
to create a master race. He killed seven
million Jews in his attempt. Creating a
master race was not such a terrible idea,
but the ends here obviously didn't
justify the means.
The last verse of I Corinthians 13
reads, "And now abideth faith, hope,
charity (love), these three; but the
greatest of these is love Mr. Skid-
more's "modern parallel" reads,
"There are, in the end, three things that
last: poverty, social injustice and the
military budget. And the greatest of
these is our acceptance of them What
do "faith, hope and love" have to do
with "poverty, social injustice and the
military budget?"
If Mr. Skidmore wants to call this his
anti-Biblical philosophy on the world to-
day, that's his opinion. But to correlate
ideas such as these presented with the Bi-
ble is pure distortion.
JohnParncJJ
Freshman, Pre-Business
Christian
M
By ANTH
Miff
"Medn
Slavery: Tl
Blacks ii
South" was
a "Persp
ture given
L. Savitt
School of
medical
program,
was part ol
general intel
sponsorei
medical set
Charles E.
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York.
Dr. Savil
was based
Medicine
and on re
ducted in V'j
lecture foci
Coh
Wh
Continued
The
recommenl
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four progr
administrate
cut.
Boudreaul
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 28, 1982
'ess Service
CY
ff
9
ior'
i milar to the
terminally-ill
in. Denial of
escape. Who
.ay'?
Iclear age, this
is our greatest
lm the nuclear
we deny �
Ichronological-
hce.
Id of death �
:cepting mega-
never-before-
ourselves out
instead for life,
jctively, before
of acceptance
n
ives were pret-
fcs of the outfits
political stars,
pn suit, but the
f, I was afraid it
move too fast.
the right at the
ley were pretty
big red stains
r costume came
to use the ac-
they stock the
get a gander at
unfortunately,
Jfit.
mate Ferdinand
fuse to fork out
Irt.
ireboy" outfits
tattered; the
tutioners' veils
jtoo revealing
leims angel suits
)re shipment of
coveralls had
ne knew where
practicing up
Is, a senior from
V novelist and
fis most recent
m the plentious
e in Greenville,
Of Ayden.
1" reads,
things that
ice and the
greatest of
)em What
have to do
tice and the
call this his
le world to-
to corrolate
with the Bi-
fohn Parnell
�re-Business
Christian
Med School Gives Public Lecture
By ANTHONY BOYD
Staff Writer
"Medicine and
Slavery: The Health of
Blacks in the Old
South" was the topic of
a "Perspectives" lec-
ture given by Dr. Todd
L. Savitt of the ECU
School of Medicine's
medical humanities
program. The lecture
was part of a series of
general interest lectures
sponsored by the
medical school and the
Charles E. Culpepper
Foundation of New
York.
Dr. Savitt's lecture
was based on his book,
Medicine and Slavery
and on research con-
ducted in Virginia. The
lecture focused on the
question of whether
blacks were medically
different from whites.
Savitt also talked about
black health in the slave
quarters, female
disorders, children's
disorders, types of
health care and
epidemics.
According to Savitt,
slavery was a part of
the Southern culture.
By 1860, blacks made
up one-third of the
Southern population.
Citing information
from diaries, letters,
journal, magazine and
newspaper articles, Dr.
Savitt said that
Southerners were con-
cerned with their health
and the health of their
slaves. Disease was
more rampant hi the
South, the most com-
mon being parasitic in-
fections, malaria,
yellow fever, small pox,
measles and dysentery.
Doctors could treat
minor medical pro-
blems, but for treating
disease, "their presence
was not effective
Savitt said blacks
were medically dif-
ferent from whites.
However, many of the
differences were based
on anecdotes and used
mainly to justify
slavery. There were no
medical procedures
designed specifically to
treat blacks. "It was a
political claim Savitt
said.
Dr. Savitt also
discussed life in slave
quarters, which he call-
ed, "small com-
munities He explain-
ed that the quarters had
problems that are com-
mon to all groups such,
as body lice, bed bugs,
viruses and skin and
scalp problems. One of
the main health pro-
blems of the slave
quarters was what to do
with the waste. "The
privvies were dug
higher than the wells,
and waste seeped into
drinking water causing
typhoid and dysen-
tary he said.
One of the few times
female slaves were
allowed time off was
College Funds Proposed
While Enrollment Drops
Continued From Page 1
The committee
recommended over
$607.6 million for the
four programs that the
administration wants to
cut.
Boudreaux felt that
the committee's plan
would be sufficient but
fears that the debate
over funds at the
federal could delay ap-
propriations even more
than it did this year.
"The only thing we
can do is sit back and
see who wins
Boudreaux said. The
issue won't be settled
mmmmmmmasmmammmmmm rvx&m
until well after the fall
elections.
"Our concern is to
eliminate waste and in-
crease efficiency in the
programs, not to deny
education to deserving
students Elmendorf
said. "But we'd also
ask that deserving
students pay their
share
He said the ad-
ministration's plan to
get students to pay a
larger portion of their
education costs before
qualifying for aid is
working. But Charles
Saunders of the
American Council on
Education noted that,
according a recent
study, lower-income
students had been forc-
ed to transfer to
cheaper public colleges
due to aid cutbacks.
A report by the Na-
tional Institute of In-
dependent Colleges and
Universities cited a
more than 5 percent
decline in freshman
enrollments this year
from last at over half
the nation's private
schools. The institute
also reports that one-
third of the colleges
suffered a drop of over
10 percent.
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when they were
menstruating.
"Menstruation was
sacred; slave owners
didn't want to impair
breeding said Dr.
Savitt.
According to Savitt,
"More than half of the
slave children died
before the age of 10
The most common
child diseases among
slave children were
neonatal tetanus and
smothering or overlay-
ing of children.
Smothering is similar to
what is now called crib
death.
Care of sick slaves
was ultimately left to
the slave owner who
was obligated to take
care of his property.
When a slave became
ill, he told his master,
who would look up the
slave's symptoms in a
household medical
book and treat it. The
plantation mistress
usually attended to the
sick slaves, although
some plantations had
hospitals staffed by old
slave women. Doctors
were expensive and
were not called in until
the last minute. Many
slaves relied on self
treatment with home
remedies and traditions
passed on from African
ancestors. The "root"
doctor was also a
source of treatment.
Many epidemics
began in slave quarters
and brought together
the fearful white
population of towns to
clean the slave quarters
and the poor sections
of town.
The ECU medical
school is one of eight
medical institutions in
the nation to receive
Culpepper funds. The
funds support the
"Perspective Lecture
Series designed to
generate community in-
terest in the history of
medicine. The next lec-
ture, titled "The
Anatomy Lesson is
scheduled for Nov. 10.
Professors' Salaries
Compared In Study
Continued From Page 1
The maximum salary
that a full professor can
receive at ECU is
$43,400, but "you
don't have anybody
making that Bearden
said.
"One of the scarcest
resources in academe
today is doctorates in
business Reardon
said. He added that the
accounting field has the
shortest supply of doc-
torates in the entire
field of business; conse-
quently, they command
a premium in the
marketplace.
Bearden said he
hopes that ECU or
some other schools will
eventually offer a doc-
toral program in
business. At present,
only UNC-Chapel Hill
has such a program.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
OCTOBER 28, 1982
Page 6
Gilbert And Sullivan's Best
'Mikado' Being Performed At McGinnis Theatre
The Mikado's Many Faces
Top: Fred Johnson as Nanki-Poo and Denise Miller as Yum-Yum. Bot-
tom left: ECU graduate Steven Williford plays Pooh-Bah. Right: Star
Jay Fox.
ECU News Bureau
GREENVILLE � Gilbert and
Sullivan's celebrated Japanese
musical fantasy, The Mikado, will
open the 1982-1983 East Carolina
Playhouse season Oct. 28, with
subsequent performances Oct. 29
and 30 and Nov. 1 and 3.
The production, a cooperative ef-
fort with the ECU School of Music,
will highlight a year-long celebra-
tion of East Carolina's 75th an-
niversary, and is being staged in
tribute to earlier successful East
Carolina Mikado productions, by
an East Carolina Teachers Training
School drama group in 1913 and
1915 and a Summer Theatre produc-
tion in 1967.
According to Edgar Loessin,
chairman of the ECU Department
of Drama and Speech, the well-
known Gilbert and Sullivan operetta
has been "the most popular of them
all" in East Carolina history. "I
think it's because it simply enchants
everyone with its music and merri-
ment he said.
Recognized around the world as
one of the best-liked musical comic
frivolities in the English language,
The Mikado is a lyrical and roman-
tic tale of fantastic happenings in a
mythical Japanese village called
Titipu.
The improbable basis of the story
is that the beneficent emperor of
Japan has decreed that those found
guilty of flirting "should forthwith
be beheaded which leads to many
hilarious complications, especially
since Ko-Ko, the Lord High Execu-
tioner, is far too squeamish to per-
form his beheading duties.
An indication of the comic appeal
of the story is found in the
characters' names: Nanki-Poo, the
hero; the "three little maids from
school Yum-Yum, Pitti-Sing and
Peep-Bo and the village official,
Pooh-Bah.
For the past six weeks ECU
rehearsal studios and stage have
been ringing with the sounds of
singing voices and dancing feet as
the more than 30 cast members are
put through their paces by Director
Cherry Garrison, a new drama
faculty member at ECU whose im-
pressive list of more than 100 direc-
torial credits include productions at
UCLA, San Francisco State and San
Jose City College.
Summer theatre audiences will be
pleased to learn that veteran Broad-
way performer Jay Fox, last seen
here as the M.C. in Cabaret, will
return to lead the Mikado cast as
Lord High Executioner.
Music director Brett Watson has
also been busy with the 22-member
orchestra, as they prepare the more
than 25 musical numbers.
"This will be a lavish production
for us because we want to pull out
all stops for the 75th anniversary
said Playhouse General Manager
Scott Parker.
Parker noted that both single
tickets for Mikado and season
tickets for the entire 1982-1983
Playhouse bill are on sale at the box
office in Messick Theatre Art
Center.
Later productions include The
Shadow Box (Dec.2-6), the ECU
Dance Theatre (Jan. 27-29) and Our
Town (April 14-19). Parker noted
that season ticket sales have already
doubled over the last three years.
The box office is open each week-
day from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Reser-
vations may be made by telephoning
757-6390.
Opera, 'Bartered Bride
Auditions To Take Place
In Campus Music Center
GREENVILLE � Auditions for
the East Carolina University Opera
Theatre production of Smetana's
The Bartered Bride are scheduled
for Monday and Tuesday, Nov. 8
and 9 at 7:30 p.m. in Room 269 of
the Fletcher Music Center on cam-
pus.
The work has 10 roles for various
voices; four of these roles will re-
quire special preparation for the
auditions � the Marenka
(soprano), Jenik (tenor), Vasek
(tenor) and Kecal (bass), roles.
Singers who wish to try for these
should telephone Dr. Clyde Hiss,
Opera Theatre director, at the ECU
School of Music for special in-
strucitons.
The other six roles require only
the autitionees bring something to
sing that will show the ability of
their voices. An accompanist will be
provided for those who cannot br-
ing their own.
Persons who wish to try for the
chorus need only to present
themselves at audition time in order
to be judged and placed.
Further information about the
Opera Theatre auditions is available
from Hiss at 757-6331.
Anti-Nuclear Group Also A
Anti-Abortion Organization
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
"Abortion just the mentioning
of this word can cause many people
to assume a crouched position and
ready themselves for battle. It's
perhaps the most controversial issue
of our time.
Staunch feminists scream that
their bodies are their own and what
they do with them is their business.
They cry out that anti-abortionists
"are not concerned about life after
birth but only with controlling
people's free choices.
On the other hand, the opposition
sometimes refers to pro-choicers as
murderers, and so they chain
themselves to the doors of abortion
clinics. It's truly hard to find a mid-
dle of the roader on this volatile
issue.
Enter "Pro-Lifers for Survivial"
or P.S and the fire gets hotter.
Started in 1979 by anti-nuclear ac-
tivist Juli Loesch, P.S. was the
response by Loesch and some of her
friends, to the lack of sensitivity
they perceived among the peace ac-
tivists, concerning the issue of abor-
tion.
During a 1979 "No Nukes" rally,
Loesch and her group distributed
10,000 prolife leaflets explaining
why members of the anti-nuclear
movement should be opposed to
abortion too. And so came the
"birth" of P.S.
"Prolifers for Survival is a
bridge states their promotional
brochure. It links the prolife move-
ment (opposing abortion and other
socially selected killing), and the
peace movement (opposng nuclear
arms and other threats to world sur-
vival), because as they claim, "Life
and Peace belong together
Loesch recognizes a clear connec-
tion between the threat of the
nuclear arms race and the abortion
of an unwanted child.
"They're exactly the same
thing Loesch told the East Caroli-
nian Because they each represent
a deliberate, direct, and massive at-
tack against innocent human life
She refers to nuclear war as poten-
tial "megabortion a term she
coined herself.
Loesch, who was raised a
Catholic and actively works in lay
ministry is single, and has never
been married nor been pregnant.
She hopes that P.S. will be able to
"foster dialogue in arenas too often
polarized by bitter conservative �
vs � liberal debate
"Left and right are not as impor-
tant to us as right and wrong. And
what's right is strengthened by
working with the love of life in the
hearts of traditional adversaries
states P.Ss promotional brochure.
Loesch also draws on a set of con-
clusions that she has made citing the
connections between the nuclear
power industry and abortion. She
was appalled by the fact that people
have called for extra funds for abor-
tions, to be used in the event of a
nuclear accident, while they also
proclaim their opposition to nuclear
weapons and power. "This isn't
non-violence. This is a search and
destroy mission Loesch said.
Loesch went on to say, "It allows
the nuclear business to sweep away
their casualties. They nullify any
real moral or legal response to the
violence that they're carrying out
against human life
"It is this numb not-
knowingness, this species-amnesia,
which makes the nuclearmilitary
industry even thinkable. Radio ac-
tive poisons are introduced into our
world by both nuclear arms
manufacature and by the ordinary
operation of nuclear power plants
said Loesch refering to the dangers
that exposure to radiation will cause
to future generations.
"So it is for that reason that the
nuclear military industry can con-
tinue with its violence because who
speaks for this silent legion, the very
next generation? They are not a
political constituency. They can't
lobby
P.S. says that they are not a
political group in the partisan sense.
They don't endorse candidates or
legislation. Loesch adds that P.S. as
a group does not take a a position
on the proposed constitutional
amendment that would outlaw
abortion.
"At the same time, as individuals
See MEGA, Page 8
Anti-nuclearabortion activist Juli Loesch.
Lester Thurow, Next Galbraith,
Predictor Of Economic Future
Doing That Voodoo That They Do So Well
New wave band Wall of Voodoo (shown above) provides the perfect companion act for Devo this
Saturday night, Halloween eve, when the Student Union Special Concerts Committee presents the
two groups in 3-D on a 40-foot screen, Hve from the Beverly Hills Theatre. The concert will he broad-
cast to Wright Auditorium at 10 p.m 3-D glasses will be available at the door before the show.
Tickets are on sale at the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student Ceater at $5 for students in ad-
vance and $6 at the door; public tickets are $6 ia advance and $7 at the door. Pablic tickets are also
on sale at the two Greenville Record Bars and at Apple Records.
By JAY STONE
Some predict that Lester C. Thurow may well be the
next John Kennith Galbraith. (Readers may recall that
John Kennith Galbraith is the economist who
engineered much of the New Deal.) Thurow, Professor
of Economics and Management at the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology, is in a position to have com-
parisons like this made because of the extent to which
his economic policies are influencing the top contenders
for the 1984 Democratic Presidential nomination. He is
advisor to Edward Kennedy, Walter Mondale, and
Senator Gary Hart of Colorado. These three are con-
sidered by analysts to be the most likely choices for the
Democratic nomination in '84.
Thurow has been a frequent contributor to "New
York Times Magazine" and he is author of "The Zero-
Sum Society In a recent editorial for "New York
Times" he declared that the easy money measures
adopted by the Reagan administration are not likely to
pull us out of the present financial crisis.
According to Thurow, one of the reasons for this is
the weakness of the banking system due to a world-wide
recession. This recession, he said, is being fueled by the
fact that Mexico is not paying interest or principal on
more than $80 billion in loans, Poland is not paying in-
terest or principal on more than $256 billion, and all of
Eastern Europe is, financially speaking, only a step
behind the Poles. He added that Brazil, Argentina, and
Venezuala have a combined debt of roughly $100 billion
and are , at most, two steps beLind Mexico which is on
the verge of financial collapse. Canada and Belgium are
also seriously ailing. As a consequence, Thurow con-
lcuded, it is highly unlikely that mortgage interest rates
will fall, which might fuel investment in housing, since
the banks simply need a period of high lending rates to
get themselves back into a healthy financial state.
Furthermore, Thurow said, the economic climate to-
day provides the consumer with little encouragement to
inclrease spending. Wary over the rate of unemploy-
ment, bankruptcies, and plant closings consumers are
more prone to save than to spend. Hence, consumers
are not likely to provide the spark for a return to
economic growth. And neither are state and local
governments which have provided ever-increasing ex-
penditures on schools in the past, which created jobs
and stimulated growth. But that has changed in the last
few years, according to Thurow's article; with falling
school enrollments state and local spending is declining.
In his book The Zero-Sum Society Thurow offers a
unique analysis of our contemporary economic malaise.
The fundamental problem, Thurow says in his book, is
slow economic growth coupled with inflation. The trad-
tional cure for inflation has been to tighten fiscal
andor monetary policies to the point that they create a
recession large enough to crack indexing, stop infla-
tionary expectations, and force wages and prices to fall.
Thurow is quick to point out, however, that this cure
has the unfortunate draw-back of resulting in high
unemployment. Furthermore, no one knows how high
See U.S. ECONOMY, Page 7
U.
Continued Fq
unemployei
have to be t
tion in thi
Because of
vantage n
program
vocates this
to solving t!
problem is
tain the suj
electorate f
Thurow's oj
He mail
our slow
grow i a is
by tight m
fiscal poli
result in '
ty More
percent of
plants and
not being
ding to Tl
largest percj
the statist
complied u
"With ic
incentives
diminish,
need for
productive!
Knowing t(
not need
firms often I
research ai
ment for
tion procesj
result is
economy
jmi
sotrn
Thurs.
alsi
L,
ystinjl
� -
- �� � � �� �
.bHimWSIiii 0T ' I






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 28, 1982
re
It ie ECU
and Our
ter noted
e already
years.
ich week-
im. Reser-
lephoning
ice
iter
he ECU
scial in-
ure only
ething to
;rility of
ist will be
lannot br-
for the
present
le in order
kbout the
available

h,
re
lelgium are
lurow con-
Uerest rates
ising, since
ing rates to
state.
I climate to-
agement to
unemploy-
jsumers are
consumers
return to
and local
treasing ex-
jreated jobs
in the last
ith falling
fs declining.
w offers a
lie malaise.
r,is book, is
The trad-
ghten fiscal
ley create a
stop infla-
rices to fall.
at this cure
ng in high
its how high
U.S. Economy In Trouble
Continued From Page 6
unemployement would
have to be to stop infla-
tion in this country.
Because of this disad-
vantage no political
program which ad-
vocates this approach
to solving the inflation
problem is likely to re-
tain the support of the
electorate for long, in
Thurow's opinion.
He maintains that
our slow economic
growth is exacerbated
by tight monetary and
fiscal policies which
result in "idle capaci-
ty More than thirty
percent of the nation's
plants and equipment is
not being used; accor-
ding to Thurow, the
largest percentage since
the statistic was first
compiled in 1965.
"With idle capacity,
incentives to invest
diminish. There is little
need for new, more
productive facilities.
Knowing that they do
not need to expand,
firms often cut back on
research and develop-
ment for new produc-
tion processes. The end
result is a stagnant
economy with a pro-
ductivity slowdown on
top of a basis produc-
tivity growth rate that
already puts us at the
bottom of the in-
dustrial league � with
about one-third the
productivity growth of
Japan
Contributing to the
problem of slow
economic growth,
Thurow claims, are the
barriers in our political
and economic system to
disinvestment. These
barriers are in the form
of government sub-
sidies for "inefficient"
industries and import
tariffs to protect
domestic industry from
competition. Because
of this, says Thurow,
businesses are not en-
couraged to be in-
novative and to invest
in promising new areas
of the economy.
In explanation of
why the economy is
designed in this way
Thurow points to
groups which organize
to prevent policies be-
ing put into effect that
will hurt them. Labor
Unions organize to
resist policies that will
hurt workers.
Minorities and women
organize to protect the
interests of minorities
and women. En-
vironmentalists fight
against decisions that
will harm the environ-
ment and various
businesses organize to
protect their interests.
"When society has to
confront the issue of
differences in the
relative income of dif-
ferent groups � rich
versus poor, black ver-
sus white, male versus
female, farmers versus
urban dwellers � it is
addressing the
paradigm zero-sum
game. Every increase in
the relative income of
one group is a decrease
in the relative income
of another group.
Economic growth for
everyone cannot solve
the problem because
the demands are not for
more but for parity.
Our society has reached
a point where it must
start to make explicit
equity decisions if it is
to advance
To resolve our pro-
blems Thurow main-
tains that it is inevitable
that we must have more
vigorous government
involvement in helping
to plan the economy.
Income gaps between
the rich and the poor,
he says, are likely to
widen in the next twen-
ty years since we are
entering a period of
rapidly rising ine-
qualities.
"Active government
involvement in pro-
moting economic
growth will also make
some Americans richer.
We have to ensure that
the bottom sixty per-
cent of the population
does not fall behind,
for if we don't, we
won't be able to adopt
the growth policies that
we need due to political
resistance
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8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 28, 1982
Mega Killing Is Group 9s
Most Important Concern
Continued From Page 6
"We try to build
bridges on both sides
said Settle referring to
the Schism that usually
spans between "single
issue anti-abortionists"
and "pro-choice anti-
nuleers She referred
to some people as
"Hawks in Doves
clothing" when they
praise her for being
"really consistent on
life issues" but refuse
to declare their own op-
position to abortion.
"What are they really
saying about their own
decision on life
issues?"
Settle said she
thought most members
of P.S. "would have a
particular horror about
throwing women in jail
for abortion. We've got
to go beyond just mak-
ing abortion illegal
continued Settle. "We
want to make it un-
thinkable
Settle agrees with
Loesch that there is a
direct relationship bet-
ween the anti-abortion
and anti-nuclear
movements. "I don't
seperate them in my
mindif we are
preparing for war, we
are in essence willing to
make war she said
"and we're willing at
the same time to risk
the kind of
unimanaginable
devastation that would
necessarily be visited
upon those innocent
civilians � it's like hav-
ing a constant death
threat
"Once you say it's
OK to destroy a baby
before it's born, then it
will become all right to
destroy a baby in a
nuclear war said
N.C.P.S. member
Helen ZunesOnce
you say it's OK to have
an abortion, then you
get to megabortion
Zunes, who works
with Settle on P.S. pro-
jects, believes that peo-
ple who refuse to
recognize the evil of
aboriton have a "blind
spot They don't want
to see � they refuse to
see the scientific fact
that the fetus is alive �
a human being
P.S. claims that they
try to counter abortion
and the nuclear arms
race by "education,
moral witness, love,
and reason They also
support nonviolent
alternatives. They
distribute literature
from a wide variety of
writers who link pro-
lifepeace perspectives.
They also have a
resource library of
books and audiovisual
resources.
"We organize an
ongoing cross fertiliza-
tion: leaf letting and
bannering, speaking
out and sitting in, pro-
testing and
cooperating accor-
ding to there "What
P.S. Does" statement.
"We're a visable
presence for the
sacredness of life at
every age and every
stage; and against the
mechanisms that
devalue, dehumanize or
destroy life
Loesch claims that
the work of P.S. has
helped to attract
previously closed mind-
ed people into the full
pro-life position which
includes opposition to
the nuclear arms race.
"We have found a
great openness on the
part of mainline Right
to Life people to ex-
amine the question of
nuclear weapons and in
some cases come out
against bombs
Loesch said, "in the
religious peace move-
ment there's an equal
movement toward pro-
life
P.S. says they
operate by consensus
because of their broad
membership which
numbers 1500 national-
ly. They heep a na-
tional focus on their
two primary issues:
abortion and nuclear
arms. Their 15 local
chapters provide their
own diversity and often
take stands on related
lifepeace issues, as
long as the stand is
non-violent, non
political and agreed to
by the local members.
"To be pro-life has to
include the whole range
of human existence and
the condition of the
human family, said Set-
tle "you have to
acknowledge that there
are some tough pro-
blems for which there
are no quick fixes. You
must be willing to ac-
cept your brothers and
sisters unconditionally,
regardless of age or
ability or state of
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Monday, November 8,1982 8:00 PM
Hendrix Theatre, Mendenhall Student Center, ECU Campus
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Faculty & Staff $5.00
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� �
I






i HE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
OCTOBER 28,1982
Pae 9
the fun
re to eat.I
Emory Criticizes Blatant N&O Article
iqII
ler
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Sports Editor
With a contract extension and a
shutout all in one week, head foot-
ball coach Ed Emory was bound to
run into a problem or two sooner or
later.
The so-called "problem" turned
out to be an editorial column writ-
ten by The News and Observer's
Sports Editor Joe Tiede, who
believes "ECU made a mistake
when it withdrew from the Southern
Conference in 1977
Tiede commended Emory for
having "done an aggressive job of
building the ECU football pro-
gram but conceded that the
Pirates are wandering down a foot-
ball path of no direction.
"I've always respected Joe Tiede
as a writer and a sports reporter
Emory said. "He's been very good
to us through the years, but I think
he'd have a hard time finding so-
meone to agree with him if they've
been involved with the ECU pro-
gram
Here are a few of Tiede's
statements that Emory disagreed
with: "East Carolina belongs in
I-A A, in a conference like the
Southern Emory said he doesn't
believe a team needs to belong to a
conference to be successful. "It
wasn't a mistake to leave and
become an independent status he
saidIf we hadn't done that, we
would be in the same boat as Rich-
mond (UR) right now.
"We had foresight to get out.
Conference play is not a big thing in
football. If that's the only thing that
motivates you, it will be a very long
season. I've coached at four ACC
schools (Wake Forest, Clemson,
Duke and Georgia Tech), and I'd
much rather be coaching here at
ECU. You're talking about being
the best of 96 (Division I-A) and
that's better than being the best of
eight. (ACC)
"I've seen teams after they lost
the conference championship and
do nothing. Do you think Bear
Bryant spends time worrying about
a conference championship? No sir,
he's worrying about the nationals
"As an independent, ECU resides
in football limbo. "That's one state-
ment Emory disagreed with defiant-
ly. "Anytime you change leagues
there's going to be a period of ad-
justment for the team, fans and ad-
ministrators he said. "We made
that change in' 80 and it takes time
to build rivalries with national
schools. We're working to that
level.
"When we get to that status
where we are an elite football team,
that's when the bowl games and
television coverage will come in.
And when we get there, we'll give the
entire athletic department such a
surge
"The hard facts much be faced
when scheduling is considered,
along with realistic opportunities
for winning against Division I-A op-
ponents The head coach believes
beating a Division I-A is a realistic
possibility, but more importantly,
he views the present schedule as be-
PHoto By GARY PATTERSON
Freshman Reggie Branch (32) rushed for 109 yards against Illinois State
and will be trying to gain more yardage against WVU this Saturday.
ing an educational one. "I think
they'd (the player) rather lose to
Florida State than have an easy
win he said. "I think they want to
have the chance to win against a
respected team. It's good for us to
play these teams
"East Carolina has practically no
chance of earning a bowl bid or a
national ranking In reference to
this statement, Emory said he
wouldn't rule out all possibilities.
"We're just going to try and finish
with an 8-3 record and get a bowl
bid. Right now, we have to play for
respect and it's up to the players to
show how much they want
"Powers like Pittsburgh, Penn
State and Florida State have the ad-
vantage of populous areas in which
to recruit. East Carolina has none of
these According to Emory,
however, ECU has something that
no other school can offer. "We
believe competition build pro-
grams he said. "We tell each
recruit that comes here that we can
offer him something that Penn State
can't, Florida State can't or
Carolina. We'll give him the
greatest competitive urge because
we're trying to outdo those people,
and it's human desire to want to be
as good as the best man
When it comes to recuits, Emory
said ECU will get its share because
"we have more to sell
"You take West Virginia he
said. "They have only seven signees
from Virginia and we've got more
than that from North Carolina.
Emory added that ECU is much
more populous than Florida State
� two-million more. "Our drawing
range is much larger than theirs
he said. "We get people all the way
from Washington, D.C. to South
Carolina and all over
As far as comparing stadium size,
Emory said he is tired of hearing
that ECU only has 35,000 seats.
"Heck, we're bigger than 40 of the
stadiums at Division-I schools.
Besides, we're bigger than the
University of Virginia, and Duke
and Georgia Tech both draw in the
20's (20,000) at home
Emory is looking toward the
future, and he knows the road he is
traveling is a long and winding one.
But as he indicated, ECU is not the
only school to confront such a
challenge. "Look at Pitt
(Pittsburgh) and Florida State he
said. "In '74, Pitt's football pro-
gram was really struggling and I
don't think Florida State won a
game that year
In Tiede's concluding statements,
he insinuated that ECU is wander-
ing headlessiy down a football path
of no direction. But Emory knows
better. "When you know what you
want, you're not in a state of confu-
sionhe said, "and we know what
we want
In order to completely prove
Tiede wrong, however, can only be
determined by one element � time.
And as the old saying goes, time will
certainly tell.
RRotO By GARY PATTERSON
Coach Ed Emory expressed optimism about the ECU football program's
bright future after reading an upsetting newspaper article.
Mountaineers Pose Problems
By KEN BOLTON
Assistant Sports Editor
The ECU football team is prepar-
ing for a grueling four-game road
trip that will see the team travel
through states as far away as Texas
and Pennsylvania.
As Pirate head coach Ed Emory
puts it, the team will get a scenic
view of much of the country. "We'll
be going from the coal mines of
West Virginia to Dallas-Ft. Worth,
then to one of the birthplaces of
America in Williamsburg and final-
ly to Philadelphia, the 'City of
Brotherly Love "
The first stop for the Pirates will
be Morgantown, West Virginia,
where ECU will take on the highly-
ranked Mountaineers next Saturday
afternoon.
WVU is the reigning Peach Bowl
champions after they demolished
Florida 26-6 in last year's post-
season contest.
It will be Band Day at Moun-
taineer Field when WVU, 5-2, takes
on the Pirates, who have a 4-3
mark. The two teams met last year
with the Mountaineers coming out
on top, 20-3.
West Virginia quarterback Jeff
Hostetler has had an impressive year
as he has completed 49.8 per-cent of
his passes for 1555 yards. He has
been bothered by a bruised big toe
on his left foot and is expected to be
ready, but will not start. Kevin
White will .start in the backfield
along with runningbacks Ron
Wolfley and Tom Gray.
Emory feels that Hostetler might
see action. "Kevin White is a fine
player, but I don't believe that
Hostetler is not going to play said
Emory. "They are fighting for a
bowl berth, so how could they keep
him out if the game is close?"
Whether Hostetler plays or not,
Emory knows that the Moun-
taineers will be tough. Their only
two losses of the year have been to
Pittsburgh and Penn State.
"I feel West Virginia is of the
same quality and basic thinking as
Florida State with the same type of
athletes stated Emory.
"Defensively, they controlled
Oklahoma's high-powered offense,
and then controlled Pitt and Marino
(Dan). They also held Penn State to
only 118 yards passing last week,
despite Penn State's fine quarter-
back (Todd Blackledge)
Emory's sideline counterpart will
be Don Nehlen. In just two years,
Nehlen has taken the West Virginia
football program from four con-
secutive losing seasons to last year's
8-3 mark and Peach Bowl cham-
pionship. He ranks 18th among ac-
tive head coaches in total wins and
'82 Fans Leave A Lot To Be Desired
In Saturday's homecoming game,
a crowd of 26, 771 people attended
the gala event in order to cheer the
Pirates on to victory against Illinois
State.
Unfortunately, at least half of
the enthusiastic crowd left before
the game was even over.
Why? That's a good question and
a lot of people are trying to figure
out the answer, including players,
coaches and puzzled fans who re-
mained seated for the entire game.
Head football coach Ed Emory's
reasoning seems to sum it up best:
"I think the fans are too interested
in who we play instead of seeing the
Pirates play. It shouldn't make a
difference if it's Miami or Florida
State they should stay there
The homecoming game is not the
first time fans have made such an
abrupt exit. In the other three home
games, the crowd also had early
departures, as well as in past years.
The ones most annoyed by the
rudeness are the players. In a way,
it's a rejection to them, an insult.
Each time a player runs off the field
and sees the stadium become in-
creasingly empty, he can't feel like
he is being fully supported or ap-
preciated.
It's even more difficult when the
players travel to other Division-I
schools and see the huge crowds and
the great amount of energy being
released in the stadiums. Enter
Florida State.
ECU defensive end Jody Schulz
said, "At Florida State, it was 56-17
and you looked up into the stands
and not more than 100 people had
left.
K
Cindy Pleasants
A Look Inside
"I wish we had that kind of sup-
port. You wouldn't believe the dif-
ference a crowd makes
Apparently it does to Schulz, who
has had his biggest games of the
season against N.C. State, Missouri
and FSU.
Emory believes fan support is
more of a necessity than a benefit.
"I don't think they (the fans) realize
the 10-to-14 point advantage a home
team can give he said. "I think if
�the students knew that they're the
twelfth man on the team and how
much they psychologically get the
players up for the game, it might
matter more to them
Fans can make many excuses for
leaving football games early. For ex-
ample, the Pirates may have ap-
peared to have the ISU game wrap-
ped up with a 14-0 lead at halftime.
However, football followers know
that anything can happen with two
quarters remaining. Secondly, it was
53 degrees on Saturday, not to men-
tion windy. But like Coach Emory
said, if his 73 year-old mother can
sit through the game so can a 20
year-old student.
Probably the most damaging
aspect of fans leaving early is when
recruits visit ECU. You can bet the
prospects, who are seated across
from the home section, are taking
notes on practically everything, in-
cluding crowd reactions.
Attending last week's game were
at least 40 of the top 120 players in
the nation. "I doubt if any school in
the country had as many blue chip-
pers as we did Emory said.
There's no doubt that those
players want to be seen when they
play football, whatever school they
may choose to attend. And it's up to
the fans to make sure they're sup-
ported.
Many people are wondering why
the Pirates only played four home
games this year. Even though that's
the only way the schedule could be
arranged, why should the players
settle for playing in front of 20,000
people when they can just as easily
play in front of 50,000?
One should certainly be able to
understand why a few of the athletes
feel so negatively about home
crowds or rather the lack of it. It's
not that the crowds are so small.
The attendance at homecoming was
the fourth largest crowd ever at
Ficklen Stadium, but it would have
been interesting to know the number
of people who stuck around for the
second half.
With the latest controversy about
whether ECU belongs in Division-I
rankings, Pirate fans should begin
asking themselves if they are willing
to fully back a school that has the
chance to become nationally-
recognized.
Sadly enough, there's no way to
undo what's been done this season
since the Pirates played their last
home game Saturday. What's done
is done.
Then again, there's always next
year or the year after that.
winning percentage.
In keeping with this year's
frustrating pattern, injuries will play
a major part in ECU s chances
against West Virginia.
Backup quarterback Kevin In-
gram will miss the WVU game with
a fractured sternum he suffered in
the Illinois State game. Split-end
Ricky Nichols will be out with an
ankle injury. Other players slowed
by injuries include tailbacks Tony
Baker and Jimmy Walden,
linebacker P.J. Jordan and defen-
sive tackle Maury Banks.
The Pirate defense will have to be
in top form against the powerful
Mountaineers. "It will be a great
challenge to go up there and try and
control their offense commented
Emory. "They will finesse you with
passes to the backs and underneath.
Tom Gray is an outstanding runner,
while they have a great tight end in
Mark Raugh
Raugh is considered by many to
be the premier tight end in college
football. In the Penn State game, he
caught six passes to move past Steve
Lewis as the school leader in pass
receptions. So far this season,
Raugh has 26 grabs for 353 yards
and one touchdown.
The ECU-West Virginia game will
be the first time this season that the
Pirates will play on astroturf.
Emory is concerned about the ad-
justment, but feels that ECU will
benefit because it is a faster surface,
and the Pirates depend heavily on
team speed.
Emory feels that the biggest thing
right now is that the Pirates have an
opportunity to have a good season.
"We have an opportunity to
make something good happen he
said. "We could be 8-3; it is not out
of our reach. I believe the guys are
thirsty and hungry for it
The developments last week that
resulted in Emory's contract exten-
sion were well-received by the entire
ECU football program.
"We have more committment
and positivism and enthusiasm now
than ever before Emory respond-
ed. "I've gotten telephone calls, let-
ters and telegrams telling me con-
gratulations on the two-year exten-
sion. It was a great thing for our
coaching staff and it helps a great
deal in recruiting
The Pirates hope to remain in
high spirits with a victory over West
Virginia, but Emory knows it won't
be easy. "Penn State made them
mad by shutting them out so we go
into Morgantown where they're
frustrated and embarrassed here
we go again
Defearive ead Jody Schub
when they attend football
ECU ran
in Fickle Stadia.





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 28, 1982
Sneaker Sam Sez
Sneaker Who?
Sneaker Sam is the mascot
of the E.C.U Intramural
Department. His lost tennis
shoe is commonly seen at most
intramural events, and this
past weekend his shoe was
spotted in the Homecoming
parade.
Because of Sneaker Sam's
interest in intramurals, he has
decided to write a weekly col-
umn in The East Carolinian to
inform everyone of the big
plays, the big names and the
big events planned. Be sure to
catch what Sneaker Sam Sez
every Thursday.
History In The Making
Flag football came to a
dramatic close Tuesday night
when the All-Campus Playoffs
were held. The Heartbreakers,
champions of the women's in-
dependent division, won the
all-campus championship by
defeating the Residence Hall
champs, the Cotten Crushers.
The winner of the Sorority
division was Alpha Delta Pi.
The Kappa Alpha team
made intramural history as
they defeated the Scott Un-
touchables in the men's All-
Campus championship. This is
the first time in intramural
football at ECU that a fraterni-
ty team finished as the All-
Campus champion. This game
proved to be quite a battle, and
finished with the Untouchables
ready to score as time ran out.
The final score was 30-22.
The Skoal Brothers won the
men's Independent division
while the Kappa Sigma team
won the Fraternity "B" divi-
sion.
The Eighteenth Hole
The team putt-putt competi-
tion proved to be very exciting
this year as 72 teams competed
for the championship. In the
women's division, it was last
year's champion from Jarvis
Dorm, the Purple and Gold
Putters, who once again took
the honors. They defeated the
Independent division champs,
IB AC, in the All-Campus
finals. The Tri-Sig "A" team
captured the Sorority division.
Only a few strokes separated
the winners from the losers in
the men's putt-putt competi-
tion. Pi Kappa Phi received the
low-score team honors as they
captured the Fraternity divi-
sion. The Jarvis Big Slicks were
victorious in the Residence
Hall division. In the end, it was
the Burnouts who took the In-
dependent and All-Campus
titles.
Co-Rec World Series
It's down to the finals in Co-
Rec softball with Lumber-n-
Lightening playing the
Bombers. These two teams
have been the powerhouses all
season long by averaging well
over ten runs per game. It
ought to be quite a shootout.
The Finish Line
The Cross-Campus Run held
during Homecoming weekend
featured an ECU alumni, Bill
White, running the 2.5 and
five-mile race in outstanding
times. In the women's division,
April Ross won the five-mile
event, while Pat McGuigan
finished first in the 2.5-mile
race. A field of close to 50 run-
ners assembled for the chilly
contest.
Boob Tube Fans
The first soap opera trivia
contest will be held on
November 8 at three different
locations. Questions will come
from the various ABC, CBS
and NBC networks. Registra-
tion for the contest will be
November 1-3 in Memorial
Gym, Room 204. Stay tuned to
the IRS for more details.
Tar Heels Hold Big Edge in Statistics
GREENSBORO,
N.C. (UPI) � North
Carolina has the
statistical edge going
into Saturday's game
against Maryland, a
game that may go a
long way in determin-
ing an Atlantic Coast
Conference champion.
The 8th-ranked Tar
Heels lead seven of the
11 team statistical
categories compiled by
theACC
The Tar Heels lead in
total offense, averaging
461.5 yards per game;
rushing offense with
303.2 yards; scoring of-
fense, averaging 34.7
points; total defense,
giving up 155.7 yards;
rushing defense, giving
up 43 yards pass
defense, giving up
112.7 yards; and scor-
ing defense, giving up
6.8 points a game.
Maryland is second
in total offense, with a
420.3 yard average;
third in rushing offense
with 196.3 yards; se-
cond in scoring offense
with 33.9 points; se-
cond in total defense
with 307.4 yards; se-
cond in rushing defense
with 66.0 yards; last in
passing defense with
242.4 yards and third in
scoring defense, giving
up 17.1 points a game.
Duke leads in passing
offense with 303.1
yards. Wake Forest
leads in net punting
with a 40.1 yard
average and kickoff
returns with a 21.5
game average.
In individual
statistics, Clemson run-
ning back Cliff Austin,
who rushed for 109
yards against North
Carolina State, held on
to the rushing lead in
the latest statistics.
Austin is averaging
115.7 yards a game, the
only runner in the
league averaging more
than 100 yards a game.
Tech's Jack Westbrook
is the best punt
returner, averaging
12.6 yards.
Austin leads the
ACC in scoring with 66
points. Just a point
behind is kicker Jess
Atkinson of Maryland.
Atkinson leads the
league in field goals,
making 13 of 16.
Ben Bennett of Duke
continues to lead in
total offense, averaging
248 yards a game. Gary
Schofield of Wake
Forest is second, with a
219.4 yard average.
Duke's Carl Franks
is the league's top pass
receiver, making 39 cat-
ches.
Wake Forest kicker
Harry Newsome is the
top punter in the
league, averaging 43.5
yards per kick.
Dominique To Be Brought Along Slowly
ATLANTA (UPI) �
Dominique Wilkins is
billed as "the savior"
who will carry Atlanta
to an NBA division ti-
tle, but the real key to
the Hawks' early suc-
cess may lie with oft-
troubled guard Eddie
Johnson.
Johnson, a two-time
NBA all-star, reported
to training camp 35
pounds overweight,
partly caused by the
daily dosage of lithium
he must take to combat
a manic-depressive con-
dition that resulted in
serious emotional pro-
blems the last two
years.
He's had trouble los-
ing the weight while
maintaining the lithium
dosage and is still 10
pounds overweight
with the Hawks open-
ing the season Friday
night at Detroit.
That has cost him
some of the speed and
quickness that earned
him the nickname
"Fast Eddie" and
enabled him to average
over 16 points a game
in five NBA seasons.
"I have been very
much concerned ad-
mitted Coach Kevin
Loughery. "I think Ed-
die is the key to this
whole ballclub. He has
progressed over the last
week but he's still car-
rying close to 10 extra
pounds, which is a lot
of weight.
"He hasn't been in
the best shape and he's
our best guard. He's
one of the premier
guards in the league.
For us to be a good
ballclub, he has to play
like that
After losing three
straight to Philadelphia
in the opening round of
the NBA playoffs last
season, the Hawks
opened owner Ted
Turner's purse strings
and sent forward John
Drew, who had fallen
in disfavor with some
Atlanta fans, and
reserve guard Freeman
Williams � along with
$1 million � to Utah
for local hero Domini-
que Wilkins.
Wilkins, a 6-7 leaper
who gave up his senior
year at Georgia and
became the third player
taken in the NBA draft,
will be immediately
thrust into the starting
lineup and counted on
to replace Drew's 18.5
scoring average.
There is little doubt
Wilkins will get the
points. But until he
adapts to the defense
required in the NBA,
he may give up almost
as many as he scores.
Loughery says
Wilkins can handle the
pressure placed on him
with "the savior"
label.
"He's not a prima
donna-type kid said
Loughery. "That's a
big plus. But there is an
awful lot of pressure on
him and he's actually
only a senior in college
this year. He needs an
awful lot of work on
his defense, but he's
one
3ftC
DOC
DOC
one
Clothing
l
WarehouseJeam
Get yourself winterized at bargain prices �
NOW THROUGH MONDAY, NOV. 1.
Men's Coveralls by WranglerM2.99
Men's Overalls by Wrangler9.99
Men's Long Tail Flannel Shirts byDe.c . . 4.99
Ladies' Oxford Shirts &
Fancy Sweaters (Large Assortment)7.99
OUR JEAN PRICES
CAN'T BE BEAT
OPEN 24 HOURS DRIVE THRU WINDOW
Calvin Klein24.99
Ms. Lee$18.99
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Many Others
Sizes Up to 50, Come Save
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Special:
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2 ribs, fries, slaw & biscuit
on Wed. only
11-2 p.m. and 5-9 p.m.
25C
OLD FASHIONED HOMEMADE
BREAD PUDDINGonly
1011 Charles Street �752-1373 1 Block from Campus
Submit your recipes in designated
boxes in Mendenhall,
Student Store and Dorms.
Name
Address
Telephone
Dept. (major).
Classification
Faculty, Staff, Student.
Recipe: (how many servings & servings size).
Students, faculty and staff are invited to submit their favorite
recipes to be compiled into a cookbook of East Carolina's Favorite
Recipes.
10 of the entries will be selected for the Bake-Off, which will be an-
nounced at a later date. The recipes will be judged on:
Originality, Appearance, Taste
The grand prize will be a dinner for 2 at Darryl's. For any additional
information � call 758-3272 (ask for Carole)
Sponsored
toytlM
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DittVtiC
willing to learn
The Hawks have two
of the top 10 players
chosen in the draft with
6-5 guard Keith Ed-
monson of Purdue
their other first-round
choice. But Edmonson
missed three weeks of
training campas a
holdout and is way
behind learning
Loughery's system.
"The ideal thing with
rookies is to bring them
along slowly said
Loughery. "But
Dominique obviously
has been thrown into
the fire very quickly.
Edmonson has really
been hurt by the time
he's missed. He's cat-
ching up, but we do
things so much dif-
ferently from the way
he did in college
If Johnson doesn't
get in shape quickly,
however, Edmonson
may be playing more
than anticipated early
in the season.
The other big off-
season acquisition was
veteran center George
Johnson, who will team
with 7-1 Tree Rollins
and give the Hawks the
two leading shot-
blockers in the league.
With 6-8 Dan
Roundfield, one of the
league's premier strong
forwards, that gives the
Hawks an imposing
defensive front line.
"The intimidation
factor causing people
not to take the shots in
the middle they nor-
mally take may be more
important than the
blocked shots
themselves said
Loughery. "But we
can't get satisfied and
have breakdowns and
depend on the shot-
blocker to take care of
them
With the additon of
Wilkins and Edmonson
and Rollins' chronic
knees in better shape
than in years, Loughery
plans to run more, but
the team had problems
executing the fastbreak
during a 3-5 exhibition
season. Wilkins wasn't
much help on the
defensive boards and
the guard play broke
down with Johnson
slowed, Wes Matthews
erratic, and Rory Spar-
row more familiar with
a set-up type offense.
"I am more concern-
ed about rebounding
the ball to get the of-
fense going than the
guard play said
Loughery.
Loughery said he
thinks the Hawks.
42-40 last season
despite being crippled
by injuries, can
challenge Milwaukee
for the Central Division
title "but I don't think
it's going to happen
right away
"I think this team is
going to be much
stronger as the year
goes on he said.
"The young players are
a significant part of our
game plan and Eddie
Johnson is not at 100
percent yet.
$OUTH
3PJELLOWSH1P
Students are invited to attend Bible
Studies of I John with Prof. Grace
Ellenburg � Monday, November
1, 8 to 10 P.M Room 347
Mendenhall.
Refreshments served each meeting.
KYF meets bi-weekly �
For information call 756-2080
Sponsored by area Full Gospel Churches
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bu lcanintothcwbidTakeasrwrtstepThenbreakfree
Afloat in the air. The earth left behind This dream
flight has come true for over 25,000 stu-
dents of every age at America s largest
school for hang gliders and ultra-
Kght aircraft. Call or write for our free
brochure. It'svour first stepinto the sky!
WIHHHI!
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to 2-0
afternoot
victor o
sii of
at Wiimii
Head
Snerman
pleased �
pla of
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 28, 1982
11
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vaid.
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Eddie
ii 100
llliillltiiiiiii
Netters Victorious
The ECU men's ten-
nis team ran its' record
to 2-0 Wednesday
afternoon with an 8-1
victory over the Univer-
sity of North Carolina
at Wilmington.
Head coach Pat
Sherman said she was
pleased with the overall
play of the team.
"There wasn't a ball
they didn't get to
said Sherman. "We got
behind in doubles but
came back
Sherman expressed
concern over a few in-
juries the Pirates have
suffered this season,
but felt that they show-
ed some depth against
the Seahawks.
Ted Lepper 2-6, 7-6
,6-2; Galen Treble (E)
def. Lance Thompson
6-3, 6-4; Paul Owen (E)
def. Rick Watson 6-4,
4-6, 6-3; Tom Buttle
(E) def. Nelson Hughes
6-2, 6-1; Don Rutledge
(E) def. Rodney Ibepaz
6-1, 7-6.
In singles, John
Shackleford (E) def.
In doubles, Lepper
and Rutledge (W) def.
Shackleford and
Thompson 10-6; David
Creech and Treble (E)
def. Watson and
Ibepaz 10-6; Owen and
Cole King (E) def.
Hughes and Brook
10-5.
The Pirate's next
match is Monday, Nov.
1 at Atlantic Christian
College at 3:00 p.m.
LET'S MAKE
A
DEAL.
ON
SHIRTS & SWEATERS
AYDEN GOLF & C.C. 746-3389
M&
i
888
I
m
&�
Classifieds
PERSONAL
typewriter. Call Lanie Shive.
7S8-5301 or Gall Joiner 781062.
TYPING TERM papers, resumes.
thesis, etc. Call 7524733.
PATTI B. The days are getting
short; the nights are getting long.
The time is coming nigh for you to
discover your only one. Clue No. 2
Sister Board. Your Halloween
Buddy.
HEY BABES, Happy anniver-
sary! What could an innocent
game of kiss-or-treat do? A whole
lot! It's been a great year. Love ya
bunches. DDL.
MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS, LOUIS.
MH
PROFESSIONAL typing rush
jobs done. Scientific symbol ele-
ment. Call BMW after 5:30 p.m.
TYPING: MANUSCRIPTS,
papers, thesis, reasonable rates.
Call 75�-374.
HAVING TROUBLE WITH YOUR
CAR? I have the equipment and
tools to fix it. My name is John,
call me between noon and p.m.
I'm sure we can work something
WANTED: USED LP'S.
REWARD: CASH OR TRADE.
Quicksilver Records. IM East
Fifth St.
MODELS NEEDED:
PHOTOGRAPHER needs models
for a variety of protects. Will pay
for travel and up to $7S an hour
based on experience. No ex-
perience is required. Send full-
length and full face photo or port
folio to: NEW DAWN
Photography 202E W. Lockhaven,
Goldsboro, NC 27S30.
4-foot I-inch SINGLE FIN PIN-
TAIL in the eye surfboard; full
Bayley suit and vest good deals.
Call Billy 757-304.
NICE GRAY AND WHITE RAB-
BIT fur iackft for sale $50 call
7M-38��.
MISC.
RIDES
ROOMMATE
WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share Georgetown
Apt. Phone 750-2671.
MALE OR FEMALE ROOM-
MATE Wanted to share rent $70.00
per month- and one-fourth
utilities. Interested persons should
come by 417 W. Fourth St. after 5
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL Typist wants to
type at home. Reasonable rates;
756-3660.
PROFESSIONAL Typing service-
experience, quality work, IBM
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: GOLD Seiko-Ouarti watch.
Reward offered. Sentimental
Value. Call 7SI-7026 after 4 p.m.
LOST: GREEN backpack contain-
ing notebooks and other
necessities for class. If found,
return to David Cobb at 752-1636 or
758-71 lg. No questions asked.
Reward.
FOUND: EYEGLASSES IN
FRONT OF ART BUILDING. Call
7S8-10V0.
WANTED
WE BUY PLAYBOY, Rolling
Stone Mag. Quicksilver Record-
Book Exchange. 100 East Fifth St.
NEED RIDE from Washington,
NC to ECU MonFri 7:00
a.m4:00 p.m. Call Joe, �'�
946-4671 collect, nights. Desire to
share expenses.
FOR SALE
HAND-CRAFTED, rustic fur-
niture at affordable student
prices. For more information, call
Kim at 752-5717.
2 FISHER SPEAKERS model S30s
would like to trade for cassette
deck. Call 7S6-?77 or The East
Carolinian 757-6366 and leave
message for Geep Johnson.
FOR RENT: ONE ROOM EFF.
APT. for rent within walking
distance of ECU. Call 756-3057.
SURFBOARD 6 ft. ACTION Chan-
nel bottom glass on fins S17S.
752-1124.
CRAZY ZACK'S ROAD TRIP Nov.
19 S10 includes round trip to Zacks
and refreshments on the way to
Raleigh. Half-price admission to
Zack's. Call Alpha Sigma Phi
752-1073 before Nov. 12.
LOSE WEIGHT.
750-9530.
HONEST! I!
OH NO, it's DEVO, Halloween
eve. October 30th, live via
satellite. A treat from CEN and
the Student Union.
EXPOSE YOURSELF to 3 DEVO
and Wall of Voodoo only 15 in ad-
vance for students.
PUT YOUR TUX on straight and
don't be late; we're getting
sophisticated Friday, November
5th.
LIVE FROM BROADWAY, it's
Sophisticated Night. Sophisticated
Ladies, Friday, November 5th.
THE NEON LIGHTS are bright on
Broadway. Sophisticated Ladies
live from Broadway, Friday,
November 5tti.
ABORTIONS
1 -24 week terminations
App'ts. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1-800-321-0575
Gl Camouflaged Fatigues and
T Shirts. Sleeping Bags,
Backpacks, Camping Equip-
ment, Steel Toed Shoes, Dishes
and Over 700 Different New and
Used Items. Cowboy Boots,
534.95.
ARMY-NAVY
STORE ,M,son'
MARAJENS
COMING!
QUALITY
SHOE REPAIR
SAAD'S
SHOE RKPAIR
113 Grande Ave.
758 1228
TRIM YOUR FIGURE
YOUR BEST
LOOK, INC.
355-2969
Lose 12-15 Pounds in 3 Weeks
Programs for Men & Women
� Medical Weight Control �
Nutritional Counseling
SKIN CARE
Individual Skin Analysis
Deep Pore Cleansing
Faces, Body Waxing
Manicures and Pedicures
Complimentary Consultation
Check phone book for
discount coupon.
Cl.e.pCt9.mC
in town.
����
You won't
find a
better deal
on games
anywhere in
Greenville.
�5 Tokens for $1.00
�Longest plays in town
�2 free tokens with each
food order
�Great sandwiches
�Supervised Game Room
�Take-out Service
Cinclwich
gome
756-9219
264 Bypass Behind Ramada Inn
South Park Shopping CenterGreenville

ill
mmm
IN THE LOFT
THE
PAUL TARDIF QUARTET
FEA TURING
RAY CONDRINGTON
Plays TrumpetFlugalhorn
Paul Tardif on piano
Clarence Seay on bass
David Via on drums
They will be performing selections by Charlie Parker, Sonny
Rollins, and other artists such as Freddie Hubbard, Miles Davis,
Herbey Hancock � also original tunes & standards such as
"Green Dolphin Street" "I Remember April" & "Stella By Starligh
9:00 P.M. UNTIL
FRI. & SAT. � OCT. 29 & 30
$2.00 COVer Vmm call for reservations
"The Fun
Way to
Fitness"
417 Evans St. Mall
� Downtown
757 1608
Registration being held this week for NOV. 23
classes per week to choose from to fit your busy
schedule.
"Let's get the body in shape the the Holidays"
PLAZA SHELL
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
610 Greenville Blvd.
756-3023 �24 MRS.
DUE TO THE LACK
OF STUDENT
PARTICIPATION,
SGA TRANSIT IS
CLOSING THE ECU
MED-SCHOOL BUS ROUTE
EFFECTIVE FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 29th
m
mm
24 hour Towing Service
U-Haul Rentals
Available
2704 E. 10th St.
7581033
Buck's
Gulf
Complete
Automotive Service
24 hr. Towing Service
Jartran Rentals Available
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 1
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
JIBS 00 Pregnancy Test, Birth
Control, and Problem Pregnan-
cy Counseling. For further infor-
mation call M2-OS3S (Toll Free
Number M0-221-2M8) between �
A.M. and S P.M. Weekdays.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
�!7 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N C
TART
The REBEL ART CONTEST is here! Enter
one or two pieces on Friday, November 5,
between 9:00 and 4:00 in Jenkins 1325. 2D
art must be framed or matted and acetated
and ready for hanging. Free-standing art
must be self-supporting. There is a $1.00
entry fee. The categories are: (1) Painting
(2) Sculpture (3) Ceramics (4) Drawing (5)
Photography (6) Design metals, fibers,
wood (7) Graphic Art and Illustration.
Contest open only to ECU students.
REBEL
Kash & Karry 6
Hwy. 33 � Old Pactolus Hwy.
Open 6:00 a.mll :00 p.m. daily
400 St. Andrews
Drive
Greenville
BEEF
BARN
i for reservations
Phone
756-1161
Thurs Oct. 28-Sun. Oct. 31
SPECIALS:
Frito Lay Reg BBQ, Sour Cream & Onion8oi. 99
Buy 1 Get 1 FREE
2 Liter Pepsi89C Save 50c
10 OZ. Pepsi Products19 Save 10
Jack's Cookies, Vanilla WafersBuy 1 Get 1 FREE
Dainty Maid Butterwheatvi ib. loot 92C
Buy 1 Get 1 FREE
Vi gal. Pine State Pure Ice Cream1 Save 8ic
Pine State Dip Ice Cream10C per scoap
Pine State Milk goi. homogenized l09
� Video Game Center �
Roasted Peanuts35
FREE bag of Popcorn w I purchase of $10 or more of Gasoline.
Famous Hot Dogs65C - Buy 1 Get 1 FREE
Mode with Paul's famous Relish
Sausage Dog75 - Buy 1 Get 1 FREE
Miller12 o. bottles 25t
We also have:
White Kerosene, Reg. & Unleaded Gas
IHW
I

'V
I





12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 28, 1982
AND YOU'LL SAVE AN EXTRA 10 ON ALL
REVCO BRAND PRODUCTS AND PRESCRIPTIONS
(ONLY E.C.U. STUDENT I.DS QUALIFY FOR 10 DISCOUNT)
Also, checkout Revco's low, everyday
discount prices on all these items
VISA
.
A
Revco
Roll-On
Deodorant 2�.�.
Revco's low, everyday
discount price 99c
YOU PAY
Amino
Protein
Shampoo
& Conditioner
Twin pack
Revco's low, everyday
discount price $1.99
YOU PAY
AMINO
Mead Envelopes
10O's
Revco's low, everyday
discount price 69c
YOU PAY
Revco
Oral
Mouthwash
24 fl. oz.
Reg Mint or Amber
Revco's low, everyday
discount price $1.23 ea
YOU PAY
ea.
Facial Buff
Cleaning Pad
Revco's low, everyday
discount price
YOU PAY
Mead
Tablet
Plain
Revco's low, everyday
discount price 69c
YOU PAY
BeMeS
Revco Mini Pads
30's
Revco's low, everyday
discount price $1.99
YOU PAY
Courant
Spray
Cologne

I W-lriui
Kt il hiiiI'H i
. jjiii iiiai
2 fl. oz.
Revco's low, everyday
discount price $1.99
YOU PAY
HIHLI.1HI�� ���
Q-Tips
170's
Revco's low, everyday
discount price $1.63
YOU PAY
All Set
Hair Spray
14.7 oz Extra Firm Gold
or Firm Blue
Revco's low, everyday
discount price $1.69 ea.
YOU PAY
�v
Mead
Steno Notebook
Revco's low, everyday
discount price 69c
YOU PAY
read. a'
100 ruled
index cards
Mead Index Cards
3" x5"
Revco's low, everyday
discount price 44c
YOU PAY
0 � �
GREENVILLE
South Park
115 E. Red E
756-9502
Center
�YRIGHT � 1982 BY REVCO P.S INC.
Items available while t
last.
Cutex
Nail
Polish
Remover
8 fl. oz.
Revco's low, everyday
discount price 99c
YOU PAY
18 TABLETS
Head & Chest
Cold Tablets
18's
Revco's low, everyday
discount price $2.29
YOU PAY
Cadbury
Thick Candy Bars
Asst.
Revco's low, everyday
discount price
YOU PAY 3 FOR
REVCO C0UP0N�SAVE $2.00
Caprice AMFM
Portable
Radio nfi2i
Revco's low, everyday
discount price $9.99
YOU PAY
WITH THIS COUPON
LIMIT ONE PER COUPON
Coupon expires 111782 at the
Red Banks Rd Revco store only
REVCO C0UP0KSAVE $2.00
Coitair Pistol Power
With Shampoo
1500 watt
Revco's low, everyday
discount price $11.99
YOU PAY f
3��
WITH THIS COUPON
LIMIT ONE PER COUPON
Coupon expires 11782 at the
Red Banks Rd. Revco store only
REVCO COUPON-SAVE $1.00
Northern
Free Style
Brush
Revco's low, everyday
discount price $5.99
YOU PAY
WITH THIS COUPON
LIMIT ONE PER COUPON
Coupon expires 117�2 at the
Red Banks Rd Revco store only
DISCOUNT DRUG CENTERS
m . � � H r �
��BMMMPMpW
mm i�ii m i
11 �. y mm �i i�i. mi �py





Title
The East Carolinian, October 28, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 28, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.226
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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