The East Carolinian, October 26, 1982






Qto iEaat (Earnlttuatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.16
Tuesday. October 26. 1982
Greenville, NX
14 Pages
C irculation Ki.tMMi
Handicap Access
DarryVs Builds Ramp For Wheelchairs
B PATRICK O'NEII I
stall Wrilri
DarryPs 190" restaurant has kept
its promise to I C U's handicapped
students. wheelchair accessibility
ramp has been installed to their
newly constructed sunroom making
the room available to wheelchair
c ustomers.
I as! month a story appeared in
1 M Easl , arolinian reporting that
some oi ECt 's handicapped
students were upset that the local
Darryl's 1W restaurant did not
plan to install the wheelchair ac-
cessibility ramp in the new section
o! the restaurant that was then still
undet construction.
1 he East Carolinian brought the
situation to the attention of Darryl's
cials at theii Raleigh offices. A
promise was made that the ramp
would be promptly installed and this
paper was thanked for bringing the
situation to theii attention
"1 think it's great said ECU
;tory graduate student Rick
Burke, "becuase Darryl's lived up
he i responsibilitN to not onl the
community, but to all of the han-
dicapped population Burke uses a
wheelchair for mobility and is a
regular customer of Darryl's, which
is located next to Slay Dormitory,
where most of ECU's wheelchair
students reside.
"I'm very pleased added ECU
English student Brian Rangeley.
"When they found out the nature of
the problem over there, they jumped
right on it and got it taken care of
Rangeley said that he felt that the
article in The East Carolinian was a
contributing factor in rectifying the
problem.
"They've always been very
helpful to us in trying to find us a
place to sit continued Rangeley,
who also uses a wheelchair. "And I
think they're continuing this effort
to accomodate us by installing that
ramp to the sunroom
Burke praised Darryl's manager
Robert G r i n n e 11 lor being
"especially responsive" to the needs
oi the wheelchair students. "He's
always treated us real well and
bends over backwards � he's real
supportive Burke said.
"All of the guys I've talked to are
very pleased with it added
Rangeley. "When I heard that the
ramp was installed 1 made it a point
to go back over there to eat and see
what it's like
A spokesperson for Darryl's said
he was pleased that the ramp was in-
stalled and that the students were
satisfied. "We do everything we can
to help handicapped people said
the spokesperson.
An apparent misunderstanding
was involved in the original decision
to install the ramp. "The ramp was
in the (construction) plans claim-
ed a local Darryl's employee on
Monday.
In the original news story it was
reported that one of Darryl's
Raleigh officials was unclear about
whether a ramp was in the original
plans or not.
Burke claimed that one of the
local employees of Darryl's voiced
his dissatisfaction with The East
Carolinian's original story claiming
that it was not representative of the
facts.
Homecoming Queen Celia Hancock
Photo Bv STANLEY L��V
Celia Hancock was crowned as ECU'S 1982 Homecoming Queen Saturday The announcement took place at half-
time during the ECU homecoming game against Illinois State I niverity. Both the Pirates and Celia came away
winners.
Tibetan Abbot Speaks On Buddhist Faith, Personal Potential
Bv PATRICK O'NEILL
. jt' W filer
� up ��: more than UK) people.
most �1 " ?m K I students, turned
tsi rhursday night to hear a
ttion given bv a visiting Bud-
monk
I he venerable Abbot Khenpo
karthai Rinpoehe spoke through an
rpreter for about an hour on
Discovering Inherent Qualities of
slligence
1 fie lecture, which was held in
Building, gave a basic
e and introduction to the
. ol the Buddhist faith,
poche spoke ol the need tor
ple to turn more inwardly and
re with the mind. He
described a basic hope ol Buddhists
� b tble to take "whatever may be
a- ng and making it right (and)
whatt ei may be narrow making it
wide He noted that Buddhism was
not only a Tibetan religion, but that
it had "a long history ot presence in
Bn
A
many parts of the world
Rinpoehe said that Buddhism "is
a method that challenges one's in-
herent abilities" and that all human
beings have "inherent richness" and
other positive qualities that could be
utlizied but are often left
undeveloped and unused.
According to Rinpoehe there are
various Buddhist methods that can
be utilized as vehicles to the realiza-
tion and opening up to the
awareness of one's inherent
richness.
"Fame and popularity are not im-
portant, richness and beauties are
not important, sex is not important
what is important is an in-
telligence that recognizes one's
abilities and being able to develop
these abilities Rinpoehe said.
He pointed out that the U.S. is
recognized all over the world for its
technological and material advance-
ment, but that it has not fully
developed a lot of its potential and
i ;
-�. i
Photo Bv DAVE WILLIAMS
m
Abbot Khenpo Karthar Rinpoehe
that the state of mind of people both personally and socially. "This
should be directed towards bringing is only partially happening(in the
peace, happiness, and well being U.S.) Rinpoehe said.
"The problems which we see
around us in the corporal world
such as racism, sexism, destruction
of the environment and the nuclear
dilemma are all a manifestation of
our own inner neuroses said one
ECU student who attended the lec-
ture. "By working on the quality of
our own state of being through
meditation and following Buddrrt
principles we are enhancing the w ell-
being of society and the world
According to Rinpoehe a person
must have a clear, open and stable
mind to begin a Buddhist lifestyle.
"The essence of Buddhism lies in
the practice he said. He also tied
to dispel negative myths that are
often associated with meditation
practices such as those who claim it
is "totally mystical" or tht it turns
vou into a zombie. He said these
ideas were the result of misinforma-
tion and misconceptions.
This was Rinpoche's second visit
to North Carolina and his first visit
to ECU. His trip from his
monastery in Woodstock, N.Y. was
arranged by ECU physics professoi
Dr. Joseph Norwood and sponsored
bv the Departments of Sociology.
Anthropology and Economics.
Philosophy and the Asian Studies
Committee oi ECU.
"It (Rinpoche's visit) went better
than anyone could possibly have ex-
pected, "i thought it went
marvelously weil said Norwood
"1 think the students were highly in-
spired by his visit and we're all
highly gratified
Norwood has known Rinpoehe
for several years and takes periods
trips to his N. . monastery.
Rinpoehe stayed with Dr. Nor-
wood and his family during his four
day visit. Norwood, who is a
member oi Greenville's Tibetan
Buddhist Meditation Center, invites
all interested students to participate
in their activities.
Storm Blasts N.C. Coast With Hurricane Winds
Causes Floods And Damage To Land, Property
Go Home Preppies:
hoto Bv DAVE WILLIAMS
Art students got their revenge on current fashion and tried out halloween
costumes in the annual Beaux Arts Ball held at the Upper Level Friday
night.
CAPE HAT TERAS, (UPI) � An
intense storm packing hurricane-
force winds plodded northward
Monday, leaving behind crippled
boats, demolished beach cottages
and flooding.
High winds and seas began sub-
siding along the North Carolina
coast as the storm slowly moved in-
to Virginia, but Norfolk police said
the Willoughby Spit area was under
as much as four feet of water.
About 60 homes were evacuated by
rescue workers using amphibious
"Duck" vehicles.
Although the Coast Guard
reported a number of distress calls
from boats caught by the storm, one
sailor who rode it out safely in port
was former CBS anchorman Walter
Cronkite, who was in Elizabeth City
w hen winds began kicking up during
the weekend.
"I hadn't planned on spending
this long here he said.
Cronkite had been heading for
Wrightsville Beach, where he plann-
ed to leave his 43-foot sailboat w hile
he covered the November elections
and later return to resume a cruise
to the Florida Keys.
After a night-long search, the
Coast Guard cutter Point Brown
early Monday located a disabled
43-foot sailboat that had been
blown 90 miles by the winds after
losing its mast Sunday morning off
Cape Hatteras.
Storm warnings � one step under
hurricane force � were posted from
Cape Lookout north through
Virginia. Gale warnings remained in
effect from Cape Lookout south.
Winds over 75 mph were reported
at the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-
Tunnel Monday morning and gusts
of 80 to 92 mph were recorded Sun-
day at the Frying Pan Light Tower,
located in the Atlantic Ocean off the
mouth of the Cape Fear River.
The winds pushed waves to 8 to
13 foot levels on beaches and into
the 20-foot range offshore. Tides
were running well above normal
levels.
At Kitty Hawk, authorities
reported 10 oceanfront homes were
destroyed by the pounding surf, and
three others were endangered. The
demolished cottages included two
that were washed out to sea and
three left as wreckage scattered on
the beach.
Further south in the county, N.C.
12 � the only highway link on Hat-
teras Island � was closed because
of flooding from wind-driven seas
and drifting sand.
In New Bern � 40 miles from the
ocean � the Neuse River peaked at
eight feet above normal levels, caus-
ing minor flooding. Tides normally
do not affect the river, but strong
winds pushed it over its banks.
Guests at the Holiday Inn pitched
to move furniture to safety when the
waters threatened to flood the
ground floor. Manager David
Riegel said about a half-inch of
water entered 12 of the 35 rooms
facing the river, but levels in the
parking lot reached 6 inches.
"It came up very slowly Riegel
said, and employees were able to
remove all furniture and carpet
from the rooms. "We probably lost
about 40 square yards of carpet pad-
ding. Everything else was saved
Most guests at the motel were
relocated to second floor rooms, but
two couples asked to be moved to
another motel.
Lloyd Mason, a bndgekeeper at
the drawbridgebinding Cedar Island
to Carteret County, spent Sunday
night at his post because flooding
along U.S. 70 prevented his relief
man from getting to work.
Co-Manager Killed In Robbery
By DARRYI BROWN
�istiini Sr l-difor
The co-manager of the Greenville
A&P Supermarket was shot and
killed Saturday night during a rob-
bery by two masked gunmen, accor-
ding to Greenville Police Chief
Glenn Cannon.
Howard Manning Jr 39, of
Farmville and a co-worker were rob-
bed Saturday about 9:30 p.m. as
they walked from the store in
Greenville Square Shopping Center
to the Branch Banking and Trust of-
fice on Arlington Boulevard to
make a deposit. They were con-
fronted by two men wearing ski
masks and armed with a shotgun
when they arrived at the bank, Can-
non said.
Manning was shot in the ab-
domen after he showed some
resistance to the men when they
demanded money, according to
Cannon. He died at Pitt County
Memorial Hospital about 11 p.m.
from internal bleeding which
resulted from the gun wound, accor-
ding to medical examiner Dr. Stan
Harris. The co-worker was not in-
jured.
The two gunmen were last seen
fleeing from the bank on foot but a
search of the area following the inci-
dent did not turn up any evidence of
the masked men. They escaped with
approximately $21,000 in cash,
checks and food stamps, Cannon
said. Greenville police and the State
Bureau of Investigation are continu-
ing a search for the suspects.
Manning's co-worker ran back to
A&P after the gunmen fled, and
told other store employees to phone
for police and an abulance.
Manning had been co-manager of
the Greenville supermarket for three
years, after working 12 years at the
Farmville A&P Supermarket. He
graduated from Farmville High
School in 1962.
Students Told To Lock Up
By STEVE DEAR
surf V rllf r
"People are making themselves sitting ducks
said Inez Fridley, College Hill Campus Coordinator.
Fridley was referring to two assaults upon female
residents of Belk dormitory in their rooms within the
last month. Both assaults occurred on weekend
nights exactly one week apart in the early morning
hours.
The girls were alone in their rooms, and both had
their doors unlocked.
The attacker, although the two incidents may not
have been done by the same man, searched for a
room that was not only unlocked but had one occu-
pant.
Fridley stated that people from outside the ECU
community are believed to commit many of the more
serious crimes ECU has experienced, such as assault
on students. "Students leave their doors wide open -
people from outside say to themselves 'this is an easy
mark said Fihdley.
"The lock is the safest thing you have to prevent
crime added Joseph Calder, director of the Depart-
ment of Public Safety, in reference to dormitory
crime.
Findley also stressed that students mistakingly
believe they are completely safe from serious crimes
in dorms, adding that male students don't realize
assaults similar to those on the two Belk residents can
happen to them also. "It's not only women that are
the possible victims, it could happen to guys too
added Findley.
Findley urges residents of Scott and Belk dor-
mitories to lock their suite doors as well as their room
doors at night since they are more vulnerable to
criminals because of their outside hallways.






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 26, 1982
A
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
It you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcement column,
please type it on an announcement
form and send it to The East
Carolinian in care of the produc
lion manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications Building
Flyers and handwritten copy on
odd sized paper cannot be ac
cepted
There is no charge for an
nouncements. but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you want
and suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column for publicity
The deadline for announcements
is 3 p m. Monday tor the Tuesday
paper and 3pm Wednesdayy for
the Thursday paper No an
nouncements received after these
deadlines will be printed
This space is available to all
campus organizations and deparl
ments
PHI KAPPA PHI
Toward tne New Millennium
Challenges and Dreams will be
the theme of the eighth annual
ECU Phi Kappa Phi symposium to
be held on campus in early
February, of 83 A call for both
faculty and student papers suppor
tmg this theme, which deals with
the future has been issued in an
ticipation of the new millennium,
papers are invited to deal with a
wide range of topics ranging from
discussions of the near future will
or may hold Faculty are invited,
at this time, to submit abstracts of
approximately one page with a
deadline tor submission of
November 15 Papers selected will
be announced by November 24
Student papers directed toward
the same theme are invited two of
which will be selected for a award
of ilOO each The best student
paper submitted will be included
m the symposium program Both
faculty and student papers are to
be submitted to Dr J W Byrd.
Department of Physics
CO-OP
Duke Power has available a
variety ot co op positions All work
experiences are for alternating
semesters beginning m January or
May 1983 and are located m
Charlotte Any interested students
witn a minimum G P A of 2 0 and
maiormg m Computer Science.
Main. Business Education, Office
Administration, industrial Educa
tion, Industrial Technology.
Chemistry or Environmental
Healtn should contact tne Co op of
tice. ext 6V79
PHI SIGMA PI
Tau Chapter ot Phi Sigma Pi's
national honor fraternity will hold
its pledge meeting October 27 at
SOO p m in 132 Austin. Following
the pledge meeting, a dinner
meeting will be held at Parker's
Barbeque at 6 00 p m All brothers
and pledges are urged to attend
COMMERCIAL
ART
Fashionmodel announcement
dates have been changed, to
November 3 and 4, 7 00 to 10 00
CONGRATS
Congratulations to the Ugliest
man on Campus Gene Gigilo,
representing the big Os Come
by the AOTT house tor your tree
kegi
RACQUETBALL
An organizational meeting is to
beheld in November 2, 1982 at 7.30
in room 105 Memorial gym.
RacquetbaM players and
students interested in learning
how to play are urged to attend
this first meeting. Re activation of
the R ball team is dependent upon
student interest. For more irtfor
maiton call Amanda 752 9193.
ILO
The internaitonal Language
Organization will be meeting on
Wednesday, October 27, 19t2. The
meeting will be held in BC 305 at
3 00 p.m. There will be more
discussion on the Noche Latina
snd the revission of the con
stituiton. All interested persons
are welcome to attend You do not
have to be a Foreign language ma
jor or minor.
T
STUDIES GOT
YOU DOWN?
A two part mini series offered at
NO cost by t he University Counsel
ing Center from 3 4pm, 305 Wright
Annex On Monday, October 25.
"How to Succeed in College and
Still Have Fun' , and on Tuesday,
October 26, "How to Avoid Test
Anxiety" No advance registration
is necessary
SMITHSONIAN
The Smithsonian Institution is
offering 10 week graduate
research appointments in a varie
ty of areas The graduate students
will conduct medividual research
under staff's supervision The sti
pend tor these fellowships is $2000
All interested graduate students
should contact nte Co op off ice, 313
Rawl ext 6979
SAM
The Society tor the Advance
ment ot Management will be
holding a meeting on the 26th of
October at 3 00 m Rawl 104 The
guest speaker will be the president
of the Wall Link Company, Don
Boldt. Mr. Boldt is a Harvard
MBA and will be speaking on the
topic of "The Law ot Personnel
Management According tc Boldt
All members and mtersted guests
are welcome to attend New
memberships will be taken at this
meeting For more information
call 758 5258
NOISE ORDINANCE
There will be a meeting to
discuss Greenville's New propos
ed decibel based noise ordinance
on Wednesday October 27, 1982 in
the multipurpose room, of the
Mendenhall Student Union at 5:00
p.m. All university members and
organizations are welcomed to at
tend.
HEALTH CAREERS
DAY
Nurses, medical techs, physical
therapists, occupational
therapists, social workers, and
slap majors representatives
from various hospitals and health
agencies will be on campus to talk
with you about employment
possibilities! Different
organizaitons will be here on the
following dates November 5
Nursing building 945 1.00 p.m
November 8 Allied Health
Biulding 1 30 4 30 p.m.
Mark your calendar and tell
another friend about this in case
they do not see the announcement.
PSICHI
Psi Chi Initiation will be held at
Mendenhall Multipurpose Room
on October 26 followed by a Wine
and Cheese Social from 7 30 to
�:00 pm for members, new inhates
and their dates Reservations
must be made by October 22 and
Psi Chi Library or calling 756 8495
This Is your chance to meet all the
members and take an active part
in supporting Psi Chi
SCHOLARSHIPS
The School of Art is offering ten
scholarships for undergraduate
art students ot the junior and
senior rank. Eight scholarships
are in the amount of $250 each
Two scholarships, established by
Don and Jack Edwards ot the
University Book Exchange, are in
the amount of $500 each To
qualify, a student must have a
GPA of 3.5 in art, and an overall of
3.0. Slides of five works (name. M
tie. media, and size) must accom
pany the scholarship application
form. Application forms may be
obtained from the School ot Art of
fice. The deadline tor all com
pleted application material is
November 30.
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines. There are 33
units per line. Each letter, punc-
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end of line if word
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac
cepted over the phone We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
75C per line or traction of a line.
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lower case letters.
Kfiurn in Mr III 4 BOIMI) office l�" KASI
CABMHJMIAM �Htwl b 1 p.m. Momta� hrf�r�
lui'da paprr and Wdnr�d�� befnrr n��rd�
puhhtaiiun.
Name
Address.
City State
No. lines
.Zip.
Phone.
at 75� per line $.
No. insertions.
.enclosed
�1 . J11


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PPHA
SIGMA TAU DELTA
English Department faculty and
Sigma Tau Delta members are in
vited to a Halloween Party this
Thursday night. October 28. 8.00
p m at the Tar River Clubhouse
Dates can come too! All party
goers wh wish to participate in the
costume contest must dress up as
a literary character The BEST
costume wms $25 Hope to see you
there!
SKI FLASH
Snowski regisrtation for
Christmas Break Trip will be Nov
9 at 4:00 PM in Memorial Gym 108
A $5 deposit will be accepted to
reserve your space Can Jo
Saunders at 757 6000 if you need
more information
FRISBEE
Learn new disc skins, play
ultimate, or just come to the bot
torn of College Hill Tuesdays and
Thursdays at 4:00 to throw frisbee
and enjoy these remaining
beautiful, warm autumn das
Club meetings are Mondays at
8:00 in MSC, room 248 1982
Natural Light Flying Disc Classic
Video will be shown at the Attic on
Wed. Nov 10
ECU LAW
The ECU Law Society will meet
Thursday evening. October 21 in
room 241 of MSC Guest Lecturer
will be Ms Betsy Warren A'
lornay representing Wake Forest
Law School.
The Preprofesssionai Health
Alliance (PPHA) will have a
meeting this Thursday. October
28.1982 This meeting will be held
at 5 30 P m at the Afro American
Cultural Center All members and
any other interested parties are
urged to attend
ZETA BETA TAU
Congratulations to all the newly
elected officers of Zeta Beta Tau
President Howard Lipman, Vice
President Scott A Sutker,
Tressurer David Denison.
Secretary Thomas W Lanphere,
Rush Chairman Mike Friend
Zeta Beta Tau is looking forward
to a successful year with these
new officers
There will be a meeting Thurs
day October 28 at 6:00 m
Mendenhall Student Center Of
ticers must be present at 5 30 All
members must attend This is
your last chance to be a toundign
father tor ZBT
COMMUNITY
THEATRE
The first meeting of the Com
munity Theatre Group will take
place on Tuesday. October 26 at 7
PM m Rawl 232 Actors, singers,
dancers and technicians welcome.
Experience is nice, but not
necessary A full length musical is
being planned tor Spring.
For more information, call Al
Agate at 758 9474.
CO-OP
The co op office has available an
opportunity witht he Federal Law
Enforcement Training Center in
its Criminal Justice Intern Pro
gram The internship runs from
January 3 through March 11 and is
located in Glynco. Georgia for
more information contact Nancy
Fillnow in the Coop office, ext
6979
PRC MAJORS
Seymour Johnson Air Force
Base in Goldsboro, NC has an
alternating Co op position
available for Spring semester in
the ir recreation department The
position reequires a 2 0 GPA and
you must be willing to work tor
two terms It is an excellent opor
tunity for anyone interested in
gaming valuable work experience
in the area of recreation Salary
approximately $1,000 per month
gross Contact Nancy Fillnow in
the Coop office, 313 Rawl.
757 6979. if you would like to apply
or want more information
TUTOR
Phi Sigma PI, the National
Honor Fraternity is offering tutors
tor a variety of General College
subjects at competitive rates it
you are in need of a tutor can
752 3022 tor more information
CO-OP
Black and Decker in Tarporc
has an opening tor a part me ac
counting clerk "the person mus'
De able to pertorn- miscellaneous
accounting duties such as payng
invoices and general bookkeep
mg Preferred is someone who can
operate a 10 key adding machine
Employment would start as soon
as possible For more into can the
Co op office, ext 6979
HAPPY
HALLOWEEN
We re having a Halloween
Costume Part next Thursday
night. October 28th All parV
goers who wish to partiopa'e in
our costume con'est must dress up
as a literary character The BEST
costume wins $25 Enghs Depar'
ment faculty as wen as members
are cordially invited T.me a"d
piace will be posted later S'aT
tuned'
CO-OP FOR BUSINESS
MAJORS
There are positions available
with the General Accounting Ot
tice as an Evaluation Trainee
Students mus' have completed 75
hours and be available tor two
work periods beginning in the Spr
mg 1983 semester Conversion to
permanent employment alter
graduation would be likely For
more information contact Carolyn
Powell a the Co op office, ext
6979
BAPTIST STUDENT
UNION
HEY1 Do you enioy friendly
fellowship, good friends and food,
and a chance to be yourself m this
"rat race" environmnt at ECU?
Then come join us at the Baptist
Student union where we have din
ners on Tuesdays at 5 30 for only
$1 75 PAUSE on Thursdays at
7 00 tc allow us to take a break
after an almost fulfilling week
and lots ol people lust like you who
erioy others Call 752 4646 if you
have any questions Bob Clyde
campus minister.
EPILEPSY
All Pre Health Professions
students are invited to attend a
seminar on EPILEPSY presented
by Dr Ross Shupmg ot the Green
vitie Neurological Associates at
7 30 p m on Tuesday. October 26.
1982 The Alpha Epsnon Delta
Pleoge meeting will be at 7 00
p m. in Flanagan 307
WOMEN
A meeting for women interested
in forming a chapter of the
American Association of Universi
ty women will be held Thursday.
November 4 at 7 30 p m m the
community room at First
American Savings & Loan
(formerly East Federal Savings 8.
loan) m Greenville
POETRY
CONTEST
Need some extra money' Enter
the REBEL poetry contest and
you could win the $90 first prize,
$70 second prize, or the $40 third
prize Prize money is provived by
the Attic and Budweiser The con
test is open to all current ECU
students, and all entries should be
submitted to the REBEL or Media
Board offices in the publications
building by November 1 Include a
cover sheet with your name, ad
dress ana telephone number Win
ners win be published in the
REBEL and an others will be con-
sidered
FRESHMEN
REGISTER
Freshman Registers may be
picked up m the Buccaneer office
on Tuesdays and Thursdays from
2 00 p m till 5 00 p m. The Buc
caneer Office is located on the se
cond floor of the Publications
Building NOTE: All Freshmen
Registers must be picked up by
October 20 Remember you have
already paid tor this publication,
so why let your money go to waste
PROSE
CONTEST
The REBEL is conducting a pro
se contest, open to all current ECU
students First prize is $125, se
cond prize is $100. and third prize
is $75 Prize money is provided by
the Attic and Budweiser Submit
typed entries to tne REBEL or
Media offices located in the
publications building The
deadline is November 1. so get
busy. The winners will be publish
ed in REBEL '83 and an ohters
will be considered. A copy ot the
rules is posted outside the REBEL
office it you have any questions
BRODY BUILDING
DEDICATION
ECU faculty, staff and students
are invited to a special open house
at the School ot Medicine's Brody
Medical Sciences Building Mon
day. Oct 25 from 3 00 6 00 pm
The tour is one of several speca'
events 'o be held to highlight the
dedication of the school's new $26
million facility
ECU guests will be able to tour
teaching areas and research
laboratories ana see many ot the
buildings special features, m
eluding a biohazards containment
facility Refreshments will be
served
Gov James B Hunt Jr will be
the keynote speaker at the formal
dedication and ribbon cutting on
Oct 29 at 4 00 pm The ECU Wind
Ensemble under the direction of
Prof Herbert L Carter will per
form
Aiso scheduled during dedica
hon week are an open house for
Pitt County Memorial Hospital
employees on Oct 26 and special
continuing medical education pro
gram on calicum antagonists on
Oct 27
CO�OP JOB
Burroughs Wellcome in Green
ville has an alternating Coop posi
tion open in its Validation Depart
ment. The job will be tor two
terms beginning in January, 1983
INDT students with some
background in math, physics,
computers, electricity, and
chemistry and who hav good
writing skiils should contact Nan
cy Fillnow in the Co op office, ext
6979
CHEMISTRY MAJORS
Burroughs Wellcome in
Research Triangle Park has an
alternating co op position open for
a chemistry major. The job will in
volve working with chemistry
researchers and begins in January
1983 running for about Six months.
Ail interested chemistry maiors
with at least two semesters of
organic chemistry should contact
Nancy Fillnow m the Co op office.
ext 6979
CO-OP
The Co op office has a ioo open
ing tor an accounting position
avaibie with a local manufactur
mg firm Requires adding
machine experience and accour
tmg background Interested
students should inquire at the Co
op office located m Raw) at room
313
PHYE MAJORS
All students who plan to declare
physical education as a maior dur
mg change of maior week for the
Fail Semester, should report to
Minges COIiseum from 12 00 2 00
p m on Thursday December 9,
1982 (reading day) for a motor
physical fitness test Satisfactory
performance on this test 'S re
quired as a pre requis.te tor of
ticiai admittance to the physical
education maior program More
detailed information concerning
the test is available by can ng
757 4497
Any student with a medical con
dihon that would contraindicate
participation m the testing pro
gram should contact Dr israei at
757 6497 Examples would include
heart murmurs, congenital hear'
disease or significant
musculoskeletal problems It you
have nay significant medical con
ditions please notify Dr israei
even if you plan to be tested
CADP
The Campus Alcohol and Drug
Program win hold a mee'ing on
October 26 at 5 00 pm in the second
floor conference room of Erwm
Hall Any student intersted in fur
thermg responsible attitudes
toward the use of chemical
substances is encouraged 'o at
tend For more information call
757 4793 Or 757 6649
FRISBEE
Weather permng, we will be
at the bottom ot college niii today,
ana every Tues ana Thurs a"
4 00 Look tor the frisbee c uD "
the Homecoming parade 198;
Natural Light Fly.ng Disc Classic
Video win be shown a' the Ml
Wed Nov 10 Ciub mee'ngs a'e
Monday nights 8 00 -n Venaea:
Room 248 anyone n'erested in
t'iSOee s urged M ae"a
MODELING
The ECU Commercial
Departynent would nxe 'c .nvi'e
an interested persons maai anc
Female M aend our oo
cataloging photo sess-ons 'c be
eio on Wednesday November 3
and Thursday November 4 trorr
7 10 P m in the "gr ng studio 0�
jenx.ns Art Building We w be
photographing and ca'oiog.n
any owe .ntrested -� modeling tor
fashion ads a-s a�:u's A
pi 'Dgrapns ariM be i ec ac
ca'aioge-d tor tu'ure eterence A
�models cosf" wii. be pa a d� 'w
hour tor tnir paropa"
COOP
Par' 'ime ci op tra-ng posi
t rs are ava.aoie "r Bue er
Mtg Cc in Kinsion ese ra
. ocs lions could lead 'c I
time opportunities n Produc'ior
Superv.Sion ProduC'icn Co I
or Purcnas s f e new Buemer
piar in Raieign oegnning June
1983 All "te'eVec INDT maiors
�ac' Nancy F.unow In the Co
f "ce ex' 6970
WOMEN'S RUGBY
Its s'hi not toe iae to p-a�
Anyone nteres'eo n P aying
wemens rubgy neees In 'epc I
pradces Tuesday Ihrv Tursaa
a" 4 DO We pradce ben.nc 'he
Aided Hea" Bei�, bu"d.ng Ab
sdu'eiy nc pre'Ous e�per ence s
'eaj 'ed
WANTED
A Graduate s'uden- or ac� r�
member 'o become an advisor -
the ECU acrcsse cue Piease
can for more informal an a"er
6 00 O'clock 758 6�14 Ask tor NiCk
Pen or Bill Jenk.ns t ng answer
call 758 1418 ai'er t dock a"C ask
fir Brad Brown
POSITION FOR
INDT MAJOR
There IS a" opening with Long
Manufacturing Co tor a Quau'y
Control Supervisor This perma
nent position involves set' g uc
and maintaining a qua! "�
program in Rumania for tractors
manufactured for LOMi The s'ar
�,ng date in immediately and "he
salary is negotiable Con'act Nan
cy Fillnow in the Co op office ext
6979. for more information
The East Carolinian
- - J
vnr 123
Puoi'Sed every Toesda. s
Thursday dur.ng :n acaae� c
,ear anc e.er. WaUHiMTll �
-�g m ver
Tne Eas' Caronn.an is the ct
li( a -ewscaper of Eas-
Carolina uW verv'y aatiwd
operate- anc OuB' s"c ,cr arc
d, me stwowrrts a Eas' Carol.na
Univers '�
Subscription Rate 20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located m 'he Old South
Building on the campus ot ECU
Greenville N C
POSTMASTER Sena aocress
changes 10 T-e Eas" Carolinian
Old 5oo� Building. ECU Green
v.lie NC 27834
Telephone
757 6346 6367,6309
ujfmammj
J. A. UNIFORMS
SHOPS
Bring this ad for
10 OFF
on the purchase of
one of our lab coats!
All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes, shoes,
and hose. Also � used ECU nurses
uniforms. Trade-ins allowed.
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive.
Near Hollowell's Drug and old hospital.

�F W:
PEK1KG CUPPER
Elegance in
Unisex Hairstyling
C jII for appointment at 758-1505
KOH-I-NOOR
RAPIDOGRAPH
Specie! limi-ed-Time
Offer
Buy a 4-pen set and save 35
Regular retail value-$46.75
You pay only $29.95
The best of RAPIDOGRAPH
Technical Pen tor all graphic arts
and drafting applications:
Hungate's
Technical Pen
Pm PluaS C
GREENVILLE. NC
Long Leaf Mall
WILMINGTON. N.C
ARTS � CRAFTS � HOBB.ES
CrabtrecNalko Mall
RALFIGH. NC
Northgatc Mall
DURHAM. NC
Located 12 mile from ECU at 1005-A Hamilton St.
PJLzzalxui
Greenville's Best Pizzas Are
Now Being Delivered!
Most delivery pizzas lack in
true quality and have'hidden'
delivery costs in the price-
Pi ZZ A INN has changed
��WME����i�m�aqat
all that!
We sell our delivery
pizzas at Menu Prices!
No Surcharge. We also
give FREE Drinks with
our large and giant
pizzas. TRY US TODAY!
CALL 758-6266 Greenville Blvd.
Travel
with
ECU
to the
Big
Apple
Nov. 24-Nov. 28,1982
Spend your Thanksgiving holiday in style on Broadway,
at Macy's Parade, shopping, A touring the city. Space is
limited A time is drawing near. For more info, contact
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Center.
Tuesday, Wednesday
& Thursday
POPCORN
SHRIMP
$295
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad may be substituted
for Slaw .35c extra
� -





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 21.1982
s

�n 1
Brains Sent To Wash
s
CHAMPAIGN, IL
(CPS) � Someone left
a bag full of 22 human
brains in the laundry
room of a University of
Illinois fraternity
house, and no one yet
knows exactly whose
brains they are.
Sophomore Paul
Gerding opened his
laundry bag several
weeks ago to find the
brains where he
thought his dirty
clothes would be. In
something of an in-
stinctive reaction, he
pitched the bag into an
alley behind the Acacia
fraternity house, where
he lives, before calling
the police.
University police in-
vestigator Charles
Moore says the "case
has been solved" since
then, and charges have
been filed against a
group of students
thought to be responsi-
ble for snatching the
brains from a research
lab and putting them in
the laundry room.
Moore refused to name
the group.
Group members did
appear before a
disciplinary board last
week, but no penalty
has been imposed.
reports John Scouffas,
assistant vice
chancellor of student
affairs.
Scouffas adds that,
in his view, the case
isn't fully solved yet.
The group � another
fraternity, some believe
� has taken respon-
sibility for the theft and
placement of the
brains, but Scouffas
says the individual
"ring leaders are not
known
Acacia member John
Holliday says Acacia
has "reason to believe
it was another fraterni-
ty, but it would be un-
fair to accuse anyone
Holliday notes the
incident occurred dur-
ing a period when
pledges, on their way to
a special weekend,
often pull pranks on
their brothers. Holliday
speculates pledges from
another house simply
chose Acacia this time.
"We're not angry.
No harm was done. No
one is angry. It's a
joke
Indeed Scouffas,
Moore and Champaign
Det. Gary Wright all
chuckled when discuss-
ing the case.
Scouffas says the
most serious aspect of
the case is the theft of
the brains. Officials are
still unsure from which
lab they were stolen.
"We think they got
them from our medical
center
Then "they probably
dropped them in
through a window" at
Acacia, which Scouffas
is confident won't
retaliate for the stunt.
Holliday is less confi-
dent. Asked if members
had plans to try to top
the prank, he said they
"had thought about
it
? ��
Computers In Class XTlTIC
Is Symposium Topic
The use of
microcomputers in the
teaching of history and
social studies is the
focus of the 18th an-
nual East Carolina
University Symposium
on History and the
Social Studies Oct. 29.
The event is planned
as a conference for
secondary school
teachers of history and
social studies and is
sponsored by the ECU
Department of History.
Featured speaker is
Dr. Mark Rothman, a
faculty member at the
Paul D. Schreiber High
School, Port
Washington, N.Y and
the C.W. Post Center
of Long Island Univer-
sity.
Dr. Schreiber is
author of several
reports and teaching
materials dealing with
microcomputer ap-
plications and has serv-
ed as consultant to the
Montgomery County,
Maryland, school
system on computer ap-
plications in the social
sciences.
His symposium topic
is "Microcomputer Ap-
plications in the Social
Studies
Other speakers are
members of the ECU
faculty:
"Microcomputers in
the Social Studies: An
Introduction Hugh
Wease of the history
faculty;
"Microcomputers: A
Resource for
Teachers John War-
ren of the English
faculty;
"Microcomputers in
History Instruction
Dale Light of the
history faculty and
"Introduction to
Microcomputing
Skills Katye Sowell
of the mathematics
faculty.
Also appearing on
the program will be
ECU Chancellor John
Howell and professors
Walter Calhoun,
William Cobb and Fred
Ragan of the history
department.
Persons interested in
attending the sym-
posium may secure fur-
ther information and
registration forms from
the Department of
Historv, ECU Green-
ville, N.C. 27834.
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2Ur �afit (Earnltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, n . . rru w
Mike Hughes, wtmmmmsm
WAVERLY MERRITT, Dtm tor �J Advents, ClNDY PLEASANTS, Sports Edttor
Robert Rucks, ���.� mmw Greg Rideout, ��
ALl AFRASHTEH, Cred-i Uunaxer STEVE BACHNER, Entertainment Editor
Stephanie Groon. 0nto,vaw Juliana Fahrbach, stvtetd.tor
JONI GUTHRIE, Tethnuat SuperMsor MlKE DAVIS, Production Manager
October 26, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Warren County
Governor Overlooking PCB Threat
It was almost as if the Warren
County protestors' message of the
past six weeks had gone completely
unheeded. In Monday's
newspapers, state officials were
quoted as saying they hope the
demonstrators will "bury the hat-
chet" when the PCB landfill in Al-
ton is sealed next month. To them,
the controversy's as simple as that.
But it's hardly likely that that view
is shared by those on the other side
of the fence.
It's hardly likely.
At the risk of sounding incredibly
repititious, it should nonetheless be
noted that the Hunt administration
established the PCB landfill in Af-
ton before conclusive scientific
evidence has proven the relative
safety or danger of the chemical in
relation to humans. Although they
(state officials) seem to like to
downplay that aspect of the dump-
ing, it is still � and always will be
� the paramount consideration.
PCB is a toxic chemical that has
been linked to cancer in laboratory
animals. That much is readily
known � by doctors and officials
alike.
Unfortunately, we Americans
have become more or less immune
to initial reports and indications
from medical labs. What was once
overwhelming news is now virtually
commonplace. "Everything
nowadays causes cancer anyway
right?
Well, as ironic, even ridiculous,
as that cliche may seem, our state
officials seem to have taken it to
heart.
They sincerely believe that once
the proverbial lid is placed on the
contaminated soil, the concentra-
tion of marches and protests �
which have by now become routine
� will diminish shortly thereafter.
Somehow it just seems too easy.
Especially when most of the
outspoken civil rights leaders in-
volved in the controversy have vow-
ed to continue putting pressure on
the Hunt administration to remove
the dump. "That dump stands for a
symbol of discrimination, Ken Fer-
ruccio (president of Warren County
Citizens Concerned About PCB)
said last week at a rally. "It sym-
bolizes just about everything civil
rights legislation is supposed to pre-
vent. It has to go
Nevertheless, officials say that
the 20-acre landfill should be per-
manently sealed within the next four
weeks, pending completion of soil
deliveries from 243 miles of con-
taminated N.C. highways and from
Fort Bragg.
But apparently so as not to leave
Warren County residents "up in the
air gallant attempts have been
made to calm the crowds. Gov. Jim
Hunt, after finally agreeing to meet
with angry protest leaders two
weeks ago, promised that he would
diligently pursue detoxification of
the dumpsite.
The outraged public also received
consolation from O.W. Strickland
(head of the Solid and Hazardous
Waste Branch of the N.C. Division
of Health Services), who explained
that the site will be monitored
periodically, and "if any PCB is
detected (leaking from the top or
bottom of the Afton landfill), it will
be pumped out and taken to another
landfill that has been approved for
the disposal of PCB
But if the whole thing's just that
simple, then why have 500 marchers
already been arrested? And why do
they continue to show by the hun-
dreds to demonstrate? Don't they
know there's nothing to worry
about? Don't the people realize that
the men working at the dumpsite are
only wearing those "moon suits" as
a precautionary measure?
Well, maybe it's that easy to the
state officials who would apparently
say anything to quell an angry
crowd. But at least one legitimate
expert disagrees.
He is Albert R. Hanke, project
officer for the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency.
Hanke says that detoxification or
removal of cantaminated soil from
the Afton PCB dump is highly
unlikely. He emphasized that no
such project has ever before been
done.
"The Warren County landfill is
not engineered for any such pro-
cedure as detoxification Hanke
told the News and Observer last
week. "Once you put something in
a landfill, you don't take it out
Of course, this latest difference of
opinion between fast-talking state
politicians and a federal expert
strikes up yet another dilemma for
the residents of Warren County.
Just who do we believe? A man
more concerned with his future in
politics or one who has supervised
EPA chemical disposal projects in
at least six other states?
But, then again, our own gover-
nor and his staff certainly wouldn't
lie to us about something as poten-
tially deadly as PCBs, would they?
mm &esry0�soF wuk t sevavi ime wnts
WHO OWNfcA DIAMOND MlNEfcor WI &T ANVTHING?
I Mm the we throws anwfWMOWCAse
'Your Vote Does Make A Difference'
'82 Elections Big On Issues
I've long felt amtmalent about oting.
So often � nearly always, actually �
casting a ballot comes down to choosing
the lesser of two evils. Nearly always, I
take a deep breath, decide which
Demopublican or Republicrat will cause
the lesser harm to me and mine, pull the
lever, exhale slowly and walk out from
behind the curtain feeling diminished.
If you are one of the millions ot
Americans who don't vote because you
don't think voting makes any difference, I
understand. We both know that public
policy is often the result of deals cut in
secret between powerful special interests.
We know that money and mediabhtzes,
not integrity, often carry precincts. In the
face of that knowledge, casting a ote
seems almost quaint, like sipping a cherry
phosphate at a computer fair.
Yet I'll be voting this Nov. 2, for reasons
both rational and emotional. Why? Partly
because I'm excited about some of the
issues this fall, partly because I believe
1982 is a transitional year � not a sweep-
ing, revolutionary one, certainly � but a
pivotal year. The results of next month's
congressional, state and local elections will
do much to mold the shape of our
domestic economy in a time of recession
and determine the thrust of American
foreign policy in a time of great interna-
tional conflict.
In Berkeley, California, where I live, the
municipal election is largely a referendum
on residential and commercial rent control
laws passed by the voters last spring.
Because 1 believe that rent control is the
only thing keeping Berkeley from sucumb-
ing to acute toxic gentrification
(symptoms: two croissants in every pot, a
boutique in every abandoned factory), 1
will vote for candidates sworn to uphold it.
Moreover, local elections anywhere are
those in which voting is most likely to
make a difference. The issues are concrete,
and the winning candidates are relatively
accessible � and, therefore, accountable
� to the people who elect them.
My congressional district is fortunate to
have as an incumbent Ron Dellums, one of
the few unwavering voices of reason in the
House of Representatives. For years,
Dellums has fought against militarism and
for equitable social policies. He gets my
vote. In the Senate race, it's Governor
Campus Forum
Gospel According To Mickey?
Editor's Note: The following letter is a
self-proclaimed "modern parallel" to
the 13th chapter oj Paul's letter to Cor-
inth.
Now, I will show you the ways that we
have not surpassed those before us. If
we have the technology to advance to
higher levels of civilization but do not
share with the world, we are but hoar-
ding capitalists, a selfish monstrosity. If
we have the gift of freedom, and, with
full knowledge, understand that respon-
sibility, yet we build and stockpile
massive, destructive, immoral nuclear
weapons to keep this freedom with the
cost of social and human deprivation to
the rest of the world, we are only fooling
ourselves. If we have an adundance of
both monetary and environmental
wealth, with the capabilities to put food
in every person's stomach and
knowledge at every person's fingertips,
but instead choose false priorities, have
we not, in fact, regressed?
Freedom is opportunity; the oppor-
tunity for everyone to become unequal.
Freedom is there for everyone, whether
poverty-stricken or not; it sees not the
inequality it often creates. Freedom is
never wrong. The end always justifies
the means. It never puts the burden on
those too weak to carry for the few en-
compassing populas it serves; neither
does it brood on the social cost of our
philosophy of Social Darwinism. We do
not rejoice in the fact that 50,000 people
will die of starvation today, but rather
with brainwashing rhetoric that we need
more and more nuclear bombs to secure
our freedom so we can feed ourselves.
There is no limit to our insight, our
righteousness heirarchy of priorities, our
phobic reactions to communism,
socialism and the power of the Pen-
tagon.
Social injustice never ends.
Technology will continue to advance;
the gift of freedom will be protected
with yet thousands more nuclear
weapons. But will we ever be able to
solve the real attrocities of this life?
Technology will peak; computers do
break down. When the perfect computer
is designed, human unemployment will
peak at revolutionary heights. Two
thousand years ago, when the human
race was younger, we had the same
underlying problems: social injustice, in-
equality and a false sense of priorities.
As we have grown up 2,000 years, we see
we have advanced so little. Now, we see
indistinctly � if we look � as in a mir-
ror; only then can we see face to face.
Are we really free now? And have we
really progressed? There are, in the end,
three things that last: poverty, social in-
justice and the military budget. And the
greatest of these is our acceptance of
them.
Mickey Skidmore
Junior, Social Work
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from foyner Library.
Moonbeam for me. Jerry Brown is an op-
portunist, but he is not a clone of Ronald
Reagan, like his opponent. Brown should
be a lively, thought-provoking presence on
Capitol Hill.
I've saved the most important things �
the arms race and the economy � for last.
David Armstrong
American Journal
Nearly one-fourth of the American peo-
ple will have a chance to vote on the pro-
posed Bilateral Nuclear Weapons Freeze
on Nov. 2. It is crucial to the prospects for
peace that the freeze resolutions win, and
win big. No one seriously expects Ronald
Reagan and Leonid Breznev to scrap their
missiles on Nov. 3 if the resolutions pass;
they are non binding. But the freeze resolu-
tions are essential tools for sending a
message to the men at the top. Namely,
that we, the people, have had enough of
their nuclear brinksmanship, that we want
jobs and peace instead of the arms race,
and we are capable of organizing on a
massive scale to make our feelings known.
That brings us to the bottom line. The
congressional elections are, in effect, a na-
tionwide referendum on Reaganomics.
Democrats attack President Reagan for
starving social services, fattening the
military budget and presiding over double-
digit unemployment. Republican
counterattack, charging that the
Democrats got us into this mess and offer
no workable alternatives. Both are correct
That is why I am looking at third partv
alternatives to the fat cats in Washington
and the fat cats in exile. In California. I
plan to vote for several candidates of the
Peace and Freedom Party, a coalition of
feminists, peace activists and minorities
that posits community control of public
policy as an alternative to corporate high-
balling. The Citizens Party, which ran Dr
Barry Commoner for president in 1980.
occupies a similar place on the political
spectrum in many states.
What are the chances of victory for third
party candidates? Slim and none, for most
of them. However. I second Eugene Debs'
remark that, "I would rather vote for
something I want and not get it than for
something I don't want and get it
Besides, if my intuition about this year is
correct � if 1982 is a transitional year in
American politics � then the seeds of this
fall's third party campaigns may blossom
in a future spring.
That's why I'm going to the polls this
vear. See vou there?
Two More I Forgot To Write About
WHAT 15 THE WORST PROBLEM
UIMMY CARTER LEFT US WITH P
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UNEMPLOYMENT INFLATION
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T HE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 26. 1982 5
l
Ihe
i
ms
Ire
!
:
im
Authority To Speak
On the Soviet Use
Of Yellow Rain'
By KEITH BRITAIN
Stall Writer
On Wednesday Nov.
3, a well-known
authority on chemical
warfare will be at ECU.
Dr. James A. Phillips
will be giving talks at
Mendenhall Student
Center room 244 at 3
p.m. and in room 244
at 7:30 p.m.
Phillips, a policy
analyst for the Heritage
Foundation, has done
extensive research on
the Soviet Union's use
of chemical warfare. In
the talk he will be
discussing the topic
"Yellow Rain
"Yellow rain" is
composed of a lethal
chemical known as
tricot hecene mycotox-
m. Phillips and U.S. in-
telligence sources claim
that Russia has
employed the use of
Yellow Rain in Laos,
Kampuchea and
Afghanistan.
Reports of the in-
cidents began in 1976
with Soviet-sponsored
attacks against the
Hmong tribesmen in
Laos. U.S. intelligence
has been able to recover
samples from the
jungles despite efforts
to cover them with
Napalm, according to
the State Department.
Dr. Phillips states
that the Soviets have
been using the
mycotoxin in
Afghanistan because
the anti- communist
rebels are hard to
using conven-
weapons. The
"hole up" in
and using
the" yellow rain"
enables the Soviets to
bring them out of
hiding.
The use of chemicals
in warfare has been
prohibited for over 50
years. The 1972
Biological Warfare
Convention, agreed to
by Moscow, states,
"Never in any cir-
cumstances to develop,
produce, stockpile or
otherwise acquire
chemicals for the use of
warfare He main-
tains that the Soviet
Union has not only
defeat
tionai
rebels
c a e s
broken the agreement
but has made chemicals
a part of Soviet warfare
doctrine.
In 1981, the Reagan
administration and the
United Nations
demanded an investiga-
tion of the alleged
Soviet use of chemical
warfare. Moscow
repeatedly tried to
block formation of the
impartial U.N. Nations
Commission to in-
vestigate the situation
in Laos, Kampuchea
(formerly Cambodia)
and Afghanistan.
The talk will be spon-
sored by ECU'S chapter
of the N.C. Federation
of College
Republicans. The lec-
ture is part of a series
of talks given by
Phillips in an attempt
make the public aware
of chemical warfare.
The fusarium fungus
producing the
mycotoxins thrives on
grain and bread expos-
ed to cold. Soviet scien-
tists began studying the
fungus as early as 1930.
Thirty-five years later
they were able to con-
vert the fungus into the
present weapon. A
member of the State
Department was recent-
ly quoted echoing a
statement brought
forth in the Phillips ar-
ticle. "With their own
people starving, I can't
believe the Russians are
growing a fungus on
badly needed wheat to
use as an implement of
war
The population of
the Hmong people has
dropped by one-fifth
since 1960. At least
20,000 are thought to
have died from the
chemicals.
Many of the
tribesmen still suffer
from recurrent attacks
including constant
headaches, pulmonary
disorders and eye or ear
problems. At least
thirty-five Hmong
adults in the U.S. have
died suddenly in their
sleep for no apparent
reason. Similar pro-
blems have been
reported with the
Afghans and Kam-
pucheans.
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 1
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
$lgS 00 Pregnancy Test, Birth
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Number MO-ttl 2S4�) between �
AM and 5 P M. Weekday.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N.C.
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THt t AS1 CAROl INIAN
CXTOBER26. 1982
Weapons Cost Called Wasteful By Study
By PATRICK O'NEILL
More than one
million dollars per
minute is being spent
on the military
worldwide and nuclear
stockpiles exceed
50,000 weapons, accor-
ding to a study con-
ducted by a coalition of
arms control groups.
The study, "World
Militarv and Social Ex-
penditures, 1982
ctarges that nuclear
and conventional arms
races have wasted
resources without
enhancing international
security.
Present nuclear
stockpiles represent the
equivalent of 3.5 tons
of TNT for every per-
son on earth, more
than one million times
the explosive power of
the Hiroshima bomb,
the study reported.
"Under its heavy
military burden, the
global economy has
suffered said Ruth
Leger Sivard, the
author of the study.
"The diversion of
resources from civilian
needs is a silent killer,
curbing productivity
and development and
adding more millions to
the hundreds of
millions of people who
lack the most basic
necessities of life
Sivard is the director
of the non-profit
research organization
called World Priorities.
She is a former chief of
the economics division
of the U.S. Arms Con-
trol and Disarmament
Agency.
The report, which us-
Greenville Residents Protest
Nuclear Weapons At Base
ed information sup-
plied by the Pentagon,
the CIA, United Na-
tions organizations and
several internationl
publications, claimed
that:
� World military costs
have risen to $600
billion a year � well
over $1 million a
minute
� The world's nuclear
weapons stockpile is
equivalent to 16 billion
tons of TNT (In World
War II, 3 million tons
of munitions were ex-
pended).
� Spending per soldier
averages $19,300
worldwide.
� For every 100,000
people, there are 556
soldiers. An estimated
100 million people
worldwide are engaged
directly or indirectIv in
military activities.
� Nuclear missiles can
go from Western
Europe to Moscow in
six minutes.
� NATO and Warsaw
Pact forces have a total
of 100,000 tanks.
� Although no nuclear
holocaust has occurred,
at least 10 million peo-
ple hae died in "local
wars" since World War
II. and more civilians
than soldiers have been
the victims.
The report claims
that the Soviet Union
and the United States.
representing 11 percent
ol the world's popula
tion, have spearheaded
and shaped the global
militarv competition
since 194
The two superpowers
"lead in the develop-
ment and refinement ot
new torms ol war-
tare it says. "Ihev
spend half the world's
militarv budget, export
58 percent of the arms
moving in international
trade and control V
percent of the world's
stockpile o nuclear
weapons
"The crux ot the
stud) is that it's human
madness to utilize so
much of our energv and
resources for creating
destructive equipment
instead ot meeting
esential human needs
said Norman Wait
man. a research
associate with World
Priorities. "Our securi-
ty is really being com-
promised by the arms
race and the build up
ot both conventional
and nuclear weapon-
"I think it's impoi
tant tor the students ot
East Carolina to in-
form themselves ot the
nature o t nuclear
power and the extent ot
world monetarv invest
ment that goes into
weapons production
and military research
continued Waitman
"They should take an
active part in whichever
way thev .an to ht
forestall the arm-
build-up
I he -rrr,s oi
Association, the In
s 111 u i e for W
( �:J e r. the Pea
I firough I a a I Juj
tion Fund.
Rockefeller Foun
tion. I he Stanley, F our.
dation and the I n
ot Concerned Socnii
were the Ann-
groups that spo-
the "
I reign .
volved included Pi
Ploughshai
iC anadat. I he H' I
mncil of '
the L nsted N �
ssocation 1 v-
B PATRICK O'NEILL
SMI' Vtrtlci
A group o Green-
ville residents including
students, staff and
faculty members of
ECU joined the North
Carolina Peace Net-
work (NCPN) in their
continuing series of
nuclear weapons pro-
tests at the gates ot
Seymore Johnson Air
Force Base in
Goldsboro.
NCPN claims that
nuclear weapons are
possibly kept on the
base property, but
Seymore Johnson of-
ficials will neither con-
firm nor deny the
presence ol the nuclear
warheads because they
-ay that all information
regarding U.S. nuclear
weapons is classified.
According to Sister
Marge Grabarek. a
member ot the Peace
Network Steering Com-
mittee, there are still
14 Air Force jets kept
at the base that are
capable ot carrying
nuclear weapons.
The classification of
the base is "category
I" despite the removal,
last month, of Seymore
Johnson's B-52 bomber
wing.
Category I indicates
that Seymore Johnson
is one of the primary
targets in the event of a
nuclear attack. B-52's
are known to be used
primarily to carry
nuclear warheads.
"That indicates to
me that they probably
still have nuclear
weapons there
Grabarek said. She is
also the director ot the
Peace and Justice of-
fice of the Catholic-
Diocese of Raleigh.
The group stood with
signs on a grass median
about 50 yards from
the entrance to the
base. Passing motorists
generally showed little
reaction or ignored the
demonstrators. Some
would react with ap-
preciative thumbs-up
signals while others ex-
hibited facial signs of
anger and would shout
negative remarks at the
group.
One series of three
signs held by a group of
ECU students read
"No Nuclear
Weapons " USA-
USSR" and "Save
Goldsboro One
Catholic nun held a
sign proclaiming
"Thou shalt not
nuke
"I decided it was
time that I stopped
thinking about the
potential atrocity of
nuclear war and began
to take action to assure
a safer world said
ECU computer science
student Mary Rider,
who participated in the
one-hour vigil.
"It's immoral to
have nuclear
weapons Grabarek
added. "It's immoral
even to threaten to
kill
"A lot ot students
live in a microcosm of
school and fail to even
look beyond the books
to the real world con-
tinued Rider. "We
need to be aware of our
responsibilities to make
our world a peaceful
one, because if there's a
nuclear war, the books
don't matter
anymore
Grabarek claimed
that the present process
of dialogue between the
U.S. and the Soviet
Union on nuclear arms
reductions is not effec-
tive. "I think we should
begin a serious and
honest process to devise
some way of getting rid
of the nuclear weapons
� otherwise they will
get rid of us
Grabarek said.
"The potential threat
of nulcear war over-
shadows everything we
do added Rider. "If
we don't take action (to
stop the arms race) then
eventually our world is
going to end
Reagan Reported On By ACLU
B PATRICK O'NKII I
st�f Wrilrr
The head of the
American Civil Liber-
ties Union accused the
Reagan administration
of "ideological opposi-
tion to civil liberties
and said that the ad-
ministration and its
supporters in Congress
had been responsible
for "the most
dangerous threats to
civil liberties" in recent
years.
Ira Glasser, the ex-
ecutive director of the
national public interest
organization that
defends the Bill ol
Rights, made his ac-
cusation in an introduc
tion to a 60-page report
the organization issued
titled "Civil liberties
in Reagan's America
Glasser said that, in
some ways the Reagan
administration posed a
greater danger to Civil
Liberties than former
U.S. Sen. Joseph Mc-
Carthy or President
Richard Nixon, two ol
the organization's most
frequent targets from
earlier decades. The
term "McCarthyism"
came about as a result
of the Wisconsin
senator's claims m the
1950s that many 1 S
government organiza-
tions were heavily in-
filtrated by com-
munists.
"Those men were
not ideologically com-
mitted to making tun-
damental changes in
our legal structure
said Glasser
"But tor this ad-
ministration con-
tinued Glasser. "the
erosion ol the Bill ol
Rights seems to be a
primary goal, not a side
effect
The report reviewed
the status of civil liber-
ties in 20 categories in-
cluding criminal
justice, national securi-
ty, political dissent,
abortion and women's
rights.
"One ol the pnn-
sipal undercurrents in
Reagan's America is a
hostility towards
women which is mask-
ed as a nostalgic de
mand tor a way ol life
based on traditional
tamily value the
report said.
"1 very often feel
that when the president
interferes with civil
liberties, he doesn't
u ridersta
f his
tions or
said Fr�
Jacobson
democratic �nt
candidate foi th v-
i "It
unawareness
frightens m�
he's supp �ed

Blood Drive On Campus
ECU's -ir Force
ROTC detachment 6�
is sponsoring a blood
drive to be conducted
on campus today and
tomorrow. Students
wishing t o donate
blood should go to
Mendenhall Student
Center. Room 244. bet-
ween 10 a.m. and 4
p.m.
According :i
AFROTC spokesper-
son, Detachment 6 �
has been assisting the
Red Cross with bK
drives since 1951. In the
last decade, more than
XX) pints ol bl
have been collected
campus, and the drives
supply a large percen-
tage of the blood need
ed in Pill I
rne AFROTC

enef it nee
"
i
��
"
the FF
Ho: �rsS netv cho .
ABORTIONS
App'ts Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1-800-321 0575
Gi lij ay. o 1 a)u-i-d
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LJ Ove- '00 O � ��r, n
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KESKAKCH PAPERS-
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Ittf
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Halloween
Sidewalk
Sale
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SALE ITEMS:
ECU plaques, gift books, sweaters,
ECU pitchers, shirts, stadium
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much more loo numerous
to list.
We feature the best in Video Entertainment
1 group of spec, pure hose
T-shirts ot $3.95 whilo
they lost. Many more
bargains you'll be dying
to take advantage of.
?YOUR FORTUNE TOLD FREE
BY MADAME ZOLA
?DRAWING FOR FREE PRIZES
?Apple bobbing and
balloon popping for
an extra discount
10C
pepsfs
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 27
8:30 A.M. 4:00 P.M.
ON THE SIDEWALK BETWEEN RAWL AND WRIGHT BLDG.
RAIN DATE OCT. 28
STUDENT SUPPLY STOREL
jjfl East Carolina University jEa
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Tuesday � Ladies' Day � All Ladies Receive 2 Free Games (13 yr. or older)
Wednesday � High School Day � Show High School ID for 2 Free Games
Thursday � Men's Day � All Men Receive 2 Free Games (13 yr. or older)
Friday � College Day � Show College ID for 2 Free Games
Saturday � Elementary School Day � Any Student Ages 7 14 Receives 2 Free Games
Sunday � Family Day � Any Young Person With Parent Receives 2 Free Games
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'





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THE EAST C AROl INIAN
Entertainment
CXTOBER 26. I82
Pa�ie ?
On Halloween?
No, Not Men,
Devo In 3-D!
'
� 'r'v
' - I- V
. ' v vV' v'?
The Student Union Special Con-
certs Committee will venture into a
new programming medium this
Saturday night, Halloween eve.
when the committee presents Deo
live in concert via satellite from the
Beverly Hills Theatre.
The concert, sponsored in con
junction with the Campus Enter-
tainment Network, will be held in
Wright Auditorium at 10 p.m.
In addition, the concert will be
broadcast to Wright Auditorium in
3-D. Glasses for the 3-D viewing will
be available at the door on the even-
ing of the event. Opening for Devo
on the ticket is new band Wall of
Voodoo.
Devo, those five musical spuds
from Akron, Ohio, are living proof
that new pleas are often met with
fear and resistance. It's been four
years since they burst on the scene
with their debut album, O: Are e
not men? A: N e are Devo and that
outrageously reworked version ot
, vWn B- x version oi
:V? 'since then, the group has
fr? �;rvo7Vw OcVViSK'ZYJS&XkVJ Ctf&WASW E& Z OHK 7. � - ,K developed into a powerhouse rock
Live Devo spuds will be leaping from a 40-foot video screen this Saturday night in Wright Auditorium. Wall of Voodoo, loo.
unit, with a highly original stage
show. By fusing basic rock and roll
with a funky back beat. Devo's per-
formances blister with unique
energy. They are as uplitting, ex-
citing and danceable as any contem-
porary band.
The concept behind this show is
brand new and the production
technology is currently only
available on about titteen campuses
across the country. According to
University Unions Program Direc-
tor Ken Hammond. East Carolina
University is helping to pioneer new
entertainment concepts which are
certainly the wave of the future
The technology is made available
by the New York-based Campus
Entertainment Network The Net-
work is operating on the premise
that it can deliver top attractions in
music, theatre, sports, as well as
major lectures, via satellite to col-
lege markets at the time the events
are occurring at only half the price.
This makes it possible con-
tinued Hammond, "for a school
such as ECU, which would not nor-
mally be able to attract the top per-
See DEVO, Page 9
Artists For Survival Aim Straight For Heart
By PATRICK O'NEILL
sl�IU rllcr
"We hope to reach people emotionally through the
language of art, and to educate them about the arms
race. Our exhibitions include works expressing our hor-
ror of war, and also those with a vision of peace and
joy.
The above is a quote from the statement ot purpose
of a new organization called Artists for Survivial, which
began last winter in the New England town of Waltham,
Massachusetts.
The organization, which now claims 240 members,
was founded by two Waltham artists who saw a need to
integrate their art work with what has now become an
international effort to reverse the nuclear arms race.
"Art through the ages has reacted to life and been an
expression of life said one of the founders of Artists
For Survival Suzanne Hodes "and since life itself is
threatened, certainly artists should be concerned
"And in addition, art has been a means of com-
munication from one age to another, and if there is a
threat to our future then art loses all purpose
Hodes, who is a v ter and a printmaker, calls
herself an "expressionist artist She joined together
with Mitchell Kamen, who also paints and works with
batik and ceramics, to form the organization last
February.
"We have both been dealing with the threat of
nuclear war in our individual work Hodes said. She
added that she often tries to create art forms that deal
with social and political issues.
She and Kamen decided to exhibit their work together
as a social statement on the threat of nuclear war, and
soon after their first exhibit. Artists for Survival was
born.
Hodes said that she and Kamen were inspired during
a nuclear freeze rally in Boston where they encountered
a group of musicians calling themselves Musicians
Against Nuclear Arms. They felt that artists could also
make a statement.
"We decided that we would exhibit our work on the
threat of nuclear war along with information about the
arms race Hodes said. "We thought that art was a
very good means of reaching people on the emotional
level
That first exhibit appeared in the Harvard Medical
School Countway Library in March of this year. Hodes
said that a Boston Globe story.referred to "an organiza-
tion" of artists which at the time was only her and
Kamen.
But soon after the word got out calls and letters came
in from other artists, and the numbers grew.
Other exhibits soon followed including one in the of-
fice of Massachusetts senator Paul Tsongas and another
at the "345 Gallery" in New York City. At present, the
group has members with work on exhibit at a show at
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Local fabric artist Charlotte Purrington, who found
out about Artists For Survival, by sending a letter to
Helen Caidicott, the founder of Physicians for Social
Responsibility, also has one of her pieces on exhibit at
the MIT show.
Artists For Survival also provides information, fact
sheets, quotations from religious, scientific, and
political leaders, photographs, pamphlets and books to
its members and other interested people. "We urge
viewers to involve themselves in action to stop the arms
race the statement of purpose continues.
Hodes said that the group held its first formal
meeting in April and that 35 people came. Most of their
members are in the New England area and Hodes says
that her and Kamen are not really trying to start a na-
tional organization, but rather an idea which others can
also use.
"We hope that people will pick this up in different
parts of the country Hodes said, "and start their own
individual groups She adds that their organization
would be happy to help other groups if they can.
Hodes feels personally that the arms race is the most
"extraordinary criminal wasteful expenditure ot
funds" in our world.
"Each day that goes by that our taxpayers money is
used for nuclear armaments, we are implicated in
something that is really insane Hodes said. "The
fruits of our labors are being used to create weapons ot
massive destruction
Hodes also believes that the funds that go to support
the arms race create "a real moral dilemma" for people
because in reality "you get less security � not more �
as you keep constructing more armaments
Hodes said that she sees an "extreme wastefulness"
because on the final level, she doesn't really feel that
we're getting anything for our money when we invest it
in nuclear weapons, which she claims the U.S. is
building at the rate of three more per day. while also
becoming "less safe" and "less secure
Hodes invites anyone wishing to get more intorma-
tion or to join Artists For Survival to send her. or
Kamen, a postcard or letter.
Membership in their organization costs S10.00. but
they add that "more is appreciated. Less is acceptable if
$10.00 is an insurmountable obstacle "
The address of Artists For Survival is 144 Moody
Street. Waltham, Massachusetts. 02154. (617)891-4235.
"I urge students in every field to become politically
active on this issue she said, "and also to educate
themselves as much as possible
'Special' Concert
Homecoming Crowd Loved .38
By MARTY HARDIN
M�f f W ritrt
As Donnie Van Zant said when I spoke with him
backstage, "it was a hell of a show Of course, he's
referring to the .38 Special concert held in Minges Col-
iseum Sunday night, which had every person in the au-
dience "rockin It indeed was a "hell of a show
Chairman Jerry Dilsaver and the Major Attractions
committee did their usual fine job promoting the show
and it paid off in dollars. The walk-up of over 900 peo-
ple Sunday night set an ail-time record for ECU con-
certs and the show was, according to Dilsaver,
"technically a sellout Judging by the looks of things,
Minges did indeed have close to a capacity crowd.
But the committee can be thankful that, after all was
said and done at the box office, the bands put on an ex-
cellent show for Homecoming.
SPYS proved a morc-than-just-adequate opening act
and 1 feel that they are one of the hot new groups-on-
the-rise which Mr. Dilsaver and his people were quick to
catch before their prices started to climb to keep pace
with their success. , .
My only complaint is that the slick, hi-tech rock of
SPYS did not blend well with the down-home, southern
grown rock of .38 Special. I do not feel that this conflict
of styles clashed to the point of detracting from the
overall effect of the show which proved to be, simply
stated, a good time. ECU students are a very wise group
when it comes to appreciating good rock no matter what
the style or blend. . ��, �
After a slight delay, .38 Special followed SPYS with a
sound that one might have thought would be painfully
loud but was instead powerful and clean. The band
tours with a very elaborate and impressive system and
by flying some of the speakers sound V�
acoustically-awful coliseum at least doubled in com-
parison to earlier shows. -�-
Van Zant poured everything he had into lead vocals
Music
and the rest of the band, featuring rare dual drummers
Steve Brookins and Jack Grondin, followed suit with
hot guitar licks courtesy talented Jeff Carlisi, Uarry
Junstrom's steady pacing on rhythm guitar, and a bot-
tom that provided stability and foundation by Don
Barnes.
The band kept everyone on their feet with rousing
renditions of hits like "Rockin" into the Night
"Wild-Eyed Southern Boys" and "Caught Up in You
A fine light show and mixdown only made matters bet-
ter.
The music took wings and so did Van Zant whose
acrobatic flying exhibition near the end of the perfor-
mance (swinging from the stage some 30 or 40 feet into
the audience) was made possible by wires normally used
to fly speakers and other equipment.
I will long remember the abundant energy of .38
Special as the group will remember the abundant energy
of ECU students at the show. Van Zant put it like this:
"I usually don't like doing the college concerts because
the people don't respond or are too reserved to let go. I
was a little worried about it but I was knocked out when
1 could see those ECU people let it all go! Honestly, no
bullshit, this was one of the best shows on our tour
Once again, congratulations to the Major Attractions
commitee for a job well done. 1 hope the praise will echo
as loudly after the next extravaganza.
Donnie Van Zant giving his trousers a hardy hike in Minges Sunday night. (Staff photo by Gary Patterson.)
A
t
Mi I
wmm : "�-





8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 26, 1982
'JinxecT Has
Bette Plus
Plenty More
Bv MICHAEL S. BUTZGY
Slaff Writer
Jinxed could be one of the fun-
niest movies of this season. I went in
to it not knowing quite what to ex-
pect. After all, this was the movie
with the enormous "mishegas"
budget that went at least a year over
schedule and who knows how much
over that budget. Director Don
Siegal may not have the movie he
wants but, nevertheless, it's a good
flick.
Review
What really makes this movie is
Bette Midler. The Rose was maybe
just a tad melodramatic, and
although she was good in that, she's
great in Jinxed. But the movie does
not come across as a vehicle for
Miss Midler, rather it almost
reminds one of a 1940's comedy.
Blackjack dealer Willie (Ken
Wahl) is being systematically run
out of his job by Harold Benson
(Rip Torn). It seems that for some
reason Harold is a jinx to Willie,
resulting in Harold making lots of
money, and Willie losing his job
alot. Bonita (Bette) lives with
Harold, even though he beats her up
alot. She doesn't leave because the
money's good. "Great" reason to
get beat up.
Willie decides he's had it and
follows Harold home. Harold
leaves, and Willie seduces Bonita,
who madl falls in love with him.
Bonita asks Willie something sne's
never asked anyone before: "Will
you kill my boyfriend?" And of
course the rest of the movie becomes
a mishmash of plot twists and hilari-
ty-
Rip Torn is also good in this film.
You remember Rip; he played
Richard Nixon a couple of years
back. In Jinxed he plays one of the
nastiest assholes you'd ever want to
see. But he does it with such relish.
Some of the best acting done in this
film is when Torn plays it straight.
Of course, this doesn't make any
sense.
Ken Wahl should raise a few
young ladies' blood pressure. He
was last seen in Running Scared, a
film about the Bay of Pigs invasion
in the early sixties. (That film was
around for about ten minutes, but if
you ever get a chance, it's kind of
interesting.)
In Jinxed, Wahl is a likeable
young man, and he plays off Bette
pretty well, which was essential to
this film. What it didn't need was a
second fiddle. They work together
almost as a team. (Bette does kind
of get a little more spotlight. But
after all, who is the star of the
film?).
I'm recommending this film but I
can't predict how it will do. It would
be a shame if it just faded away for
HBO to pick up at a later date.
It may only be cute, but we need
more cute comedies nowadays. The
comedy film is not as prevalent as it
used to be; and there's no good
reason for it, unless watching so-
meone's liver getting cut out has
become the American past time.
This film may remind a few, in an
offbeat sort of way, of Continental
Divide with Blair Brown and the late
John Belushi. It was cute and funny
and that's all that counts.
I give it � � � . The film is now
playing at the Buccaneer Theatre.
fod
H
CM
sail
Sl
� 1
at
ad
ti
Gr
pi
m
Otl
7
pel
I
he!
en!
I
Cougar's Springsteen Impersonation Has Too Many Holes
By ZACK
PERKINSON
stiff Wriler
John Cougar �
American Fool
He was hailed as the
new Springsteen, which
is pretty redundant,
since Springsteen was
hailed as the new
Dylan, who was hailed
as the poet of his
generation. Is Cougar
the poet of his genera-
tion? Hardly.
Like Springsteen, he
evokes the familiar im-
ages of common
adolescence: teenage
romance and imitations
of hoodlumry. In
"Jack and Diane
which has received con-
siderable airplay, the
recurrent phrase "two
American kids growing
up in the heartland"
rides a locomotive-like
beat. Well, I guess I can
overlook one or two
concessions to popular
trends that don't in-
terfere with artistic in-
tegrity.
Colin Hays' writing
and singing set the
band far above the
pack of Mohawked
void dwellers. The
socio-political
statements throughout
the album are much
more palatable than the
Clash's smug artist-as-
moral-arbeiter posings.
Hays writes with
humanity and a passing
reference to James
Dean that exemplifies
the eternal drive-in, hot
rod, beating hearts
motif.
The instrumentals
are predictable
throughout. The guitar
Review
licks are a little chop-
pier than Springsteen's,
but the imitation is
almost outright. There
is even a little accor-
dion, perceived as stun-
ning innovation on
"Born to Run" and
other early Springsteen
albums. Here it is just
more mimicry by
Cougar.
Granted, John
Cougar has the most
powerful and ex-
pressive voice in rock
'rf roll since Bob Seger.
But he lacks a musical
expertise that he tries to
compensate for with his
slavish imitations of
Springsteen.
He could explore the
limits of his con-
siderable vocal talent bought this record, but
with fresh music and
production. I wonder,
though, iff he hasn't
already seen those
limits and is playing it
safe with a proven for-
mula. A lot of people
I'll stick
thing.
to the real
Men at Work �
Business as L sual
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f





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 26. 1982
Mindless, Mutant
Continued From Page 7
formers because they only play ma-
jor markets, to bring the acts to the
campus in a live setting
Tickets for the Devo show are on
sale at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center at $5
for ECU students in advance and $6
at the door; public tickets are $6 in
advance and $7 at the door. Public
tickets are also on sale at the two
Greenville Record Bars and at Ap-
ple Records. For additional infor-
mation contact the Central Ticket
Office at 757-6611, ext. 266.
Halloween Rockers
From Way Back
The following review originally ap-
peared m the Nov. 1, 1981 edition oj
the e Brunswick Record.
Reprinted by permission; all rights
reserved.
B DON FFRENC1
lh �� Rrun�uk Rrtord
The true spirit of Halloween hit
New Brunswick last night when
Devo invaded the Barn, holding
over 3,000 people captive. The cap-
tives were subjected to "new tradi-
tionalist" propaganda designed to
mutate new coverts for their
crusade. The weapons for this
RL MP-sponsored de-evolutionary
uprising were good music, strange
films, dancing, and the mere
presence of the modern-day cult
heroes.
The night was all Devo's. In lieu
of an opening band, 20 minutes of
movies were shown. These were not
your everyday films, but rather
videos of Devo songs. A lot has
been said about these films and they
more than lived up to their reputa-
tion. They were very strange, but
entertaining, avant-garde films with
an oddball cast of characters in-
cluding Boogi Boy, General Boy
and Devo themselves.
Beautiful M orrf, the best film,
began with a flower blooming � the
natural innocence of our beautiful
world. Then followed the con-
trasting, horrible reality of our
violent man-made world � atomic
bombs, street violence, starvation
� overpowered the ideal images
with a stark honesty that left one a
bit unnerved. Whether the films
made one question the artificial
world we've created or just plain
laugh, everyone knew one thing for
sure; this was not going to be an or-
dinary concert.
The final footage portrayed three
of the Devoids bound to
ultramodern crosses. When they
symbolically broke away from the
chains of today's closed-minded
mechanized society the packed
house cheered in defiant delight, the
screen rose, the curtain opened, and
Devo did their stuff. A truly
melodramatic and exciting opening!
And what a show it was! Even the
spaced-out movie shorts could not
sufficiently portray the massive
amounts of power, energy and fun
emitted by the five-man gorup when
they were on stage. These up-to-date
powerhouse rockers played like they
were obviously men with a mission.
The spudboys stamina was incredi-
ble. They never once stopped their
frantic dancing and panicky moving
about the stage.
The people on the packed floor
were there to dance, so despite a
lack of space the floor was
transformed into a sea of bouncing
heads. It was virtually impossible to
avoid being swept up by the riotous
madness that took over the stage as
well as the floor. The people in the
reserved seats (upstairs) somehow
managed the impossible, however,
and remained calm and seated
throughout the 2-hour show.
A wide variety of songs from each
album were played. The crowd
seemed unfamiliar with the first few
songs which were taken from the
LP. Nh Tradidionalists. But
everyone burst into jubilant life
when they recognizerd the opening
notes of "Girl U Want All of the
songs were played very well, but the
vocals suffered from a less-than-
perfect sound system. A knowledge
of the lyrics was crucial.
One of the highlights of the show,
and a real audience favorite, was a
frenzied version of "Uncontrollable
Urge This song was a perfect
description of the urgency of the en-
tire concert: "Got an urgeGot a
surgeand it's out of control
Almost every song got out of con-
trol and reached a fevered orgasmic
peak unmatched by just about any
other band.
The music was only one part of
the Devo experience. At times, the
many special visual effects stole the
show. After about 30 minutes, the
curtain closed for a setcostume
change. As the curious crowd an-
ticipated Devo's next surprise a slow
countdown added to the suspense.
The curtain opened to a new stage
set engulfed in fog and lit by a huge
strobe light. It was like a scene out
of a weird dream set in some
futuristic unknown world.
The group performed two encores
for the very enthusiastic audience.
For the first, Mark Mothersbaugh
dressed as Boogi Boy and sang their
newest single, "Beautiful World
The final encore consisted of a well-
choreographed rendition of
"Working in the Coal Mine the
recent cover hit from the movie
Heavy Metal. Amidst dense fog,
Devo, wearing lighted mining hats,
shoveled and picked in the make-
belifve coal mine. After they left the
stage for the last time, the movie
screen was dropped again and while
militaristic de-evolutionary music
spewed from the speakers, the pro-
jectors rolled tootage of the
uniformed spudboys saluting some
higher being.
On the way out, the crowd looked
shocked, provoked, satisfied, but
most of all entertained. Because for
a few hours they were not men, they
were Devo.
'Business As Usual'
Continued From Page 8
'This album is hot.
Men at Work are
without a doubt one of
the best bands ever out
of Australia. Influences
as diverse as reggae,
Gerry Rafferty, and
Elvis Costello make
this a truly unique
sound. Of course, they
have to sell records,
and if you have spiky
hair and little ties the
rhythm section has to
pound in most of to-
day's musical social
commentary. From the
universal paranoia of
"Who Can It Be
Now?" to the child's
cry of "Be Good
Johnny" to the com-
passion of "Touching
the Untouchables" the
intelligence and ability
combine to provide
music that is enormous-
ly better than most
records on the charts.
Records provided by
Apple Records of
Greenville.
���???� ��
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PRESENTS
TUES OCT. 26th
TEZZER
AND
GLISSON
TOGETHER ON THE
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Includes initial eye examination, lenses, care
kit, instructions and follow up visits for one
month. ECU student l.D required
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Dr. Peter Hollis
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With Very Special Guest
WALL OF Voodoo

LIVE FROM HOLLYWOOD
HALLOWEEN EVE OCT. 30
'satellite presentation
WITH
THE STUDENT UNION SPECIAL CONCERTS COMMITTEE
SATURDAY OCT. 30. 1982 10:00p.m. WRIGHT AUDITORIUM STUDENTS $5.00 In advance $6 00 at door
NON-STUDENTS $6.00 in advance $7.00 at door DOORS OPEN 45 MINUTES EARLY
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER. THE RECORD BAR (Pitt Plaza)
THE RECORD BAR (Carolina East Mall). APPLE RECORD?
EAST CAROLINA UN'VERSITY
1
I
T





A
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
OCTOBER 26. 1982
Page 10
Defense Records Second Shutout
Pirates Ruffle Redbirds' Feathers
By CINDY PLLASANTS
Sports r dilor
The setting was perfect for an
East Carolina homecoming day.
Warm blankets to fend of wintry
weather, purple and gold balloons
floating through the air, the crown-
ing of the queen and a crowd of
26,771 fans cheering in the stands as
the Pirates marched onto Ficklen
Stadium were a few visibilities
necessary to make the traditional
event memorable.
The main attraction, however,
was the game. Any school in the
country would be disappointed to
lose THE homecoming game.
Students expect a win, a big win.
And the Pirates didn't let them
down.
ECU captured its second shutout
of the season against Illinois State,
21-0, upping the Bucs record now to
4-3.
Head coach Ed Emory said a
shutout is always a personal victory
for the defensive team. "It was just
great to get a shutout he said.
"Anytime you get a shutout in col-
lege football today, your defense
has done a nice job
The defensive players, however,
were not the only heroines of the
day. Led by junior quarterback
Greg Stewart, the Pirates finished
with 382 yards rushing and 518
yards in total offense - the highest
ever for a team coached by Ed
Emory. Stewart, who was named as
the ECAC Offensive Player of the
Week, scored twice against the Red-
birds while rushing for 79 yards and
passing for 141 yards.
Stewart scored both touchdowns
in the first half to put the Bucs
ahead. 14-0. ECU's third
touchdown occurred in the final two
minutes of the third quarter when
fullback Reggie Branch ran three
yards into the endzone to score the
first TD of his career at ECU. Jeff
Heath's three extra point kicks
boosted the Pirates' lead to 21-0.
Despite some impressive in-
dividual efforts. Emory still was not
completely satisfied with the of-
fense's play. "I was disappointed
with the intensity on the offensive
team he said. We had too many
fumbles. I think they (offense) were
surprised they it wasn't as easy as
they thought it would beECU
had five fumbles and recovered all
but one against the Redbirds.
Emory added that the offense
played well enough on the line to
win 60-0. "But our quarterback
play left a great deal to be desired
he said. "We just didn't make
things happen
The first quarter just underway,
ISU was positioned on ECU's
21-yard line but a 10-yard holding
penalty moved the Redbirds back to
the 31. In a first and 20 situation,
ISU's Mark Coppens pass was pick-
ed off by strong safety Clint Harris
at the 17-yard line who then return-
ed 25 yards. Emory said Harris's
interception, his fourth for the
season, came at a critical point in
the game. "Defensively, we played
very tight on the first series, but
then got real strong he said. "I'm
just glad Clint Harris got that in-
terception to stop their drive
With Ernest Bvner, Branch and
Stewart gaining yardage, Stewart
scored the first TD of the game with
7:37 remaining in the first quarter.
The Pirates made another attempt
but ECU quarterback Kevin In-
gram's pass was intercepted by
ISU's cornerback Reggie Sum-
merise.
In the second quarter, freshman
kicker Jeff Heath attempted a
34-yard field goal but the kick went
just right. After an ECU fumble by
Stewart, the Redbirds gained
possession and needed four yards
for a first down but defensive end
Jeff Pegues made sure they didn't
get it by sacking Coppens for an
eight-yard loss.
Injured on the play, Coppens was
replaced by ISU's Steve Moews in
the second half. The third quarter
got off to a bad start for the Pirates
with Stewart's pass being in-
tercepted by ISU at the its own
26-yardline. But Moews was sacked
by Moe Bennett on the first play for
a five-yard loss and the Redbirds
neer regained the yardage they lost.
The Bucs' final scoring rally came
with a few minutes remaining in the
third quarter. Freshman Reggie
Branch, who rushed for 109 yards,
ran up the middle for six more
points. Emory commended Branch
for his fine showing against ISU.
"Branch has done a very Fine job
for us he said. "He's a hard run-
ner and has come through when we
needed him most
A defensive line led by Amos
Twitty, Kevin Banks and Jeff
Pegues held the Redbirds in the final
quarter to only three first downs.
ISU made one last attempt but the
Redbird center snapped the ball
over Moews head for a 19-yard loss
and thus eliminated Illinois State's
chance to score.
Coach Emory praised ISU highly
and described the coach and his
players as having a "lot of class
'Illinois did one heck of a job
he said. "We were beat up pretty
bad
The Pirates will now get ready for
a tough road trip to 13th-ranked
West Virginia this weekend. The
Mountaineers were blanked by Penn
State this past Saturday, but WVU
managed 382 yards in total offense
and 21 First downs. Coach Emory is
especially glad that West Virginia
had a tough game before meeting
the Pirates. "Losing drains you like
a leech he said. "It just takes
something out of you. The win will
help us
Illimits S 1�altrust Downsr .aruliM 30
26-54Rushes-Yard66-377
111Passing Yards141
i9Return Yards59
23-IO-IPassing21-11-3
9-39.8Punts -Ancta&C2-32.5
4 1Fumbles Lost5 1
3-45Penalties Yards7 58
Illinois Stale0 0 0 �� �
f.�i Carolina7 7 7 0-21
Scoring
EC -StewartVrun (Heath kick)
EC -Stewart5run (Healh Kick)
EC -Branch.3run (Heath kick)
Individual Mairsnes
Rushing: ISU � Coppens 1(8). Bowers 7 23. Jones
I 1 41. vs inters 5 22. Moews 1(5). Team 1 - 19); EC I -
Mewart ?.?v. Branch 16-109. Baker 10-47. Ingram 3-12.
I ewis6 33. Bvner 10 68, Hill 2-9. Williams l 16. Cobb 1-4
Passing ISC - Coppens 12 1601. Moews 10-451-0.
McDougle 1-0-0-0; ECU � Stewart 20-11-141-2. Ingram
I-0-0-1
Receiving ISL � Denmson 5-42 Young 1-8. Bowers
1-15. Winters 2-6. Collins 1-40. BCD - Nelson 3-81. Branch
1 3. Baker 2-0. 5 Adams 2-25. Vann 2 26. Bvner 1-6
Photo By DAVE WILLIAMS
(Top) Flanker Cariton Nelson runs down the middle against Illinois State after Stewart's release as teammates
John Floyd and Reggie Branch look on. (Bottom) Emory and ISU's Otolski and players show good sportsman-
ship toward one another after Saturday's game.
Emory's Contract Extended
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Sports Editor
Before each practice, head foot-
ball coach Ed Emory begins work-
outs by uttering one word to the
players.
But rather than the usual morale-
boosting adjectives, the happy
coach informed his players last
Thursday that the word for the day
was "contract
ECU Chancellor Dr. John M.
Ho well, in conjunction with
Athletic Director Dr. Ken Karr, an-
nounced this past Thursday that
Emory's contract had been extended
through January of 1985.
"We are on a threshold of a new
era in NCAA Division I-A foot-
ball Howell said. "Coach Emory
and the football team have played
Division I-A football this season
and we are proud of their perfor-
mance
It seemed only fitting for Emory
to first relay the news to the players,
especially since he believes they are
the main reason for his or any other
coach's extension.
"I think it (contract renewal), was
an endorsement of their character
and play he said. "Very few
coaches get fired if they (the players)
want them as their football coach. I
felt like it was what they wanted
After the announcement of the
contract had been made, Emory was
surprised by the overwhelming sup-
port he received from the press and
Pirate supporters. "I didn't know it
was weighing so heavily on
everybody's minds he said.
Although the head coach had not
mentioned his contract to the
players this year, a few of them
showed their concern at a
Fellowship of Christian Athletes
meeting last week by praying for
Emory and many of their sick and
injured teammates. "I was very
touched that they would include me
in their prayers Emory said.
"That meant a lot to me
Apparently, the power of prayer
should not be underestimated. Two
days later his job was once again
secure. However, Emory said he
had been more concerned about
other matters rather than the finan-
cial aspects of a job loss. "I wasn't
worrying a lot about how I was go-
ing to pay my bills he said. "I've
seen so many coaches work so hard
and not be able to fulfill their goals
because they were short of time.
'�We've worked very hard and I
felt like the coaching staff here
knew what was ahead of them
If a coach has ever turned a team
around and showned marked im-
provement, Emory certainly has this
year. During the '82 season, he has
guided the most explosive offense to
be seen at ECU in years. The Pirates
have already surpassed last year's
passing yardage of 839 with a whop-
ping 1031 yards so far this season,
besides having four road games to
spare. At one time, the Pirates were
ranked 16th in offense, racking up
500 yards in total offense against
Richmond and 474 yards against
East Tennessee State.
Defensively, the Pirates were
ranked eighth early in the fall season
and are presently listed as 16th in
Division-I rankings. The Pirates
four home opponents have only
been able to score 15 points in
Ficklen Stadium, with ECU's defen-
sive team allowing one touchdown
to be scored by the Richmond
Spiders.
A 1959 graduate and former foot-
ball standout at East Carolina,
Emory truly loves his alma mater.
The head coach is filled with Pirate
pride and believes wholeheartedly in
the ECU football program. In time,
he also feels like it has a chance to
become a great one. "With the pro-
gress we've made and the extended
years we now have at East
Carolina he said, "we can succeed
in making the Pirate program a ma-
jor success
Karr indicated that Emorv will be
facing schedules for the next two
seasons which will include op-
ponents as equalh as hard as this
year's grueling competitors. He fur-
ther stated that the Pirates have
shown improvement despite limited
resources and the increased difficul-
ty in the schedule.
Emory, meanwhile, will be con-
centrating on finishing the four re-
maining away games. Now 4-3, the
coach doesn't have to wonder
anymore if he will be around after
this year and according to Emor.
that's very good new.
"Security brings about a lot ot
decisions he said. " When there's
insecurities on a staff, there's a
tendency to take shortcuts A
shortcut, he explained, would be
playing an athlete who may be suf-
fering a minor mjurv and reallv
needs to sit out a game, but is played
because he might make the dif-
ference between winning and losing.
Fortunately. Emory now doesn't
have to face the possibility of
deciding whether or not to take
shortcuts. He's here to stav, and
hopefully it will be for quite a long
while.
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
ECU Head Coach Ed Emory
Otolski Impressed With Bucs
Lady Pirates Hit Road
By EDWARD NICKLAS
Staff Writer
Beginning a lengthy road trip that
will last for the remainder of the
season, the ECU Lady Pirates suf-
fered what Coach Lynn Davidson
referred to as a "disappointing
loss" in Friday's volleyball match
against Appalachian State Universi-
ty-
ECU, however, raised its' record
to 20-12, beating a mediocre East
Tennessee State squad in Saturday's
action.
The Lady Pirates won 2 out of the
first 3 games against ASU, but end-
ed up losing the last two games and
the match, 14-16, 15-9, 10-15,
15-12, 15-13.
Davidson seemed frustrated by
the loss. "We played fair she said.
"Our service, reception, and passes
were excellent. We just couldn't
seem to get things going
In Saturday's game against ETS,
the Lady Pirates, who were led by
the play of Lita Lamas, won rather
handily, 15-12, 15-5, 15-2.
The Lady Pirates will pack their
suitcases once again as they travel to
Wilmington Thursday to play UNC-
W and the University of South
Carolina at Lancaster.
By KEN BOLTON
Assistant Sports Editor
With only one senior in their star-
ting lineup, the Illinois State Red
Birds are in the process of building
for the future.
After Saturday's 21-0 loss to the
Pirates, ISU head coach Bob
Otolski said that the ECU squad
was just too strong for his young
ball club.
"They are an extremely well-
coached team said Otolski. "ECU
is a very physical team; they hit hard
and they run hard
Two important plays which hurt
the Red Birds were an unsuccessful
fake punt and the loss of starting
quarterback John Coppens.
With 21 seconds left in the first
quarter and ECU leading 7-0, the
Red Birds faced a fourth-down ana
nine at the ECU 34-yard line. ISU
punter Jim McDougle attempted a
pass to the right sideline that was
wide of the mark, and the Pirates
took over.
According to Otolski, the fake
punt was pre-meditated, but the
Pirates did a good job of shifting
out of the formation that they
originally showed.
Coppens, a sophomore who came
into the game with 547 yards passing
and three touchdowns, was hurt in
the second quarter when his left
hand was stepped on by two dif-
ferent people on the same play.
Otolski was impressed with the
ability of ECU defensive end and
All-America candidate Jody Schulz.
Although Schulz didn't have one of
his best games statistically, his
presence was felt on the field.
Otolski served eight years as an
assistant coach at Indiana, and has
seen many outstanding defensive
lineman. "Schulz can play with the
best of 'em commented Otolski.
"He's a Fine football player with
great pro potential
The Red Birds used a spread-out
type of offense that they call the
"scatter This formation puts only
one back behind the quarterback
and spreads the others out as
receivers. "We went to our spread
offense out of respect for their
defensive line stated Otolski.
Illinois State has a defensive gem
of their own in free safety Mike
Prior. Prior entered the game rank-
ed number two in interceptions in
Division 1-AA, with six takeaways.
He intercepted two more passes
against the Pirates which ran his
seasonal total to eight and he how
has 11 in his career, which involves
only 12 games. He also led the Red
Birds with 14 tackles against ECU.
"They have real strong running
backs noted Prior after the game
"They are also very quick and tough
to bring down
Coach Otolski expressed the fact
that the Pirates could easily be 6-1
right now if it weren't for a couple
of bad breaks against N.C. State
and Missouri.
"I don't think the people around
this area realize how good a football
team East Carolina has Otolski
observed. "I coached in the Big io
for eight years, and I can tdl you
this is a good team
-1
I
I
I







THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 26 198:
11
I
V
I
ind
risk
Cavaliers Use
Wing Offense
James Earns SEC Honors
CHARLOTTESV1LLE,
Va. (UPI) � Virginia
football Coach George
Welsh said Monday he
had considered putting
the Wing-T formation
into the Cavalier's of-
fensive scheme for
several weeks.
As it turned out, his
timing couldn't have
been better.
The Wing-T, along
with other new offen-
sive wrinkles, helped
the Cavaliers to a big
day Saturday when
they rolled up 643 yards
total offense and snap-
ped an eight-game los-
ing streak by beating
Wake Forest 34-27.
The offensive out-
burst represented
Virginia's second-most
productive game ever.
Only a 691-yard effort
by the 1968 Cavaliers
against Davidson sur-
passed Saturday's per-
formance.
The Cavaliers went
over 300 yards rushing
and passing a first for a
Virginia team ant;
recorded their highest
point total against an
NCAA Division I op-
ponent since a 38-28
victory over William '
Mary in 1974.
Unveiling the Wing-
T on the fifth play of
the game, Virginia con-
fused the Wake Forest
defense on numerous
occasions in the first
half while building a
31-14 half time lead.
Vireinia scored on
five of its first seven
possessions while
averaging 9.3 yards a
play and accumulating
447 yards in the first
two periods.
Welsh said the idea
of the Wing-T "had
been floating around in
my head for a couple of
weeks
"We were trying to
get some type of three-
back offense to get
some counter plays
said Welsh. "We'd
reached a point where
we had to do something
or maybe we weren't
going to win a game
Virginia's first 1982
triumph after five suc-
cessive losses represents
the Cavaliers' first win
since a 13-10 victory
over Virginia Military
Institute Oct. 31. 1981.
"Wake didn't know
it (Wing-T) was coming
and that helped said
Welsh. "Eight times or
so in the first half, we
just fooled them. Wake
uses a read defense and
they flow quickly. A
counter game is usually
successful against that
type of defense
Virginia's balanced
attack was spearheaded
by junior quarterback
Wayne Schuchts. He
completed of 15 of 30
passes for a school-
record 320 yards, in-
cluding a 93-yard
touchdown toss to Nick
Merrick. Schuchts also
ran for 53 vards, giving
him 373 yards total of-
fense, just three shy of
Bob Davis' Virginia
record.
"Wayne did very
well said Welsh.
"There was a lot of
new stuff, and he
handled it well. He
broke some tackles run-
ning the ball and threw
well on the run
Virginia hosts VMI
Saturday when the
Cavaliers will be seek-
ing their 50th victory in
the 76-game series with
the Keydets.
Asked if the Wing-T
would become a perma-
nent fixture, Welsh said
he wouldn't tell.
"I don't know what
we'll do this week
said Welsh. "But when
I decide, I probably
won't tell anyone.
"We have to be
careful this week. We
have to understand
what it took to win the
game last week. It's a
big game for VMI or at
least that's what I've
heard.
"I think it's a big
game for us. They've
v. on tour games,
haven't they0 We'd be
foolish to be overconfi-
dent
CHARLOTTE,
N.C. (UPI) Western
Carolina University
tailback Anthony
James was named the
Southern Conference's
offensive player-of-the-
week today for the se-
cond consecutive week.
James had three
touchdowns in the
Catamounts' 36-17 win
over Wofford.
James, from Hart-
sville, S.C nows leads
the conference in scor-
ing with an 8.6 point
per game average. He
rushed for 117 yards in
the Wofford game.
"Anthony ignited us
again Coach Bob
Waters said. "He is so
explosive, as good a
tailback as there is
anywhere when you
consider all that he
does ' open field runn-
ing, blocking, pass
receiving and uncanny
ability to follow his
blocking
East Tennessee State
linebacker Shannow
DePew, who had 23
tackles in a 20-15 loss
to Furman, was named
the Southern Con-
ference's defensive
player-of-the-week
Monday.
DePew, from
Blountsville, Tenn
had 12 solo tackles and
was credited with 11
assists. He also
recovered a fumble and
broke up a pass play.
"Shannon is always
around the ball East
Tennessee State Coach
Jack Carlisle said.
"He's just a very
steady, reliable player
who always gives you
100 percent
James and DePew
were selected for the
honors by a panel of
sportswriters and sport-
scasters who belong to
the Southern Con-
ference Sports Media
Association.
Photo By DAVE WILLIAMS
Tryouts for an ECU Pirate mascot will be held at 5 p.m. on Monda.
Nov. 1 at the ticket office in Minges Coliseum.
l3-? ���� l A
I
The ECU soccer team tell victim
to a tough UNC-Greensboro team
Sunday afternoon 4-0.
UNC-G, which is ranked number
three in Division-Ill, ran it s record
to 15-2, while the Pirates dropped to
7-6.
"We didn't play good in the hrsi
half, but played better the second
half said ECU head coach Robbie
Church.
UNC-G was led bv Eddie Rad-
wanski, who had two goals and one
assist. Mike Sweeney had one goal
and two assists and Lewis Borges
added a goal and an assist.
A big difference in the game was
the number of shots-on-goal. LNC
G took 22 shots, whereas the Pirates
attempted onlv six. Pirate goalie
Brian Winchell was credited with 11
saes
The Pirate's next match is
Wednesday night at :(X) p.m. at
Old Dominion Universit.
Photo By CINOY WALL
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12
I HI EAST CAROI IN1AN
OCTOBER 26, 1982
Wolfpack Defense Gains Confidence As Offense Proves Itself
RALEIGH (UP1) �
North Carolina State
coach Monte Kiffin
said Monday he
behees his detense
may hae gained con-
fidence in the Clemson
game despite giving up
38 points.
Kiffin said the
Wolfpack offense,
which came up with 29
points, showed it is
capable ol a lot of scor-
ing.
"Our defense may
have gained some con-
fidence because they
knovs that they don't
have to shut out so-
meone to win he
said. 'They know our
offense can score some
points. That should
make them play more
relaxed and play bet-
ter
North Carolina State
hosts South Carolina
Saturday.
"I look for a tough,
tough game Kiffin
said. "They have an
outstanding defense
with an extremely big
defensive line
North Carolina State
gained a total of 394
yards against Clemson.
Tol Avery completed
22 of 33 passes for 246
yards and two
downed them, out-
yardaged them he
said. "But the defense
touchdowns and
sophomore Joe Mcln-
tosh gained 113 yards.
"We improved a lot
during last week Kif-
fin said. "We improved
up front where it starts.
I don't feel lucky just
to have been in the
game with Clemson.
"We out-first-
didn't play as well as
we wanted, or needed
to
Kiffin said he doesn't
know if split end Ricky
Wall or right guard
Steve Saulnier will be
ready to play Saturday.
Wall has a knee injury
and Saulnier has a
bruised sholder.
He also said free
safety Eric Williams
has a pinched nerve in
his neck.
Kiffin said Doug
Howard, a starting left
tackle who has missed
three games with a knee
injury, and Vince
Evans, the Wolfpack's
starting fullback in the
first game of the season
who suffered a knee in-
jury against Furman,
would both miss Satur-
day's contest.
"With Vince. it's a
day-to-day thing
whether he will play in
the next couple of
weeks or we redshirt
him Kiffin said. "He
jogged some last week,
and he's supposed to be
close to getting ready,
but we'll have to wait
and see
GREENSBORO,
N.C. (UPI) - Defen-
sive back I endell Jones
of Maryland and defen-
sive end Andy Headen
of Clemson were nam-
ed Atlantic Coast Con-
ference Defensive Carolina The fumble
Players-of-the-Week recovery led to a Clem
Mondav. son score.
Jones, from Easton,
Pa , had four intercep-
tions in a 49-22 win
against Duke. He also
had seven tackles and
broke up another pass.
Headen, from Liber-
ty, S.C had eight
tackles and recovered a
fumble in a 38-29 vic-
tor v over North
The two were
selected for the honor
by the Atlantic Coast
Sports Writer Associa
tion.
Support the
PIRATES
Wed Oct. 27
ThuOct.28
Sat, Oct. 30
Mon Nov. 1
Tue Nov. 2
Wed Nov. 3
ECUS UPCOMING ATHLETIC EVENTS
Soccer at Old Dominion, 7:30 p.m.
Volleyball at UNC-Wilmington (7 USC-Lancasfer), 6:30 p.m.
Football at West Virginia, 1:30 p.m
Soccer at Central Florida, 2 p.m
Quarterback Club at Ramada Inn, Greenville, 6 p.m
Soccer at South Florida, 4 p.m.
Press Conference at Pirate Club, noon.
Volleyball at Virginia Commonwealth. 6:30 p.m.
Bobby Knight To Visit ECU
Indiana University's
highly successful head
basketball coach Bobby
Knight will be in Green-
ville Saturday, Oct. 30,
to conduct a coaching
clinic along with East
Carolina's new head
coach Charlie Har-
rison.
The clinic will begin
with registration at
12:30 p.m followed
by a session with Har-
rison on practice
orgfaniation from 2
p.m. until 4 p.m.
Knight will speak on
his offensive and defen-
sive philosophy, star-
ting at 4:15. Two ses-
sions will be held b
Knight with a dinner
break between.
Those interested in
attending ma register
in advance with the
ECU basketball office
The cost of registration
is $15.00.
Brewers Reinstate Kuenn
N.C . State's Joe Mclnlosh runs into "Buc wall
MILWAUKEE
(UPI) � Harvey
Kuenn, the hometown
hero who took the
Milwaukee Brewers to
within one victory of
the World Series cham-
pionship, will return as
manager for 1983,
General Manager
Harry Dalton announc-
ed today.
"We think it is fit-
ting that Harvey return
to manage the Brewers
in 1983 Dalton said.
"He played a major
role in the Milwaukee
Brewers' finest season
ever, leading them to
the American league
championship and a
near-miss in the seventh
game of the World
Series Dalton said.
"He was just what the
doctor ordered
"I'm thrilled that the
Jrewers asked me back
for 1983 said Kuenn.
51, who replaced Bob
"Buck" Rodgers as
Brewers manager June
2, with Milwaukee tied
for fifth in the
American League East
with a 23-24 record,
seven games out of firsl
place.
Under Kuenn, the
Brewer posted a 72-43
record and finished
with the best record in
baseball.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 26, 1982
13
nbk
ere
fcocia
'Jt
ee1
ING
INTER
SEC ?ace Sef
ATLANTA (UP!) � All of this puts the
This year's Sugar Bowl in a dilem-
Southeastern Con- ma.
ference football race That bowl has an
ma) go right down to agreement with the
the wire. Southeastern Con-
tour of the league's ference to take its
10 teams � Georgia, champion with an op-
Auburn, Louisiana tion to choose among
state and Alabama are co-champions. With
making a run at the bowl berths opening up
conference title and, Nov. 20, the week
the way the schedule is before the Auburn-
set up. the SEC may Alabama game, there is
not crown its champion going to be pressure on
until after the Auburn- the Sugar Bowl to gam-
�Vabama game on Nov. ble.
27. That's one of the
The Georgia reasons the Sugar Bowl
Bulldogs, co-champion insisted on changing a
previous agreement
which forced it, in case
of ties, to take the SEC
co-champion which
hadn't been to New-
Orleans as recently as
the other.
Under the old rule,
since Georgia was there
on Jan. 1, 1981, the
Sugar Bowl would have
had to wait until after
last year's Alabama-
Auburn game to see if
Alabama earned the
bid. With the rule
vbaek road change, the Sugar Bowl
games with Alabama was able to grab
(Nov. 6) and Mississip- Georgia, leaving
State (Nov. 13). Alabama to line up a
rennessee also Cotton Bowl berth.
rupted Alabama's "The dust will settle
bid to win or share the when Georgia plays
Florida and then
Auburn said Sugar
Bowl executive director
Mickey Holmes. "If
it's Georgia, we'll
know by sundown on
Nov. 13. But if Georgia
loses, we could go to
Nov. 2" before we
know anything for
sure.
"If a tie is looming,
we would indicate to
the SEC what our
choice will be on the
weekend of Nov. 20 so
other teams can make
plans
last season and cham-
pion the year before
that, currently leads the
ace with a 4-0 SEC
record. But Auburn is
right on Georgia's heels
at 3-0 and those two
meet at Auburn on
Nov. 13.
I ouisiana State also
5 unbeaten in SEC
iv. but the Bengals
ive a tie with Ten-
nessee marring their
rec � so can't afford a
loss - a tough task
SEC title for the 10th
time in 12 years b
upsetting the Crimson
Tide week before last in
Knoxville.
But. like Alabama
C oach Bear Brvant
says, don't count the
de out et. Alabama
plays both LSI and
Auburn in friendly Bir-
mingham, and i f
k � - a loses to ether
Florida I No. 6 at
.1 av k -on viIle) or
Auburn, the Crimson
Tide could be co-
npion again.
Classifieds
- ����
�.����
PERSONAL
PAM SKYWALKER VOU havt
and always will be my friand- live
long and pro�.p�r mttbwya-
Capt. James O Fett. PS. Heard
the wookie died. Congratulations'
Vader knows; doe LufcaT
CHI�OMEGAS: We not only had
fun but also won. Now it's time to
party with the priie. Let's get
together and plan an even better
time. Congrats. The PHI TAUS.
ROBERT: Pack your tux and grab
the keys to a Cadillac because
we're gin�to Roseball in style!
fAirTHE UGLIEST MAN on
campus, dammit! What the hell do
you want?
ROOMMATE
WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED
ED to share apartment one block
from campus. SIM a month plus
one third utilities. CHERYL
7SMW.
MALE OR FEMALE ROOM
MATE Wanted to share rent S70.00
per month and one-fourth
utilities. Interested persons should
come by 417 W. Fourth St after 5
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL Typist wants to
type at home. Reasonable rates;
7 S 340
PROFESSIONAL Typing service-
experience, quality work, IBM
typewriter. Call Lanie Shive.
7S8 5101 or Gail Joiner 7St-1 Oat.
TYPING TERM papers, resumes,
thesis, etc. Call 7S?-a713.
PROFESSIONAL typing rush
jobs done. Scientific symbol ele
ment Call 7S8 4�J7 after S30 p m
10 YEARS typing- reasonable
rates spelling, punctuation and
grammar corrections. Pro-
ofreading. Cindy 9 a.m. top.m.
355 2448
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: GOLD Seiko-Quarti watch
Reward offered. Sentimental
Value. Call 7S 702 after 4 p m
LOST GREEN backpack contain
ing notebooks and other
necessities for class. If found,
return to David Cobb at 7SI 134 or
75B 71 IS. No questions asked
Reward.
WANTED
WE BUY PLAYBOY. Rolling
Stone Mag Quicksilver Record
Book Exchange 108 East Fifth St
WANTED USED LPs
REWARD CASH OR TRADE
Quicksilver Records. iOt East
Fifth St.
MODELS NEEDFO
PHOTOGRAPHER needs models
for a variety of proiects Will pay
tor travel and up to J7S an hour
based on experience No ex
penence is required. Send full
length and full face photo or port
folio to NEW DAWN
Photography J03E W Lockhaven.
Goldsboro. NC 77S30.
CRAZY ZACK'S ROAD TRIP Nov
if sio includes round trip to Zacks
and refreshments on the way to
Raleigh Half price admission to
Zack's. Call Alpha Sigma Phi
7S2 1073 before Nov 12
LOSE WEIGHT. HONEST
7a-fS30.
IT DON'T Mean a thing if it ain't
got that swing Sophisticated
Ladies, Friday Nov Sth, Wright
Auditorium
SIR DUKE, IH be the one sashay
mg down the aisle at
Sophistocated Ladies. Friday Nov
Sth, see you Judith
Take the "A" TRAIN, but get
there Friday night for Duke EH
ington's Sophistocated Ladies in
Wright Auditorium
YOU'LL HAVE it made with your
3D shades See 1-OEVO in CEN
Saturday, October 30th
THE FIRST LIVE 3D concert in
history is coming to ECU on Satur
day, October 30th Come dressed
to kill
WALL OF VOODOO WHO'?? On
ly 45 to find out with 3 OEVO on
October 30th.
RIDES
NEED RIDE from Washington.
NC to ECU Mon. Fri 7.00
a.m4:00 p.m. Call Joe l�'i
94 47! collect, nights Desire to
share expenses
MISC.
FOR SALE
HAND CRAFTED rustic ur
niture at affordable student
prices For more information, call
Kim at 752 5717
1 FISHER SPEAKERS model 530s
would like to trade lor cassette
deck. Call 75 877 or The East
Carolinian 7S7 �34 and leave
messaoe loi GeeD Johnson
FOR RENT ONE ROOM EFF
APT for rent within walking
distance of ECU Call 75 3057
SURFBOARD It ACTION Chan
ne! bottom glass on tins S175
752-1124
ANOTHER COUNTRY, another
culture. Picture yourself in Costa
Rica this spring carrying on your
ECU studies at low cost want to
know more? Dr Baker, Brewster
A224; Dr Bort. Brew A201 or Dr.
Farr, Brew A! 18.
� foot 1 inch SINGLE FIN PIN
TAIL m the eye surfboard fun
Bayley suit and vest good deals
Call Billy 7 57 304
. � .

Photo Bv STANLEY LEARY
Defensive ends Jody Schuiz and Jeff Pegues sack ISU's quarterback in
Saturday's game.
GALLERY LAINZBERG
STROH'S
presents
Available
Overton's
Marsh's Surf-N' Sea
AccuCopy
Sharpe's
Varsity Barber Shop
Sandwich Game
Arcade Variety & Grill
Sammy's Country Cooking
Pizza Transit Authority
Sharp's Formal Wear
THE PHANTOM FORECASTER
(the most accurate college football prediction sheet available)
FREE
at the
following locations
Hodges
Bonds f
Archie's Steaks
Pantana Bobs
Subway
Heart's Delight
U.B.E.
Tree House
Mr. Gatti's
Arcade Variety
TUB. 0CT.lt, l�2 OO-IW ADt4f�� L00
Reg. $229.95
ThursFri.
Oct. 28-29
10-7
ECUMendenhall
Student Center

&o� -12.000 btu-s .Cleanbumln9 �cr�1X�
�Odorless
�Ideal for large areas
batteries
� ALL WE ASK IS - COMPARE!
Lay a way Now.
Also Located In Raleigh, 2741 E. 10th
Wilmington & Laurinburg j58-2080
10-6MonFri.
&M& CALL 75B-4W, OR carter &2P
Colonial Heights ,0s,
Wed. -
DTkMY witf w special any Elbo clothing worn
PONY NITE K Beyerage fof 45C
SPONSORED BY:
CROWS NEST
FAMOUS PIZZA
PEPSI
SSNr40 GOO�$ �0i.CAS�W0RKSH0P
SaRSH'S SURF N SEA MARATHON RESTAURANT
FOR HEAD'S ONLY
SHARPE'S
U.B.E.
PIZZA TRANSIT AUTHORITY
FAMOUS PIZZA
Fast, Friendly Delivery
Delivery is h'Kh.l-
758-5982 or 5616
DAILY
FOOD
SPECIALS
Happy Hour �
2-Close
$1" Pitcher
45t Draft






14 fHE EAST CAROL ONI AN OCTOBER 26, 1982
U
him j�
mm, novmbcu
Duke Ellington's
PtlLTTi QTCD
SATELLITE PRESENTATION
WITH
E.C. U. STUDENT UNION
FRIDAY, NOV. 5th, 1982 � 9:30 p.m. � WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
STUDENTS $6.00 � FACULTYSTAFF $9.00 � GENERAL PUBLIC $12.00
DOORS OPEN 45 MINUTES EARLY � COLLEGE ID. REQUIRED
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT The Mendenhall
Student Center-Central Ticket Office
PRODUCED BY �
b
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
I





Title
The East Carolinian, October 26, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 26, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.225
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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