The East Carolinian, October 21, 1982






�be Safit (Unniliuinn
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No J5
ja
Thursday, October 21,1982
Greenville, N.C.
2 Sections 18 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Blue Light Telephones
Security System Operational
By STEVE DEAR
Miff Writer
I ast week the ECU Department
of Public Safety announced that the
blue light security telephone system
has become fully operational.
Each telephone is encased in a
weatherproof box that is attached to
a pole with a blue light on top.
"The purpose of the system is to
trv to give the student body a
quicker response in cases when they
need help said Joseph Calder,
director of public safety. The system
is also designed to deter criminals
from the areas in which the blue
lights are located.
The telephone system is to be used
by anyone who needs the assistance
of a public safety officer or anyone
who witnesses a crime.
If a person needs assistance, he or
she should locate a phone (look for
a blue light), open the box encasing
the phone and lift up the receiver.
The instant after a receiver has been
lifted a public safety officer will
dispatch an officer to the location of
the phone. Then, the officer will
speak to the person in need of
assistance.
Calder stated that misuse of the
telephone system can and will lead
to prosecution, similar to prosecu-
tion for misuse of the fire alarm
system.
According to Dr. Elmer Meyer,
vice chancellor for student life, the
system was approved in the spring
of 1980, after he suggested the idea
in 1979. Construction started in
1981 but was delayed because the
Carolina Telephone Company had
complications in installing the
phone lines. The switchboard in
Howard House, the location of the
Department of Public Safety, also
had to be rebuilt.
The system is currently in opera-
tion in many other universities such
as N.C. State, Cornell, and the
University of Wisconsin �
Milwaukee.
If the system proves to be a suc-
cess the university may add several
more telephones in other locations
on campus.
The locations for the telephones
were determined in part by easy ac-
cessibility, well-known locations,
volume of pedestrian traffic, and
areas of isolation on the campus.
They are as follows:
� In the large paved parking lot
south of Joyner Library and
Mendenhall Student Center in the
north center area of the lot.
� At the corner of Seventh and
James Streets on the east side of
James Street.
See SECURITY, page 8
(AST CRfiOUnfl umVERSITy
Dots indicate position of securit phones on campus.
Governor Hunt Supports Extended Benefits For Unemployed
RALEIGH (UPI) Gov. James
B. Hunt Jr. said Wednesday he is
concerned over the loss of extended
unemployment benefits for 15,000
jobless North Carolinians and he
hopes it will become a campaign
issue in the No. 2 congressional
races.
"This is no time to be penalizing
people who through no fault of their
own, are out of work, trying to find
a job and who are struggling to pro-
ide for themselves and their
tamities the governor said at his
weekly news conference.
All workers who are laid off
because of plant shutdowns are now
eligible for 26 weeks of unemploy-
ment benefits. Those who have not
found new jobs have been eligible
for an additional 13 weeks of
benefits under the supplemental
program, but about 15,000 jobless
North Carolinians and workers in
eight other states will lose those
benefits Saturday.
Some of them will be eligible for
an additional six to 10 weeks of sup-
plemental benefits under another
program expiring in March.
Hunt said the cutoff was caused
by changes in the complex formula
for supplemental benefits. The
change was pushed by the Reagan
administration and enacted by Con-
gress last year, amid projections
unemployment would be about 7
percent nationally.
But the national jobless rate is
now 10.1 percent, he said, and "this
is the kind of time you need those
additional weeks.
"We're at a time right now when
we've got a lot of people hurting
he said.
Hunt said he was raising the issue
because he is concerned about
vorkers and he wants Congress to
restore the benefits when it returns
after the elections.
"I don't think there's any ques-
tion there are political implications
to this he said, and he hopes can-
didates will make it an issue in the
two weeks before the elections.
The governor said it is unfair
because South Carolina workers will
remain eligible for supplemental
benefits while North Carolina
workers will lose them. It would be
difficult for the Legislature to find
money to continue the program on a
state level, he said.
In other topics, Hunt downplayed
the significance of a planned visit by
President Reagan to Raleigh next
week, saying the trip would
motivate GOP workers but could
also inspire Democrats to work
harder for candidates they support.
He said he felt there would be no
substantial change in the current
lineup of seven Democrats and four
Republicans in Congress, but
repeated earlier warnings the GOP
will out-end the Democratic Party
by a large margin.
While Reagan remains personally
popular, Hunt said the president's
policies have slipped in popularity.
Democrats must counter
Republican campaign distortions by
stressing the economic issues and
the recession, Hunt said.
The governor also sidestepped
comment on a recent poll showing
him ahead of Sen. Jesse Helms,
R-N.C, if the 1984 Senate race were
held now. The poll, by the Universi-
ty of North Carolina journalism
school, showed Hunt held a 51-35
lead over Helms, but Helms has not
lost any popularity in the state
despite losing Senate battles over
prayer in schools and abortions.
"Polls of that kind don't make
any particular impression on me
said Hunt, but he admitted, "I
sometimes look with interest at what
people do
There has been widespread
speculation Hunt will challenge
Helms in two years, but the gover-
nor said he has made no plans for a
race.
Local Company To Lay Off Employees
ECU Selected To See
Sneak Preview Concert
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
One of Greenville's largest
employers, the Proctor and Gamble
Company, has announced that they
are laying off 10 percent of their
workforce effective Dec. 3.
The statement from Proctor and
Gamble comes less than a week after
it was announced that the national
unemployment rate had reached
10.1 percent. This is the first time
that the U.S. unemployment rate
has hit double digit figures since the
1940s.
Gene Parker, a spokesperson for
the Proctor and Gamble plant, said
that it was hard to say if the layoff
at the Greenville facility could be at-
tributed to the present economic
situation.
Parker noted that the layoff in-
volved 50 technicians who have been
with the plant for less than three
years. He said that the layoffs were
necessary because of the curtailment
of the plants Pampers business.
"We have more-capacity than We
need right now he said. "The
plant primarily ships to interna-
tional markets
Parker mentioned that much of
Proctor and Gamble's international
shipping was no longer necessary
because their foreign affiliates have
now developed their own produc-
tion facilities. Much of the expor-
ting of Pampers disposable diapers,
which was coming from N.C. ports,
are now being done via their West
German plants, said Parker.
"We're very upset about the
whole thing Parker continued. He
noted that this was the first time
that any layoffs had to be made at
the Greenville facility in its seven
years of operation in Greenville.
Laid-off employees will be eligi-
ble for "recall rights" for one year,
but there was no way to predict if
any of them would be rehired.
Parker said. He added that no addi-
tional layoffs were anticipated at
this time.
Greenville Mayor Percy Cox
when reached for comment noted
that the layoffs were unfortunate.
He said that he had no further com-
ment at this time.
B GREG HIDEOUT
ECU is one of 15 schools
throughout the country selected by
Campus Entertainment Network to
view a sneak preview of their new
atelllte network. On Saturday, Oct.
30, at 10 p.m. CEN will beam live-
via-satellite the music of Devo and
Wall of Vodoo to a 40-feet high
screen in Wright Auditorium.
"It's what major entertainment is
coming down to said Ken Ham-
mond, assistant programing direc-
tor at Mendenhall Student Center.
"All because of cost
ECU was picked to be part of the
network, according to Hammond,
because of the size of its facilities,
campus population and proximity
to a major market. He explained
that a marketing firm was hired by
CEN to find schools to meet this
criteria.
The venture will not cost ECU
any money. Hammond says CEN
will fit Wright Auditorium with the
necessary equipment to make it
acoustically perfect. They will also
install a receiver disk for the satellite
transmission. "We will be responsi-
ble for promotion and assisting with
on-site production he said.
Hammond said the next show will
be Duke Ellington's "Sophisticated
Ladies" live from Broadway on
Nov. 5. The official launching of
CEN is in December with a concert
featuring The Who.
Hammond says the network plans
to broadcast lectures and sporting
events as well as concerts and plays.
The agreement with CEN is for
See LIVE, page 5
New Marketing Chairman Selected
Departments Split In Business School
By DARRYL BROWN
Aafctaat Nm Editor
The ECU School of Business this
semester has divided its Department
of Marketing and Management into
two seperate divisions, completing
the last of the adminstrative
modifications planned for the
school.
Dr. Edward W. Wheatley, for-
mally chairman of the marketing
department at Univerity of Miami,
has joined the ECU faculty this
semester to head the new marketing
department. Dr.Carl W. Gooding,
formally chairman of marketing
and management, will head the new
management division.
The departments now have
separate facilities, with most of the
classrooms adjacent to faculty of-
fices, to promote student-teacher
communication. The management
department, according to Gooding,
will offer two areas of concentra-
tion: human resource management
and production management.
The new marketing department is
growing in size and course offer-
ings, says Wheatley. They are ac-
tively recruiting two new faculty
members at the national level to
begin teaching in the fall semester of
1983.
The department currently has
nine full-time professors and five
adjunct professors who are active,
prominant businesspersons in the
professional marketing field.
The department is planning to of-
fer several new courses in their cur-
riculum. Possible courses include
service marketing, public relations
and music merchandising. The
department is hoping to offer
courses of value to music majors
and arts and sciences students.
Wheatley is meeting with the
music department next week to
discuss the possibility of an option
for music students with a business
emphasis. He also hopes some new
marketing courses will be valuable
and of interest to pre-law, health
care and medical students.
"I'm very much in favor of the
idea of having qualified students
take double majors or free electives
in business Wheatley said. "I'm
enthusiastic about the possibility of
having arts and sciences students in
our marketing courses
The marketing department is
planning several seminars in the new
Branch Banking and Trust Manage-
ment Development Centerand is
preparing a brochure, to be
available by spring semester, that
discusses the field of marketing,
course options and career oppor-
tunities for students.
Class Officers Denied Vote
Enjoying Her Fall Break
This ECU faculty member spent her fall break in the mountains of western N.C.
MM By STAWLCY LCA Y
By BUDDY CONNER
Staff Writer
A ruling by the SGA attorney
general, Mike Swaim, has put the
status of the recently elected SGA
legislature speaker in doubt.
Swain, at the request of SGA
President Eric Henderson, ruled
that under his interpretation of the
SGA constitution class officers do
not have a vote in the legislature.
This ruling also means that Gary
Williams, graduate class president,
can not serve as speaker, a job
which the legislature by aclaimation
elected him for at their last meeting.
Williams said the decision ap-
pears to have been politically
motivated since the request for the
ruling was' made by Henderson prior
to Williams being elected to the
position of speaker. He also ex-
plained that Henderson, as junior
class president last year, had been a
voting member of the legislature.
Williams is appealing the attorney
general's ruling to the Review Board
and according to Swaim, no date
has been set for the board to meet to
consider the appeal. This, Swaim
explained, is to ensure fairness for
Williams. "The new Review Board
has not been selected yet and the old
one has worked with me in the past
and may be partial to me he ex-
plained.
Swaim's ruling is controversial
because there are conflicting sec-
tions in the constitution. Article III,
Section 2 states that "No person ex-
cept a full-time student at East
Carolina University shall be eligible
for a legislative office; neither shall
any person be eligible to that office
who is serving on the Executive
Council of a judiciary body
Class officers serve on the Executive
Council.
Article IV, Section 5(B) states
that "The president of the several
classes shall enjoy the following
powers and duties: (1) To be a
member of the Executive Council.
(2) To be an ex-officio member of
the Legislature. (3) To perform all
duties as delegated by the
Legislature
Ex-officio members have, accor-
ding to Robert's Rules of Order and
SGA tradition, always had the right
to vote. Also, Williams was
delegated by the legislature to serve
as speaker.
This gives Williams his ground
See ATTORNEY, page 1
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 21, 1982
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
it you or your organization
would like to nave an item printed
in the announcement column,
please type it on an announcement
form and send it to Tne East
Carolinian m care of tne produc
tion manager
Announcement forms are
available at tne East Carolinian
office m tne Publications Building.
Flyers and handwritten copy on
odd sued paper cannot be ac
cepted
There is no cnarge tor an
nouncements but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you want
and suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column for publicity
The deadline tor announcements
is 3 p m Monday tor the Tuesday
paper and 3pm Wednesdayy for
the Thursday paper No an
nouncements received after these
deadlines will be printed
This space is available to all
campus organizations and depart
menfs
COMMUNITY
THEATRE
The first meeting of the Com
munity Theatre Group will take
piace on Tuesday, Oc'ooer 26 at 7
PM in Rawl 232 Actors, singers,
oancers and technicians welcome
Experience is nice, but not
necessary A full length musical is
be'ng planned tor Spring
For more information, call Al
Agate at 758 9474
BIBLE ISTRUTH
The B'ble is truth it is NOT iust
another good book because it was
written by Men of God who were
inspired by God (II Tim 3 16, II
Peter 1 21) H is not a book of
nega'ive laws but the heart of
God giving us attitudes and pr.n
oples to iive by so we can prosper,
enioy life, aa really "eip others
(II Tim 3 16. John 10 10. I Tim
6 17! Ccme learn more of tne truth
ot God s word so you can change
your life for the better (Romans
12 2) Monday, October 18th at
Wndenhaii Studen' Center, in
Rm 242 at 7 30
COOP
T he co op office has available an
-pportunify witht he Federal Law
E ntorcement Training Center in
its Criminal Justice intern Pro
gram The internship runs from
January 3 through March 11 and is
located n Glynco, Georgia tor
rore information contact Nancy
Fiilnow in the Co op office, ext
6979
BACKGAMMON
The Department of University
Unions is sponsoring an All
Campus Backgammon Tourna
ment on Monday. October 25. 1982
a" 6 00 PM m "he MSC Multi Pur
pose Room All ECU full time
students with a 2 0 GPA are eligi
cie to enter Register at tne
B ihards Center by Friday. Oc
'coer 22 Trophies will be awarded
to first, second, and third place
t.n,shers It sufficient participa
fton permits, 2 winners will repre
sent ECU at the Association of Col
lege Unions international
Regional Tournament in Knox
vule. Tennessee
CO�OP JOB
Burroughs Wellcome in Green
ville has an alternating Co op posi
tion open in its Validation Depart-
ment. The job win be for two
terms beginning in January. 1983
INDT students with some
background in math, physics,
computers, electricity, and
chemistry and who hav good
writing skills should contact Nan
cy Fiilnow in the Co op office, ext.
6979
CHEMISTRY MAJORS
Burroughs Wellcome in
Research Triangle Park has an
alternating co op position open tor
a chemistry major The job will in
volve working with chemistry
researchers and begins in January
1983 running for about six months.
All interested chemistry majors
with at least two semesters of
organic chemistry should contact
Nancy Fiilnow in the Co op office,
ext 6979
SING BEETHOVEN
The Beethoven Ninth Sym
phony, for orchestra and chorus,
will be performed by the ECU
Symphony with chorus on Sun
Nov 14. at 315 pm in Wright
Auditorium The chorus will in
dude an School of Music choruses
and the Greenville Community
Chorus
ECU students, faculty, and staff
with some choral experience are
invited to participate in the
chorus Rehearsals will be con
ducted by Or Brett Watson of the
music faculty each Tuesday
(except Oct 19) beginning Oct
12, from 3 4.00 p m in Rm 105 of
the Fletcher Music Center Final,
rehearsals will be Fri , Nov 12, at
7 30pm and Sat , Nov 13, at 200
pm (Interested persons may
begin rehearasais Oct 12 or Oct
26.) Singers should bring their own
choral scores, available from the
ECU Student Supply Store.
CO-OP
The Co op office has a job open
ing tor an accounting position
avaibie with a local manutactur
mg firm Requires adding
machine experience and accoun
tmg background interested
students should inquire at the Co
op office, located in Rawl at room
313
PRC MAJORS
Seymour Johnson Air Force
Base in Goidsboro. NC has an
alternating Co op position
available for Spring semester in
the r recreation department The
position reequires a 2 0 GPA and
you must be willing to work for
two terms It is an excellent opor
tuhity for anyone interested in
gaming valuable work experience
m the area of recreation Salary:
approximately $1,000 per month
gross Contact Nancy Fiilnow in
the Coop office. 313 Rawl,
757 6979, if you would like to apply
or want more information.
TUTOR
Phi Sigma Pi, the National
Honor Fraternity is offering tutors
tor a variety of General College
subjects at competitive rates. If
you are hi need of a tutor call
752 3072 for more information.
POSITION FOR
INDT MAJOR
There is an opening with Long
Manufacturing Co. for a Quality
Control Supervisor. This perma-
nent position involves setting up
and maintaining a quality control
program in Rumania tor tractors
manufactured for Long. The star
ting date in immediately and the
salary is negotiable. Contact Nan
cy Fiilnow in the Co op office, ext.
6979, for more information.
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
COURSES
Personal Development Courses
begin
Oct 21 Real Estate Finance,
Commodity Hedging Oct. 26 -
AerobicExercise Nov. 17 Real
Estate Appraisal.
For information call 757 6143.
CO-OP
Part-time coop training posi
tions are available with Buehler
Mfg. Co. in Kinston. These train
ing positions could lead to full
time opportunities in Production
Supervision. Production Control
or Purchasing in the new Buehler
plant in Raleigh beginning June,
1983. All interested INDT majors
contact Nancy Fiilnow in the Co-
op office, ext 6979
WOMEN'S RUGBY
its still not too late to play
Anyone interested in playing
womens rubgy needs to report to
practices Tuesday thru Thursday
at 4 00 We practice behind the
Allied Health (Beik) building Ab
solutely no previous experience is
required
CAR BASHZ
Today and tomorrow Oct 21 and
22 on the Mall, the Geology Club
has organized a tundraising Car
Bash Come start the Homecom
ing weekend off with a smash.
NUTRITION
The Nutrition and Community
Health class in the Department of
Food. Nutrition, and Institution
Management will present a pro
gram on Nutritious Snacks for
children The program, which
centers around a Halloween
theme, will be presented to the
students of Falkland Elementary
School on Monday October 25.
WANTED
A Graduate student or faculty
member to become an advisor for
the ECU Lacrosse club Please
call for more information after
6:00 O'clock 758 6914 Ask for Nick
Pell or Bill Jenkins, it no answer
call 758 1418 after 6 o'clock and ask
for Brad Brown
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FAMILY EYE CARE
and
CONTACT LENSES
Adult and Pediatric vision care in a
relaxed and personal setting. Full eon-
tad lens services Quiek. aecurale
eyeglass service.
DR PETER W HOLLIS
� CAM CENTO
Of GAtCiVHiC r�
TiPTON ANNEX ??8 GREtNVILlE BLVD
756-9404
OFF
Any Prescription
Eyeglasses Or
Contact Lens Fitting
Must Be Presented At Time Of Order
Other Discounts Do Not Apply
PSICHI
Psi Chi initiation win be held at
Mendenhall Multipurpose Room
on October 26 followed by a Wine
and Cheese Social from 7 30 to
9 00 pm tor members. new intiates
and their dates. Reservations
must be ,nade by October 22 and
Psi Chi Library or calling 7 56 8495
This is your chance to meet all the
members and take an active part
in supporting Psi Chi.
SCHOLARSHIPS
The School of Art is offering ten
scholarships for undergraduate
art students of the junior and
senior rank. Eight scholarships
are in the amount of $250 each
Two scholarships, established by
Don and Jack Edwards of the
University Book Exchange, are in
the amount of S500 each To
quality, a student must have a
GPA of 3 5 m art, and an overall of
3.0. Slides of five works (name, ti
tie, media, and size) must accom
pany the scholarship application
form Application forms may be
obtained from the School of Art Of
fice The deadline for all com
pleted application material is
November 30
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines. There are 33
units per line. Each letter, punc-
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end of line if word
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac
cepted over the phone. We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
75� per line or fraction of a line.
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lower case letters.
Kfiurn to MEDIA BOARD office (Ml EAST
CAROLINIAN (fieri � 2 p.m. Monday befonr
Tundat paper and Vtedaetday before Tb�rsa
publication
I Name.
Address.
CityState.
Mi?-lines �
-Zip.
Phone.
at 75c per line $.
, No insertions.
.enclosed
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SKI FLASH
HOMECOMING
DECORATIONS
Any organization wishing to
enter me Float of HouseDorm
Decorating competition for
homecoming should submit an ap
plication to Jon Curtis Room 203
Mendenhall by October 8
Snowski regisrtafion for
Christmas Break Trip will be Nov
9 at 4 00 PM in Memorial Gym 108
A 15 deposit will be accepted to
reserve your space Call Jo
Saunders at 757 6000 if you need
more information
FRISBEE
Learn new disc skills, play
ultimate, or just come to the bot
torn of College Hill Tuesdays and
Thursdays at 4 00 to throw tnsbee
and enioy these remaining
beautiful, warm autumn days
Club meetings are Mondays at
8 00 in MSC. room 248 1982
Natural Light Flying Disc Classic
Video will be shown at the Attic on
Wed Nov 10.
ECU LAW
The ECU Law Society will meet
Thursday evening, October 21 in
room 241 of MSC Guest Lecturer
will be Ms Betsy Warren, At
torney representing Wake Forest
Law School.
GAMMA BETA
PHI
Our next group meeting will be
nejd on Oct 21 m MendenhaH's
room 221 at 7 00 PM Plan to at
tend
STUDIES GOT
YOU DOWN?
A two part mini series offered at
NO cost by t he University Counsel
mg Center from 3 4pm 305 Wright
Annex On Monday, October 25,
How to Succeed m College and
Still Have Fun and on Tuesday,
October 26, How to Avoid Test
Anxiety" No advance registration
is necessary
LEARING
A program for increasing Lear
ning Efficiency will be offered by
the Counseling Center this fall. Dr.
George Weigand will teach the
class on Monday and Wednesday
at 100 PM begimng October 25
and Or Wilbert R Ball will teach
the class on Tuesday and Thurs
day at 1 00 pm begming Oct. 26.
Both groups will meet in 305
Wright Annex The Classes are
available to all students Atten
dance is voluntary no fromal
registration is required.
PHI KAPPA PHI
"Toward the New Millennium:
Challenges and Dreams will be
the theme of the eighth annual
ECU Phi Kappa Phi symposium to
be held on campus in early
February, of 83 A call for both
faculty and student papers suppor
tmg this theme, which deals with
the future, has tieen issued In an
ticipation of the new millennium,
papers are invited to deal with a
wide range of topics ranging from
discussions of the near future will
or may hold Faculty are invited,
at this time, to submit abstracts of
approximately one page with a
deadline for submission of
November 15 Papers selected will
be announced by November 24.
Student papers directed toward
the same theme are invited, two of
which will be selected for a award
of JIO0 each The best student
paper submitted will be included
m the symposium program Both
faculty and student papers are to
be submitted to Dr j W. Byrd,
Department of Physics
BAPTIST STUDENT
UNION
HEY! Do you enjoy friendly
fellowship, good friends and food,
and a chance to be yourself n this
"rat race" environment at ECU?
Then come iom us at tne Baptist
Student union where we nave din-
ners on Tuesdays at 5:30 for only
$1 75 PAUSE on Thursdays at
7 00 to allow us to take a break
after an almost fulfilling week,
and lots of people iust like you who
enjoy others Call 752 4646 if you
have any questions Bob Clyde
campus minister
CO-OP
Duke Power has available a
variety of co-op positions. All work
experiences are tor alternating
semesters beginning in January or
May '983 and are located in
Charlotte Any interested students
with a minimum GPA of 2 0 and
majoring in Computer Science,
Math, Business Education, Office
Administration, industrial Educa-
tion, industrial Technology,
Chemistry or Environmental
Health should contact tne Co op of
fice, ext 6979
SLAPBAKESALE
If you're hungry for Mom's
home cooking, we have the next
best thing. Come on out Sat Oct
23 from 10 a.m. until 12 noon to the
SLAP bakesale in the tresnman
parking lot across from Beef'n
Shakes Help make this fundraiser
a success!
CO�OP
There win be an organizational
meeting tor the Co-op club on
Thursday. October 21, at 4:00 p.m.
in 306 Rawl The club is for an
returning Co op students and those
interested In the Cooperative
Education program at ECU. Call
757 6979 for more information
BRODY BUILDING
DEDICATION
ECU faculty, staff and students
are invited to a special open house
at the School of Medicine's Brody
Medical Sciences Building Man
day. Oct 25 from 3:00 6:00 pm
The tour is one of several special
events to be htid to highlight the
dedication of the school's new S26
million facility
ECU guests will be able to tour
teaching areas and research
laboratories and see many of the
building's special features, in
eluding a biohazards contamnc-
facility Refreshments will be
served
Gov James B Hunt Jr will be
the keynote speaker at the formal
dedication and ribbon cutting on
Oct. 29 at 4 00 pm The ECU Wind
Ensemble under the direction of
Prof Herbert L Carter will per
form
Also scheduled during dedica
tion week are an open house for
Pitt County Memorial Hospital
employees on Oct 26 and special
continuing medical education pro-
gram on calicum antagonists on
Oct 27
Rock � roll
with a
Mil
The Record Bar goes undercover to bring you
two albums of perilous rock at a very safe price.
38 Special "Special Forces"
Spy "Spys"
on sale through October 27
$6.49 LP$6.99 Tape
Record Bar
RECORDS. TAPES � A LITTLE BIT MORE
Pitt PlazaCarottrta East Matt
ZETABETATAU
There wil be � meeting at 6:00 at
New Deli on Thursday October 21.
Ail of the officers must be present
at 5:30. If there are any questions
call 758 790 or 753 7290. Anyone in-
terested is welcomed to attend, if
is not too late to be a charter
member
PHYE MAJORS
All students who plan to declare
physical education as a major dur
ing change of major week for the
Fall Semester, should report to
Minges COMseum from 12:00-2:00
p.m. on Thursday. December 9,
1982 (reading day) for � motor
physical fitness test. Satisfactory
performance on this test Is re-
quired as a pre requisite to' of
ficial admittance to the physical
education major program. More
detailed information concerning
the test is available by calling
757 6497
Any student with a medical con-
dition that would contrainaicafe
participation in the testing pro
gram should contact Dr. Israel at
757 6497 Examples would include
heart murmurs, congenital heart
disease or significant
muscuioskeietai problems if you
have nay significant medical con
ditions please notify Dr Israel
even if you plan to be tested.
CADP
Tne Campus Alcohol and Drug
Program will hold a meeting on
October 26 at 5 00 pm m the second
floor conference room of Erwin
Hall. Any student intersted in fur
thering responsible attitudes
toward tne use of chemical
substances is encouraged to at-
tend For more information call
757 6793 or 757 6649
CO-OP
Black and Decker in Tarboro
has an opening tor a part time ac
counting clerk. Tne person must
be able to perform miscellaneous
accounting duties such as paying
invoices and general bookkeep-
ing Preferred s someone who can
operate a 10-key adding machine.
Employment would start as soon
as possible For more info, can the
Co-op office, ext. ef79
SIGMA TAU
DELTA
We're having a Halloween
Costume Party nexi Thursday
nignt, October 2tth. ah party
goers who wish to participate a
our costume contest must dress up
as a literary character The BEST
costume wins S25. English Depart
ment faculty as wen as members
are cordially invited. Time and
place win be posted later Stay
tuned!
FRISBEE
Weather permitting, we will be
at the bottom of college hill today.
ana every Tues and Thurs. at
4.00. Look for the frisbee dub in
the Homecoming parade. 19�2
Natural Light Flying Disc Class c
video win be snown at the Attic
Wed Nov 10 Club meetings are
Monday nights-l 00 in Mendenhall
Room 24t. anyone interested n
frisbee is urged to attend
BE A CLOWN
Anyone who would like to star in
the homecoming parade by dress
ing like a clown and giving out
balloons, or iust for the excuse of
acting crazy in public, please con
tact John Curtis MS Center and
leave your name and pnone
number Thanks!
CATHOLIC
NEWMAN CENTER
The Catholic Newman Center
would like to invite everyone to
join in with us for celebrating
Mass every Sunday n the Biology
Lecture Han starting at 12 30 and
every Wednesday at 5 00 at the
Catholic Newman Center located
down at the bottom of College Hill
The Catholic Newman Center is
having a Burger and Beer Bash 111
and you are invited it will be held
Sunoay October 24 at 2:30 till
whenever, it win be held at tne
Newman Center, 953 E 10th
Street, located at the bottom of trie
Hill we will supply tne oeer
burgers, notoogs and soda Please
bring a salad or dessert, and a Si
donation Hope to see you there.
PROSE
CONTEST
The REBEL sconouct.ngapro
se contest, open to an current ECU
students First prize is S�25. se
cond prile M S100. and third prie
is S7S. Pnre money is provided by
the Attic and Budweise' Submit
typed entries to tne REBEL or
Media offices located n the
publications building The
deadline is November I so ge'
busy The winners win be pub. 6
eo m REBEL 83 ana af ante's
will be convoked A copy of the
rules is pos'ed outside the REBEi-
office if you "ave any questions
POETRY
CONTEST
Need some extra money Er-er
the REBEL poe'ry ccres" ao
you could win the S90 Nrtl pr it
$70 second pr.xe or 'he Sac Haird
prize Prize money s prav vec o�
the Attic ano Budweise' Tne cor
test If open to an current ECU
students, and aH entries snou'C be
submitted to tne REBEL Dr Mec a
Board offices in tne putucaons
building py November t nciyoe a
cover sheet with your aa-ie ad
dress and telephone number yym
ners win be pubisMeo Hi tne
REBEL and an o'hers �fN be cor
sidered
S.R.A.
Stuoen' Residence Association
now has an office loca'ed l� Gree"
Hall Anyone interested H con
tnbufing 'deas offering
assistance or asking questions
having to do with tne Stude
Residence Association tee' tree �c
come by Office Hours are from
2 X pm to 4 00 pm Monday
through Friday
COMMERCIAL
ART
Fasnionmooei announcement
dates have been changec to
November 3 and 4. 7 00 to 10 0C
4 HCLUB
The ECu Conegiate 4H Cant
will meet October 25 n room 248 of
MSC at 5 15 Everyone welcome
For questions can 7S� 8887
Carolina east mall Sgreenville
If s Gant Week! FREE Mug! FREE Giveaway!
Register now for a week's worth (7) of drMi shirts to be given away October
aOthl No purchase is necessary to register. Also, a Gant mug will be givan
away with the purchase of a Gant shirt or slacks at regular price. Our Gant
salesman, Joe Overfett will be here Saturday, October 23rd to help you.
Make Gant your best wardrobe investment for long
comfort! Polyestercotton, 100 2x2 ply cotton oxford shirts,
plaids. Sizes 14 to 17, 32 to 36. Mi to tM
Shop Monday Through Saturday 10 a.m. Until 9 p.m.
Phone 756-B-E-L-K (756-2366)
year round






Amendments On State Ballot
THF EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 21.1982
RALEIGH (UP1) �
North Carolinians will
decide the fate of con-
stitutional amendments
affecting the start of
legislative terms and
finances for urban
renewal projects when
they vote Nov. 2.
Unlike the furor last
spring over proposed
tour-year terms for
General Assembly
members, this fall's
suggested changes have
generated hardly any
debate. Both are likely
to pass.
The first amendment
would push back the
start of a legislator's
term from election day
to Jan. 1, mostly to ac-
commodate local of-
ficials who are headed
to the General
Assembly.
The Constitution
forbids an official from
holding two public jobs
at the same time. This
meant, for example,
that a mayor elected to
the House would have
to resign from City
Hall immediately after
winning the legislative
seat, even though he
wouldn't be going to
Raleigh for several
more months.
Senior Deputy At-
torney General James
F. Bullock said he
favors the change
because it eliminates
confusion over what a
local official can do.
But Rep. JP. Huskins,
D-lredell, believes it
will only cause confu-
sion.
"If something hap-
pened and the governor
had to call a special ses-
sion you'd have a
School Budgets Cut
EAST LANSING.
MI (CPS) � Budget
cuts have gone so deep
that Michigan State
University dorm
residents now must pay
extra for a sound
night's sleep.
The university has
stopped supplying
dorm residents with
feather pillows this fall
as part of an effort to
save money, explains
Donald Schmidt, assis-
tant dorm manager.
Students now have to
bring their own pillows
to school.
MSU and all
Michigan state schools
already have had to
cope with four budget
cuts this year as the
state tries to make up
for revenue shortfalls
in the depressed region.
Losing pillows isn't
the first indignity MSU
students have suffered.
In July, the school an-
nounced it would
replace its traditional
"leatherette" diploma
covers with 35-cent
cardboard covers.
But MSU students
aren't the only ones ex-
periencing such hard-
ships. Colleges in more
than 20 states are being
forced to cut budgets
� and in some cases
student services � in
mid-fiscal year.
Kansas State, for ex-
ample, now delivers
grades to students by
hand instead of by
mail, thus saving some
$4000 a term in postage
costs.
At American Univer-
sity in Washington,
D.C dorms have
removed paper towels
from lounges, laid off
security guards, and
shut down air condi-
tioning during the day.
Northern Illinois
students recently
camped outside to pro-
test the shutting down
of their dorm air condi-
tioning.
Maryland recently
became the largest
school to drop free
telephones from the list
of dorm amenities.
The most serious ef-
fects of the state cut-
backs have been on
academic jobs and pro-
grams. During the sum-
mer. Temple Univesity
fired 50 tenured pro-
fessors, while Sonoma
State fired 29.
The State University
of New York at
RCADF N XRIKM
Miller
$2.39
Gl Cainoutiagtd Fatiguii and
T Shirts Sleeping Baqs
HacKp�c� Camping Equip
merit Steel Toed Shoes
Dishf s and Over 700 OiMerent
New. and Used Items Cowboy
Boots 13� 95
ARMY-NAVY
SYORE fUr"
Brockport laid off 52
teachers, eliminated its
geography, German
and Music majors, and
cut a number of course
offerings.
The University of
Idaho similarly reduced
the number of classes it
offers, ended its
museum studies pro-
gram and stopped its
tutoring service to
students.
Over the last two
weeks, Alabama,
Georgia and Colorado
colleges learned they
would have to slash
their budgets for the
year.
The problems arise
when local economies
sour, people make less
money, and thus pay
the states less in taxes
than the states had
planned to spend. Even
though a majority of
state legislatures actual-
ly budgeted more for
higher education than
they did last year, a ma-
jority of those have
since had to renege on
their promises of more
money. When that hap-
pens, all state-funded
institutions � in-
cluding colleges �
typically have to 1m-
ARCADE ARIETY
;i�t S ii a titbit '� i�
All
2 Liters
99C
pose emergency cut-
backs.
It took two years of
such cuts to affect stu-
dent service at
Michigan State.
Now "we annually
go through all the ser-
vices we offer to
students to see which
are most utilized and
cost-effective
Schmidt says. "Pillows
have been a high-
replacement item for
us
MSU spent $22,000
last year to repair or
replace warm feather
pillows, Schmidt says.
Some 4000 pillows �
out of a total of 16,000
� are typically replac-
ed because of wear and
destruction during
pillow tights.
Schmidt says of-
ficials have been ex-
perimenting with ways
of solving the pillow
problem, including us-
ing throw-away
pillows. "But the
throw-aways didn't
even make it through a
year's use
Students apparently
are bringing their own
without much fuss,
however.
bunch of lame ducks in
Raleigh passing on
whatever happens to be
called he said.
The other amend-
ment would let a city
issue "tax increment"
bonds for specific parts
of their communities
without seeking voter
approval.
The bonds would
raise money for public
works in a particular
area, such as a civic
center or parking deck.
Those bonds funding
those projects then
would be paid back by
the growth in property
taxes � the tax incre-
ment � assessed
private businesses in
the area.
"It's such a nice new
financing device said
Ernest Ball, legal coun-
ABORTIONS
1 -i4 week terminations
App'ts. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1 800 321 0575
cheapest gomes
in town
You won't
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on games
anywhere in
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�2 tree tokens witn each
food order
� Great sandwiches
� Supervised Game Room
� Take-out Service
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game
756-9219
264 Bypass Behind Ramada Inn
South Park Shopping CenterGreenville
Watch for our ad in the East Carolinian
on Tues Oct. 26, about our annual
Halloween Sidewalk Sale for Oct. 27.
Bargains and fun for all.
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
Wright Building
Owned and operated by hast Carolina University
cil for the North
Carolina League of
Municipalities. "It
would make it much
easier to provide public
facilities in conjunction
with private develop-
ment in downtown
areas without putting a
charge against the
public
Huskins said he liked
the idea in general but
opposed issuing bonds
without a public vote.
Ball argued, however,
that many bonds are
charged only against
certain groups, such as
for water projects.
State Treasurer
Harlan Boyles also en-
dorsed the amendment,
calling it an innovative
idea for North Carolina
that has proved itself in
nearly 40 other states.
"JS
jegf
752-0476
COUKTRV
C0OKIM6
Daily Special
$t99
plus tea and tax
1 meat, 2 veggies, 1 bread
Open after the game until.
"Tailgate with Barbeque Ribs
& Chicken"
Come see us after the game
and try our new beef tips.
We deliver if S plates or more.
SHOE
ROOM
J t � i i �- innm9' i 4V�
Clothing x
Warehouse Jeam
752-1268
402 S. Evans Street
On the Downtown Mall
Ladies' & Men's Shoes
including:
Topsiders BASS
Leather Men's & Ladies' Boots
and all other name brands
BUY ONE PAIR AT
REGULAR PRICE �
GET 2nd PAIR AT PRICE
12
Also in the back section:
ladies' & Children's
Shoes or Clogs
3 pair for $15
or $7 for 1 pair
Men's Shoes $8.00
Hours: 10:00-5.30 Mon. Sat.
MasterCharge Visa Layaway Plan Available
It
oo
t f We Are Going for
� Volume With Permanently
Reduced Prices
Reg. Our
Brond price Price
Jordache42- 27"
Calvin Klein42" 24"
Chic34- 20"
LeeJr.&Ms29- 18"
Gloria Vanderbilt46" 27"
Men's Lee Rider25" 16"
Boys' Lee Rider19" 12"
Dee Cee 14 ox. Denim15" 9"
For Men & Women UMany Others
Black Denim
Gloria Vanderbilt
9Q99
Reg $42 00 OUR PRICE X7
OVER 3,000 pairs in stock
Next to McDonald's On
264 By Pass, Greenville, N. C.
31
Several Sty In
Overalls
3
Reg. $24 00 OUR PRICE
15
99
Phone 756-0857
MB
i






A
3tt?e laot (Earoltafan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, a- Ma�atrr
Mike Hughes. ManaitlnKtd,�r
Waverly Merritt. mm oj Cindy Pleasants. - mm,
Robert Rucks. �� m Greg Rideout. ,� �,
AU AFRASHTEH. � M- STEVE BACHNER. -�- WOm
Stephanie Croon, c � Juliana Fahrbach. ����
Joni Guthrie. r�- w� M,KE DAV,S- Produc"onManag"
October 14. 1982
Opinion
Page 4
U.S. Politics
Can We Trust Our Leaders?
IN RESPONSE TO THE
PRESIDEN1SSPEECH,
WE DEMOCRATS ASK.
ArHWrMLYBETTER
OFFNWTH
YOU WERE
A YEAR
MO
BESIDES YOU
MRS. REAGAN
Although cases of impropriety
among elected officials are by no
means unique to this time period,
the recent rash of crimes committed
by several of this country's � and
especially this state's � politicians
definitely merits comment.
Only a few weeks ago, amid a
wave of controversy, Rep. Ike An-
drews from North Carolina pleaded
guilty to driving under the influence
of alcohol on his way home from
Washington, D.C. A common of-
fense, admittedly, but nonetheless,
a direct violation of the law.
But even that event seems trivial
by comparison to what has since
evolved. This week's news has been
virtually overflowing with other
reports of similar cases. Unfor-
tunately, it seems a trend is upon us.
In Wednesday's newspapers
alone, three separate stories herald-
ed case after case of illegalities
engaged in by our elected officials.
Closest to home, G. Ronald
Taylor, a former state house
member, was sentenced Tuesday to
five years in prison and a $10,000
fine for accepting a bribe from
federal undercover agents.
He had pleaded guilty to that
charge on Sept. 17, obviously hop-
ing to receive the sympathies of
federal Judge Franklin T. Dupree.
Instead, Dupree � who is apparent-
ly as sick and tired of this all-too-
familiar mess as are most of us �
invoked the maximum penalty
allowed under current law.
But Taylor was only one of 21
persons arrested in that case on July
29 following a 21-month FBI in-
vestigation. Another official, Ed-
ward W. Williamson, a former Col-
umbus County commissioner,
pleaded guilty to bribery on Mon-
day and received a prison sentence
of 10 years.
And still another state official,
District Court Judge J. Wilton
Hunt of Whiteville, is awaiting trial
on several charges, including
counterfeiting, bribery and
racketeering, possession of stolen
property and narcotics violations.
Elsewhere, Rep. Philip Crane,
R-Ill was charged Tuesday with
driving under the influence of
alcohol in San Rafael, Calif. He
Nuclear.
refused to submit to a blood-alcohol
test, and a standard check revealed
he was driving on an expired license.
Sadly, the list goes on and on
from a mayor in Newark, N.J
charged with campaign im-
proprieties to an Erie, Pa county
tax director charged with embezzl-
ing $268,000 in public monies over a
four-year period.
But if there is a point to be had
from all this, then surely it has been
made.
Perhaps it would be too easy to
dwell on the ironies surrounding
lawmakers in today's society. That
argument, however valid, is,
nonetheless, overused. But by the
same token, perhaps we have grown
too accustomed to the infidelities of
our elected officials. Perhaps we
have even become immune.
rCampus Forum
Poetic, Prosaic Responses Uprooted
Ten years ago � roughly speak-
ing the credibility of most U.S.
public officials was simply accepted
as fact. Trustworthiness was merely
a campaign prerequisite � at least
in the eyes of the average voter.
But since the age of Watergate,
the ABSCAM convictions and
numerous other offenses that have
come to plague U.S. politics on a
regular basis, elected officials are
probably the least-trusted persons in
American society.
And aside from all the
characteristic buck-passing that oc-
curs at all levels of government
(starting at the grassroots plateau),
it is this lack of solid trust between
officials and constituents which has,
time and time again, stunted this na-
tion's progress.
After all, it is difficult to believe
that any of the problems and issues
facing the United States today will
ever be absolutely solved when a
goodly number of our "leaders"
consistently opt to break the laws
they are charged with enforcing.
Granted, this oversimplification
of such a truly gigantic tragedy is,
by definition, dangerously over-
simplified. But the dilemma is,
nonetheless, set. As voters, we are
charged with the responsibility of
choosing "the best" candidate in
the upcoming elections. How in hell
are we supposed to know?
First Step In Halting 'Futility'
By PAT O'NEILL
President Reagan is against it; the
Department of Defense is against it; Jesse
Helms and John East are against it. And,
closer to home, ECU Political Science Pro-
fessor Dr. Edwin Griffith is against it.
All these persons are oposed to what is
known as the "Nuclear Freeze" move-
ment. In fact, Griffith goes one step fur-
ther; he implies that the KGB (the Soviet
brand of the CIA) is behind both the freeze
and peace movements in the U.S.
Despite Griffith's absurd claims and
President Reagan's scare-tactic warnings
that a freeze will lock the U.S. in a
vulnerable position of inferiority, the
freeze is here to stay. The people of the
United States and of the world are finally
realizing that the insanity of the nuclear
arms race must be stopped � and revers-
ed.
The nuclear freeze is calling on the
United States and the Soviet Union to �
bi-laterally stop the research and produc-
tion of all nuclear weapons.
Already, the freeze has received
widespread support � cities and towns all
over the country have adopted local freeze
legislation. On election day next month,
the freeze will be on the ballots of several
states in the form of a resolution.
A groundswell is now emerging that
What The Hell Do You Know, Lady?
Nothing more than knowing
I am ready to have
my arms cut off.
Goodbye red-gold
reaching for the moon.
Chaimawed at the ankles,
falling like a fool,
Soon I will crush
my own ripe fruit.
My wavey auburn curls,
squirrel nest barrettes,
also crushed;
our final fall.
Sectioned in all directions,
mauled and split,
they '11 smile
when they heave me
to the fire.
With broken arthritic fingers,
a torn natural dress,
I'll decompose
still feeling the pain.
As I understand it,
the chemicals are next.
Broadcast to my feet
they permanently dissolve
my Mother Earth roots.
Cut, split, burned,
humiliated with acid
what a way
for a 200 year old
lady to go.
They don't understand
I live, feel, remember
before they were born.
I could also forget
the -times they said
they lived.
Maybe that's it.
Like elephants, big turtles,
I live longer
than they do.
They need
to kill me.
But what can I expect?
They kill each other.
Why should they think
anything
about murdering me?
What the hell do you know, Man?
Hal J. Daniel III
Professor, S.L.A.P.
Adjunct Professor, Anthropology
Editor's Note: In addition to his posi-
tion on the faculty at ECU, Hal Daniel is
regional editor Jor Fine Madness, a
Seattle-based poetry review.
The geology faculty would like to be
on record as opposing the Davis Ar-
boretum site for the proposed new
classroom building. We favor a location
between Mendenhall Student Center and
10th Street. This latter site would bring a
more even balance to our campus; it
would avoid adding to the congestion
associated with Brewster, Memorial
Gym and the Science Complex area, and
it would preserve the wooded area
associated with the arboretum.
The question of the building site is not
simply a fight between two gangs, one in
favor of trees, the other in favor of
parking lots. If this were the case, the
mall would be the best site for the new
building and for new parking lots, and
all tree-lovers would come out on the
losing side. The arboretum site will have
negative long-term impacts on the
physical and intellectual character of the
campus.
Also, there is a large reservoir of opi-
nion within the university and Greenville
in favor of saving the arboretum. Many
alumni also would like to see the ar-
boretum area preserved. The ad-
ministration would be wise to consider
these opinions and to refrain from what
many of us feel is callous treatment of
land and trees left as a gift to the univer-
sity.
As far as we can see, the only viable
argument in favor of the arboretum site
is that it may cost less. The university
does not own enough land in the area
that would be a better site between Ninth
and 10th streets! By its ngid point-by-
point defense of the arboretum site, the
administration is substituting trivial
debate for substantive explanation.
The administration also seems to be
unwilling to assume a leadership role in
acquiring the best site for the building.
We are being asked to accept second-
best status for the classroom building.
Evidently, the administration does not
accept second-best status for programs it
deems important.
The successful development of the
medical school and the $1-million cam-
paign for our football team are cases in
point. If second-best status is not bang
accepted for other ECU programs, why
should it be accepted for an academic
classroom building?
A fund-raising drive for the
Mendenhall-10th Street site could begin
with faculty and students. Good
response could form the basis for alum-
ni, community and business support.
These would give added weight to the re-
quest for funds which the general ad-
ministration will eventually have to sub-
mit to the legislative process. All
elements in the community could be in-
volved in putting the new building in the
best site, and the arboretum area could
be preserved. If the administration
wishes to lead, we will follow.
The Geology Faculty
Over The River And Through The Woods
N.C. Home
hopefully will not heed the type of pressure
that is being applied by the likes of these
madmen.
For 37 years, the nuclear arms race Iul,
gone on and on without interruption. It
has been largely orchestrated by the same
people who now oppose the freeze.
These people are living in a fantasy
world. They refuse to sec the futility of the
arms race. Every year, they are given
billions and billions of dollars for
weapons, but it's never enough. They
always want more and more. Fear is the
basis of their argument.
But now, the fear is no longer based
solely on our Russian "enemies Rather,
the fear results from the nuclear weapons
themselves. There are now so many
weapons on our planet that we are quickly
losing control. Thirty-five nations will
have nuclear weapons potential by the end
of this decade. The ability to control the
proliferation hinges on a sincere effort by
all the superpowers to work together in an
atmosphere of trust. Anti-Soviet rhetoric
will not set the stage for this dialogue; it
will only serve to maintain the status quo.
The freeze is a constructive first step.
Fortunately, the American people are
ahead of their "leaders" in the effort to
create a safe and peaceful world. No
longer will their empty, trustless words
reign supreme.
Unlike most every other normal
American kid who's ever gone to grade
school, I never got to write a boring essay
on "How I Spent My Summer Vacation
It is, of course, entirely unfair. Eleven
years of grammar school simply wasted.
Naturally, this has left an incredible void
in my life, an unachieved lifelong goal, an
unfulfilled dream, so to speak.
It is to this end, then, that I now bestow
upon you, the faithful reader(s), the
dubious honor of reading my first travel
treatise, which I have so catchily tided
"How I Spent My First ECU Fall Break
It is my sincere hope that you may gain as
much insight from reading it as I have lost
from writing it.
Mike Hughes
Just The Way It Is
Now, I don't know about you, but
before I go on a trip � regardless of where
� I like to give the car the once-over, just
to be sure all the important things are
working okay. I've run into some pro-
blems in the past, and let me tell you, it's
no fun.
But, fortunately, this time, everything
was fine. The tape player wasn't slurring as
usual; the ash tray was empty, and the coat
hanger was still snug around the muffler. I
was all set for my big trip � my very first
exposure to North Carolina culture.
Needless to say, the excitement was
mounting when I left on Friday with my
trusty K-Mart road atlas at my side. Fall
break couldn't have come at a better time
right smack in the middle of North
Carolina Festival Week. And I for one
planned to take in all the excitement.
It's strange, but many people just don't
realize that North Carolina � a state I cer-
tainly like calling home � is simply a well
of tradition and celebration?
I mean, think about it; we've got a
festival for almost anything you'd ever
want to honor (and even some you pro-
bably wouldn't). Let's see, there's a Shad
Festival, Mullet Festival, Shrimp Festival,
Collard Festival, Blue Crab Festival,
Hollering Contest, bla bla bla.
And, as if eating and drinking tons of
"delicious" seafoods and greens weren't
enough, each of these crowd-pleasing ex-
travaganzas hosts a traditional beauty
pageant, featuring young lovelies who
gather from all over the "tri-county area"
to vie for the coveted prize: a year's reign
as Miss Mullet, Crab Girl or Queen Col-
lard. Just imagine the thrill!
But, as I was so fortunate to find out on
my trek, these "rip-roarin' " get-togethers
are only a small part of what this proud
state has to offer. Several other lesser-
known festivals, although they may well be
just as good as their metropolitan counter-
parts (Grifton, Swansboro, etc.), have yet
to hit North Carolina's big-time media cir-
cuit.
Take the Squirrel-Carcass-Throwing
Festival in Stench, N.C, for instance.
Amazingly, not too many people this side
of the Guano River know about it. But
every year in October, since around the
turn of the century, hundreds of folks
from Hog's Breath to Toadsville turn up at
the Stench County Fair Grounds to take
part in two days of distance and accuracy
competition, not to mention plenty of
eating, dancing and evicerating. Last
year's winner, Mr. J.D. "J.D Shankar,
repeated his expert performance from one
year ago, w� a record toss of 76 feet, 4 in-
ches, and only a moderate splat.
In nearby Nosehair, N.C, I found out
that the semi-annual Barber Shop Quartet
Belching Contest has been pulling in the
crowds for years. Yes, this small rural
community of 38 comes to life twice a year
� in early and late October � to host the
spectacular festivities. Last year's first
contest was an upset victory by none other
than Zack and Elrod Jackson, the town's
mayor and milkman. Zack and Elrod won
the hearts of old and young alike with their
"stirring" rendition of "Yes, Jesus Loves
Me It was truly a sight to behold.
And then, of course, there's the Edna
Gleck Look-Alike Contest and Festival in
Wide Load, N.C, which features singing
and dancing by the Gleckettes, a fine enter-
tainment experience. Ironically, I found
out that the event has never been won by
Miss Gleck, although one corpulent par-
ticipant said Edna did come in second the
year Inez Dumfry took the trophy.
But my favorite of all was probably the
Half Moon (N.C.) Square Dance Festival
and Bottle Fill. Now, there's a town that
really knows how to throw a party. For
eight hours, six of the best clogging bands
this side of Gunk, Tennessee, performed
night and day, playing the music that has
made them and Half Moon famous
(punkabilly), while the crowds gathered in
awe around what has become the most
popular festival attraction in recent years:
the out-of-order sign on the plastic port-a
john door. It's truly a sight to behold.
Well, in short, that's how I spent my
first ECU fall break. I'm sorry if you're
turning green with envy, but I guess that's
how it goes.
So, the next time you're sitting around
the house feeling sorry for yourself
because you "don't have anything to do
don't blame North Carolina. It certainly
isn't her problem.
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes is a seventh-
generation parsley farmer from Saska-
toon, Saskatchewan. This is not the first
time he has written for The East Caroli-
nian, although it may be the test.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 21. 1982 5
IV
rc
's
id
HI
I-
Flu Worse For Smokers
BOSTON (UPl) �
People who smoke run
a 25 percent greater risk
of contracting the flu
and when the do are
likely to be sicker than
non-smokers, Israeli
doctors reported
Wednesday
The risk and severity
of the flu increased
with the number of
cigarettes smoked dai-
ly, the doctors reported
in the New tngland
Journal of Medicine.
The report also said
non-smokers confined
to smoky rooms in the
winter run a greater
risk of contracting flu.
"The risk for all in-
fluenza (both mild and
severe) increased from
47 percent in non
smokers to 72 percent
in the heavy smokers"
who puff more than a
pack a da. the studv
said.
"We conclude that
smoking is a major
determinant o' mor-
bidity (sick rate) in
epidemic influenza and
may contribute
substantially to m-
capacitation in out-
breaks in populations
that smoke heavily
the doctors said.
The study, con-
ducted on 336 healthy-
young men in the Israel
Defence Forces over a
17-dav period during a
1978' influenza
epidemic, found
smokers had 21.3 per-
cent more cases of flu.
It also found that
smokers with the flu
lost 20.5 percent more
work days.
"The relation bet-
ween smoking and in-
fluenza described here
is probably causal
they said. "We con-
sider it highly unlikely
that the association
reflects the
'constitutional'
characteristic of
smokers rather than the
effects of smoking
The results back up
previous research in the
Israeli military that
found female recruits
who smoked had a sick
rate 44 percent higher
than their non-smoking
counterparts during an
epidemic of an
influenza-like illness.
The doctors recom-
mended flu immuniza-
tion and a program to
discourage smoking be
implemented in large
industrial and service
organizations to cut
down the number of
work days lost by
smokers with the flu.
"Since both smoking
and epidemic influenza
are widespread, the im-
pact of a causal
association between the
two would be of im-
mense importance in
terms of health and
economic considera-
tions the study said.
Although the new
study found the
number of cigarettes
smoked daily increased
the risk and severity of
the flu, the length of
time a person smoked
had no impact. The
recruits studied all had
smoked at least 6 mon-
ths.
And cases of severe
flu was 30 percent in
non-smokers; 40 per-
cent in tight smokers
(under 10 cigarettes a
day); 52 percent in
moderate smokers (up
to a pack a day); and 54
percent in heavy
smokers.
The 132 subjects with
severe cases lost an
average of three work-
ing days each and the
whole unit lost 403
working days.
ATTENTION
ECU Society of Collegiate
Journalists
Live 3-D Concert
Comes To Campus
Continued From Page 1
two years, after which
the equipment they in-
stalled becomes the
property of the univer-
sity. According to
Hammond this opens
up numerous
possibilities for campus
programming.
The Devo concert on
Oct. 30 will be the first
live 3-D concert in
history. Tickets will be
$5 advance for students
and $6 at the door. For
non-students, tickets
will be $6 advance and
$7 at the gate. Tickets
are on sale now at the
central ticket office in
Mendenhall and the
local branches of Apple
Records and Record
Bar.
Will Meet On Oct. 26 at 7 p.m.
Austin 203
Guest Speaker Dr. Jim Holte
Everyone Welcome
ARCADE
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!





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 21, 1982
7
,
t
Tibetan Monk To Speak At ECU Tonight
By PAT O'NEILL
SUM Writer
A Tibetan Buddhist
monk will be speaking
tonight at 7:30 p.m. in
Brewster C-103. The
lecture is titled
"Discovering Inherent
Qualities of In-
telligence and is be-
ing co-sponsored by the
departments of
sociology, an-
thropology, economics
and philosophy. The
Asian Studies Commit-
tee is also involved.
The Venerable Khen-
po Karthar Rinpoche
traveled to Greenville
from his monastery in
Woodstock, N.Y.
"He's a being who is a
great deal more
enlightened than we
are said ECU physics
professor Dr. Joseph
Norwood. "He's a
Judge Hard On Protesters
COLUMBIA, S.C.
(UPI) � A federal
judge says he gave the
maximum fine of
$1,000 each to five anti-
nuclear activists who
trespassed at the Savan-
nah River Plant after a
peace rally this sum-
mer.
Judge Charles E.
Simons Jr. said
Wednesday that he
wanted to sentence the
protesters to jail but
"there's no sentence
available to me. If there
was, I'd impose it
The five are Chris
Kueny, 24, and
Rosemarv Freriks, 26,
of Chapel Hill, N.C
Michael Gooding, 22;
Barbara Smith, 23, and
Mitch Yarborough, 40,
all of Columbia.
Federal officials have
charged a sixth defen-
dant, John Penley, 30,
of Chapel Hill, with
jumping bail.
Simons ordered the
group held at the
Riehland County Jail
until an indigency hear-
ing before a U.S.
magistrate today.
U.S. Attorney Henry
McMaster, who recom-
mended the stiff fines,
said if the defendants
are indigent, meaning
they have no way to
pay the fines, they will
be released.
"When we are con-
fronted with such a
complete and utter
disregard for the law
and such a knowing
and intentional and, in
this case, an announced
intention to break the
law, we always recom-
mend the maximum
sentence he said.
But defense attorney
John Delgado said,
"This is a vindictive
response of the govern-
ment to stifle dissent
and free speech
A spokesman for the
Natural Guard that
sponsored the peace
rally said the group did
not agree with their
trespassing but sup-
ported them through
the trial.
Brett Bursey said the
defendants believed
"their First Amend-
ment right to freedom
of speech to protest the
government's nuclear
arms policy was
violated
great deal saner than
we are � therefore he
is an example
The monastery,
known as the Karma
Triyana Kharmachakra
Retreat Center, was
established in 1978 as a
center where students
could study traditional
Tibetan Buddhism.
In 1976 Rinpoche
was instructed by his
Holiness the 16th
Gyalwa Karmapa to
help in the establish-
ment of the KTD.
Karmapa is head of
the Kagyu Order and is
the;chief holder of the
meditation and Yoga
teachings known as the
Mahamudra and the
Six Doctrines of
Naropa. His spiritual
status is considered
equivalent to that of
the Kalai Lama.
Both Karmapa and
Rinpoche were forced
to flee from Tibet in the
late 1950's after it was
annexed by the
Chinese.
According to a state-
ment issued by the
Tibetan Buddhist
Mediation Center of
Grenville, the annexa-
tion of Tibet destroyed
much of its unique
religious culture and
forced what remained
into exile. Many adept
practitioners of Bud-
dhism sought sanctuary
in the West.
Karmapa is credited
with foreseeing the an-
nihilation of Buddhist
culture in Tibet. He
successfully relocated
to India a large number
of Lamas as well as sav-
ing valuable texts and
relics.
Rinpoche, 57, began
his formal training at
Trangu Monastery in
the 1930s. He was fully
ordained as a monk in
the Hinayana tradition
and received the or-
dination of the
Mahayana and Va-
jrayana from the
Venerable Situ Rin-
poche when he was 20.
He has also worked in
the establishment of the
first seminary for the
Tibetan refugee com-
munity at Buxa, India.
Norwood describes
Rinpoche as "an exam-
ple of the fact that we
don't have to settle for
our usual level of
neurosis
He adds that Rin-
poche is "practically
entirely sane" and "it's
rather startling to be
around him
According to Nor-
wood, Buddhists
recognize the value in
all religions, believe in
reincarnation, and are
able to achieve a state
of mind known as nir-
vana. "They don't look
down on other
religions
Agriculture Secretary Angry At
Magazine Insult Of TV. C. Farms
RALEIGH (UPI) �
Agriculture Commis-
sioner James A.
Graham vowed
Wednesday he would
never buy Newsweek
again because this
week's cover shows a
reputed North Carolina
farmer surrounded by
marijuana plants.
"It's absolutely,
positively, completely,
any way you look at it,
a clear-cut insult to our
state farmers who do
their part to supply
food to this state and
this nation the raspy-
voiced commissioner
complained.
"I think it's ternble.
I resent it very much.
My question is there are
21 states that produce
more marijuana than
North Carolina. So
why did they single out
North Carolina0"
The cover picture
shows a man wearing a
ski mask and holding a
pitchfork and rifle. The
lower right hand corner
bears the words "North
Carolina Farmer
The article leads with
seven paragraphs about
"Uncle Jesse a
former moonshiner
who now grows mari-
juana somewhere near
the Yadkin River in
western North
Carolina. The man's
marijuana patch can
bring in $50,000 on the
open market, the
magazine said.
North Carolina is not
mentioned again in the
article, which generally
discusses how mari-
juana now might be the
nation's third largest
cash crop, worth more
than $10 billion a
year
Graham said he ob-
jects to the cover's
reference to its subject
as a "farmer
"The man on that
cover is an outlaw he
said. "By no stretch of
the imagination could
you call him a
legitimate North
Carolina farmers
We do not have a pro-
blem with legitimate
farmers growing mari-
juana. We produce
peanuts, meats. We're
number one in sweet
potatoes and we take
pride in tobacco.
"I'd sue 4em if I
could

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 21. 1982
IV
s
e
rn
lie
r
k
Group Protests Military Rally
B PATRICK
O'NEILL
SUH Writer
A week-long conven-
tion sponsored by
Soldier of Fortune
magazine was held in
Charlotte, N.C. last
week drawing over
1,000 participants as
well as a group of peace
protestors.
Soldier of Fortune
magazine is noted for
their pro-military, pro-
mercenary slant. Their
classified ads typically
advertise "soldiers for
hire" with the
qualifications asked for
ranging from expert
markmanship to
knowledge of
weaponry, for high risk
jobs for dependable
pro-western alliances.
The event drew
various speakers, in-
cluding U.S. Army
General William
Westmoreland who
highlighted the closing
session of the conven-
tion Saturday night.
Westmoreland was
field commander dur-
ing the Vietnam War
from 1964 to 1968 and
army chief of staff
from 1968-1972.
Attorney General Ruling
Objected To By Meyer
Continued From Page 1
for appeal and Swaim
the basis for his ruling.
Swaim noted that
Dr. Hlmer Meyer, vice
chancellor for student
life, might try to per-
suade him to change his
ruling when they met
today.
Meyer said he had no
intention of trying to
pressure Swaim to
change his vote. "1 will
be trying to tell him
that he is clearly wrong
on the ex-officio mat-
ter. Not only is it clear
in Robert's Rules of
Order (that ex-officio
members can vote) but
is is also in the tradition
of the SGA Meyer
explained.
Swaim also based his
ruling on the separate
but equal branches of
government doctrine,
saying that the
legislative and ex-
ecutive council should
not have a vote in the
proceedings of the
legislature.
Henderson could not
be reached for com-
ment on why he re-
quested Swaim to rule
on the matter in the
first place.
Other class officers
such as David Cook,
senior class president,
Jill Tippet, sophomore
class president and Jim
Henderson, junior class
president, were also af-
fected by the ruling.
Cook has also filed and
appealed the ruling.
Numerous books and
buttons were on sale in-
cluding one reading "I
Love the Smell of
Napalm in the Morn-
ing "Assassination:
Theory and Practice"
and "Quiet Killer II:
Silencer Update
"We were opposed
to the glorification and
promotion of
weaponry which was
going on at the conven-
tion said Aaron
Newlander, one of the
group of people who
joined together in a
silent vigil outside the
convention center.
Newlander was part
of an ad-hoc committee
called Concerned
Citizens of Charlotte
that came together
specifically to oppose
the Soldier of Fortune
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gathering.
The magazine claims
that its readers are
mostly military
veterans and active per-
sonnel, police offiers
and gun afficionados.
Soldier of Fortune
has been criticized
because of its policy of
carrying advertisements
for mercenaries seeking
work.
It is illegal for any
U.S. citizen to work in
the military of a foreign
army for pay. But the
Boulder, Colorado-
based publication
claims that is a
"magazine for profes-
sional adventurers"
and denies that they
cater to mercenaries.
Newlander said that
the demonstrators were
also opposed to the
promotion of the use of
violence to solve pro-
blems rather than a
peaceful and creative
means of conflict
resolution.
The third annual
gathering of the
organization included
military seminars, a
shooting competition
and demonstrations in
the use of attack dogs,
machine guns and
parachuting.
During a parachute
jump that was con-
ducted in cooperation
with the convention, an
Oklahoma man was
killed when he landed
in a tree and was
strangled.

PEKWG CUPPEft
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With a large number of
ECU students (male & female) as
our customers, we are looking forward
to catering to your every hair care
need. College students of today
demand certain styles that the
PEKING CLIPPER is accustomed to
doing. We stay open Tues. & Thurs.
nights till 9:30 p.m.
Call for appointment ot 758-1505
Located 12 mile from ECU at 1005 A Hamilton St
WILDFIRE
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Spend your Thanksgiving holiday in style on Broadway,
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Sirloin Steaks
Cottonelle
Toilet
Tissue
4 roll pkg.
Limit 2
Natural Light
Beer
6 Pack � 12 Op. Cans
$199
2 Blocks from ECU
Overton's Finest
Heavy Western
T-Bone Steaks
Lesueur
Peas
PRICES EFFECTIVE THURSDAY THROUGH SATURDAY
303 can
Limit 4
All
Coca-Cola
Products
2 Liter Bottle
each
Fresh,
Whole
Fryers
43C
Incredible Savings!
Breyer'S
tall
Assorted Flavors
Yogurt
4$l
8 oz. cup
Great for Freezing!
oo
Golden
Bananas
4 lbs.
$100
Fresh Pork
Small
Spareribs
$149
Duncan Hines Butter
Golden or
Yellow
Cake Mix
18 oz. box
78C
Grade " A" White
Large Eggs
68C
dozen
Limit 2 dozen
20C Off Label
22 oz. bottle
98C
Go Pirates!
Beat Illinois State!
Be sure to do all of
your homecoming grocery
shopping at OVERTON'S
&1PN
�hi '�ii vmm$wr-gfiwigg





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 21, 1982
A
�?�

T
"r
Woman Testifies In
Trial Of Cycle Gang
CHICAGO (UPI) �
A North Carolina
woman testified
Wednesday she spent
Christmas Day, 1981,
with her motorcycle
gang captors, engaging
in sexual orgies, taking
drugs and sitting down
to Christmas dinner
with armed men.
Darlene Betty
Callahan, 25, was the
key witness in the case
against six members of
the Outlaws motorcycle
gang charged with kid-
napping her and forc-
ing her to work as a
prostitute to pay off
her boyfriend's $1,500
drug debt.
Ms. Callahan said
she was taken to the
homes of two gang
members' mothers
Christmas Day and that
"everybody" took
valium and snorted co-
caine, drank and ate.
She said dinner con-
versation centered
largely on the fate of a
fellow gang member
who was killed when
his pickup truck was
blown apart by a
bomb.
I ater, she said, she
was taken to a motel
where she was forced to
engage in sexual acts
with reputed gang
leader Tommie Stimac,
32, and his wife, Toni
Summers, 35, while all
took turns taking pic-
tures.
Ms. Callahan said
che was also taken to
the gang's Gary, Ind
farmhouse, where she
saw "pistols, shotguns,
rifles and automatic
weapons" and t-shirts
with the Outlaws' skull
emblem on them.
She said she was con-
stantly warned by the
defendants not to try to
escape. She said her
captors carried
automatic pistols in
their belts and shoulder
holsters.
Ms. Callahan
testified Tuesday she
was kidnapped by the
Outlaws, sold to Stimac
and forced to have sex
with club members to
work off her
boyfriend's $1,500
drug debt.
But lawyers for two
of six members of the
Outlaws charged with
kidnapping and white
slavery said she was a
prostitute and drug ad-
dict and traveled from
North Carolina to
Chicago willingly.
Ms. Callahan, 25,
testified in federal
court she turned to pro-
stitution in 1977 to sup-
port her $300 to $500 a
i
2704 E. 10th St.
758 1033
Buck's
Gulf
Complete
Automotive Service
24 hr. Towing Service
Jartran Rentals Available
day heroin habit.
She said she and her
boyfriend were ab-
ducted from their
Asheville, N.C motel
room in December 1981
by Allan Ray Hat-
taway, 33, Salisbury,
N.C and Gary Miller,
33, of Asheville.
She said the pair
forced her to travel to
Chicago, where she was
sold to Stimac and held
prisoner for 44 days
before she escaped Jan.
25.
Her boyfriend, Tom
Forrester, and Lonnie
Gamboa, both 29, were
killed and tossed 100
feet down an abandon-
ed mine shaft in North
Carolina, Ms. Callahan
said.
Forrester was in debt
for drugs, she said.
Stimac, reputed
regional vice president
of the Outlaws; Ms.
Summers; George R.
"Snoopy" Borroughs,
36, reputed head of the
gang's Montreal
chapter; Martin Cur-
ran, 28; Hattaway and
Miller were indicted in
May on charges of kid-
napping, using firearms
in the commission of a
felony and violating the
Mann Act against white
slavery.
Hunt Promises
Dump Site Safe
RALEIGH, N.C.
(UPI) � Gov. James
B. Hunt Jr. assured
Warren County
residents in an open let-
ter Wednesday he will
work to guarantee the
safety of a PCB landfill
near Alton, but one
resident said Hunt's
pledges are inadequate.
The letter, published
on a full page of the
Warren Record, outlin-
ed commitments Hunt
made during an Oct. 8
meeting with a
10-person delegation
representing opponents
of the landfill.
Hunt said the state
will monitor the landfill
and the environment
and health of residents
in the area. The gover-
nor also said he will
work for detoxification
of the landfill and sup-
port legislation banning
further landfill con-
struction in Warren
County and transfer of
any other toxic material
to the PCB dump.
Some opponents
have claimed the Afton
site was selected
because a majority of
Warren County citizens
are black. Other critics
say the landfill is bound
to leak and thus en-
dangers the health and
safety of area residents.
Security Phones
Now Operating
Continued From Page 1
� In the middle of the
grass area between the
Bloxton House and
Garrett dormitory.
� In the grass area bet-
ween the Jenkins
building and Jarvis
dormitory on the north
side facing the service
drive.
� On the southwest cor-
ner of Wright
Auditorium at the bar-
ricades.
� On the west side of
the Croatan.
� On the southwest cor-
ner of Memorial Gym.
� At the bus stop on the
northeast side of Tyler
dormitory.
� In the grass area east
of Minges Coliseum
and west of Ficklen
Stadium.
� In the parking lot
west of the Allied
Health building.
� On the north side of
Fletcher dormitory.
The Shoe Outlet
i
Wjl JP i�0 Evans Stree'
' Weekly
fromsup.m Specials
7 DAYS A WK
MONDAY - ��
Gyro Sondwich 2.45 2.00
TUESDAY -
Athenian Chicken 2.95 2.55
WEDNESDAY -
Steak & Cheese Sub (or mushroom)2.65 2.25
T URSDAY
m ifior i. Sp� ciat 2.95 2.55
FKIDA .
Kcubo a. m, 2.95 2.55
SATURDAY & SUNDAY
Souvlakia Sandwich2.45 2.00
201 West 9th Street
NAME BRANDS at
DISCOUNT PRICES
50-75
Off Regular Price
Men's & Ladies' SHOES
Acme r� -
Dingo DOOTS
Hanover
Nome Brand Leather Clogs
$4.95-510.95
Ladies' Dress & Western Boots
$10-$27.95
BASS FREEMAN
HANOVER TOPSIDER
FLORSHEIM DINGO BOOTS
Next door to C
EVANS SEAFOOD v
Pt
ID REQUIRED
ATTIC
Admission 25
Beverages 65t
Friday Oct. 22 4-7pm
THURSDAY
THE STATES
wLAHNN & LOFTIN
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
STORMZ
�LADIES' ADMITTED FREE
WHAPPY HOUR STAMP
SUNDAY
MAXX WARRIOR
MONDAY
ROLLING STONES
VIDEO
ON 7' KLOSS NOVA BEAM TV
4
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
E�ch of to� �ovftu0 iiwns Is require to be reedtty eveUeWe for ���
) below the advertUed price In each AAP Store, except aa apecmcairy nofa
In thl� ad.
at ot
o
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT, OCT. 23, AT A&P IN GREENVILLE. N.C.
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
703 Greenville Blvd.
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville, N. C.
GOOD WED THURS FRI. AND SAT. ONLY
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
Ground
Beef
5-lb. Roll
Pkg.
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
BONE-IN
(T-BONE
Steak 1
it, 2.68'
A&P QUALITY FRESHLY
u- t Ground
m- Chuck
3 lbs. or
more
lb.
rE FARrV
WH.D MECXOM
Yellow Onions 3 : 59c
TRUCKLOAD POTATO SALE! EASTERN GROWN
All R CQc OH, -158
I nUUIMUMU
White
Potatoes
Purpose
lb
bag
5 a 68' 20
50ft 3 10ft 88'
Bag Your Own bulk � 8C
CALIFORNIA THOMPSON OR RUBY RED
LONG ISLAND GROWN SNOW WHITE
Seedless Grapes I Cauliflower
89 fesr s88
p&o brand w Savings y
P&Q BRAND
Sandwich Bread
88
24 oz.
loaves
A&P CHILLED
hs-i
51
Orange Juice
Va gal.
ctn.
Soft Drinks
2 liter
plastic
bottle
79
SEALTEST
Light N' Lively
49
r-Pl
SUPER SAVER COUPON
SAVE 30'
ON THE PURCHASE OF 48 OZ. BTL.
PURE VEGETABLE
Wesson Oil
698
GOOD THRU SAT OCT 23 AT AAP
LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON ANO 7 50 ORDER
I" mm PjW $urer $aver COUPON i tm obj
SAVE 20
ON THE PURCHASE OF 2 BIG ROLLS
A&P QUALITY
Paper Towels
601
GOOD THRU SAT. OCT. 23 AT AAP
UNIT TWO WITH COUPON ANO 7.50 ORDER
"fS
SUPER SAVER COUPON � tm
V"
SAVE 20
ON THE PURCHASE OF 3-8 02. PKGS.
ANN PAGE -Beef
Hn BSaa 'Chicken
POt TIBS 'Turkey
603
GOOD THRU SAT OCT. 23 AT AAP
LIMIT THREE WITH COUPON AND 7.50 ORDER
SAVE 20
ON THE PURCHASE OF 2-17 02. CANS
DEL MONTE SMALL
Premium Sweet Peas
699
QOOO THRU SAT OCT 23 AT AAP
UMTT TWO WITH COUPON ANO 7 50 ORDER
SUPER SAVER COUPON � mt
'�
r-
SAVE 20
ON THE PURCHASE OF 10 OZ. JAR
NESCAFE
Instant Coffee
602
gTW GOOD THRO SAT OCT 23 AT AAP
I VuSJmW LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON ANO 7 50 ORDER
SUPER SAVER COUPON �� �� ,
SAVE 20
ON THE PURCHASE OF 12 OZ. PKG
ANN PAGE CHED-O-Brr
Cheese
Food
Slices
iOOO THRU SAT OCT. 23 AT AAP
UMTT ONE WITH COUPON AND? SO
604
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
OCTOBER 21. 1982
Page 9
Bolcom And Morris Tonight
Singing Duo Performing Their Campus Debut
- . . .� ru�.�. A lomnnrrv Art in Wimton-Salem. mittee will launch the 1
As part of the homecoming and
75th anniversary festivities, the
ECU Unions Artists Series Commit-
tee is pleased to announce the
premier campus performance of
Bolcom and Morris, tonight at 8
p.m. in Hendrix Theatre of
Mendenhall Student Center.
For the past ten years, the hus-
band and wife team of Bolcom and
Morris have been tantalizing au-
diences with their vast repertoire of
music that is an unusual blend of
concert music and the vernacular.
With an ear for style and tempo they
will give you a typical evening,
songs of the parlor piano days of a
hundred years ago, the pop songs of
the early 1900's, the exciting wit and
elegance of the great Gershwin and
Porter show tunes, some Charles
lves, and the latest of Leiber and
Stroller's cabaret songs.
Between the two of them, Bolcom
and Morris have appeared in a
variety of clubs and recitals, and
together they have performed with a
number of major symphonys and
have recorded five albums on the
Nonesuch label.
Tickets are still available at the
Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall
at $2.50 for ECU students and $7.50
for ECU faculty and staff and for
the general public. All tickets at the
door are $7.50.
'Collage' Exhibit
Opens Tomorrow
Collage, an exhibition of five
southeastern artists working in col
lage, will open at Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center on Friday, October 22,
continuing through Sunday,
November 21, 1982.
Many artists use collage as a
means of artistic expression. Some
using elements of collage in their
work, others like those in this ex-
hibition, as the only means for
creating a piece.
The Southeastern Center for Con-
temporary Art in Winston-Salem,
N.C organizers of this exhibition,
have chosen five artists: Kaola Allen
of North Carolina; Marcia Goldens-
tein of Tennessee; Judy Voss Jones
of South Carolina; Dale Loy of
Mississippi; and Anne Hanger
Markle of Lousiana.
This exhibit is circulated by the
Southern Arts Federation and fund-
ed in part by the National Endow-
ment for the Arts and the state arts
agencies of Alabama, Florida,
Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana,
Mississippi, North Carolina, South
Carolina and Tennessee.
Collage is being brought to East
Carolina University's Mendehall
Gallery under the auspices of the
Student Union Art Exhibition Com-
mittee.
1Juicy' Playing In
Wright Tomorrow
The Homecoming Steering Com-
Progressive Locals Try
Luck With Legislature
Bv PATRICK O'NEILL
Miff nlr
It was an unusual sight, at downtown Greenville's
Rathskeller Night Club, to see groups of middle aged
patrons lining up at the door to pay the cover charge.
But this was indeed no ordinary night at the Rat,
because on this night the groups performing were play-
ing a benefit for two democratic political candidates.
The turnout was larger and the crowd mix included 18
year old ECU freshmen, as well as Greenville residents
who once voted for people like Truman and Stevenson.
The guests of honor, were Fredrica (Freddy) Jacob-
son and Mariem House and the liberal-progressive
clientele of Greenviile were out in full force to wish
them good luck in their effort to get elected to the NC
State Legislature.
The Equal Rights Amendment was defeated, but the
spirit of its supporters continues on as women all over
the country are deciding to run for political offices as a
way of winning their battle for equal rights.
Freddy and Mariem are in the running and that was
clearly evidenced at the Rat as they went around the
room shaking hands and introducing themselves to
ever v body.
Both women are mothers and college graduates, both
have vears of volunteer service in the Pitt County area,
and both are sick and tired of a male dominated
legislature making the decisions that keep women
relegated to the status of second class citizens.
"Women have helped to shape civilization in their
role as those who nurture and care for others said
Mariem in her candidacy statementWhen women are
able to take these qualities, service to others before self
and sense of justice and fairness, into public life, all
citizens benifit
"We feel the ERA would allow women to exercise
basic privileges and responsibilities in a truly equal part-
nership with men continues House.
"We want to increase the numbers of women in our
legislature, so that an effective female presence will en-
sure full and fair consideration of women's issues ad-
ded Freddy.
Mariem, who is running for the North Carolina State
Senate, or as they say "House for the Senate has been
a resident of Grifton for 31 years and a registered
democrat for 36 years.
She graduated from RoberSonville High School and
attended the University of North Carolina and Alfred
University of New York. She has three children and is a
member of the Grifton United Methodist Church.
She is also a member of the Pitt County League of
Women Voters, past president of the Grifton Service
League and past chairwoman of the Grifton Board of
Elections.
Mariem is on the board of the Women's Treatment
Facility (halfway house for women inmates), a member
of the Pitt County Chapter of the Naitonal Organiza-
tion for Women (NOW), and the Pitt County Council
on the Status of Women, and a counselor at the REAL
Crisis Prevention Center.
Freddy, like her running partner, is involved in
numerous volunteer community projects. She has been
a Greenville resident for 16 years and is presently the
Vice President of WOOW Radio in Greenville. She
graduated from Lutheran Hospital School of Nursing in
Baltimore, Maryland. She has two children.
Freddy was on the original advisory board of the
REAL Crisis Intervention Center, Pitt County League
of Women Voters and the Greenville Chapter of the
American Civil Liberties Union. She is also a past chair-
woman of the Women's Treatment Facility.Her ac-
tivities also include membership in NOW, the Greenville
Fair Housing Task force, North Carolina Broadcasters
Association, and the Eastern Arts Festival Publicity
Committee.
In addition, Freddy is a board member of the First
District Democratic Women (Pitt County), an advisor
to the Mayor's Advisory Commission, and current
President of the Pitt County Women's Political Caucus.
Both believe that their records of service speak for
itself and hope that the voters will feel likewise. "We're
serious candidates adds Mariem.
See LOCALS, Page 13
mittee will launch the 1982
Homecoming weekend activities on
Friday, October 22 with a concert
featuring Arista recording artist
JUICY. The concert will be held in
Wright Auditorium and will begin
at 9:00 p.m. There is no admission
charge to the event.
With enthusiasm, excitement and
plenty of talent. Juicy, a Five-
member ensemble from North
Carolina, is making an exceptional
debut on Arista Records. The group
comprises a complete spectrum of
musical talents, with backgrounds
stemming from classical, jazz,
popular, gospel, rock and soul
roots. It gives Juicy a sound which is
fresh, dynamic and quite unique.
Juicy's members are as varied as
their musical backgrounds, held
together by a common thread of
talent, professionalism and a
tremendous desire to give pleasure
to their audiences.
Jerry Barnes, (bassist, vocalist) is
also an accomplished artist, actor
and vocalist. Self-taught, this pro-
digy of the bass guitar captivates
and excites an audience with his
precision, stylish variety and
tremendous showmanship.
Katresse Barnes, (keyboard,
vocalist, percussions) was the win-
ner of the talent award in the Miss
North Carolina Teen U.S.A.
pageant in 1980. Her exceptional
virtuosity as a pianist has won her
numerous awards and honors, in-
cluding the Omega Psi Phi Talent
Hunt in 1978 and the Sanford
Scholarship in Music in 1979.
Katresse was also rated superior in
the voice competition at Temple
Texas. Her exciting piano, percus-
sion and vocal styles are showcased
richly in Juicy.
Guitaristvocalist Wyatt Staton is
another highpoint of Juicy's unique
sound. A self-taught musician, his
dynamic presence and performances
contribute a great deal to the overall
spirit that is Juicy.
Allison Bragdon, (saxophones,
vocalist, keyboard) began playing
tenor sax in high school, performing
both as a tenor saxophonist and as a
vocalist. A member of the 1978 edi-
tion of Who's Who in American
Colleges and Universities, Allison
holds a B.M. degree from North
Carolina State.
Full Slate For The Weekend
Clockwise from top: "Wall Series 10" by Dale Loy, from Collage ex-
hibit; Steve Martin in weekend free flick, Pennies From Heaven
crossover band Juicy; and music duo William Bolcom and Joan Morris.
.38 Special, SPYS All Set For
Sunday 9s Homecoming Coup
A t Friendly Minges Coliseum
Capping 75th anniversary
homecoming activities this year is a
major concert this Sunday night at
Minges Coliseum featuring one of
the hottest bands in contemporary
rock, .38 Special. Opening for them
Don Barnes. Larry Junstrom, Donate Van Zant, Jack Grondin, Jeff Carltei and Steve Brooking of .38 Special.
is up-and-coming SPYS whose self-
titled debut LP recently cracked
Billboard's top forty album chart.
"For the convenience of students,
the Major Attractions Committee
will operate a ticket booth in front
of the student store from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. today and tomorrow or until
tickets sell out said Jerry Dilsaver,
chairman of the committee.
Tickets will remain on sale at the
Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center at $7 for students
and $9 for the general public. All
tickets sold at the door the night of
the show will be $9. Tickets are also
on sale at both Record Bar locations
and Apple Records.
1981 saw .38 Special's aim proven
true. The group scored a platinum
album with Wild-Eyed Southern
Boys (the 23rd best-selling LP of
1981, according to Billboard
surveys), as well as a hit single with
"Hold on Loosely which was the
third most played song on AOR
radio in 1981, according to Kal Rud-
man's Friday Morning Quarterback
Album Report. From January to
September of that same year, .38
Special played for three-quarters of
a million fans; and with the release
of their fifth A&M album, Special
Forces, .38 Special will be setting
out on a nearly year long tour
(primarily headlining 10,000 seat
arenas) that will be seen by close to a
million concertgoers.
.38 Special have come a long way
from their earliest road trips, when
the band and crew traveled in an
Econoline van with a mattress in the
back, slept four to a hotel room,
and watched a $20.00 a month pro-
fit disappear when "Big Blue
their cantankerous equipment truck
constantly broke down. But
somehow they managed to eke out
the princely sum of $2.50 a day per
member to eat. To limit the money
to one meal a day, the band would
sleep as late as possible and wait as
long as they could to eat, then spend
two dollars at a local cafeteria or
McDonald's.
Following the evening shows,
"we would all pool our extra fifty
cents recalls guitarist Jeff Carlisi,
"and buy sandwiches from our road
manager, who would bring cases of
peanut butter and jelly on the road
with him When the band signed
for their first manager, "he was real
embarrassed to tell us how low the
daily allowance he could give us for
food was. When he finally admitted
it was $10.00, we rejoiced
But such was .38 Special's drive
to make the mark in music and to
get out of Jacksonville's west side,
the Liverpool of the American
South. Like Liverpool, it is heavily
industrial, a community where the
best future a kid can look up to is a
job as a truck driver and the only
escape routes are rock'n roll or
crime. "Back On The Track a
song from the new Special Forces
LP, sums up what life was like for
many of Jacksonville's west side
kids:
Bad reputation, it seems to be my
style I been categorized as a little
wild. Police took my photograph;
a hunted boy runnin' From his
past Some people call me the
devil's child.
At 17 I was on my own Had
clothes on my back from a broken
home. Slapped in the face til my
daddy got straight I knew it was
time to run.
No wonder Jacksonville spawned
such bands as the Ailman Brothers,
Lynyrd Skynyrd, Blackfoot and
Molly Hatchet. As Don Barnes ex-
plains, "None of us came from a
See SINGER,
It
"�"�"awifi �n '�'





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 21, 1982
What Really Happened To The Citizens' Party?
A


By JAY STONE
Staff W rim
In 1982 it is possible for one to
hear people ask, "What ever
became of the Citizens Party?"
You remember the Citizens' Party.
In 1980 it ran Barry Commoner for
President and LaDonna Harris for
Vice President. Despite its poor
showing in that race, however, the
party is still alive and active. Recent-
ly, in fact, the fledgling party has
won races in Burlington, Vermont,
Schenectady. New York, and Seat-
tle, Oregon. In a number of other
races, though the Citizens' Party en-
trants did not win, they improved
their support strikingly, gathering
from 26 to 49 percent of the vote in
five places.
The Citizens' Party was created as
a result of what it refers to as the
ideological stagnation of the
Democratic and Republican parties.
Its supporters claim that the two
major parties are reluctant to con-
front "the central crisis of our
time" � an economic system
dominated by the nation's largest
corporations' overriding concern
for profits.
As a remedy for this the Citizens'
Party prescribes a transition to
"Economic Democracy The tran-
sition would require two major
steps: 1) direct social control over
the productive sectors of the
economy so that the wealth of com-
munities is not lost, for example, by
sudden, uncontrollable plant clos-
ing; and 2) reducing the amount of
resources being used by the military.
In a telephone interview with The
East Carolina Citizens' Party,
spokesperson Rick LaRue
elaborated on the concept of
Economic Democracy.
"You've got companies making
billions of dollars and paying very
little in taxes LaRue said. "The
people are believing in a myth when
they think of the American
economic system as a system in
which government is not involved
with the economy. It is. We have a
tax structure which subsidizes and
benefits large corporations to the
detriment of small business and en-
trepreneural enterprises
LaRue further stated that, as a
consequence, the Citizens' Party is
in favor of a corporate tax and
restructuring of tax laws so that
small businesses and enterprises,
which benefit the public as a whole,
will be encouraged. Although it
does not shy away from public
ownership of certain industries like
utilities and railroads the party's
agenda emphasizes decentralization
of the economy. It does not favor
nationalization of industry as a
general rule.
Besides encouraging small
businesses, decentralization would
include getting workers and con-
sumers involved in the decision-
making process of industries. This
might be done, a Citizens' Party
spokesperson said, by government
regulation requiring a cerntain
number of consumers and a certain
number of employees on the board
of directors of industries. Another
one of the party's economic pro-
posals is establishing public work
programs to bring about full
employment.
The Citizens' Party held its bien-
nial convention in New York City
during the summer. This convention
drew over 250 participants from
twenty-seven states and the District
of Columbia. It also drew represen-
tatives of "green parties" from
West Germany, Britain, and the
Netherlands who, together with the
Citizens' Party, announced the
establishment of a Euro-
peanAmerican Peace Alliance to
work for nuclear control and disar-
mament. The development of the
alliance with the West German
"green parties" is particularly
significant because of major vic-
tories that they achieved in the re-
cent West German elections.
Among the initiatives that the
EuropeanAmerican Peace Alliance
intends to take in working toward
disarmament is to work for a 40-50
billion dollar cut in defense spen-
ding and elimination of the cruise
missile and Pershing II from
Western Europe. The Alliance also
supports an immediate international
moratorium on research, testing,
manufacture, deployment and sale
of new nuclear weapons and
technology. The Citizens' Party
calls on the United States to take the
first step toward this initiative.
Up until the present, perhaps, the
Citizens' Party has been most
associated in the media with the
cause of environmentalism. It pro-
posed a moratorium on new nuclear
power plant construction long
before Ted Kennedy did in the 1980
presidential election. In addition, it
has advocated a phase-out of all ex-
isting plants within five years, say-
ing that their energy contribution
can be replaced with solar,
photovoltaic, geothermal, wind and
other sources of renewable, en-
vironmentally clean energy.
The most bold environmental
policy that the party has proposed,
however, is the creation of a Na-
tional Environmental Bill of Rights.
This measure would, ostensibly,
protect the rights of all to a
healthful environment, including
the rights to clean air and water;
safe renewable energy systems, and
freedom for involuntary exposure to
toxic materials. It would also secure
scenic resources and the natural
habitats of animals from encroach-
ment of industry.
In comtemplating the Citizens'
Party's prospects its members point
out that Reagan was elected by only
27 percent of America's eligible
voters. The Citizens' Party, they
say, is presently dedicated to a
grassroots coalition building effort
in order to consolidate power for a
major national push within twenty
years. This November the party is
planning to contest more than
eighty local and state races in at
least twenty states. Another twenty
or so candidates are planning to run
for the U.S. Senate and House.
Doctor Dorothy Clayton, Pro-
fessor of Political Science at East
Carolina said that the chances of a
third party succeeding in the United
States are poor at the present time.
She added, "If, however, the
economy fails to improve or it
worsens than a third party's chances
might improve considerably During
periods of economic turmoil or a
crisis old loyalties and coalitions
may weaken. Then new loyalties
and new organization can spring up
to take their place "
Singer Van Zant Inspired
By Legendary Skynyrd Band
Continued From Page 9
rich background. We had zero,
nothing at all. Our relatives would
ask, 'Why don't you get a job or
join the navy?' The only thing we
had was our belief in ourselves
Singer Donnie Van Zant's interest
in music started at age twelve, when
he'd watch his brother Ronnie Van
Zant's band rehearse in his parent's
living room � the band that became
Lynyrd Skynyrd. "It looked like a
lot of fun. so I thought I'd try it
.38 Special drummer Steve Brookins
lived down the road and had a band
that needed a singer, so Donnie
joined.
Fourteen year-old Don Barnes
joined the band in unusual cir-
cumstances. While unsuccessfully
attempting to steal some of the
band's equipment, he was literally
caught in the act.
A few years later. Barnes and Van
Zant met guitarist Jeff Carhsi. and
they struck up a musical association
that lasted through high school.
The new band scoured the en-
virons around Jacksonville for an
isolated structure in which to
rehearse and finally settled into an
abandoned stucco auto part-
warehouse they called "The
See 38 SPECIAL, Page 12
The Medical Store
2205 IV. 5th St. I P.O. Box 59
Greenville. N.C. 27834
MEDICAL STUDENTS
SPECIAL
DIAGNOSTIC SETS
LEATHER BAGS
BLOOD PRESSURE SETS
STETHOSCOPES
A VERY HEALTHY
DISCOUNT on COMBO. SETS
PHONE 757-3490
OPEN: Mon. 2-7; Wed. 2-7; Fri. 2-7; S�t. 10-3
East Carolina Medical Supply Co.
1-800-682-3633
RATB?NITY
PL SfcwT
uV
1
TUGS. 0a.Zfr, 1182 i:oo-i:oo AOMTMoNlLOO
go
t 1 y I
BJlRiB CALL 758-45 , OR CO� & &�P
1
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will
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K
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With Very Special Guest
WALL OF Voodoo

LIVE FROM HOLLYWOOD
HALLOWEEN EVE OCT. 30
SATELLITE PRESENTATION
WITH
THE STUDENT UNION SPECIAL CONCERTS COMMITTEE
SATURDAY, OCT. 30.1982 10:00p.m. WRIGHT AUDITORIUM STUDENTS $5.00 in advance $6.00 at door
NON-STUDENTS $6.00 In advance $7.00 at door DOORS OPEN 45 MINUTES EARLY
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER. THE RECORD BAR (Pitt Raza)
THE RECORD BAR (Carolina East Mall). APPLE RECORDS
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY





?
l e or it
.nances
Dui i
oil 01 a
oalit ions
.1
d
dnJ.
1 he
i:
Wall Of Voodoo Doing Their Magic With Devo
The Student I nion Special C oncerts Committee will venture into a new programming medium on
Saturdav, Oct. 30. when the committee presents Devo live in concert with guests Wall of Voodoo
(pictured above) via satellite from Beverlv Hills, California. The concert, which is being sponsored
in conjunction with the Campus Entertainment Network, will be held in Wright Auditorium and
will and will begin at 10 p.m. As an added bonus, the show will be broadcast in 3-D. Tickets for the
show are on sale at the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student Center at $5 for students and
S6 for the public. All tickets sold at the door will be $7. Public tickets are also available at both
Record Bar locations and Apple Records. Watch for further information in Tuesday's East Caroli-
nian.
Dinner Theatre Has
Neil Simon Comedy
Tonight through Saturday, October 23,
auditorium 244 of Mendenhall Student Center
will come alive with good food and the delightful
Broadway comedy Same Time, Next Year for
Mendenhall Student Center's Fall Dinner
Theatre production.
Everyone is invited to the full dinner perfor-
mances October 21-23 at 6:30 p.m. The food pro-
mises to continue in the fine tradition of ex-
cellence previous productions started. The
talented Alpha-Omega players of the Repertory
Theatre of America will return for another bright
and engaging production.
Same Time, Next Year is the romantic comedy
about Doris and George as lovers who are mar-
ried, but not to each other. They meet by chance
in a North California inn in 1951. The play
follows their one-night-a-year romance that lasts
25 years and survives each character's develop-
ment.
Doris grows up becomes a flower child, a
Women's Libber, and finally becomes the head
of a succesful catering business. George goes
from being wound up to being laid back and
finds himself with wider lapels and attitudes
throughout the years, the couple remain devoted
to their respective spouses, and we see their love
as a beneficial growth, rather than a harmful
happening.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 21, 1982
11
PET I
VILLAGE
NEW!
Large selection of
FRESH WATER FISH
& Supplies
511 S. EVANS 756-9222
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HAVE A PROBLEM?
NEED INFORMATION?
REAL Crisis intervention,
24 HOUR SERVICE
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312 E. 10th Street
Greenville, N.C 27834
Pig Cooker For Rent
15 plusl 5 deposi
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Rolling Stones
Steve Winwood
Gap Band
Toto
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SALE
Missing Persons
Pat Travers
Nicolette Larson
Donald Fagen
Zapp
Balloons Over
Greenville
Taking Orders now
for Homecoming bouquets.
Large selection of Purple
& Gold balloons.
Also bouquets aailalle
for all occasions.
Call Mrs. Tabor
am time � da or night:
752-3815
Balloon Bouquet
16 balloons) Ori
mixed daisies
$595
beautifully
wrapped
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West 5th St. Ext.
Near Hospital
752-6195
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1890 SOtM
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the women of the Fleming Center. Counselors are
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assured by the caring staff of the Fleming Center.
SERVICES: � Tuesday - Saturday Abortion Ap-
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Hearth care counseling jijc FLEMING
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Lay a way Now.
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Open Monday
Through Saturday
10:00 til 6:00
2741 E. 10th
758-2080
VtiA
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and education for wo-
men of all ages.
2311 S Evans St. Ext
756-201.
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with this S
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Not Good Toward Daily Specials
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05 A LEGACY OF LOVE
3:05
5:05
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LAST NIGHT R
GISELLE
?
�vXv
Forgive me, Father, for I have sinned.
I have killed for my Country,
I have stolen for my Church,
I have loved a woman,
and I am a Priest.
MONSIGNOR
CHRISTOPHER REEVE in MONSIGNOR
starring CENEVIEVE BUJOLD FERNANDO REY JASON MILLER
JOE CORTESE ADOLFO CELI with TOMAS MILLAN as Francisco
Student Union
ECU Major Attractions
presents
f Sunday, Oct. 24
.38
SPECIAL
STARTS TOMORROW! R
��TTMCTTO jjj
IMMI i' MIUIMI tCCMfUTWt
PIMIT KHWI tWMUl
ith Special Guests
Spys
featuring 2 former members
of Foreigner
Minges Coliseum
Tickets now on sale �
$7.00 advance to ECU Students
$9.00 � General Public
at Mendenhall Central Ticket office
m� a mye A Glorious Uproarious Love Story.
TOMORROW!
LUCIANO PAVAROTTI
(PGlwcrnt a�p atgsrti
53
Greenville
Record Bars
&
Apple Records
�m.m.iimmmmmmm
i
?

T





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 21, 1982
.38 Special Didn't Give
In To Typical Pressures
Continued From Page 10
Alamo For security, they boarded
up the doors and windows, and had
to enter the building by climbing up
a drainpipe. It was at The Alamo
that .38 Special got their name.
Although it was in the middle of
nowhere, somebody complained
about the noise. The police,fearing
that they had come across a voodoo
drug cult, surronded The Alamo
with pistols and shotguns drawn.
Over the horns, the band could
hear them yell: "Come on out
peacefully or these.38 Specials will
take you to jail
.38 Special set out to make it in
the rowdy bars of the South where,
to quote Donnie Van Zant, "If
there's no girl pretty enough to start
a fight over, you start a fight
anyway These are the bars that in-
spired "Rough-housin on Special
Forces, a song filled with "fighting
fools getting loose at the corner
joint
Three years of bar dates paid off
when a tape recorded at Lynyrd
Skynyrd's demo studio attracted the
interest of Peter Rudge, Skynyrd's
manager, who soon had the unsign-
ed band opening for Peter Framp-
ton, Kiss, and Johnny Winter. "We
went from playing for 10 people to
playing for 10,000 recalls Donnie.
The band signed with A&M
Records and recorded their first LP,
.38 Special. Bassist Larry Junstrom,
who was briefly a member of the
Lynyrd Skynyrd band, joined the
group, they cut their second album,
Special Delivery, and became a top
attraction on the national circuit.
But for a band who wanted to
"make our mark as Don Barnes
says, the results weren't totally satis-
fying. In the year and a half follow-
ing Lynyrd Skynyrd's plane acci-
dent, .38 Special severed their rela-
tionship with Rudge, went back to
Jacksonville, went on unemploy-
ment, and started trying to write the
best songs they could. "We wrote
songs, threw them out, and then
wrote more songs Barnes says.
With the help of Mark Spector,
then with A&M's A&R Department
and now the band's manager, they
refined their song style and were in-
troduced to the songwriting talents
of Jim Peterik (who led the band
The Ides of March and now co-
writes with .38 Special). Peterik's
song "Rockin' Into The Night"
became an FM hit for the band.
Back on the road again as
head liners, .38 Special earned a
reputation as live performers that
caused one paper to note their
"instant ability to conjure a spirit of
celebration anytime they set up
their amplifier A good part of
that spirit comes from Donnie Van
Zant, whose antics have earned him
the tag of a "beserk riverboat
gambler When Van Zant gets ex-
cited, he tends to jump off the stage
into the audience. At England's
Reading Festival, Donnie jumped 20
feet from the stage into the au-
dience, figuring that if he broke a
leg, it didn't matter, since it was the
last date of the tour.
For Barnes and the other
members of .38 special, it's a lesson
they learned from one of those
Jacksonville boys "born on the
wrong side of the tracks Ronnie
Van Zant. As Don Barnes says,
"Nobody thought he'd ever amount
to anything, nobody cared if he did
or not, but he just went out and did
it because he knew he could
St. Louis
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THE EAST CAROl INIAN
OCTOBER 21. 1982
13
A
Fredrica Jacobson
Miriem House
Locals
Campaign
Continued From Page 9
Both women are running as write-in candidates
on the democratic ticket because they missed the
filing deadline to get their names on the ballot.
Freddy is running for the Ninth House District
against incumbents Sam D. Bundy and Edward
(Ed) Warren. Mariem is running in the Ninth
Senate District against Vernon E. White (D), and
Sallie C. Keel (R). Both are relying on the hard
work of their supporters who are being supervis-
ed by Dot Gronert, their campaign manager and
the current president of the Pitt County Chapter
of NOW.
"People have been very receptive said
MariemThey have come up to us and said
"We're so glad you're doing this "
During a door to door campaign swing in
Williamston, N.C. Freddy was recognized by a
local resident, "Oh you're the woman I saw on
TV proclaimed a local woman. Freddy was
pleased to see that she was indeed a viable and
visible candidate.
ilii'i 1 Department Qf University Unions
ttllil ACU-I Ail Campus Backgammon Tournament
e TcjtTiar-e; w ' oe ;or,awcrec tc 3ere'�ir tn� 1 ��. men -��' I �� represent
ECU, rf sufficient MfTKr oetor pciifwes (he Association z Coiege ;o�.x,s frir)�on&,
'egior.ai 'ace toace tournaments to oe �c at Ihe Urawersrty of Ter'essee on
Feorjary 10, 11, ir.a IS "983
How To Enter
A registration, 'orr- awlarJt � (he
Billiards Center at Mcaerw St-aent
Certer. must te :ompJeCed ir-z subm:
to tne Sooervscr c- 3uty at re Center �
Wednesday, Octooe' 20
All-Campus Tournament
Schedule
� Mcoay Octooer 25
� 6 0C PM-MSC Muto-Purpose Roc-
� Doubie-efcmrtaoon ana or roun z
robin format
� Eact match �mi oe oiavec to a
cesigrtec port otai
Costs
at entry fee of $' 00 s requnsd and
Ddyab.e at tne tournament s-te
Tne DarTiCOants ac oe going ;c
Tennessee wi' nave tne costs of oagig.
transportnon eas arc entry "ees part
- "�vcennaij Student Ce"te'
Requirements
tac- z jrt be req ��
s-ca - s i-e-1 Z � r ve-s ce'sez
. - . j bo the
jmament
The - Backgamm
Rules was be sec n trie pen
Zzoes of Vie � to tc ?� able for jsc it
-e B -a'rs Ce�er t s Ngj
�eczezzc thai i Dat; cas
e es ce :c re :ou"se't
E3c- pane Da -ss.t sC G?�
Tho i ce erec -�� r e es-1
Office
Eac" oa" c pan) s -eu-este tobnog
a oackgap oe'e I oosvote
Awards
tnopti es a oe av.a'oec .o re first
secede yc 9 'Z cace sV-s
Immortal Bard Really A Fake?
�JWWVSJWSSSSSSSSSSSS&SSSSSSSS'
B I)K K WEST
WASHINGTON
(I PI) � Calvin Hoff-
man, author of "The
Murder of the Man
Who Was
Shakespeare claims
new evidence un-
covered in England
supports his thesis that
Shakespeare's plays ac-
tually were written b
Christopher Marlowe.
I'm not enough of a
student of Elizabethan
I'ama to evaluate Hof-
fman's uspicion.v On
a pop quiz, I would
have identified
Christopher Marlowt.
a a fictional private
ce created by Ray-
mond Chandler.
It occurred to me,
however, 'hat expert
testimony on the sub-
ject could be found in
the disputed works
themselves. Here is
how an interrogation of
the Immortal Bard
might read:
Q. Come now, Mr.
Shakespeare, 'fess up.
Did you really write
those plays yourself?
A. "An ill-favoured
thinj sir, but mine
own. I call the gods to
witness
Q. What about the
claim that Marlowe was
the author?
A. "This is a very
false gallop of verses.
Falser than vows made
in wine. Stands not
within the prospect of
belief. What imports
the nomination of this
gentleman?"
Q. Well. Hoffman
says it has been
discovered that
Marlowe was still alive
five vears after his
reputed murder in
1583. That would at
least physically place
him in the time frame
of some of the later
manuscripts.
A. "But this denoted
a foregone conclusion.
Give me the ocular pro-
of
Q. Hoffman also
wants to re-open the
tomb of Marlowe's
patron. Sir Thomas
Walsingham. to locate
a box that might con-
tain conclusive
evidence of Marlowe's
authorship.
A. "That takes the
reason prisoner. Poor
Tom's a-cold. So may
he rest. Vex not his
ghost
Q. Is there any con-
nection at all between
you and Marlowe?
A. "Thev sav we are

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MEMORIAL DR. EXT. GREENVILLE
RESEARCH PAPERS
Imp) e u grades! Rush S: 00 foi
ihc current. Of� patc, research
aialog i.l' pdpt' mi File a
academic subjects
Heseftfta viiantf 11322 ldah
�Ve O Los Angeles, CA 90025
(213)447 :
almost as like as eggs.
He does it with better
grace, but I do it more
naturally
Q. What about Fran-
cis Bacon, Edmund
Spenser and all those
other English authors
who have been men-
tioned as your
ghostwriters?
A. "Mechanic slaves
with greasy aprons,
rules and hammers.
Cudgel thy brain, no
more about it. Nothing
will come to nothing
Q. Yeah, but where
will it all end?
A. "Things at worse
will cease, or else climb
upward to what thev
were before
Q. I didn't ask tor a
stock market predic-
tion, sir. 1 wanted to
know what your per-
sonal reaction would
ARCADE VARIETY
211E Ma A
iCWdc
be.
A. "I am tied to the
stake, and I must stand
the course
Q. I wasn't asking
you about
Reaganomics, either. Is
there anything else you
wish to say in rebuttal?
A. "Little shall 1
grace my cause in
speaking for myself.
Reputation is an idle
and most false imposi-
tion; often got without
merit, and lost without
deserving. He that
filches from me mv
Wt have ice
and other
Partv Accessories

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cdJrfoRni&
concept
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Appointments Please � 752-2967
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Applications are now being
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contact:
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757-6084
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757-6136
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757-6249
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i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
OCTOBER 21. 1982
Page 14
Explosive' Seminoles AxeBucs, 56-17
By CINDY PLEAS ANTS
Shorts �lor
The East Carolina Pirates travell-
ed to sunny Florida last weekend
but in Campbell Stadium at Florida
State University, the Bucs found a
chill in the air that cut to the bone.
The Seminoles were on a war-
path, racking up 706 yards in total
offense and 456 yards passing to
totally devastate ECU, 56-17. FSU
surpassed its previous record of 645
yards in total offense, which the
Seminoles set in 1969 against Mem-
phis State.
"As far as I'm concerned, they're
(FSU) probably one of the most ex-
plosive offensive teams in the coun-
try said ECU coach Ed Emory.
"We had great field position and
they still took the ball and moved
it
Unlike the Pirates, the Seminoles
mostly moved the ball through the
air. The Seminoles had 277 yards
passing the first half to ECU'S 22.
FSU quarterbacks Kelly Lowrey and
Blair Williams displayed a passing
extravaganza, with Williams com-
pleting eight-out-of 12 passes for
208 yards and Williams connecting
four-out-of-five attempts for 69
yards. In Division I-A, the
Seminoles were ranked 19th in pass-
ing offense, averaging 228 yards.
But with Lowrey and Williams com-
pleting 21 of 31 passes, FSU doubl-
ed their passing average, while ECU
collected a total of 51 yards.
ECU quarterback Greg Stewart,
who was listed in tenth place in pass-
ing efficiency in last week's rank-
ings, was constantly pressured by
FSU's defensive line and completed
one of ten passes and threw four in-
terceptions. Ingram replaced
Stewart in the second half, but faced
a few of the same problems as
Stewart, thus enabling Ingram to
only complete two of eight attempts
for 29 yards.
Down 35-3 at halftime, it looked
as though the Pirates would collapse
in the third quarter, but that was not
to be. The Seminoles came into the
third quarter and intercepted
Stewart's pass in the first eight
seconds of play. Now in possession,
FSU's Lowrey then threw a 32-yard
pass to Jessie Hester to put the
Seminoles on ECU's three-yard line.
Greg Allen leaped headfirst into the
endzone to score FSU's sixth
touchdown, upping their lead to
42-3.
With 12:29 remaining in the
quarter, the Pirates began to move
down the field with Ingram calling
the signals. Ingram passed to
Carlton Nelson for a 16-yard pick-
up and a first down. Reggie Branch,
who tied with Ernest Byner with 77
yards as ECU's leading rushers,
sprinted for 24-yards for another
first down. Ingram then kept for 16
yards and the Pirates scored their
first TD of the game when Byner
faked left and ran fifteen yards into
the endzone.
The Seminoles in control once
again, a 21-yard pass to Tony
Johnson put FSU on the 30-yard
line. However, on the next play,
Mowatt fumbled a Williams pass,
which was recovered by ECU. Only
4:23 remaining, ECU's Scott Lewis
and Branch rallied to put the Pirates
on the two-yard line at the end of
the third quarter.
In the first play of the fourth
quarter, Ingram pitched out to Tony
Baker who ran in to score ECU's se-
cond consecutive touchdown
against the Seminoles.
Emory praised his team for not
giving up against Florida State.
"We could have laid down and died
but we didn't he said. "We picked
up almost 200 yards (total offense)
in the second half
Now 49-17, the Seminoles went
on to score their final touchdown
when Williams threw to Weegie
Thompson in the endzone. With
7:31 remaining in the game, the
Pirates had two more opportunities
to score but Baker fumbled on a se-
cond down and Ingram threw two
incomplete passes in ECU's final
scoring attempt.
The Pirates only points in the first
half was a 39-yard field goal by Jeff
Heath in the second quarter. The
Seminoles scored five touchdowns,
with sophomore tailback Greg Allen
responsible for scoring three of
them.
The win boosted FSU's record to
5-1, suffering one loss to Pitt-
sburgh, 17-37. Now ranked 17th by
the Associated Press and 14th by
United Press International this
week, FSU coach Bobby Bowden
was pleasantly surprised by his
team's showing last Saturday night.
"We played much better than 1 ex-
pected he said. "We played a
much different team tonight than
we did last week. Southern Illinois
(59-8) was a finesse team and East
Carolina was more of a physical
team. I guess we played about twice
as good as I thought we could
Emory expressed the bitter disap-
pointment that he shared with rest
of the Pirate squad after the loss.
"It's hard to explain the pain and
hurt I feel right now he said. "We
came to this game with the 16th-best
defense in the country and gave up
700 yards. It's really hard to unders-
tand how that happened
Emory added that FSU did a
grand job of picking the Pirates all
night. "They screened us, draw-
played us and threw out of their
minds he said. "And in some
parts of the game, we played
defense like we were on ice
The head coach said that after the
Seminoles first scored, the Pirates
never seemed to regain any defen-
sive poise. "We're not that bad on
defense he said. "We're 3-3 now
and there's a lot of schools in the
country who wish they were 3-3 Ir
tackles, Schulz led the Pirates with
nine tackles. Hal Stephens followed
with eight and Steve Hamilton
wound up with seven, including one
quarterback sack.
The Bucs face Illinois State in this
Saturday's homecoming game, and
Emory said the Florida State bout is
now history. "The least important
game to us is the Florida State
game he said. "We cannot do a
damned thing about it. We'll be
picking up our wounds and getting
ready for Illinois State
Gametime is 2 p.m.
Ptioto ty OA�Y FATTEKSON
Ernest Byner runs in for TD against Florida State.
E.arolinaFlorida Slate
17First Downs29
59293Rushing44-250
51Passing Yards456
8Return Yards46
18 3-4Passing33-22 1
3-436Punting1-400
4-2Fumbles-Lost4-1
4-20Penalties-Yards7-63
East aroitna0 3 7 7-17
Florida State1411 7 14-54
Scoring:
FSU - HJones.38 pass from Lowrey (Hall kick)
FSU � G.Allen.24 pass from Lowry (Hall kick)
FSU - GAllenrun (Hall kick)
ECU � Heath. 39 FG
FSU � GAllen.5 run (Hall kick)
FSU � Hester. 21pass from Lowrey (Hall kick)
FSU � G.Allen1 run (Hall kick)
ECU - Byner. 1!run (Heath kick)
ECU � Baker, 2run (Heath kick)
FSU � HJones2 pass from Williams (Hall kick)
FSU - WThompson. 16 pass from Williams (Hall kick
Emory Looking Ahead
IndiMdyal Statistics
Rushing� ECU: Baker 10-60. Byner II-77, Branch
16-77, Stewart 5-1. Lewis 6-25, Ingram 11-53: P5U � O.
Allen 11-60. R Williams 6-41, T Smith 6-68, Lowrey 4-11.
B Williams H-7). C. Jones 12-73. B Allen 3-0. T Smith
6-68. Dans 1-4.
Passing - ECU Stewart 10-1-422. Ingram 8-2-0-29;
FSU: Lowrey 15-9-1-237. B Williams 16-12-0-223. Davis
2-1-0-1-4).
Receiving � ECU: Nichols I 22. Nelson 1-16. Adams
1-13; FSU: Hester 4-138. G. Allen 3-65. H Jones 2-40. T.
Smith 1-5. Mcltinnon 2-87. T Johnson 2 50. Mowatt 3-19.
Hester 4-138. C Jones 3-40. W Thompson 1 16
By KEN BOLTON
Assistant Sports Editor
East Carolina University football
fans knew it wasn't going to be easy
when the Pirates confronted the
Florida State Seminoles.
Two years ago, the Pirates went
down to the Sunshine State and
came away a 63-7 loser. This year's
game was a little closer even though
the Seminoles won by a large
margin, 56-17.
But the final score doesn't lay as
much blame on the ECU football
program as it may appear, as ex-
perts agree that this is probably the
best team that Florida State has ever
had.
After the game, head coach Ed
Emory emphasized the difference in
the two schools' programs. "FSU
spends four million dollars on their
football program he said. "Last
year they decided that they needed
some linemen, so they went out and
signed eighteen linemen from all
over the country
As Emory put it, the loss was just
a case of too many turnovers and
poor defense. "You can't go into a
game ranked 16th in the country in
total defense, give up 706 yards and
feel good about your defensive
play
The Pirates will have to forget
about the Seminoles and concen-
trate on Illinois State, this week's
opponent in Ficklen Stadium.
An undefeated home season
could be a reality for the ninth time
in the 20-year history of Ficklen
Stadium if the Pirates down Illinois
State. This being the final home
game of the 1982 season, ECU
enters with a 3-0 mark on their
home turf.
Illinois State will come to Green-
ville with a 1-5 record. The head
coach of the Red Birds is Bob
Otolski, who is 4-12 in his second
season at ISU.
The Red Birds will come into the
game with a potent passing attack
that has already accounted for 1100
yards through the air. "Despite be-
ing a young team, offensively they
can move the ball, said Emory.
"Illinois State throws the ball a
good deal from the shotgun,
something that we have not seen this
year from an opponent
The Red Birds especially concern
Hmory for three reasons.
"One, Illinois State has had an
open week, which gives them two
full weeks to get ready for us
"Second their last game as
against Wknita State, a team that
runs the same offense we do
Wichita State started the
I-formation as ECU runs it under
Larry Beckish, ECU's current of-
fensive coordinator.
"Third, I'm concerned about a
letdown going into this game. And
if they looked at the films of the
FSU game, they might get real thirs-
ty Emory added.
A True 'Team Player'
Shulz: All America
By KEN BOLTON
Assistant Sports Editor
Three years ago, ECU defensive
end Jody Schulz was considering
hanging up his cleats and not play-
ing any more football. At that time,
he was playing for Chowan College
in Murfreesboro, N.C. And during
his freshman year, he did not play
very much and became discouraged.
But Schulz stuck with it, and it
has paid off tremendously. In the
last three years, he has started every
game that he has played in. His last
year at Chowan, he was chosen as a
junior college All-American. He
then decided to attend ECU because
the Pirates put forth the most effort
in recruiting Schulz.
During his first year at ECU,
Schulz recorded 125 tackles and led
the team with 56 solo stops, 23 bet-
ter than the second man. He also led
the Pirate defense with nine quarter-
back sacks and six tackles in the
backfield that resulted in losses.
After the 1981 season, he was
voted the team's top defensive per-
former and received the Purple
Pirate Award for excellent play.
Schulz also received the E.E. Rawl
Award for character, scholarship
and athletic ability.
His credentials also earned him
AP All-America honorable mention
honors and led to this year's build-
up.
Coming into this season, Schulz
was touted as ECU's next All-
American. And after six games, he
has proven worthy of that recogni-
tion.
A Green Bay Packer scout may
have said it best aUer the Richmond
game: "Jody Schulz rates right up
there with the best defensive players
in the country. He does a lot of
good things. The guy at Rutgers
(Bill Pickel) is bigger and may be the
best in the country, but Jody is not
far behind
All of the publicity is something
that Schulz could just as well do
without. "The pressure bothered me
a lot at the beginning said Schulz.
"I just wish the press would put
more emphasis on the team, since
that's the most important thing
Schulz pays little attention to per-
sonal statistics, and is more con-
cerned with winning. "I look at my
stats, but I don't dwell on them he
said. "If you worry about it too
much, they won't be around to look
at
One of Schulz's main concerns is
the lack of support which is evident
at every home game. "At Florida
State last week, it was 56-17 and you
looked up into the stands and not
more than 100 people had left he
said. "I wish we had their kind of
support, because you wouldn't
believe the difference that a crowd
makes
Schulz always seems to have his
biggest games against the top teams
on ECU's schedule. Last year
against North Carolina, he had 14
tackles and a quarterback sack.
Then against Miami (FL), Schulz
racked up 13 tackles, including 2
sacks for 17 yards in losses.
This year, Schulz has also saved
his best for the big teams. He had 14
hits, one tackle for an eight-yard
loss and two quarterback sacks
against Missouri. Last weekend, he
had nine tackles against Florida
State.
According to Schulz, Florida
State was the best offensive team
that he has faced since being at
ECU. "We knew that they were
good, but we were surprised at how
good they really were he said.
"They had good depth, with their
second and third strings as good as
the first team
Schulz will try to put the FSU
game out of his mind, and concen-
trate on this weekend's homecoming
game against Illinois State. It will be
his last home game as a Pirate.
"When you wake up in the morn-
ing and you're so sore that you can't
get out of bed, you wonder why you
keep doing this stated Schulz.
"You learn a lot about yourself
when you lose, but winning makes
all of the pain and work worth it
Tarheels' Impressive Offense
Downs Lady Pirate Spikers
By EDWARD NICKLAS
Staff Writer
The ECU Lady Pirate volleyball
team, led by seniors Stacey Weitzel
and Mitzi Davis, succumbed to the
University of North Carolina's im-
pressive offensive play, losing 15-5,
15-11 and 15-12.
The Lady Pirates, who have had
closer matches with the Lady Tar
Heels in the past, were forced to
play a defensive match.
"The key to the match said
head coach Lynn Davidson, "was
that Carolina controlled the game
offensively. You can't win playing
defensively all night
Davidson added that the Pirates'
previous matches with the Tar Heels
have always been long and drawn
out. "I give them a lot of credit
she said. "They are exceptional this
year
UNC dominated the first game
but fought hard to win the next two
games. Behind Stacy Weitzel and
Mitzi Davis, both of whom were
playing in their last home game at
ECU, led their team to a hard-
fought finish. Behind Weitzel's bat-
tle cries, ferocious spikes and diving
saves, along with Diane Lloyd's
nimble set-ups, ECU tied the second
game 8-8 before surrendering five
straight points to Carolina.
� In the third game, UNC jumped
to a quick 8-1 lead. AfteT two ECU
timeouts, the Lady Pirates struck
for 10 straight points to rattle the
Lady Tar Heels. UNC, however,
regrouped and won the game and
match, winning seven of the last
eight points.
Weitzel and Davis, who received
gifts and gracious hugs prior to the
start of the match, were praised
highly by Coach Davidson.
"Weitzel is probably the best player
to have competed in volleyball at
ECU she said. The standout is
captain of the Lady Pirates team
this year and has been a starter for
the last three years.
"Mitzi Davis Davidson con-
tinued, "is a great kid to coach. She
is a hard worker, a great athlete and
has a super attitude. Davis is also an
all-American on ECU's softball
team.
Now 19-11, ECU will take to the
road for the remainder of the
season, starting with Appalachian
State on Oct. 22.
Golfers Post Best Match Yet
Defensive End Jody Shah
fry �ABY FATTMSON
By ECU SPORTS INFO.
The ECU golf team had its best
match of the season at Campbell
University's Hargrove B. Davis In-
vitational this week, with the team
finishing fourth and capturing one
individual victory.
David Dooley, a freshman from
Charlotte, N.C, placed third after a
four-hole play-off against
Guilford's Charles Bradshaw and
Campbell's John Marshall. All
three paired the first two holes, but
Marshall fell off of the third hole
after shooting a bogey. Bradshaw
and Dooley both paired the third
hole, but Dooley eagled the fourth
to take third place.
Jack Nicklas, Jr of UNC-
Chapel Hill captured first place
after a play-off with N.C. State's
Neal Braxton.
Overall, the State team won with
729 strokes, with Carolina close
behind with 731. Guilford took
third place with 737 and ECU had
740 strokes for fourth place.
Individual scores included,
Dooley, 143; Kelly Stimart, 147;
Don Sweeting, 148; Chris Czaja,
154; John Riddle, 155 and David
Woodard had 158 strokes.
The ECU golfers will end the fall
season at William & Mary on Oct.
25 and 26.
ECU Booters Edge Wesleyan;
Improve Overall Record To 7-5
The ECU soccer
team tied the school
record for most wins
Wednesday afternoon
when they defeated
N.C. Wesleyan 2-1.
The Pirates record for
the year is now 7-5.
Goals were scored by
Bill Merwin and Mike
Swan, with an assist by
Chip Baker.
"We played real well
especially with only 14
players said head
coach Robbie Church.
"They were a tough
team and we were for-
tunate to get that last
goal
"We'll have to be
sharp for UNC-
Grecnsboro Church
added, referring to
ECU's next opponent.
"They're ranked fifth
nationally in
Division-3
The UNC-
Greensboro match is
scheduled for Oct. 24 at
2:00 in Greensboro.
I
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 21,1982 15
JSON
d
attack
1100
ite be-
ll they
Ticry.
-all "a
otgun,
ten this
mcern
had an
?m two
is.
le was
im that
le do
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rent of-
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e. And
of the
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vidson.
player
e ball at
ndout is
Ites team
tarter for
son con-
)ach. She
jhi'te and
is also an
softball
Ike to the
of the
aiachian
hs Czaja,
nd David
id the fall
on Oct.
n;
7-5
Church
Jrring to
pponent.
iked fifth
in
UNC-
Imatch is
Oct. 24 at
Jsboro.
Soccer Star Brian Winchell
Scoring Goals On & Off Field
Booters Equal Record Win Mark
Bt BARBARA
TYNDALL
oporto Inf Wriln
Meet Brian Winchell,
a returning senior at
East Carolina Universi-
ty who enjoys nothing
more but to be able to
kick a soccer ball
around and score
game-winning points.
Winchell, playing
forward, is in his
fourth year witrf the
Pirates. In 1979, he
received the most
valuable defensive
award.
The team has been
playing well so far this
year with a 7-5 record.
During a match against
Guilford College this
month, Winchell at-
tempted seven shots
and made three by per-
forming the "hat
trick"technique.
We're good when we
are playing good, but
bad when we're playing
bad Winchell com-
mented. "The team
works well together.
With a few key players,
the team works well off
of them
In the game prior to
Guilford against
Wesleyan College,
Winchell played goalies
for the first time in two
years. He shut out
Wesleyan, the fourth
ECU shutout this year.
Winchell began play-
ing soccer at the age of
seven. Originally from
New Jersey, it was
there he learned his
first lessons in how to
play the game. His
older brothers were
also avid soccer players
and Winchell said this

Brian Winchell
had a lot of influence
on him picking up the
game.
To Winchell, soccer
is more than just kick-
ing a ball around. Men-
tal and physical exer-
tion are provided in the
versatile sport. Physi-
que has little to do with
the player; "As long as
you re flexible, you
don't necessarily have
to be big Winchell
said.
Luckily he has never
been seriously injured
during a game. The one
injury feared my most
soccer players is a kick
to the knee which can
bench a player for a
while.
"Aggression flares
during the game said
Winchell. "But the
worse ones are put out
of the game
Winchell is majoring
in accounting and plans
to practice as a certified
public accountant after
graduation.
By Joel Scales
Sports lafo. Writer
East Carolina
University's soccer
team is off to one of its
better starts in the
history of Pirate soc-
cer.
The early season suc-
cess can be attributed
to many factors, in-
cluding new head coach
Robbie Church. After
beating N.C.
Wesleyan, the Pirates
have now tied the
school record for the
most wins in a season.
The impressive start
can also be attributed
to overall team play
and strong defensive ef-
forts.
One of the standout
defensive players is
senior Dannis Elwell.
The Springfield, Va
native plays the
sweeper position and is
a captain on the squad.
Elwell said that one of
the reason why he
decided to attend East
Carolina was because
his brother had come
here.
"I hadn't planned on
playing soccer here
said the 5-11,
170-pound Elwell. "I
was out by one of the
dorms kicking and
former coach Brad
Smith asked me to
come and try out
Elwell earned a
scholarship his
freshman year. The
Elwell success story
continued until the K
cond game during his
sophomore season
when he went down
with a knee injury.
Because of the injury
Elwell had to sit out for
the remainder of the
season and was red-
shir ted. After months
of rehabilitation during
the off-season, Elwell
returned with three
years of eligibility re-
maining.
Elwell. who will
Wwto By CINOY WALL
ECU Soccer At Its Finest
graduate in December
with a degree in
business administra-
tion, will be nominated
by East Carolina for
academic all-America
in the at-large category
"Dennis is a fine
young man who has of-
fered us a lot of leader-
ship said coach
Church.
But Elwell
unselfishly stated
otherwise. "I'm just
one of the many
members of the team
he said. "Things are
really coming together
for the teams now. No
coach is perfect, but
coach Church listens to
the players and works
well with the personnel
he Has
Elwell said he is anx-
ious to finish the season
just as well as he began
it. "We're playing
much better than last
year assured Elwell.
"Our attitudes have
also improved
There's no doubt
that ECU will continue
to improve with players
like Elwell on the field
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758-4600
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16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 21, 1982
Running Back Tony
Baker Filling Role
With Great Success
New York Native Adjusting Fine
McCOI�Jtel?ORACE
S��rs Info. Writer
When the ECU
coaching staff realized
they would have to
begin their 1982 season
without premier runn-
ing back Jimmy
Walden, they had to ex-
plore their depth charts
like tailors plundering
through a tangled
threadbox searching
for that perfect hue.
They threaded player
after player and none
fit the eye of the needle
as well as a 5-10,
175-pound freshman
sensation named Tony
Baker.
The High Point
native led all ECU
rushers with 353 total
yards on 56 carries
after only four games,
averaging 6.2 yards per
carry. His longest
burst, a 75-yard
scamper down the
sidelines agaisnt Rich-
mond was the longest
touchdown run since
Ed Emory has been
head coach at ECU.
"Before high school
I didn't play football
because it just didn't
seem to be my game at
all he said. "I never
played recreation or lit-
tle league football when
I was growing up. All I
ever though about was
playing baseball until
my last two years of
high school
Baker did consider
playing football his
freshman year in high
school, but said he
thought more about
other sports. Track
then came into the pic-
ture, which outshadow-
ed baseball and Tony's
ideas of playing foot-
ball. He was im-
mediately known in
western North Carolina
after his first year of
track for his times in
the 400 200- and
100-meter races and
was well respected for
his anchor leg on the
relays.
"I still wanted to
play baseball though,
but 1 couldn't because
baseball and track oc-
curred during the same
season in high school.
It was a difficult choice
but I decided to go
ahead and concentrate
on being a sprinter
Tony replied.
Baker soon turned in
his spikes and baton for
cleats and a football.
The accomplished
sprinter wanted to find
out if he could earn
some respect on the
grid.
"1 knew I had the
speed to play football
but I was small. It
seemed like all the
other sprinters were go-
ing to play football so I
decided to show up for
summer drills too
Baker said.
Baker's high school
coaches were aware of
his quickness and im-
mediately put him at
the tailback position to
determine just how
quick he actually was.
He ran the forty-yard
dash in 4.4 seconds and
the coaches knew they
had found a speedster.
"From that day on, I
knew speed would
always be my greatest
asset if I was going to
be a football player
Baker said.
By the end of Bakers'
senior season at High
Point Andrews, Baker
had gained over 1600
yards and received an
invitation to play in the
Shrine Bowl, made all-
conference, all-state
and had received
honorable mentions as
a high school ail-
American.
As expected, Baker
was being noticed by
college recruiters. He
was recruited by N.C.
State, Chapel Hill,
Clemson and nearly
every other ACC team
for both football and
track. He admitted,
however, that he had
hopes of playing col-
lege baseball at one
time but changed his
See BAKER, Page 18
By HORACE
McCORMICK
ECU Sports Info
Steve Hamilton, a
former tight end at
Williamsville High
School in Williamsville,
NY, has begun to
emerge as one of East
Carolina University's
premier defensive
lineman. The towering
6-4, 236-pound junior
began to stand out dur-
ing spring drills, winn-
ing the Pirate's Defen-
sive Attack and
Weight-Lifter-of-the-
Year awards.
Hamilton didn't
always awaken to the
boisterous sounds of
neighboring loud music
and other campus life
alarms. Three years
ago, he was rising to
the trumpeting inota-
tions of a bugle. Steve
was not marching down
College Hill Drive in
old leather Converses
and a clashing sweat-
suit either, but fully
dressed in uniform
marching in blindingly-
shined shoes to the beat
of "taps" at the Fork
Union Military
Academy at 6:00 a.m.
every morning.
"Living in a military
academy was like living
in a totally different
world Hamilton said.
"Discipline was very
tight. It was like living
every hour of your life
on a schedule. When
the flag was down we
were in bed and when
the bugles blew we were
up, even if the sun was
still down. Beds were
checked before
breakfast and so were
we from our hats to our
shoes
Although the
military academy was
extremely confined,
Hamilton still managed
to acquire most of his
knowledge of football
there.
climb aboard the No. 12
StadecoacbLWestern Sizzlin's
chopped sirloin
Head for
.Western
Sizzlin and some mighty
Jfine eatm' with the
j No. 12 Stagecoach
I Chopped sirloin beef
I ground dally by our
j own butchers and
I cooked just the way
with your choice of potato
The No. 12 Stagecoach, a
delicious, affordable meal
at Vfestem Sizzlin Can't
you Just taste it sizzlin?
"I went to Fork
Union in Virginia right
after I graduated from
high school in
Williamsville added
Hamilton. "I didn't
come directly to college
to play football because
I didn't feel that I was
actually ready for col-
lege ball at the time. I
knew I had the poten-
tial, so I went to the
pleted his first season
just as planned, but
didn't expect the
recognition to come so
soon.
"Just after my first
season explained
Hamilton, "there I
was, immediately faced
with the decision of
whether or not to stay
at the academy another
year or to go on and
Defensive Linemen Steve Hamilton
academy to prepare
myself as a better col-
lege prospect. As m
first season at the
academy progressed,
my play seemed to just
get better and better.
Scouts began to notice
me early in the
season
During Hamilton's
first season at the
academy, he was
recruited by Wake
Forest, Virginia Tech
and Boston University,
among others. He corn-
play college ball. The
decision wasn't really
tough at all. I knew
that college football
was what I wanted. The
tough decision was
deciding where to go. I
decided on East
Carolina
During the re-
mainder of Hamilton's
stay at Fork Union, the
academy really began
to grow on him.
"For the first time
assured Hamilton, "I
was beginning to adjust
to the atmosphere and I
began to enjoy it. They
taught me things that I
could have never learn-
ed anywhere else.
Everything I learned
there has stayed with
me through college and
has helped me to adapt
to college football
Hamilton was no
longer "just a caged
bird singing a sad
song" at the academy
"I felt good when I
left the academy to
come down South to
East Carolina said
Hamilton. "I miss the
academy, but I won't
forget any of the things
that I learned there.
They taught me to ap-
preciate the simple
things in life that most
of us take for
granted
Hamilton had played
tight-end at
Williamsville and at the
academy. When his
freshman season at
ECU began, he was still
a tight-end, but just un-
til the day head coach
Ed Emory called him
into his office.
"There was a sur-
prising number of in-
juries on our defensive
line that year
Hamilton recalled.
"Unexpectedly, coach
Emory asked me if I
felt I had the ability to
play defensive tackle. I
was surprised at first,
but coach Emory knew
that I had some ex-
perience playing defen-
sive line while going
both ways as a tight-
end and defensive end
in high school. I was
hesitant at first, but I
wasn't a starter at the
time and I didn't mind
helping the team in any
John's
Flowers & Gifts
503 E. 3rd St. 752-3311
& Pitt Plaza Shopping Center 756-1 160
Homecoming is less than
2 weeks away.
Order your special lady
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for only $5��
For groups of 25
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only $4$0 grouP
Last day for group orders
is Thursday, Oct. 21st.
15x7 color
a enlargement
with film developing
This coupon good for a
free 5x7 color enlarge-
ment when you leave a
roll of color print film
for developing.
EAST CAROLIHA UNIVERSITY
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
WRIGHT BUILDING
Offer Good: Oct. 21 thru
Nov. 5,1982
1 0NE COUPON PER ROLL
� 750 This coupon must accompany order
GEOLOGY CLUB FUNDRAISING
CAR BASH
Sponsored by
Bob Gouras Used Auto Parts
Oct. 21st, 22nd Thurs. & Fri.
ON THE MALL
�H
Boyd 's
Hairstyle
1008 S. Evans St.
758-4056
3 Hairstylists
Danny R. Boyd
Melvin Boyd
Mel H. Boyd Jr.
way I could, even if it
meant not playing
tight-end anymore
That same day
Hamilton informed
coach Emory that "he
was going for it He
completed the second
half of his freshman
season at defensive
tackle, but not to his
satisfaction, even
though the coaches
were pleased. During
spring drills, Hamilton
changed his mind and
went back to offense.
Before the fall came,
Hamilton changed his
mind again and found
himself back at defen-
sive tackle early during
summer drills.
In 1981, Hamilton
split his duties at defen-
sive tackle with senior
George Crump.
"I didn't mind
said Hamilton.
"George was a senior
(and a pro draft pick)
and I knew my day as a
starter was coming.
During the off-
season, I was enthused
about returning to
camp. My day was here
and 1 was ready to
show it
Hamilton did exactly
what he said he would.
The once "caged bird"
to the confines of a
military academy in
Virginia is now singing
his way up the defen-
sive statistics chart, no
longer rising to bugles,
but to the occasions
that are demanded of a
real defensive tackle.
Classifieds
PERSONAL
WHO IS THE uaiieii man on cam
ggg
MIKE: HAPPY ANNIVERSARY
AND HOMECOMING- ain't it
oraat! Law RAPE.
MIKE HUNT: You stiak. man.
THE PHANTOM.
ROOMMATE
WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED to share apartment one Mock
from campus. SIM a montti plus
one-third utilities. CHERYL
751-1W.
FEMALE ROOMMATES NEED-
ED to live at Georgetown Apts.
For Information, call 7St-t24.
after j p.m.
FOR SALE
ROOMMATE: Watching yea
study Dante is a Divine Comedy
indeed! You're in deep water Why
not wise up and pet ChHs Notes.
They'll help you understand what
you read, and they give a great
review Do us both a tavor! The
bookstore has the titles you need
LAUGHING IN MY PILLOW.
YOU DIRTY RAtItothe person
who stole my Cliffs Notes: You
can steal my car steal my watch,
even steal my date! But to steal
my Cliffs Notes is a blow indeed
Just because they give a great
review and make those tough lit
assignments easy to understand is
no excuse Next time, go to the
bookstore and buy your own Cliffs
Notes May the bird of paradise
nest in your bookbag! RIPPED
OFF.
FOX l couldn't hetp but notice
you buying Cliffs Notes at the
bookstore. We must have a lot in
common I use Cliffs Notes to help
me understand those tough l�t
assignments, and they give me a
great review Let's discuss this
further over a bottle of chilled Car
donnay! Your place or mine?
HUNTER
LOST GOLD Seiko Ouarti watch
Reward ottered. Sentimental
vaiue Call 7ST9U after 4 p.m
LOST: GREEN backpack contain
mg notebooks and other
necessities for class, if found
return to David Coo at 7SM414 or
7S�-711�. no questions asked.
Reward.
HANDCRAFTED, rustic fur
mture at affordable student
prices. For more information, call
Kim at 7S1 5717.
SUZUKI 400 W7. only MO mi.
DOHC. new rear tire. Runs great!
MB or best offer. 7SO-4717.
1 FISHER SPEAKERS model SMs
would like to trade for cassette
deck. Call 7S�-a�77 or The East
Carolinian 757-4144 and leave
message for Peep Johnson.
FREE KITTENS TO AGOOD
HOME. Call 7Se 144 after 4 p.m.
AVON FOR SALE! Cosmetics.
iewelry. perfumes. Christmas
gifts, and much more at tow. after
dable prices. Specials offered
weekly! Please call 752 MM for
more information. Ask for Leioh
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL Typist wants to
type at home. Reasonable rates
754-3440.
PROFESSIONAL Typing service
experience, quality work. IBM
typewriter. Call Lanie Shive.
"5� 5301 or Gail Joiner 754 1042
TYPING TERM papers, resumes
thesisetc. Call 751-4713.
LOST AND
FOUND
LADY S WATCH found Sept 22
near dirt path at bottom of College
Hill Call 752545 Ask for John
WANTED
PHYSICS 125 tutor wanted wtll
ing to pay reasonable amount and
fit time schedule around yours
Contact SaixJr 7SI-4147.
WANTED USED LP s
REWARD CASH OR TRADE
Quicksilver Records let East
Fifth St
MOOELS NEEDED
PHOTOGRAPHER needs modets
for a variety of protects Will pay
for travel and up to s?s an hour
based on experience No ex
pertence is required Send full
length and full face photc or port
folio to NEW DAWN
Photoqraphy 202E W Lockhaven
Gotdsboro NC 275M.
USED LP v earn EXTRA CASH
Quicksilver Records� Book Ex
change 1M East Ffth St
WE BUT PLAYBOY Rolling
Stone Mag Quicksilver Record-
Book Exchange 1M East Fifth St
MISC.
ANOTHER COUNTRY another
culture Picture yoursei m Costa
Rica this spring carrying on your
ECU studies at low cost Want to
know more? Or Baker Brewster
A224 Or Bort Brew A?0 or Or
Farr Brew Alii.
OPEN 24 HOURS DRIVE THRU WINDOW
Special:
2.99
2 ribs, fries, slaw & biscuit
on Wed. only
11-2 p.m. and 5-9 p.m.
OLD FASHIONED HOMEMADE
BREAD PUDDINGonly
25C
1011 Charles Street � 752-1373 1 Block from Campus
�� ��

Beef Barn Presents
Dick Gable and
His Dixie Land Band
members have performed with
G. Miller Bob Crosby
Jimmy Dean and appeared on
Ed Sullivan and The Tonight Show
Sat Oct. 23rd � 5:30 p.m.
until
no min, � no cover
Call for appointment.
I St. Andrews
Drive
Greenville
BEEF
BARN
for reservations
Phone
756-1161
li
mat
the!
easi
Un
fix
dot
r
?
-�� mum� � tmmum � �
IMMmHMpII





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 21, 1982
17
Sherman Pleased As Men's And
Women's Tennis Teams Improve
In ECU's opening
match of the fall seaon,
the men's tennis team
easily beat Campbell
University, winning
five singles and two
doubles matches for a
7-2 victory over the
Camels.
New head coach
Patricia Sherman said
she was pleased with
the team's perfor-
mance, especially since
the players did not
practice last week and
have just returned from
fall break.
Sherman added that
the players have work-
ed mainly on their
4
Tennis Coach Patricia Sherman
Photo By STANLEY LEARY
doubles game.
"General coverage was
not good when we
started practice she
said. "We've learned
how to chip shots
In singles, Ted Lep-
per (E) def. David
Holland (C), 6-2, 6-2;
Galen Treble (E) def.
Frankie Delconte (C),
6-3, 6-0; Cole King (E)
def. Steve Davis (C),
5-7, 6-0, 6-1; Don
Rutledge (E) def. Bruce
Eickhoff (C) 6-2, 6-2;
Peter Gemborys (C)
def. Kevin Covington
(E), DEFAULT; Paul
Owen (E) def. Don
Gordon (C), 6-1, 6-3.
In doubles,
Rutledge-Lepper (E)
def. Holland-
Horcasitus (C), 6-3,
5-7, 6-3; Creech-Treble
(E) def. Delconte-
Gordon (C), 6-4, 4-6,
6-4; Eickhoff-
Gemborys (C) def.
Owen-King
DEFAULT.
Now 1-0, the Pirates
play Richmond on
Monday, Oct. 25 at
Minges courts. The
match begins at 3:00
p.m.
As for the women's
team, they were
defeated by N.C. State
9-0 in their final match
Located in parking lot
behind H L Hodges
752-5878

24 flavors, 28 toppings -
� create your own sundaes �
� outrageous cream shakes -
� popcorn & drinks
W
couponj
This entitles bearer and a
family member, or bearer
and a boyfriend or
girlfriend, to 20 off any
double-dip sundae.
Expires Sunday, Oct. 24
QtCr-i
the
soaps
on TV
See your friends
at Hearts Delight!
12 a.m.12 p.m. 7 days a week
Woody and Janie Smith
Your Host and Hostess
756-2414
2725 Memorial Dr
Greenville
Q�StAUQ&nt
- OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK -
Breakfast, Lunch, & Dinner
Gourmet Salad Bar
Steaks, Seafood, & Other Dinners
Fine Wines & Champagne
Banquet Rooms
Our goal is to make dining with us a
pleasure, with the best food and service,
A special Thank You for your patronage.
STROWS
presents
THE PHANTOM FORECASTER
(the most accurate college football prediction sheet ava.lable)
FREE
Available Ilfclp at the
following locations:
Li
Hodqes
Bonds
Arcliie'
Pawl an.
Subw.)
Hear.
U.B.E.
Tn Houro
Mr.Gatti's
Arcade Variety
Overton's
light
Marsh's Surt-NSea
Ac :opy
Sh e's
Va. -ty Barber Shop
Sandwich Game
Arcade Variety & Grill
Sammy's Country Cooking
Pizza Transit Authority
Snarp's Formal Wear
of the fall season.
According to Sher-
man, it was a learning
experience. "We found
out some things we
were weak on this fall,
particularily doubles
she said. "Today, we
played much better but
we need to work on
consistency
In singles, Ellie Com-
pton (N) def. Katherine
Folson (E), 6-0, 6-4;
Michelle Nadanzi (N)
def. Debbie Christine
(E), 6-2, 6-1; Leslie
Lewis (N) def. Janet
Russell (E), 6-2, 6-3;
Robbin Burch (N) def.
Laura Redford (E) 6-0,
6-1; Meg Caller (N)
def. Kim Harrison (E)
6-1, 6-1; Kathy Ellis (N)
def. Jackie Mayer (E),
6-0, 6-1.
In doubles,
Compton-Lewis (N)
def. Tolson-Christine
(E), 6-1, 7-6; Nadanzi-
Burch (N) def. Russell-
Redford (E), 6-2, 6-3;
Ellis-Caller (N) def.
Harrison-Sowers (E),
6-0, 6-0.
Photo By GA�Y PATTERSOM
Tonv Baker Pauses For A Break During FSl Game.
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ittl
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(V
Bring this ad for
10 OFF
on the purchase of
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All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes, shoes,
and hose Also � used ECU nurses
uniforms. Trade-ins allowed
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive.
Near Hollowell's Drug and old hospital.
r
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WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH FOR:
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2826 S. Memorial � 335-2251
Hrs Mon-Thurs. 6 a.m9 p.m.
FriSat. 6 a.m10 p.m.
Sunday 7 a.m2 p.m.
Welcome ECU Students
& Faculty
1 'reasonably priced '
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also Steaks
and some Italian dishes
Beer & Wine available
Private Dining Room A vailable
"Daily Specials"
1 �
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Thurs Fri.
Oct. 21, 22 9-4
Student Supply
Store Lobby
A
I






18
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 21, 1982
Baker A Success
Continued From Page 16
mind. "Track and
football seemed to be
my ticket into college,
so I put baseball behind
me for good he said.
Baker was ap-
preciative of his
scholarship offers, but
there was alway two
things missing
whenever he reviewed
the backgrounds of the
prospective schools: an
1-formation and an art
school.
"Before I even
thought about playing
college football, I knew
I wanted to go to art
school he said.
"Later, after reviewing
ECU, Baker discovered
that they had one of the
best art schools in the
state.
After talking to a few
ECU coaches and
found out that ECU
was converting to the
I-formation, Baker
decided that attending
ECU would be in his
best interest.
Baker reported for
summer drills at ECU
and immediately stood
out above the majority
of the long line of runn-
ing backs, fighting for
that second position
behind returning
starter, Jimmy Walden.
But soon Walden went
down with an injury
and the fight was now
for the first team.
"I used to lie in my
room and daydream
abnout starting during
the summer he said.
"1 thought that if so-
meone got hurt that
they would put another
more experienced
player in, if not, cer-
tainly someone bigger
than me But two
weeks before the N.C.
State game. Baker was
informed that he would
be starting and the
pressures were on.
"I knew I had the
ability and the con-
fidence, but I didn't
think any one else truly
believed in me except
the coaches he said.
"I knew I was going to
have to prove myself to
the other players. Their
acceptance of my per-
formance was the mcbt
important thing to me
then
When the State game
was finally here, it
didn't take long for the
Pirates to accept Baker.
"After we went into
the dressing room after
the first half, I really
began to feel like I was
one of them he said.
"They had accepted my
performance and me as
a Pirate
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FOOD TOWN
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Saturday, October 23, 1982
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 21, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 21, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.224
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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