The East Carolinian, October 14, 1982






�hc Izaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.14
Thursday, October 14, 1982
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 10,000
World Hunger
Students Voice Concern
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
For the second year in a row the
Greenville-ECU Hunger Coalition
conducted a street theatre skit out-
side of the Student Supply Store as
part of their "World Food Day"
events.
Crowds of over 200 people
gathered to watch during the three
different times the skit was perform-
ed. "I thought it brought home a
nice simple idea in graphic terms
said John Gardner, an assistant to
the vice chancellor for student life
who watched the skit. "That being
that there is a direct trade-off bet-
ween military and human needs pro-
grams
World Food Day is an interna-
tionally recognized day, set aside by
the Food and Agricultural
Organization of the United Nations,
to call attention to the problems
associated with hunger.
The skit contrasted the correla-
tions that members of the Hunger
Coalition see between world
military spending � especially U.S.
military exporting and nuclear
weapons build-up � and the pro-
blem of hunger on both domestic
and international levels.
Approximately 20 people, most
of them ECU students, staff or
faculty, acted in the five minute
skit. Participants assumed the roles
of Uncle Sam, military generals,
poor people, and spectors of death.
A drummer provided musical ac-
companiment. Some of the adults
brought children with them who
also were incorporated into the skit.
"I enjoyed it, I thought it was
done well commented ECU
special education student Darlene
Sippel. "I agree that the govern-
ment, by increasing military fun-
ding, is taking away from critical
social programs
Sippel thought that having
mothers with children in the skit ad-
ded a realistic dimension to the per-
formance and that the facts brought
out during it probably helped people
understand the problem of hunger
more clearly.
Jennifer Baughan, an ECU
graduate student in psychology, was
one of the mothers who acted in the
skit with her two year-old daughter
in her arms. She said she noticed a
sense of insecurity on her child's
face when she saw her mother begg-
ing to Uncle Sam for some food
Nobel Peace Prize
Awarded To Two
and"9.
�.� .
Tm mm 1HB1 Photo By STANLEY LEARY
Students Participate In World Hunger Day Activities
whose time has come she added,
paraphrasing from a quote often us-
ed by the Hunger Project, a national
See STUDENTS, Page 5
stamps.
"On a personal level, I feel very
dedicated to the eradication of
hunger on our planet Baughan
said. "I believe that it is an idea
By GREG RIDEOUT
Nini Editor
The 1982 Nobel Peace Prize was
awarded yesterday to anti-nuclear
activists Alva Myrdal of Sweden
and Alfonso Garcia Roblez of Mex-
ico.
The award was announced by the
Norwegian Nobel Committee in
Oslo, Norway. Myrdal and Roblez
were cited for their international
disarmament efforts.
Dr. H.A.I. Suggs, a former pro-
fessor in ECU's political science
department and expert on interna-
tional armament, said he was happy
to see Mydral and Robles receive the
prize. "They are very deserving of
it
Suggs, also a retired naval officer,
was active on the armament side of
the issue in the Navy. He expressed
concern that people see disarma-
ment and armament as two different
sides of one issue.
"The Defense Department
doesn't see the importance of disar-
mament he said. "We would be a
great deal better off if we had a level
of disarmament
Myrdal, 80, is the wife of Gunnar
Myrdal who won the 1974 Nobel
prize for economics. She has already
been honored for her anti-nuclear
work with the Albert Einstein Peace
Prize. She is the Fifth Swede to win
the prize.
Robles, 71, was the Mexican
foreign minister from 1975-76 and
since 1976 has served as permanent
representative to the U.N. Con-
ference on Disarmament in Geneva.
Myrdal and Robles were chosen
from a list of 60 prominent can-
didates that included intered
Solidarity leader Lech Walesa and
U.S. Middle East envoy Philip
Habib.
The winners will receive a gold
medal and a cash award that is
worth $157,000. The Nobel Peace
Prize, which is awarded by a com-
mittee comprised of five people
elected by the Norwegian parlia-
ment, is given each year in accor-
dance with Alfred Nobel's 1895 will.
Nobel, the inventor of dynamite,
said the peace prize should be given
to "the person who during the
preceding year, shall havconferred
the greatest benefit on mankind
Suggs, who did his doctoral
dissertation on the status of disar-
mament in the Soviet Union, says he
sympathizes with what Myrdal and
Robles are doing in reference to the
disarmament issue.
Rare Disease On Campus May Be Related To Pot Smoking
Bv PATRICK O'NEILL
suff �nin
The Student Health Center (SHC)
issued a warning yesterday that a
rare disease, possibly transmitted by
smoking contaminated marijuana,
has been reported on campus.
Four "documented-suspected"
cases of a disease known as
Salmonella have occured recently at
ECU. According to Jolene Jer-
nigan, a family nurse practitioner
with the SHC, there has not been an
absolutely positive connection
drawn between the four ECU cases
and the use of contaminated mari-
juana. "We have had a few cases of
Salmonella on campus, but they
have not been linked to pot or any
other common factor Jernigan
said.
"Significant outbreaks (of
Salmonella) in Michigan and Ohio
were noted in which the only
common factor was the use of mari-
juana said Jernigan. She noted
that "the (Salmonella) infection is
most often acquired by eating con-
taminated food products.
"Poultry and meat products are
the most common reservoir for the
Salmonella bacteria. The feces and
urine of infected animals also carry
the bacteria continued Jernigan.
Jernigan noted that contamina-
tion of the marijuana could possibly
occur when untreated manure is us-
ed as a fertilizer on the pot plants,
or through accidental contamina-
tion during the drying and storage
process.
"It is, however, possible that the
marijuana was mixed with dried
animal manure in order to increase
the selling weight of the drug she
said.
A recent outbreak of Salmonella
has been reported across the eastern
U.S. Outbreaks of the disease have
also been reported in Alabama and
Georgia.
The U.S. Drug Enforcement
Agency suggests that most of the
marijuana grown in Mexico is
distributed in the southwestern
U.S where no outbreaks of
Salmonella have been reported.
However they report that the na-
tional distribution of marijuana to
our area points to Columbia or
Jamaica as the source of origin of
the contaminated pot.
Jernigan said that the infectious
reaction that results from
Salmonella exposure will begin sud-
denly eight to forty-eight hours after
the person ingests the bacteria from
a contaminated source. "The early
symptoms include abdominal pain,
watery diarrhea (sometimes mixed
with blood and mucous) nausea,
vomiting, and fever and chills Jer-
nigan reported.
"These symptoms may last two to
five days or as long as two weeks
There are two types of disease
caused by the Salmonella bacteria.
The more serious type is commonly
known as typhoid fever. "Most of
us have been vaccinated against this
disease and it is rare in the United
States Jernigan noted.
The second more common disase
is called salmonella gastroenteritis.
This is the type that is being seen
more frequently in the U.S. over the
past few months.
Because of the disease, all cases of
salmonella gastroenteritis and
typhoid are reported to the Com-
municable Disease Control Board,
which investigates to determine the
source of contamination.
"Ail we want to tell them is to get
it checked out � they're not going
to be investigated continued Jer-
nigan. "Nobody can get anything
off our records unless they have the
written consent of the patient
Campus Ministry Celebrates
Congressional Club Caught Spying
On Andrews' Democratic Supporters
RALEIGH (UPI) Democrats are
accusing the National Congressional
Club of spying on supporters of
Rep. Ike Andrews, D-N.C, by co-
pying license plate numbers from
cars parked outside an Andrews
reception last month and obtaining
the names of the owners.
"It sounds like a Watergate-type
operation said Gary Pearce, news
secretary to Gov. James B. Hunt Jr.
and one of those who attended the
Sept. 27 reception at a Raleigh
home.
"What the hell are they trying to
do It really is kind of offensive that
people go and take down your
license plate just because you went
to something he said.
Pearce's name appeared on a list
of 74 names provided to a club
employee who last Friday made an
urgent request to the state Division
of Motor Vehicles.
Other names on the list include
political figures from the 4th Con-
gressional District, where Andrews
faces a tough re-election campaign
against Congressional Club protege
William Cobey of Chapel Hill.
Among those listed are state Sen.
James Speed, D-Franklin, whose
wife Martha is the Democratic Party
chairwoman for the district; State
Elections Board Chairman Robert
Spearman of Raleigh; Edward
Hipp, a member of the state Utilities
Commission; and Burley B Mit-
chell, the father of state Supreme
Court Justice Burley B. Mitchell Jr.
Congressional Club employee
Thomas DeWitt of Cary submitted
a list of 86 license plate numbers and
paid $1 each for the 74 names traced
by the DMV. The.other 12 plates
could not be traced because the
numbers were incomplete or had not
been entered into state computers.
DeWitt refused comment on the
matter and referred inquiries to
R.E. Carter Wrenn, executive direc-
tor of the conservative political club
founded by Republican Sen. Jesse
Helms.
Wrenn said DeWitt obtained the
license numbers of cars parked out-
side the Andrews reception. The
event was held at the home of Clif-
ton Benson, who lives a block away
from Congressional Club Chairman
Thomas Ellis.
By PATRICK O'NEILL
SUff rit�r
Over 200 people from throughout
the GreenvilleECU Catholic com-
munity came together Friday night
to celebrate the Jubilee anniversary
of Catholic Campus Minister Sister
Helen "Happy" Shondell.
Sister Happy has been a member
of the immaculate Heart of Mary
Order of sisters since being received
into the Novitiate in 1957.
The theme of the Mass and dinner
party was "His love will endure
Sister Happy's message to her
friends was that "the celebration of
Jubilee is a celebration of God's
faithful love for his people
"The Jubilee was a real celebra-
tion, we were all glad to come
together to honor Happy said
ECU student and president of the
Catholic Newman Community
Mary Rider. "She cares about peo-
ple and puts that care into action
Sister Happy's work includes
ministering and counseling to
ECU's approximately 14,000
students as well as working with St.
Gabriel's and St. Peter's Catholic
Churches. She also works in
hospital ministry, a widowed and
divorced group, with gay students
and on numerous other levels of
human services.
Former ECU Catholic Campus
Chaplain Father Charlie
Mulholland gave the sermon during
the Jubilee Mass that opened the
evening's activities at St. Peters.
Father Paul Byron of St. Thomas'
Catholic Church in Chapel Hill was
the principal celebrant. Catholic
deacon Tom Davis and current ECU
Catholic Chaplain Father Jerry
Sherba were con-celebrants of the
mass.
"It was the most exciting and
happiest day of my life said an
obviously happy Sister Happy.
A reading from the gospel was
given by the Rev. Robert Clyde,
ECU's Baptist campus minister.
Numerous ECU students and facul-
ty members helped with the
festivities of the day.
"I'm glad she's here for us, and I
hope she'll be here for a long time
said Rider.
Sister Helen Shondell
Homecoming Activities Abound
By DARRYL BROWN
Autelani Nf�s Kdiior
Which One Do You Want
Mwto By fTAMLIV LBAKY
Reactions varied, but interest was steady as students debated over whom to choose for this year's homecoming
queen.
The annual Homecoming celebration is set to begin in
two weeks, with a full schedule of activities planned for
ECU's 75 anniversary.
The three-day event, from Oct. 21-24, is centered
around the theme "Diamond Jubilee: A Past to Build
Upon, A Promise to Fulfill Highlights of the celebra-
tion include several musical concerts, the Pirate football
game, dances, parties and a black-tie ball, along with
the annual Homecoming parade down Fifth Street.
In an Oct. 4 news conference Mayor Percy Cox of
Greenville proclaimed Saturday, Oct. 23 "ECU Day" in
honor of the ECU's homecoming, 75th birthday and
contributions to the city.
Chancellor John Howell, in accepting the proclama-
tion, thanked the mayor and noted the close relation-
ship between "town and gown meaning Greenville
and ECU.
"One of our great strengths, of both the city of
Greenville and East Carolina University, has been, is
and will be our cooperative, rather than antagonistic,
relationship the chancellor said.
Starting off the homecoming events on Oct. 21 will be
the Artists Series concert in Hendrix Theatre, featuring
soprano Joan Morris and pianist William Bolcom. They
will present a program of popular songs from the past
seven decades of ECU's history.
On Friday, Oct. 22 the black-tie 75-year anniversary
ball will be held at the Greenville Moose Lodge. On the
same day will be the banquet at the Holiday Inn and a
free concert in Wright Auditorium featuring Arista
recording artists Juicy.
Scheduled for Oct. 23 is the ECU Pirate football
game in Ficklen Stadium against the Illinois State
University Red Birds at 2:00 p.m a cross-campus run
at 9:00 a.m. and several alumni gatherings, including
the awards luncheon. A Band Day contest featuring the
Marching Pirates will follow the football game in the
stadium.
Closing out the weekend on Sunday will be an 8:00
p.m. concert in Minges auditorium with 38 Special"
and "Spys" and an 8:15 p.m. performance by the ECU
Symphonic Wind Ensemble in Wright Auditorium.
Throughout the weekend will be an art exbition in
Gray Art Gallery, movies at Mendenhali Student and
various other activies. Mayor Cox calls it a weekend
where "splendor and excitement will reign supreme"
and all ECU students, faculty, staff and alumni as well
�s Greenville citizens are encouraged to take part and
enjoy the festivities.
'



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THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 14, 1982
Announcements
HONORS
Li'erature ot the Holocaust, the
Evolution of Human Communica
tion. banned Books Coming ot Age
in the Modern Soutn and
Behavioral Psychology ate the
topics ot Honors Seminars spring
lemester 1983 Honors sections o�
ENGL IMOand :?00. HLTH HIST.
LIBS. PHYS 1070. and SOCI 21)0
will also be ottered Any student
with a 3 5 gpa or freshmen with
1200- SAT is qualified to be an
Honors student See Dr David
Sande'S. Coordinator in Austin
7)�
ATTENTION ALL
ALL
Chi Beta Phi invites all to attend
an e(itmg even-ng wth Etfil
Mason Sh�? is from the Volunteer
Services ot Pitt Memorial The
lecture will concern relief of
headaches by means tfier "an
medicine II promises to be ex
Citing and informative Please
come on October 20 at 6 30 in
room 103 B (Biology Bidg I All
science maiors o extend a
special invitation ��� ot
COMMERCIAL
ART
Fashion mode' announcement
dates hve bee" canqeo to
Novemper 3 and t 00 to 10 00
CO�OP
There win be an organizational
meeting tor trie Cc op club on
Thursday October 21 at 4 00 p m
m 306 Raw1 The club is for an
returning Co op students ana those
interested in the Cooperative
Educator program at ECU Call
'57 69'v tor more information
STUDIES GOT
YOU DOWN?
A two part m i ser.es offeree at
NO cost by" he univers'ty Counsel
ng Center from 3 4pm 305 Aright
Annex On Monday October 25
how to Succeed n College ana
Still Have Fun ana on Tjesda
October M How Avoid Test
Anx.ety No advance registration
� s necessary
DISNEY WORLD
INTERNSHIPS
Aa'T D sney World's Magic
nmgoom College nternship Pro
gra" a bC �-1'y levying on earn
pusOc' 5 ��: �� n 1 30 5 00pm
tot nG1 SP v ilnC Sumrne'
terns Students will work 30 nours
per ween and earn approximately
14 00 pe' hour! - " eeks Specai
train.ng sen- nars "e'O weekly
Students will Dr r aced a-camj
me i ma rs fcnv. nterested
Students e lacl e Coop
oft'Ce - 3 3 H.i ' .A ex' 6970
POSITION FOR
INDT MAJOR
There is an opening with Long
Manufacturing Co tor a Quality
Control Supervisor This perma
nent position involves setting up
and maintaining � qualify control
program in Rumania tor tractors
manufactured tor Long The star
ting date in immediately and the
salary is negotiable Contact Nan
cy F-ilnow in the Co op office ext
697V tor more information
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
COURSES
Personal Development Courses
begm
Oct II Getting Organized Oct. 21
Real Estate Finance Commodity
Hedging Oct 26 AerobicExer
cise Nov 17 Real Estate Ap
praisai
Oct 12 Coping with Stress.
Philosophy and Retirement For
information call 757 6143
COOP
Part time co op framing posi
tions are available with Buehler
Mfg Co m Kmston These train
ing positions could lead to full
time opportunities in Production
Supervision Production Control
or Purchasing m the new Buehler
plant m Raleigh beginning June.
i�83 All interested INDT maiors
contact Nancy Fillnow In the Co
op office ext 6979
WOMEN'S RUGBY
Its still not too late to play
Anyone interested m playing
womens rUDgv needs to reoort to
practices Tuesday thru Trnjrsday
at 4 00 Ae practice behind the
Allied Health iBelk building Ab
solutely no previous experience is
required
FRESHMEN
REGISTER
Freshman Registers may be
picked up in the Buccaneer office
on Tuesdays and Thursdays from
2 00 p m till 5 00 p m The Buc
caneer Office is located on the se
cond floor of the Publications
Bu'ldmg NOTE All Freshmen
Regsters must be picked up by
October 20 Remember you nave
already paid tor this publication.
so wit let your money go to waste
FLASH
Snowski Christmas Break
There wii' be a meeting tor all per
sons interested m snowskimg on
Tuesday October 12 at 4 00 pm in
Memor ai Gym 108 A trip is being
organized for January 2 6 to
Snowshoe Aest Virginia Vou
may eiec1 to gc tor credit m the
Physica1 Education Departmen-
ts you may attend on a non credit
basis Contact Ms Jo Saunders a1
757 6000 or came by Memorial
Gym 205 for further information
GOOD LUCK
PIRATES
The Student Athletic Board in-
vites all Pirate Fans to see our
football team oft Friday. October
IS. 1982 at 115pm in front ot Belk
Dorm Come and wish the team
good luck as they prepare tor
Saturday's game against the
Florida State Seminoles Come
show your Pirates Pride
SING BEETHOVEN
The Beethoven Ninth Sym
phony, tor orchestra and chorus,
will be performed by the ECU
Symphony with chorus on Sun .
Nov 14. at 3 15 p m in Wright
Auditorium The chorus will in
elude all School of Music choruses
and the Greenville Community
Chorus
ECU students, faculty, and staff
with some choral experience art
invited to participate in the
chorus Rehearsals will be con
ducted by Dr Brett Watson ot the
music faculty each Tuesday
(except Oct 19) beginning Oct
12 from 3 4 00 p m in Rm 105 of
the Fletcher Music Center Final,
rehearsals will be Fri Nov 12, at
7 30 p m and Sat , Nov 13, at 2 00
pm (Interested persons may
begm rehearasals Oct 12 or Oct
26Singers should bring their own
choral scores, available from the
ECU Student Supply Store
COOP
The Co op office has a iob open
mg for an accounting position
avaible with a local manufactur
ng firm Requires adding
machine experience and accoun
ting background Interested
students should inquire at the Co
op office located in Rawl at room
313
ECU LAW
SOCIETY
The ECU Law Society will make
a field trip to Campbell University
Law School on October 20 This
will be an excused absence for
Law Society members For fur
ther information contact Diane
Jones 7S665S6
CATHOLIC
NEWMAN CENTER
The Catholic Newman Center
would like to invite everyone to
iom In with us tor celebrating
Mass every Sunday in the Biology
Lecture Hall starting at 12 � and
every Aednesday at 5 00 at the
Catholic Newman Center located
down at the bottom of College Hill
The CafhoMc Newman Center is
having a Burger and Beer Bash III
and you are invited It will be held
Sunday October 24 at 2 30 tin
whenever It will be held at the
Newman Center 953 E 10th
Street located �t the bottom ot the
Hill We will supply the beer.
burgers hotdogs and soda Please
bring a salad or dessert, and a II
donation Hope to see you there
BIBLE ISTRUTH
The Bible is truth It is NOT just
another good book, because it was
written by Men of God who were
Inspired by God (II Tim 3 16, 11
Peter 1:21) It is not a book of
negative laws, but the heart ot
God giving us attitudes and prin
ctptes to live by so we can prosper,
enoy lite, and really help others
ill Tim 3:14, John 10 10, I Tim
8:17) Come learn more of the truth
of God's word so you can change
yovr lite tor the better (Romans
12:2) Monday. October 18th. at
Mendenhall Student Center, m
Rm 343 at 7 30
NAACP
The ECU chapter of NAACP will
have Its biannual membership
drive, Oct. HIS from 8 3pm m
front of the Bookstore Dues are
810 tor age 21 and over, this in
eludes a subscription to Crises
magazine For everyone under 21,
dues are 83 without subscription
and Swith a subscription Please
join us, we need you There will be
a bake sale one day during the
membership drive Time and day
to be announced later
CAMPUS WOMEN'S
NETWORK
ECU professional staff and
faculty who are interested in 10m
mg a womens's network are in
vlted to attend coffee on Thurs
day. October 14, 4 30 at the Pirate
Club Janice Faulkner former Ex
ecutive Director of the N C
Democratic Party, will comment
on the value and nature of net
working, and Cathy Andruzzi will
also speak For further informa
tion, call Marie Farr at 757 6249
COOP
Duke Power has available a
variety ot co-op positions All work
experiences are for alternating
semesters beginning in January or
May l�t3 and are located In
Charlotte Any interested students
with a minimum G PA of 2 0 ano
maioring in Computer Science,
Math. Business Education, Office
Administration industrial Educa
tion. Industrial Technology,
Chemistry or Environmental
Health should contact 'he Co op of
flee, ext ��7?
CO-OP FOR BUSINESS
MAJORS
There are positions available
wtfh the General Accounting Of
flee as an Evaluation Trainee
Students must have completed 75
hours and be available tor two
work periods beginning In the Spr
ing lfU semester Conversion to
permanent employment after
graduation would be likely For
more information contact Carolyn
Powell at the Co op office ex'
�7�
MS�
Js
752-6334 -
V60 Evans Street
FREE DELIVERY
FROM 5-u P M
J DAYS A AK
H eekly
Specials
MONDAY - �� ��
Gyro Sondwich 2.45 2.00
TUESDAY -
Athenion Chicken 2.95 2.55
WEDNESDAY -
Steak & Cheese Sub lor mushroom) 2.65 2.25
THURSDAY -
Morat.nn Souvtakias Speciol 2.95 2.55
FRIDAY
Reuben & Fries 2.95 2.55
SATURDAY & SUNDAY
Souvlokio Sandwich 2.45 2.00
"WHEN ITS FLOWERS �
SAY FT WITH OURS"
P HOUSE or
WERSf
FLOWERS FOR
ALL OCCASIONS
WE WIRE FLOWERS
DELIVERY SERVICE
FTD FLORAFAX
MasterCard A Visa
752-5656 f

V MILS NORTH OF AIRPORT
MEMORIAL DR. EXT. GREENVILLE
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1�X,11
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
APO meetings Thursdays at
4 30 in 212 Mendenhall Student
Center! All meetings are man
datoryl I Please make plans to at
tend. APO needs you! Future pro
iects and homecoming activities
will be discussed Anyone in
terested in a Iraternity that
believes in leadership, friendship
and service will always be
welcomed1! Come and iom a
fraternity that is a National Co ed
Service Fraternity See you
there
ASPA
ASPA American Society tor
Personnel Administration, will
meet Wednesday, Oct 20 at 3 00
p m in Room 207, Rawls At this
time, membership dues will be
collected Meet tne new officers
and nelp plan ASPA s future This
society is for anyone interested in
the personnel relation field m
business
FRISBEE
Weather permitting, we will be
at the bottom ot college hill today.
and every Tues and Thurs at
4 00 Look for the frisbee club in
the Homecoming parade 1982
Natural Light Flying Disc Classic
Video will be shown at the Attic
Wed Nov 10 Club meetings are
Monday nights 8 00 in Mendenhall
Room 248 anyone interested m
frisbee is urged to at'end
LAW COURSE
The Department of Social Work
and Corresctional Services will of
fer a course in Basic Criminal Law
and Procedure during the Spring
Semester, 1983 The course should
be of particular significance for
those students who are maioring
either in social work professionals
are invited to enroll in this course
The course will be taught from
6 30 tc 9 00 pm once a week on
Mondays
Further information about these
and other social work and correc
tional services classes is available
from the Department of Social
Work and Correctional services.
School of Allied Health and Social
Professions at 757 4961
TUTOR
Phi Sigma Pi. the National
Honor Fraternity is offering tutors
for a variety of General College
subiects at competitive rates if
you are m need of a tutor call
752 3022 tor more information
GERONTOLOGY
When you pre register don't
forge a new mu'H disciplinary
course that will also satisfy some
ot your genera! education re
quiremenfs introduction to
Gerontology will feature faculty
members from different depart
ments as well as a number of m
terestmg guest lecturers This
course is listed as PSYC SOCI.
HPRO. HOME 2400 and will be ot
fered on Tuesday evenings during
nex' semster Be sure to pre
regis'er tor introduction to Geron
fology
AMBASSADORS
There will be a general meeting
of the ambassadors on Wed . OcT
20. 1982 It will begin at 5 00 m the
mendenhall multi purpose room
We will be welcoming our new am
bassadors at this time Teletund
results will be given at this
meeting and homecoming and 75th
anniversary ball events need to be
signed up for Please rememoer to
attend this special meeting to
greet our new members
PPHA
The Preprotessional Heair
Alliance (PPHA) will nave a
meeting this Thursday October
14. 1982 This meeting will be heio
a' 5 30 p m at the Afro America
Cultural Center AH memoers and
any others interested par'ies are
urged to attenc
COOP
Black ano Decker in Tarborc
has an opening for a part 'imp a
counting clerk The person must
be able to perform miscellaneous
accounting duties sue as on "g
invoices and general bookkeep
ing Preferred is someone ic :ar
operate a 10 key adding machine
Employment would start as soon
as possible For more info, can the
Co op office, ext 4979
SCIENCE MAJORS
It you war" � erf ' s C me
ana get. bu' �ou be'ter hurry
because it ma "o! last TheCRCs
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ano 12 noon CRC Ot Chem
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orders now1 '
MUSIC
7 np School 1! Mos
for the spring semester four ser
vice courses which quality for
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Tneater tMUSC 2228. ara Or
Hestral Mus MUSC 2218
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me Attic and Buowe ser Subrr I
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now has an otfice located in Green
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tnbutmg ideas offering
assistance or asking questions
having to do with the Student
Residence Association feei free to
come by Office Hours are from
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through Friday
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Students m general college in
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preregister on Thurs October 14
1982 at 7 00 PM .n Brewsfer D 104
it is important rna' all intended
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tng like .a clown, and giving,
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HOMECOMING
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Any 'jd" lation sh ng -c
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homecoming snouia sub a- ac
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 14, 1982
t�
i
If ac
s �
answer
inc ask
Weapons Studied
B KEITH BR1TTAIN
Msf f met
A prestigious inter-
national research in-
stitute published its
study last week show-
ing that the United
States is inferior to the
Soviet Union in nuclear
weapons.
The London based
International Institute
of Strategic Studies is a
priate organization
that periodically
publishes assessments
on the military
capabilities of the two
superpowers.
The institute's assess-
ment of military
balance found that the
Soviet Union is steadily
increasig it's nuclear
edge by its deployment
of the SS-20 nuclear
missies targeted on
Westrn Europe. Accor-
ding to it's estimate,
the Warsaw Pact coun-
tries lead NATO coun-
tries 4,124 to 1.644 in
nuclear missies.
Dr. Edwin Griffith, a
political science pro-
testor at ECU, said, "I
believe no one can
question the reliability
of the I1SS study. It is a
well known, prestigous
group
The study has added
fuel to President
Reagan's dne against
the nuclear freeze
movement. The Reagan
administration believes
that a nuclear freeze
E
would lock in a Soviet
advantage in nuclear
weapons.
According to the
president, from 1968 to
1974 NATO deployed
no new middle range
nuclear weapons.
NATO actually
withdrew 1000
warheads, while at the
same time the Soviets
deployed more than
750 SS-20 and other
warheads, the ad-
ministration claims.
"1 think one must
look deeply into the
nuclear freeze and
peace movements
Griffith said. "The
peace groups have said
nothing about the
Soviet invasions of
Afghanistan,
Czechoslovakia and the
missies of Cuba.
"Russia actually had
a full dress rehearsal of
a suprise nuclear strike
on the United States
and Western Europe on
June 19. This drew no
protests from peace
groups, yet they protest
against deployment of
572 Pershing two
missiles in Europe
The Greenville Peace
Committee has ques-
tioned that "if there are
already enough nuclear
weapons to destroy the
world why do we need
more?" Peace groups
see a unilateral nuclear
freeze as a step in assur-
ing world peace.
There are several
members of the Senate,
including Sen.
Jeremiah Denton who
believe the KGB is
behind the nuclear
freeze and peace
movements.
"When one says that
the KGB is behind the
nuclear freeze and
peace movements they
scream McCarthyism
Griffith said. "Peace
groups never criticize
the Soviet Union, but
they always criticize the
United States. I think
this fact alone should
show members of the
movement that Russia
may very well be
behind it
FAMOUS PIZZA
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Jury Convicts
Third Resister
B PATRICK
O'NEILL
Staff K tiler
A federal jury in
Ohio deliberated 64
minutes Tuesday
before deciding to con-
vict 22 year old Mark
Schmucker for refusing
to register for the Selec-
tive Service draft.
Schmucker's convic-
tion came just one day
after Ben Sasway of
California was sentenc-
ed to 30 months in
prison for the same
charge. Sentencing for
Schmucker was set for
Oct. 19.
"I expected this to
happen. But it doesn't
change my mind at
all Schmucker said.
"1 have broken the law
and I have admitted do-
ing it
�'I did what I had to
do said Schmucker,
who is a Mennonite
Christian and believes
that draft registration
violates the laws of
Christ. "I'm proud to
live in a country with
religious freedom he
added.
Schmucker remained
free on bond of $2,000
and his lawyer said an
appeal would be con-
sidered.
Enten Eller of
Virginia was the other
person convicted of
registration refusal. He
was sentenced to 250
hours of community
service. A failure-to-
register charge carries a
maximum sentence of
five years in prison and
a $10,000 fine.
Delivery is FREE
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�ije �aat (Karuliittan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, - . th
Mike Hughes, ,����
WAVERLY MERRITT. O.reaor oj Advent ClNDY PLEASANTS. Sports Eduor
Robert Rucks, Busm m�, Greg Rideout. � �diW
Ali Afrashteh, cm mn Steve Bachner, �WMnni, ����,
Stephanie Groon, ,����� .��,� Juliana Fahrbach, swEduor
JONI GUTHRIE, Trchmcat Suprrvaor MlKE DAVIS, Producnon Managrr
October 14. 1982
Opinion
Page 4
PCB Protests
Dangerous 'Lack Of Concern'
For the past four weeks, protests
and various other demonstrations
have become just another part of
the daily routine for many residents
of Warren County. It was four
weeks ago that a state PCB landfill
was opened there, in the town of
Afton.
And during that time, although it
seems ironic, the emphasis of those
protests has shifted from concern
over the safety of Warren County's
residents to the possible violation of
Alton's citizens' civil rights. This,
of" course, is not to say that civil
rights isn't a cause worth fighting
for. Nothing could be so far from
the truth. Nevertheless, it would,
perhaps, benefit the Warren County
protestors and marchers to revert
the emphasis of their demonstra-
tions back to the original plan � the
possible, if not definite, danger of
PCB dumping.
Although the legitimacy of a civil
rights gripe in the PCB "scandal"
cannot be questioned � Warren
County is, after all, predominantly
black � the most important con-
sideration at hand is the apparent
nonchalance exhibited by our state
officials in establishing the landfill
in a reasonably populated area
before conclusive evidence has
determined the relative safety or
danger of the chemical.
And that apparent nonchalance
can, perhaps, be best seen in Gov.
Jim Hunt, who sternly refused to
meet with the protestors until last
week. Then, during that meeting,
Hunt treated the whole issue as
100-percent unwarranted worry. He
assured the marchers over and over
again that the state will continue to
monitor the site for health hazards.
In effect, he told them not to lose
any sleep over the dumpsite.
Once again, it somehow seems
ironic that those same assurances
were given time and time again in
the early 1940s by government of-
Campus Forum
ficials during the dawn of nuclear
testing. Citizens were, in fact, told
to watch the test blasts if possible,
"to see history in the making And
we all know what tragedies have
been realized since that time.
It's no wonder, then, that their
little chat with the governor hasn't
enabled Warren County residents to
sleep any easier at all. Just think
about what Hunt's assurance ac-
tually means. What it means is that
he and his staff of "experts" have
no idea whether or not the dumping
of PCBs is safe. It is, in fact, his ad-
mission of ignorance � hence, his
admission of guilt.
So, when do Afton and Warren
County residents find out if their
lives are in jeopardy from the new
dumpsite? Unfortunately, that
revellation may just come too late.
Sure, the chemical may turn out to
be perfectly harmless, in which case,
the state should consider itself ex-
tremely lucky. But until such con-
clusive evidence is obtained, the
burden of guilt must lie on Gov.
Hunt and the state for their
negligence in blindly and willingly
opening the landfill at this time.
It is, of course, naive to believe
that the Hunt administration was
totally unaware of the fact that
Warren County is predominantly
black before the decision to place
the dump in Afton was made. Of
course they knew. However, claim-
ing that racial biases were the
primary reason for the site location
would be completely unjust.
But aside from prejudice and
other racial considerations �
although, by no means, to discard
the issue � the Hunt administration
has shown an incredible lack of in-
terest and concern for its consti-
tuents. And unfortunately for those
constituents in Warren County �
black or white � the "lack of con-
cern" not only constitutes a poor
political move; it may just be lethal.
THjSIS0OE.�rB
AC0N&1ENTI0U5
HEOOESKTWAMT
TO SHOOT HE
DOESN'T WANTTO
KILL rr
HEDOESNt
WANTTODRQP
BOMBS
SO WE PUT
H1M1NA1L
WHY?
HESATHREAT
TO SOCIETY.
Alliance Takes On New Importance
U. S. Eyes Turn To Turkey
By JACK ANDERSON
and JOE SPEAR
WASHINGTON � The Soviet Union is
taking advantage of Washington's preoc-
cupation with Lebanon. Secret intelligence
reports warn urgently that the Soviets are
stirring up the war between Iran and Iraq.
The Soviets are tormenting the fighting
on both sides; their probable objective is to
create chaos in the Persian Gulf region.
This is the source of most of the Western
World's oil and is far more vital to U.S. in-
terests, therefore, than Lebanon.
But the United States has a staunch ally
whose borders rub up against Iraq, Iran
and the Soviet Union: Turkey. So the
White House is taking a sudden new in-
terest in this nation.
A secret group of top administration of-
ficials � they're known as the "High
Level Defense Group" � has been
meeting with Turkish representatives.
They want to get Turkey to agree to give
the United States access to areas in Turkey
from which developments in the Soviet
Union and the Persian Gulf region can be
closely monitored.
Understandably, the Turks want
something in return. What they have asked
for, specifically, is help in combating the
terrorism that has been plaguing Turkey in
recent years. Armenian terrorists have
gunned down Turkish officials in Turkey
and Turkish diplomats abroad. The
Turkish government has asked for
American help in stopping the attacks.
The word from our sources is that the
United States will agree to give Turkey
assistance against the terrorists. This could
mean not only intelligence information,
but training and equipment as well.
REGULATION RELAXATION:
Police Halting 'Killer' Biker Ring
For the past couple of days, I have
observed the "bikers" of ECU receiving
tickets over by the School of Music. I
find this ticket frenzy rather humorous.
While 1 stood across the street from the
Croatan, I saw approximately 10 student
cyclists receive tickets in a half hour time
period. Four officers patrolled this area
alone, one giving a ticket to a student
biker who failed to stop at a stop sign.
What a horrible crime!
The officers do their ticket giving on
foot and must run down these law
breakers. It would be rather hypocritical
to chase them down the sidewalk in
those motorized carts. (Can you imagine
the "low-speed chase" that might oc-
cur?) 1 wonder if anyone has realized
that they could pedal to their escape by
outriding the officers.
With this rash of tickets, it seems as
though the campus police are protecting
us like bloodthirsty killers. Being a bike
owner myself, I can honestly say that I
do not ride to kill. Really! I ride to get to
class. Riding is faster than walking,
which a lot of ex-bikers are doing now,
at least to get to bike racks. Have you
ever noticed how far from roads most of
the bike racks are?
Getting back to the matter at hand, I
must say that there is a bigger threat
than bike riders over by the music
building. This is the crosswalk going to
and from the Croatan. Seldom, if ever,
can I cross that street without fear. Are
not motorists supposed to stop at
crosswalks? Especially when pedestrians
are crossing them? As I watched bikers
getting tickets (from the four officers), I
also watched as motorists drove by fail-
ing to heed speed limit signs, much less
the yellow crosswalk lines. Maybe this is
due to the fact that that street may be the
longest stretch of road without speed-
bumps on campus.
Aren't these motorists who plow
through crosswalks more dangerous
than the bikers who run stop signs?
I know the campus police are only do-
ing their jobs, but if I had my choice, I
would rather be run down by a bike than
by a car, anyday.
Peggy DePasquale
Senior, Music
Endangered Trees
In The Prime Of Life
The graduate students of the Depart-
ment of Geology wish to express their
opposition to the proposed demolition
of the Davis Arboretum. This decision
to locate a new classroom building on
this site was evidently made by a select
group within the university's administra-
tion. Reasonable arguments against this
plan and requests for the consideration
of other sites have since been advanced
by members of the student body, Joyner
Library and the biology department. All
have received a callous response from a
seemingly intransigent administration.
Unfortunately, the proposed building
site does not involve the removal of a
few poorly-located or diseased trees but
the wholesale destruction of mature
oaks, willows, elms and magnolias
which cannot be replaced within our
lifetimes. The arboretum was dedicated
more than 50 years ago as a gift to future
members of this university and now has
reached its prime. The decision to
destroy it without an open and ex-
haustive review of all alternatives is cer-
tainly at odds with ECU's 75th anniver-
sary slogan: "A past to build upon � a
promise to fulfill ECU's remaining
reserves of natural beauty are a part of
its heritage, and any decision which fur-
ther reduces them deserves the most
careful consideration. We are dismayed
by this administration's offhand indif-
ference to dissenting opinion,
highlighted by the suggestion of a
"possible memorial" commemorating
the arboretum's founders while their
work is demolished. Our decisions regar-
ding future contributions to ECU will be
strongly influenced by the next steps
taken to resolve this problem. It will be
difficult to support an institution which
lacks the open-minded leadership
necessary to seek a consensus of opinion
on so important an issue.
Sincerely,
Virginia WatersRobert Hines
Sieven CampbellChristopher Bergren
Alan Han tooklaunc L of tin
Doug RobertTeri Moore
Lori StewartWilliam Jones
Michael KirklandDebtx Rouse
Ken RasketrawBrian Gray
Michael LyleMichael Ellington
Grad. StudentsGeology
On The Bandwagon
Residence hall students, representing
Cotten, Fleming, Jarvis, Slay and
Umstead residence halls, highly value
the "green" area behind Rawl building
(arboretum area). They strongly feel
that a new classroom building (if it is
truly needed) should be built behind
Joyner Library and Mendenhall Student
Center.
Central Campus ARC
Despite several devastating airline ac-
cidents this year, President Reagan's ad-
visers want to relax the federal regulations
that protect passengers from these
tragedies.
The proposed new regulations would
allow airlines to meet safety standards just
about any way they can. No longer would
they have to follow strict guidelines.
Definite safety requirements � such as the
minimum number of flights a pilot must
make, or the tests an aircraft must pass �
would be loosened.
In the future, pilots would maintain only
a "sufficient skill level Planes would
make only "acceptable proving flights
Current rules spell out the amounts of fuel
a plane must carry; the new requirement
would call only for "an adequate fuel sup-
ply
ARGENTINE INTRIGUE: In the
power struggle that followed Argentina's
loss to Britain in the Falklands war, Gen.
Reynaldo Bignone emerged as the new
president. But CIA sources tell us they
doubt he will be able to hang onto his of-
fice.
Several different coup plots are evolving
that could potentially succeed, say these
sources. The most likely scenario calls tor
Bignone to be deposed bv junior army of-
ficers.
Bignone came to power with promises
that elections would be held to select a
civilian government before March 1984
And that, apparently, is the rub. Various
military factions fear they will be pushed
out of the political process in Argentina.
So they are talking about forming combin-
ed military-civilian political parties which
would serve to ensure the military
presence in any Argentine government.
Bl EAR PROSPECTS: Trouble in the
Middle East has knocked wartorn Centra.
America off the front pages, but the
ravages ot armed conflict continue to biee:
those nations. According to an internal
state department report, "The net outlooK
is so black, and pessimism is so perae
that some elements of the private sector
fear that private enterprise and private in-
itiative may never recover. v
The analysis further predicts that
"increased plant closings, capital flight.
brain drain and falling income will further
aggravate social tensions and political in-
stability" throughout the region.
Plight Of A 'Great Conscience'
Sasway Sentence Unjust
By PAT O'NEILL
"It's a tragedy that judges cannot
understand the consciences of the most
moral people oj our time, that people oj
less conscience are in a position to punish
those oj greater conscience � the sentence
is barbaric
Dr. Carroll Webber
Greenville Peace Co mm.
Carroll Webber's name has been
associated with the peace movement for
more than a decade, so his articulate com-
ment on the sentencing of draft resister
Ben Sasway (East Carolinian, Oct. 5) came
as no surprise.
For refusing to sign his name to a piece
of paper, Sasway has been told that he
must spend two and one-half years in a
federal prison.
Whether you happen to believe in the
necessity of draft registration or not, one
must seriously question the motives of a
judge who puts a non-violent first offender
behind bars for 30 months.
Close to one million other young men
have also decided not to sign that same
piece of paper, yet Sasway, who made his
refusal known to the authorities, has been
subjected to a plight that perhaps few of
the others will have to face.
Sasway, who feels that a draft will lead
to a war, said that he had to follow his con-
science when he made his decision to resist.
Our nation has gotten to where it is
because there have been people motivated
only by their consciences, people who have
chosen to stand up and resist evil.
This evil was evidenced in the colonial
days, when the English imposed their will
on us; it appeared again in the form of pre-
judice and racism against women and
blacks, and now we face the unimaginable
evil of the nuclear arms race which could
destroy us all.
Ben Sasway is well aware of the
historical precedent surrounding the
registrationwar connection in our coun-
try.
Any time the United States has had a
registration, we have soon followed it with
a draft. After each imposition of a military
draft, we have had a war. Any war has the
potential of being nuclear. At some point,
this maddening process must be inter-
rupted. Sasway chose the first stage � he
said no to evil right from the start.
Like Webber said, Sasway is one of the
"most moral people of our time Ben
Sasway is truly a person who deserves to be
recognized as a hero.
In the "land of the free and the home of
the brave a young man has chosen to
"freely" follow his conscience and to
"bravely" shoulder the consequences he
will incur for doing so. Yes, Carroll Web-
ber, the sentence that Ben Sasway received
is "barbaric He has been singled out by
the government to be used as a guinea pig
for the purpose of frightening other young
people who also choose to live their lives
according to their consciences.
It's a shame that our leaders have failed
to recognize people like Ben Sasway, who
exhibit qualities that ali Americans should
be proud of.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 14, 1982
I
iich
the
sive
;ior
� in-
'hat
ight,
rther
1 in-
st
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will
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,3r
Membership In Sierra Club
Increases By 30 Percent
ONEILL8 PATR1CK
Staff Wrtler
Membership in the
Sierra Club, the na-
tional conservation
organization, has
recently increased by
over 30 percent. Most
of this increase has
been attributed to the
Reagan administra-
tion's "anti-wilderness
stance says ECU
psychology professor
Robert Graham.
Graham is the chair-
man of the Sierra
Club's local affiliate,
the Cypress Group,
which meets u the se-
cond Monday of every
month. "The Sierra
Club has just
mushroomed in the last
year or so Graham
said. "That's undoub-
tably with the aid of
Mr. Watt
Graham was referr-
ing to James Watt,
secretary of the in-
Students Active On
World Hunger Day
Continued From Page 1
hunger relief
organization that she
coordinates on the local
level.
"I feel very deeply
that as a world leader
the United States has a
responsibility to define
very carefully what it's
priorities are
Another mother who
acted in the skit with
her three children was
Dr. Amy Hannon, a
Greenville resident. She
told The East Caroli-
nian that she got in-
volved in the skit
because she wanted to
raise the consciousness
of the people who wat-
ched it.
"I wanted to do
something that would
bring my sense of the
urgency of the hunger
problem to the
students Hannon
said, "and to focus at-
tention on the
disproportionate
allocation of funds go-
ing to the
militaryand to show
how these two issues
are related
The Hunger Coali-
tion will be performing
the skit again during
the 9 through 11
o'clock class breaks.
Student response ap-
peared favorable judg-
ing from the applause
after each perfor-
mance. One student
yelled out "They're
also cutting back the
student financial aid
funds noted Sippel.
"In El Salvador if we
had fed people instead
of feeding the military,
maybe we wouldn't
have a revolt to deal
with now Gardner
said. "You don't see
people laying their lives
on the line very often
unless they're hungry
"A hungry nation
needs to eat added
Baughan, "before it
can understand
capitalism
REMEMBER DROP-ADD DAY
IF YOU RECEIVED A
YELLOW V.I.P. CARD,
DON'T FORGET TO USE IT.
Western Steer0
Family
STEAKHOVSE
Banquet & Party
Facilities for 15
to 150 Persons
Takr Out
O.ders Call
758 8550
3005 E. 10th St Greenville
Open SunThur. 11am 9pm
Friday-Saturday Uam-lOpm
JARVIS MEMORIAL
METHODIST CHURCH
VAN SCHEDULE FOR
SUNDAY SCHOOL AND WORSHIP
STOPS:
1 iMendenhall Student Center Parking Lot
� 9.15a.m.
2)College Hill Dorms � 9:35 a.m.
3) Fleming Mali (Front) - 9 25am
4) Slay Hall � 10:15a.m.
(Van with lift for handicapped)
c
)
Do you net
what you 're
looking Jor?
Hhen you look
behind you there
are no open
doors.
Whai are you
looking Jor?
Do vou care?
510 S.
Washington St.
Downtown
Greenville
terior. Watt has been
unwelcome by the
Sierra Club ever since
his selection to the
cabinet post. Last year,
in just six months, the
club collected over one
million signatures on
their "Dump Watt"
petition campaign.
A major criticism
Sierra has of the
Reagan administration
is of its attempt to lease
or sell off federal
wilderness lands to
companies doing oil
and natural gas ex-
ploration. "The at-
tempt by this ad-
ministration to sell off
federal lands to private
owners has gotten peo-
ple incensed Graham
said. He added that
some of the oil and gas
leases were being
granted in "federally
designated wilderness
areas These areas are
supposed to have no
roads or buildings.
Graham also pointed
out that federally
designated wilderness
areas in the U.S. ac-
count for less than 1.1
percent of all the oil
and gas reserves in the
countrv.
"In North Carolina
there are only three
areas � three tiny areas
� that are designated
to be wilderness
Graham said. He noted
that all three of these
areas, Linville Gorge,
Shining Rock, and
Joyce Kilmerlick Rock
are all recreational
areas well known for
their hiking and fishing
opportunities.
Approximately 150
of the regional
members come from
the Greenville area,
with the other half
coming from the re-
maining counties, said
ECU history professor
Phil Adler, who is also
secretary of the Cypress
Group.
Adler added that
many of the Greenville
members are also af-
filiated with ECU.
Graham noted that all
ECU students were
welcome to join the
Sierra Club at reduced
student-membership
rates.
The Club's meetings
are held at the First
Presbytarian Church
(Elm "and 14th) at 8
p.m.
Not All Clinics Are the Same.
ABORTION is a difficult decision that's
made easier by the women of the Fleming
Center. Counselors are available day and
nieht to support and understand you. Com-
fort, safety, privacy, and a friendly staff . . .
that" what the Fleming Center is all about.
(All 781-5500 DAY OR NIGHT.
insurance acitpled
�XII inclusive fees
I p l IK weeks
V ree pregnano testing
Saiurda) appointments
er earl pregnant tests
CONSOLIDATED THEATRES
AIL SEATS �1.50
�inMwW
EVERYDAY TIL 111 f. M.
"i ii i�
BUCCANEER MOVIES
I J J 7 �
STARTS TOMORROW
BLOOD
TIDE IR1
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X AN Rl
ij. OFFICER
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1 OS 3 � t 1) i ts t OS
STARTS TOMORROW
GISELLE
TTrf!tl
EMMANl'EU.F WAS THI
BEGINNING
GISEL L E
SHE LIVES TO LOVK'
A VERY EROTIC MOVIE
A LEGACY OF LOVE
RBItlMCTRB l
mi �!)��! ti:aaM4
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STARTING MONDAY, OCTOBER 18
DAILY SPECIALS AT
.suBraa
Famous Foot Long Sandwiches
AAOU 5NAK BMT (HAM, PEPPERONI, GENOA, BOLOGNA) & CHIPS
MON- AND A SMALL SODA FOR $2.09
Tcc SNAK ROAST BEEF, BAG OF CHIPS, AND A SMALL SODA
I u�. FOR j209
SNAK MEATBALL, BAG OF CHIPS, AND A SMALL SODA FOR
$1.59
WED.
THURS. SNAK HAM, BAG OF CHIPS AND A SMALL SODA FOR $1.89
col SNAK ALASKAN KING CRAB, BAG OF CHIPS, AND A SMALL
rm SODA FOR $2.39
SPECIALS RUN FROM 11 A.M. UNTIL 2 P.M. DAILY.
Sunday, October 17
Super Sunday Benefit
ARE YOU NEW IN THE JOB MARKET?
JUNIOR EXECS
ENJOY YOUR JOB AND SPARE TIME, TOO
SALARY
Starts St7.IOO-S24.100 increasing annually to S2S.aOO-S44.t00 in
tour years.
QUALIFICATIONS
College grads, all degrees and degree levels considered. Recent
grads looking for first job as well as those contemplating a job
change (under age 34) are encouraged to apply. Required to pass
mental and physical exams.
BENEFITS
Club benefits including It hole golf courses, swimming pools,
beaches, sailing and flying clubs. Full medical, dental, unlimited
sick leave, 30 days annual paid vacation, post grad education pro-
grams and retirement in 20 years�
JOB
Positions are still available in the following areas: Management
(technical and non-technical). Engineering, Nuclear, Teaching,
Intelligence, Aviation Management, Diving, Pilots, Finance,
Personnel Management.
LOCATION
Immediate openings on both coasts and the Gulf of Mexico � We
pay relocation expenses.
NAVY OFFICER PROGRAMS
1001 Navaho Dr.
Raleigh, N. C. 27609
or call 1-800-662-7231
at the
Opiy
featuring
Super Grit
Cowboy Band
Bill Lyerly Band
The Coulters
Doors open at 7:00 p.m.
All proceeds go to Becky Ledford
Memorial Scholarship Fund at ECU.
For further information: 758-3943
FAMILY EYE CARE
and
CONTACT LENSES
Adult and Prdiatnc vision care in a
relaxed and person,il setting Full con-
tact lens services Quick, accurate
eveglass service
I)K PETER W HOLLIS
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756-9404
Get Your
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Mr� J-j-i Kith r,n (919� 757.185?
I .rrnn ill .North CamttfM
00
OFF
Any Prescription
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Otner Discounts Do Not Apoly
Call and Order Now!
757-3857
Mum Corsages
On,y 5550
" with
all the trimmings
EAST
CAROLINA
In honor of the 75th Anniversary of East Carolina Univer-
sity, Student Supply Store is reducing the price on a
number of items. We invite you to come in and take ad-
vantage of these great savings. This sale will begin Thurs-
day, Oct. 14, 1982.
Stadium Blankets
Shirts, Shorts
Sweaters, Mugs,
W� Huggers
I
3 Ornamey,
ajoui fc
ipnm puB 'sanb
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
Wright Building
Owned and Operated by East Carolina University

1

I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 14, 1982
'
"

t
r
Student Health Concerns
Colds Have Multiple Causes
Colds are probably the most
common illness in the general
population. They are caused by
various viruses and mainly affect
the upper respiratory tract.
These viruses are spread very
easily from one person to another
and generally cause infection
when a person's resistance is low.
People most susceptible are
children, the debilitated, and
people who are fatigued,
malnourished, or physically un-
fit. The elderly and those with
other respiratory conditions (hay
fever, asthma, bronchitis) tend to
get sicker with these infections.
The symptoms may begin with
a scratchy throat that becomes
sore and swollen, making
swallowing difficult. Hoarseness
and laryngitis may result. Pus
(white flecks) may be present on
the tonsils in viral infections such
as mononucleosis. Nasal symp-
toms include stuffiness, clear to
white discharge, and even
nosebleeds if the mucosa
becomes dry and irritated. Some
people may experience fulness
and discomfort in the sinus areas
with headache.
People with allergies may ex-
perience sneezing, itching of the
ears and itching and watering of
the eyes. Congestion may drain
down the back of the throat into
the chest causing tightness and
coughing. Occasionally these
secretions are coughed back up
(phlegm). Other symptoms may
include fever, headache, swelling
and tenderness of lymph nodes in
the neck.
Throats that remain sore more
than a couple of days or become
extremely painful, swollen, and
covered with pus may be cultured
for Strept or other bacteria. An-
tibiotics such as penicillin are
generally reserved for bacterial
infections and do not improve the
course of a viral illness.
Over-the-counter
decongestants, alone or combin-
ed with antihistamines, relieve
many of the nasal and sinus
symptoms. Some decongestants,
such as Sudafed, may cause
hyperactivity � particularly
when combined with caffeine.
Some antihistamines, such as
Chlor-Trimeton, may cause
drowsiness as noted ont the
packages. People with a history
of asthma generally should not
take antihistamines.
Many cough medicines are
available with expectorants which
help you expel these secretions
and cough suppressants which
relieve the dry nagging cough,
such as Robitussin-DM. Some
medicines, such as Vicks Formula
44 and Nyquil, contain alcohol
which may cause
drowsiness.Some contain
decongestants and antihistamines
(Novahistine, Naldecon,
Novafed-A). Multi-psymptom
medicines contain various com-
binations of the above in addition
to aspirin (Coricidin-D) or
acetaminophen (Comtrex).
Some of these medications are
readily available at the self-
medication area of the Student
Health Center. Read the labels on
your medications for precautions
and possible side effects and
follow the directions. Alcohol
should not be mixed with any of
these. Cold medications provide
symptomatic relief � not a cure
for the virus. For any questions,
consult your pharmacist or health
care provider.
Women who may be pregnant
should not take any medcation
before consulting a physician.
Steam (vaporizer, hot shower,
etc.) is very helpful in loosening
secretions so you can clear
phlegm more easily. This warm
moist air is also soothing to the
irritated tissues. Rest is important
to give your body a chance to
prepare its defenses against the
viruses. Fluids (hot tea, chicken
soup) reduce fever and prevent
dehydrations which can lead to
nausea and "dry heaves
Ascriptin (buffered aspirin) and
acetaminophen help reduce fever
and relieve discomfort.
Be sure to dress for the
weather, eat well-balanced meals,
and get plenty of rest and exercise
to help prevent colds. Also, use
care not to spread germs by
coughing, sneezing, and sharing
eating and drinking utensils.
Luncheon Seminar
Held For Women
By ELISA TURNER
Staff Witter
The Committee on
the Statues of Women
will hold its second lun-
cheon seminar for the
fall semester today at
lunchtime.
John S. Childers,
assistant professor of
psychology and direc-
tor of the ECU testing
center, will speak on
how to manage per-
sonal burnout. Mr.
Childers will give an
overview of how to
remedy and reduce the
effects of burnout.
The Committee on
the Status of Women
has been in existance
for eleven years and is
designed to work with
all aspects of the cam-
pus to ensure that
women are viewed as
equals. This committee
was originally formed
by the chancellor to
answer a questionaire
sent by the American
Association of Univer-
sity Women.
In 1975, the commit-
tee was named to serve
as an advisory to the
chancellor on topics of
concern to women.
The committee has
participated in the Title
Nine program and was
requested to be part of
the East Carolina Af-
firmative Action Pro-
gram. In addition to
the four luncheons held
each semester, the com-
mittee has provided a
directory of faculty and
staff members who are
available for con-
ferences concering
women.
"The committee ex-
ists for all women on
campus. It is designed
for students as well as
faculty and staff said
Dr. Mary Ann Rose,
assistant to the
chancellor and
chairperson of the com-
mittee. "We encourage
students to come to
these luncheons
"The main
thing we are not is a
grievance committee,
yet we are not opposed
to discussing problems
and concerns and to
channel them in the
right direction says
committee member
Wanda Wiseman.
Among these con-
cerns is the harassment
policy. The harrass-
ment policy is an ECU
policy prohibiting sex-
ual harassment by and
of both employees and
students.
See us for all your
Halloween needs, including
Witches Hats, Capes, Hairspray,
Make-Up, etc.
AT BARRE,ltd.
Dance wear Specialty Shop
For all your dancing needs.
Full Masks at greatly reduced Prices.
422 Arlington Blvd Greenville, N. C 7S6 6470
IMPORTED
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GREENVILLE. N.C. � PHONE (919) 756-7114
WERE YOUR LOCAL DISTRIBUTOR FOR
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Special:
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2 ribs, fries, slaw & biscuit
on Wed. only
11-2 p.m. and 5-9 p.m.
OLD FASHIONED HOMEMADE
BREAD PUDDINGonly
1011 Charles Street � 752-1373 1 Block from Campus
25C
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WE CARRY 100 s OF
ACCESSORY ITEMS
Amco 4 Bobbins Convertible Topi Koto
Mats Weber Cerburitors Kernel Spoilers
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Any Purchase
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Drastic Reductions on
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ALSC
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TREMENDOUS SAVINGS

Home of Greenville's Best Meats'
PIRATE COUPON
5 DISCOUNT
EXPIRES 102382
on all orders $10.00
or more.
Supermarket, Inc.
Name
mc re �'s
ID Number
Amt. of Purchase,
211 Jarvis St.
2 Blocks from ECU
PRICES EFFECTIVE THURSDAY THROUGH SATURDAY
Overtoil's Finest
Sirloin Steaks or
T-Bone Steaks
$199
Lb.
Campbell's
Tomato Soup
10 Oz. Can
Each
Limit 4
Mitt
t�i
A
Natural Light
Beer
6 Pack � 12 Oz. Cans
$199
Fresh, Whole
Fryers
39C
Nestie's Hot
Cocoa Mix
12 Oz. Box
Individual Servings
Morrell
Franks
12 Oz. Pkg.
990
990
Breyer's
All Flavors Reg. Price 2 for SI.00
Yogurt
4l�'
8 Oz. Cup
All
Pepsi
Products
2 Liter Bottle No Limit
89C
Each
Jeno's
Assorted Variety Frozen
Pizzas
120z.Pkg.
990
Grade "A"
Medium Eggs
Dozen
580
Fresh, Whole
Maola Milk
12 Gallon Paper Carton
98C
Delta or Generic
Paper Towels
Giant Roll
Limit 2 Y oar Choice
Lay's Ass't. Variety
Potato Chips
7 Oz. Bag
99C
JUST A DIME AND
2 PENNIES
Rutabagas Lb.
Green Cabbage Lb.
Yellow Onions Lb.
White Potatoes u.
-

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I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
OCTOBER 14. 1982
Page
Britain's New Series
Pleasant Cup Of Tea
By HARRIET VAN HORNE
NEW YORK � He arrives at
school on a chilly spring day in
1918. He is pale and shaken, a man
not long out of the trenches. He is
23, twice wounded, shell-shocked
and in need of a job. He is David
Powlett-Jones, a Welsh miner's son.
He manages to be both arrogant and
shy.
"You're so splendidly touchy
the headmaster says with a smile.
And splendidly touchy Powlett-
Jones remains through 13 episodes
of To Serve Them All My Days the
Masterpiece Theater drama that
premiered Sunday at 9 p.m. on
PBS.
Both the milieu and the accent
may put off some viewers at first.
But press on, and you will find
yourself caring desperately about
"P.J as students dub him, and
about young love and old scholars
and the agonies of "new boys" who
miss home and mother. You will
also feel again � as in so many
Masterpiece Theater offerings �
the insane cruelty of the Great War
in which 60.000 men fell � killed or
wounded � in one day's fighting on
the Somme.
Essentially, To Serve Them is the
story of a young schoolmaster in the
20 years between the wars. Arriving
at Bamfylde a bitter, lost young
man, Powlett-Jones puts down
roots, wins over the boys who
sneered at his Welsh accent and
gauche ways. He also loves, suffers,
and thrives.
In terms of plot, this new series is
soap opera, a Goodbye, Mr. Chips
with a harder edge and a grittier
fidelity to historic truth. Birth and
death, loving and losing, fire, theft
and sudden, fatal accidents all
figure in the scenario. Petty intrigue
abounds as does treacly sentimen-
tality. Still, it must be said that the
BBC's Andrew Davies has done a
fine job in adapting R.F. Delder-
field's long, sprawling novel to the
small screen.
If it takes awhile to adjust to the
idiom and the setting, it may take
the full 13 weeks to adjust to the
prickly character of Powlett-Jones.
I confess I never did grow fond of
him. The fault, I suspect, lies with
actor John Duttine's interpretation.
Though he won the British
equivalent of the Emmy for this
role, Duttine is perversely
unlovable. His mannerisms quickly
grow monotonous, and his Welsh
accent � when it suddenly comes
upon him in moments of stress � is
impenetrable.
In a series that glows with
brilliant performances, Duttine's re-
mains � to me, at least � slightly
off-key. The other players ef-
fortlessly fit their roles, readily
assuming the lineaments � the
pride, the pathos, the bold fronts �
of real people. Duttine remains an
actor giving a calculated perfor-
mance as a schoolmaster. He is in
no sense a bad actor, but one comes
to understand why producers often
cast him as a villain. (In Richard
Widmark's new film Who Dares.
Wins, Duttine plays an Iranian ter-
rorist. His credits list few heroes.)
In a series of such narrow focus
Alistair Cooke's introductory
remarks are most helpful.
"You may have noticed he
says, "that the masters in this
school seem much too old for their
jobs. So they were. They'd all been
called back from retirementIn
my own school, apart from an art
master and another, slightly over-
aged, who taught carpentry, I never
See PBS, Page 10
Steve & Bernadette Romance In Musical 'Heaven'
Steve Martin and Bernadette Peters long to "live in a world where songs come true" in MGM's musical
drama of the 1930s, Pennies From Heaven. The film will be shown after fall break. Frida and Saturda
night, Oct. 22 and 23, in Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix Theatre. The Student I nion Films Com-
mittee has announced the switching of two films on its fall schedule: Southernomfori will be shown in
place of Time Bandits on November 18, 19 and 20. The film Time Bandits will in turn he shown the
weekend of December 9, 10 and 11.
Baha'i Faith Has Growing Campus Following
By PATRICK O'NEILL
si�ff Writrr
Jesus was a manifestation oj God. Everything oj Him
pertained to God. To know Him was to know God. He
was the source oj all divine qualities. In this mirror the
light of the sun oj reality was reflected to the world.
Through this mirror the energy of God was transmitted
to the world. The whole disk oj the sun oj reality was
rejlected in him. � ' Abdu'l-Baha. The Son of the Glory
oj God.
'Abdu'l-Baha was the man responsible for bringing
'WFtWgton known as the Baha'i faith to Europe and
North America.
Followers of the Baha'i faith believe that
'Abdu'l-Baha's father Baha'u'llah, (The Glory of God)
who founded the Baha'i faith is the mirror of the light
of God for this day and age.
Both men were subjected to exile, imprisonment and
abuse as a result of their faith. Even today, members of
the Baha'i faith are still being subjected to torture and
murder by Islamic extremists who have outlawed the
Baha'i faith in Iran and marked its members for exter-
mination.
Baha'i s believe that Baha'u'llah is the messenger of
God for this age and the Promised One of all religions.
He and his son each spent 40 years imprisoned or in ex-
ile in the Holy Land at the hands of the religious leaders
of Islam, during the late 1800s and early 1900s.
Today there are over 125 countries which have
"National Spiritual Assemblies" of Baha'i s. Over
25,000 local Spiritual Assemblies exist in these coun-
tries.
About seven students have formed the Baha'i
Association of ECU. "The purpose of the Baha'i
Association of ECU is to familiarize those interested in
the tenents and teachings of the Baha'i faith said Bill
Jurney, an ECU communications major and chairman
of the board of the Baha'i group. "This is done through
informal gatherings, discussions, lectures, and social
events
Both of Jurney's parents are Baha'i and he has been
one all his life. At the age of 15 he made a personal deci-
sion to become a Baha'i and was officially welcomed in-
to the faith and his name was added to the national
records. Baha'u'llah established 15 as the age of maturi-
ty for Baha'i youth.
"One of the strongest points of the Baha'i faith is the
independent investigation of truth Jurney said.
"Baha'i s accept the validity of the major world
religionsinvestigation and knowledge of all of the
faiths is important
Baha'i s believe in something they call the
"Progressive Revelation" of God. They see this revela-
tion as beginning with Abraham then passing down
through Krishna, Moses, Zoroaster, Buddha, Christ,
Muhammad, the Bab, and finally on to Baha'u'llah. the
Bab (the gate) was the forerunner of Baha'u'llah. "He
was like John the Baptist noted Jurney because he
prepared people for the coming of Baha'u'llah
"Progressive Revelation is the idea that there are dif-
ferent mirrors to reflect God's light on the earth and
God's manisfestations are like mirrors that reflect
God's light to man
"The Baha'i faith sets me free said club member
Religion
Sonya Brown. "It creates order in my life which sets me
free to make my own dicisions
Brown, 19. is an ECU art student. Both of her parents
are of the Baha'i faith, as well as her two sisters. "My
firm belief in Baha'u'llah is attributed to my many years
of association with the faith she added.
"Baha'i s believe that at designated times God sends
a messenger with un updated set of religious and social
teachings for that piont in time said Jurney. They
recognize all of the religious figures mentioned in their
Progressive Revelation as being sent by God at these
designated impasses throughout history. Jurney notes
that one of the three main teachings of the Baha'i faith
is "Oneness of religion" which he calls the "unity of
faiths
The other two main teachings of the Baha'i s include
the "Oneness of God" and the "Oneness of Mankind
The "Oneness of God" refers to the Baha'i 's belief
that there is one supreme being or one God. "Any true
belief in religion is good Jurney said "We are the last
to condemn a Christian, Jew or Buddist in their belief in
God
"Oneness of Mankind" means that we are all created
equal and we should have an equal opportunity to sur-
viv and be loed noted Jurney.
The Baha'i faith also has nine other teachings and
principles many of which are unique and unusual.
They belie in the "elimination of prejudice of ali
kinds and "individual search after truth "We're
not interested in going out and converting people'
Jurney said "The Baha'i faith is not a fanatic taith
They also call for the creation of a "universal aux-
iliary language. If evervone in the world knew a univer-
sal language in addition to their mother tongue, then the
people � not the governments � could solve pro-
blems continued Jurney, "because oi better com-
munication people could work out problems and work
toward peace without going through governmental
channels
Baha'i s also teach of the "Equality of men and
women The role of women in the workings of the
faith is highly regarded. "Equalitv of opportunity for
men and women is a must declared Jurnev.
" 'Abdu'l-Baha stated that if given the choice to
educate the son or the daughter, the daughter should be
the one to receive the education, he continued, "because
in most cases she is the pnmarv educator of her
children. Today this is still the same
Baha'i s call for "Universal Education" that should
be compulsory and available to all people. Thev believe
in the essential "Harmony of science and religion" as
well as the "elimination of the extremes of wealth and
poverty Baha'i s hope that a spiritual solution can be
See BAHATS, Page 8
Cels Go On Sale Soon
"Eh, What's up, Doc?" of American popular culture.
What's up is the value of anima- More than 250 of these paintings
tion eel paintings, according to col- are the subject of a special exhibit
lectors of these unusual fragments and sale. East Carolina University
Original hand-painted animation eel of Tweety and Sylvester.
I
will host this event Thursday and
Friday, Oct. 28-29, 1982 from 10
a.m. until 7 p.m. in Mendenhall
Student Center. The public is in-
vited.
Animation eel paintings, called
"eels are the paintings actually
filmed in making animated car-
toons. Each character is painted by
hand on a clear sheet of acetate,
usually 11 X 14 inches or larger,
then laced against a background and
photographed one-by-one to pro-
duce a reel of motion picture film.
Cels are the culmination of the ar-
tistic process � the final image that
is photographed by the camera.
This exhibit was authenticated by
Gallery Lainzberg of Cedar Rapids,
Iowa, the nation's best-known
specialist in this unique art form. A
representative of Gallery Lainzberg
will be on hand to answer questions.
The ExhibitSale highlights the
work of veteran Warner Bros, pro-
ducerdirectors: Chuck Jones,
creator of Wile E. Coyote and the
Roadrunner, and Pepe le Pew; and,
Friz Freleng who created Tweety
and Sylvester, and brought
Yosemite Sam to life. Both Jones
and Freleng have been contributing
their considerable talents for more
than 50 years and both have been
honored with several Academy
Awards.
There will also be animation eel
paintings of their other creations �
Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck and the
Tasmanian Devil. Some of these
paintings have been signed.
Of equal importance in the ex-
hibit is a collection of animation eel
paintings from some Walt Disney
Films including The Jungle Book,
Robin Hood, The Rescuers, an

The Fox and the Hound. A selection
of vintage Disne animation draw-
ings from the 1930s and 1940s, in-
cluding a few choice drawings of
Mickey Mouse, will also be offered.
Disney art work has been
treasured by collectors ever since the
late 1930s when San Francisco's
Courvoisier Galleries first offered
cels for sale at prices from $5 to $50.
Some of these cels, recently auction-
ed by Sotheby Parke Bernet in N.Y.
(Dec. '81 and June '82), sold for as
much as $3,000.
Interest in collecting animation
art work from other studibs has
burgeoned in the last ten years. Ac-
cording to Charles Solomon, L.A.
Times, "Prices for material from
other studios, especially Warner
Brothers and the Fleischers, are also
rising rapidly. However, it is still
possible to obtain first-rate ex-
amples of animation art for less
than $50 � in some cases, for less
than $25
The current ExhibitSale offers
the public an opportunity to see a
broad range of animation art. The
art work from more than 25 dif-
ferent productions will be
represented including cels from
Gnomes, Raggedy Ann and Andy,
Heavy Metal, and the meticulously
hand-inked cels of the very popular
1930s characters: Betty Boop and
Krazy Kat.
Today many people are investing
in animation art work for a variety
of reasons. Gallery Lainzberg Direc-
tor Edith Rudman explains,
"People have a genuine affection
for the characters they select and a
lot of people like the idea of owning
a bit of American film history.
Capitol City Series Has 'Evita'
Raleigh's '8283 CapHol City Series is being highlighted
by the international musical hit Fvita. Winner of the
1980 Tony Award for Best Musical, Fvita traces the life
of Eva Peron from prostitute to wife of the President of
Argentina, and finally to her death at 33. The play will
be performed twice, on Friday and Saturday, April IS
and 16, in Raleigh's 2300-seat Memorial Auditorium.
The first performance is reserved seating onlysecond
performance, general admission. The popular series
also features Cleo Lane and John Dankworth, Hal
Holbrook in Mark Twain Tonight Barnum and The
Pirates of Penzance. Season tickets are still available.
For further information, call the Stewart Theatre box
office in Raleigh at 737-3104.
J
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8
I HE fcAST CAROLINIAN
(X TOBER 14, 1982

I
Baha'is On The Rise
Continued From Page 7
realized for the economic problem.
"The extremes of poverty bring about suffer-
ing and the extremes of wealth bring about
materialism � which Baha'i s define as the
point where material goods take prominece oer
God Jurney said.
Baha'i s also believe in a "Universal Peace"
that would be upheld by a "world government"
and the "protection of cultural diversity
Jurney envisions this world government as be-
ing similar to the United Nations Peacekeeping
Force. Nations would still maintain their own
governments, but in times of crisis or when unitv
was needed a "universal world government"
would be available to help rectify the situation.
"People should have the right to be their own
people and maintain their individuality adds
Jurney, referring to the cultural diversity-
teaching.
The Bahai people who currently live in Iran are
being subjected to terrible human rights viola-
tions. "They're being persecuted because they
will not recant their faith said ECU English in-
structor Jeremy Tarlo. "We believe that
Baha'u'llah is the promised one, who has been
prophesized in all the holy books of nil religions;
that runs counter to the beliefs of the Moslem
sect now in power in Iran
A prepared statement of the Baha'i National
Spiritual Assembly of the United States was read
before the Committee on Foreign Affairs Sub-
committee on Human Rights and International
Organizations. The statement spoke of the horri-
ble plight of the Baha'i s presently living in Iran.
"Since the Iranian revolution in 1978-79 a
systematic government-backed campaign to
eradicate the Baha'i faith as an independent
religion in Iran has gathered momentum. The
genocidal campaign has been characterized by
the execution, arrest, abduction and torture of
the community's leaders; attacks upon its holy
places, centers and cemetaries; the confiscation
and destiuction of its properties; the expropria-
tion of the assets of the community and in-
dividuals; the seizure of its sacred literature and
records; and by a general denial of fundemental
human rights to its members
Tarlo recommended that people interested in
learning more about the Baha'i Iranian sitiation
read the book titled -1 Cry From the Heart by
William Sears. "The book is entirely devoted to
the Iranian situation added Tarlo.
The Baha'i Association of ECU plans to
donate a copy of the book to Jovner Library.
Tarlo and his wife Karen both practice ihe Baha'i
faith.
The Baha'i's have a "National Center of Faith
in America also called the "Baha'i House of
Worship that's located in Wilmette. Illinois.
Baha'i s have one House of Worship on each
continent.
RESEARCH PAPERS
All Baha'i s recognize Baha'u'llah as the
"promised one" and credit him as being the first
person to record his religious teachings on paper.
"Baha'i s believe that their faith contains the
spiritual and social teachings which are most ap-
propriate for humankind today said Jurney.
"College is a funny time for religious beliefs
continued Jurney. "Many of us are trying to
identify just where religion and spirituality fit in-
to our livesknowledge of world religions can be
an asset
"I feel that certain social problems, such as the
threat of war, poverty, injustice, and racism exist
in our world because a form of divine guidance is
needed for this age said Brown. "I feel the
Baha'i faith can offer such guidance during this
present day turmoil
In my life the Baha'i faith has played an im-
portant role. Its guidlines have helped me
triumph over many adolescence pressures present
in our society. It has added order to my life
continued Brown.
"We welcome anyone and everyone to our
firesides said Jurney. "We discuss our religion
and all other religions and teachings at our
meetings
The ECU Baha'i group meets bi-weekly on
Wednesday evenings between 5 and 6 p.m. in
room 212 of Mendenhall Student Center.
One prayer that is used by members of the
Baha'i faith was written by the Bab: "Is there
any remover of difficulties save God? Say: Prais-
ed be God! He is God! All are His servants, and
all abide by His bidding
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OCTOBER 14. 1982
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10
THL LAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 14, 1982
'An Officer And A Gentleman9 Continues Big Box Office Run
- - mr"
f
I
By DICK SAUNDERS
l hkrigo Sun-TWMi
CHICAGO � If you
have the unwelcome
feeling that your
neighborhood movie
theater has been taken
over by punks, ex-
traterrestrials and other
alien forms of life,
shake hands with a man
named Taylor
Hackford.
He has directed a
movie about
recognizable human be-
ings, and he came to
town the other day to
assure us that grown-
ups are welcome to
come see it. Actually,
he didn't have to come.
The movie, An Officer
and a Gentleman is one
of the year's big hits at
the box office. (After a
long run, the film is in
its final day at Green-
ville's Buccaneer
Theatre.)
"That's a surprise to
me Hackford said.
"I think it's a good
film. But you never
know how the audience
is going to respond. It's
done far better than I
thought it would. It
seems to have struck a
chord.
"One, it's a romantic
movie. In the last cou-
PBS Launches Series
British 13-Parter Another Domestic Hit?
Continued From Page 7
saw a male teacher until 1919
It is these old masters who shine
in this drama, and none brighter
than the Rev. Algernon "Algy"
Hernes. He is headmaster when
PI. arrives at Bamfylde. Actor
Frank Middlemass perfectly mat-
ches Delderfield's description of
Algy He looked "like an amiable,
aging clown we read. AnJ so he
docs, fleshed out on the screen.
He is, moreover, a wise, tender,
occasionally hilarious old
gentleman "He had a cheerful, pip-
ing voice and a fruity bot-
tlenosc.His face was an actor's
face, that might have been seamed
and burnished by years of makeup
routine. The mobile eyebrows were
clownish, toobut below them the
eyes were of piercing blueness
Middlemass dominates every
scene he plays Occasionally we see
him in the C( njugal bed with his
nice, efficient wife, Elhe (Patricia
Lawrence). It appears to be a
blissful marriage. After some
earnest pillow talk about school
problems, Algy says, in his keen,
sporting fashion, "Now for some
jollv good sleep
It takes time for P.J. to recover
from his war experiences. He re-
mains "shell-shocked" for some
time. "Shell shock" was an
honorable term for men stunned by
the unspeakable horrors of the
Western Front. P.J. thinks he is a
chance survivor, and "the mutter of
the guns, the sour mists that hang
over the battlefield in summer and
winter" remain with him for years.
His feelings about the war are
cynical and very much at odds with
the jingoism of the boys and at least
one of the teachers.
You will see some particularly
fine scenes between P.J. and a
chocolate soldier called Carter (Neil
Stacy) who wears officer's khaki
and drills the school's Officers
Training School brigade. Carter
spent six months at a training camp
and emerged a martinet obsessed
with all things military. P.J. loathes
him on sight and disbelieves his
story that an old rugby injury to his
knee disqualified him for trench
warfare.
"Damn thing gave out the week
my draft was to leave for France
Carter huffs. He is distinctly an-
noyed when P.J. refuses to join the
corps as an instructor. ("Damn it,
old man, we could use a chap like
you)
Howarth, the teacher who
becomes Powlett-Jones' best friend
� and best man at his wedding � is
a type found at every boys school,
Alistair Cooke assures us. He is the
scholar with no illusions and little
faith. According to the boys,
Howarth smokes 40 cigarettes a day
and puts away three bottles of gin
each week. He quotes the German
poet Heinrich Heine on love and
sums up Bamfylde as "the best of
the second-rate schools Alan
MacNaughtan's performance seems
to me worthier of the British Emmy
than Duttine's, but that's personal
prejudice. I've always been partial
to jaded men who quote romantic
poetry.
Because we are watching a
masterpiece soap opera, we become
greatly involved with the women in
P.Js life. They are an interesting
trio, all nicely played by sturdy
young actresses with lovely voices
and easy laughter. All are greatly
smitten by the tall, melancholy
"Davey
The young, awkward love scenes
between Davey and a Welsh nurse
named Beth have a special
sweetness. Their wedding � un-
faithful to the book � is straight
out of situation comedy, a mistake.
Belinda Lang's Beth is so earthy
and fresh that the story is diminish-
ed when she and her children are
taken from us in a soap-opera acci-
dent. There follows a flirtation with
independent Julia (Kim Braden),
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who hoots at the thought of becom-
ing a schoolmaster's wife. Finally,
there is deiicate, brooding Christine,
a Firebrand in the Socialist Party.
Not a bit credible, this touch, but
you will be impressed by Susan
Jameson's performance.
As we rightly guess in the opening
installment, P.J. ends his days as
successor to Algy, a proud head-
master, watchful shepherd of an
unruly but lovable flock. Before
reaching this eminence, he must do
battle with Algy's First successor,
Alcock, a psychotic constantly on
the alert for "unnatural friend-
ships" among the boys. Charles Kay
makes Alcock a man you can com-
fortably despise.
To Serve Them All My Days is
special and not likely to appeal to a
broad audience. The first two
chapters are slow, and the dialogue
is an obstacle course. An American
must pay strict attention. But there
are rewards.
Like soap opera, this series grows
on you. You begin to care � and
there will be moments when your
eyes sting with tears. To Serve Them
lacks the elegance of Brideshead
Revisited and the easy accessibility
of Upstairs, Downstairs, but it has
that sort of British panache, that
style and confidence some of us
have come to love.
pie of years, there
hasn't been a good,
strong love story on the
screen. It has
everything to do with
chemistry. Richard
Gere and Debra Winger
(the central lovers in
the movie) established a
rapport. There's an
electricity there. The
camera picks it up, and
so does the audience.
"Two, it's a film
about upward mobility.
During the 1930s and
'40s, there were lots of
movies about people
trying to improve their
lives. But during the
'50s and '60s, the coun-
try was in an era of
stability and prosperi-
ty, and we became
cynical about the idea
of people bettering
their lives. Everybody
had it. Now, we've
reached a time when
opportunities aren't
limitless. Times are
hard. People are out of
work. People are hop-
ing � not to hit a home
run or make a million
dollars and retire � but
to take one step up.
"The success of the
movie has a specific
meaning he said
"This is my second
feature. My first movie
(The I do (maker, about
pop stardom in the
1950s) was a critical
success but nobodv
went to see it. Thev
don't let you do to
many of those. The fact
that this one is making
money for Paramount
is terrific. But the bot-
tom line is I'll be able
to make other films
That's important to
me
Sorry
You
Missed
Us
Your Marine officer selection team was on campus Tuesday &
Wednesday. We were talking about challenging career opportunities
for future college graduates. Earn an excellent salary, benefits, ad-
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positions, guaranteed upon graduation. There are rigid mental, moral
and physical standards with highly competitive selection. Freshman
through Seniors are eligible.
Should you wish to know more of your opportunities as a Marine
Corps officer contact the Raleigh offices selection team toll free
1-800-662-7312. Maybe you can be one of us.
The Few, The Proud, The Marines
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
OCTOBER 14, 1982
Page 11
Pirates To Meet 15th-Ranked FSU
By KEN BOLTON
sMstam Np�n Editor
The ECU Pirates upped their
record to 3-2 as they won their third
consecutive game at home Saturday
night by beating the University of
Richmond 35-14.
As head coach Ed Emory put it,
this was the best offensively that the
Pirates have played all year. "The
line played the best it has in three
years he said. "We had an excep-
tional game on offense except for
fumbles and penalties
The Pirate offense accounted for
23 first downs, 167 yards passing
and 333 yards rushing. The 500
yards total offense against Rich-
mond is the most total yards of any
Ed Emory coached team at East
Carolina.
Up to this point, college football
teams all over the country have been
throwing more passes than in recent
seasons. And the Pirates are no ex-
ception.
With the 167 yards in the air
against Richmond, ECU now has
829 yards passing through five
games. In 1981, East Carolina
managed only 839 yards passing the
entire season!
But the ground attack has not
been surrendered. With Tony
Baker's 154-yard rushing perfor-
mance against Richmond, the
Pirates are now up to 214 yards on
the ground per game.
Baker got all of his yardage on
just 16 carries for a 9.6 yard-per-
carry average. He got almost half of
it on one carry in the third quarter.
Baker took off around the right end
for a 75-yard touchdown romp, the
longest scoring play in Emory's
three years at ECU.
Quarterback Greg Stewart, who
missed the Missouri game, came
back to play nearly the whole time
against Richmond. Besides his 7 of
15, 167-yard passing contribution,
Stewart also rushed five times for 35
yards and one touchdown.
Baker was named the EC AC
Division-1 football Rookie of the
Week for his outstanding play in the
Richmond game, and Stewart was
voted as honorable mention offen-
sive player of the week.
The Pirates' biggest problem in
the game came from within
themselves. ECU had five turnovers
and were penalized 12 times for a
total of 132 yards.
On defense, the Pirates have
gien up only 20 points at home and
are now ranked 16th in the country
in total defense.
"1 felt we won the game on
defense Emory said after the
game. "We did look terrible on that
first drive when they went up 3-0,
but after that, we really played well
defensively
Even though Richmond ran more
offensive plays than ECU, 78 to 68,
the Pirate defense allowed the
Spiders onl three yards per offen-
sive play. ECU averaged 7.4 yards-
per-ptay.
As a result of the many Pirate tur-
novers and penalties, Richmond led
in total time of possession, 33:14 to
26:46.
The Pirates hope to win their first
game on the road this weekend
against the Florida State Seminoles.
But that will not be an easy task
considering FSU is ranked No. 15 in
this week's UPI poll after trouncing
Southern Illinois 59-8 last Saturday.
The ECU-Florida State series is
only one game old, but future
schedules show games between the
two schools slated for 1983, 1984,
x1986 and 1987.
The Pirates will be looking to
regain a measure of credibility after
losing in Tallahassee 63-7 in 1980.
According to coach Emory, the
Seminoles are a very potent football
team. "They are as good, or better
than, when we played them in
1980 he said. "But then we're a
lot better than we were
Florida State, who will come into
the game with a 4-1 record, is led by
head coach Bobby Bow den, who
has a 127-52 record in his 17th year
overall.
Emory is aware that the
Seminoles build their program on
defense. "They spend 30-40 per-
cent more preparation time on
defense than on offense he said.
"You always have to earn
everything you get off Florida State,
as they make you go the hard way
Offensively, FSU features a
backfield that averages 191 pounds.
"They are balanced in running and
passing with a fine tailback and a
good quarterback stated Emory.
"They are a very versatile team that
does a lot of things well
Emory said that he has nothing to
settle, but he knows that the Pirates
have made great progress since the
game two years ago. "I've been
looking forward to going back since
Sept. 20, 1980 just to see how far
our program has come
ECU has roots reaching all the
way to Tallahassee. Former ECU
assistant Jimmy Heggins is a part-
time assistant at Florida State, while
former ECU academic coordinator
Brian Mand is the academic coor-
dinator for the Seminoles.
Emory continues to be concerned
about the area which has been the
biggest problem - injuries. Both
taUbacks, Baker and Jimmy
Walden, are hurt, and Sam Norris,
Barry Smith and Maury Banks are
listed as questionable on defense.
"We had to play N.C. State and
Missouri with key people out, and it
seems to be the same going to
Florida State Emory said.
"I just wish we could get all our
people healthy one time for these
big games; we could really be a good
football team if all our players were
together at one time he added.
'But then that's the key to building a
program - depth
W�0 B, CIMOY WALL
Strong safety Curtis Adams gets in the wa of an attempted bomb.
A True Athlete Never Quits
By TAMMY PARHAM
Sports Inf trilcr
It's common knowledge that a
true athlete is no quitter, and ECU
volleyball player Diane Lloyd has
proven to be a true athlete in every
sense of the word.
Lloyd, a 5'5" setter for the Lady
Pirate Volleyball Team, has been
�am�d wan-iovitatioaal NCAA all-
tournament team for the second
consecutive week, this time the ECU
invite all-tournament squad.
There's no doubt that Lloyd has
shocked quite a few people,
� especially since she was cut from the
team as a freshman.
"When I didn't make the team, a
coach from my area suggested that 1
ask to be the manager, because I
could learn a lot from being around
them Lloyd said. "I didn't know
anything about the 'collegiate style'
of volleyball. It's so much different
from playing in high school
As the team's manager, Lloyd
was required to attend all practices
and was also allowed to participate
in intra-squad scrimmages.
"Over the summer I practiced a
lot, especially on the drills the team
did the soft-spoken junior said.
"I felt like I'd make the team the
next year, but I had no idea I'd be a
setter
Lloyd's first experience as a setter
has been a memorable one. During a
break at an ECU volleyball clinic
that summer, Olympic standout
Rita Crockett wanted to practice her
spike. But no one was around to set
except Lloyd.
"Rita asked me to set a few balls
for her. I told her I'd never set
before, but that didn't seem to mat-
ter to her Lloyd recalled.
Lloyd, a Chapel Hill native, not
only made the team in 1980, but she
was also named to the starting
team�as a setter. "Diane didn't
have the experience to be a starting
setter in a Division-I program that
year ECU coach Lynn Davidson
said. "A setter must be fine and ag-
gressive, not laid-back and easy-
going like Diane. It's the most
demanding role on the team. She
just wasn't ready, and our hitters
didn't cope very well
Last year, Davidson recruited an
experienced setter, and Lloyd was
benched during the foremost part of
the season. "Diane couldn't accept
that she would have to make such a
drastic change in her personality
the coach explained. T had to find
someone who could do the job. But
Lloyd did change and her deter-
mination has finally paid off.
"I knew if 1 wanted to play, 1 had
to learn to be aggressive Lloyd
said. "I knew she had recruited ao
more setters for this season so I
worked hard and practiced a lot
According to Davidson, the im-
provement was immense. "Diane
grew up a lot over the summer. She
changed from the 'meek, mild setter
to the aggressive-run-the-offense
setter the coach said. "She has
picked up the responsibility of set-
ting and done a great job. She has
good movement to the ball, a nice
touch and more consistency. Diane
really deserves the honors
Lloyd said she owed a great deal
of credit to the team. "They're
worked with me and they haven't
been so critical. That helps take
some of the pressure off me she
said.
Seminoles Speak Out On ECU
PtMta By CINDY WALL
A lady Pirate volleyball players prepared to set teammate up for a spike.
Women's Basketball
Begins Practice Friday
Fifth-year head women's basket-
ball coach Cathy Andruzzi, with
three starters returning and three
high school Ail-Americans in camp,
officially opens pre-season practice
Friday in Minges Coliseum at 6:00
p.m.
Missed from last season will be
starters Sam Jces and Lillion
Barnes, but senior starters Mary
Denkler, an Ail-American can-
didate, and Fran Hooks and
Loletha Harrison return to bolster
hopes for a third-straight playoff
appearance.
Denkler led the state in scoring
last season with a 20.1 average
which boosted her to fourth-place
on the career scoring list with 1,203
points. Her 8.6 rebounding average
was tops for ECU.
Harrison, a 58" jumping jack,
was honored as the best defender
last season. Her 6.9 scoring and 6.7
rebounding averages show her
strength.
Hooks converted from forward to
point guard last season and was the
steadying force down the stretch.
Not the quickest point guard, she
employed good court sense and
solid defense to grow into a vital
starter.
Sophomores Lorainc Foster, with
a 9.3 points-per-game average, and
Darlene Chaney, who recorded 6.9
points-per-game and 5.3 rebounds-
per-game, have future stardom writ-
ten all over them. The lightening-
quick Foster became instant offense
off the bench late last season and
Chaney carried her exceptional play
into the summer to make the East
squad for the National Sports
Festival. Senior point guard Caren
Truske averaged better than an
assist each seven minutes of playing
time last year.
. The high school All-Americans,
Bridget Jenkins, Sylvia Bragg and
Lisa Squirewell, add depth. Jenkins
was the AP player-of-the-year,
Bragg played in the McDonald's
All-Star Classic, and Squirewell was
AP All-State in North Carolina.
Add powerful center Rita Sim-
mons of Miami (FL) Central High
School and Eunice Hargett, an
honor student from nearby West
Craven High School.
The 1981-82 Lady Pirates rallied
from a shaky 4-7 start to make the
post-season playoffs.
Head coach Cathy Andruzzi,
alcg with Converse, will be con-
ducting four free mini-teaching
clinics and intrasquad scrimmages
this fall.
Sec CLINIC, Page 12
SATURDAY'S GAME: After
Florida State pounded Southern Il-
linois, 59-8 last weekend, head
coach Bobby Bowden is a little con-
cerned about whether his players
will be ready for ECU this coming
Saturday.
"I'm more worried this week
about our motivation than I was last
week he said. "Now that we've
won the Southern Illinois game
decisively, I've got to make sure
they don't look a game ahead
Bowden said that his assistants
reviewed pieces of East Carolina
film last week, and had good things
to say about the Pirates. "They tell
me they look much better defensive-
ly than Southern Illinois. East
Carolina just beat up on Richmond
and Richmond ain't that bad
The Seminoles' defensive end
John McLean said that it will not be
easy to "get ready for a team like
East Carolina But the 6-3,
220-pound junior added that the
team has no right to be too confi-
dent. "We don't have enough three
and four- year players to take this
game lightly he said. "They are a
solid football team and we realize
that we have to play well to win
Florida State noseguard David
Ponder also doesn't think of ECU
as a pushover team. "Everybody
asks if we can get fired up for East
Carolina he said. "Ya dang right
we can. We're not good enough to
take anyone lightly. All I have to do
Cindy Pleasants
Hi A Look Inside
is set some personal goals in my
mind and that is plenty incentive to
olav well
PIRATES GET READY: One
thing's for sure, ECU head coach
Ed Emory is expecting Florida State
to be prepared, especially on the
defensive end. "They build their
program on defense he said.
"They spend 30 to 40 percent more
preparation time on defense than on
offense. You always have to earn
anything you get off Florida State,
as they make you go the hard way
At this point, Emory's main wor-
ries are injuries. "I'm concerned
about our offensive line and runn-
ing backs going into Florida State
he said. "Jeff Autry and Mac
Powers at tackle are questionable,
while both Jimmy Walden and Tony
Baker are hurt at tailback. Defen-
sively, I'm concerned about Sam
Norris, Barry Smith and Maury
Banks
ECU linebackers have been get-
ting hurt on a weekly basis, but
Gerry Rogers has returned in spite
of his two broken hands.
Emory praised defensive tackle
Steve Hamilton, saying "He's just
playing out of his gourd Emory
said he hasn't seen a better defensive
tackle from any of the five op-
ponents the Pirates have played thus
far.
SCHULZ SELECTED: ECU
defensive end Jody Schulz has been
selected to play in the eighth annual
Japan Bowl in Japan's Yokohama
Stadium on January 16, 1982. The
game will be televised live on WTBS
Atlanta Cable.
"We talk to pro scouts on choos-
ing who plays said Player Person-
nel Director Duane Williams. "We
work with guys who have had super
college careers. We're also looking
for athletes with character. Jody
will be representing the United
States of America. We want to show
the Japanese people what U.S. foot-
ball is all about
Playing for the East team, Schulz
will be coached by Mike White of Il-
linois and Dick Crum of North
Carolina.
SWIM MEET: The ECU swim
team will hold a Purple-Gold inters-
quad meet on Oct. 20. The races will
be held at Minges Pool at 7 p.m.
SOCCER: The Pirates were
defeated by UNC-Charlotte, 3-0,
Wednesday, which now evens their
record, 5-5. The Bucs will meet
Richmond here on Friday at 2 p.m.
CORRECTIONS: In the Tuesday
edition of The East Carolinian, the
Florida State Seminoles were
mistakingly referred to as the
Gators. Also, Larry Beckish came
to ECU from Wichita State last year
rather than Illinois State. Please ac-
cept our apology for the errors.
Quarterback Greg Stewart completes pan oa tae raa.
iBy �AY PATTB
"�






12
I 111 l s ! t KOi INI
IKK hl K 14 1982
Harrison To Open Season
Newl appointed players, but 1 really will just don't know termen, while seven
head basketball ach not know much about "I can only promise have departed, rwo
oui team until we gel two things right now starters are listed as
Clinics To Be Held
k I arlie H: rison will
his si ottu ial
look al the I9S2 S3
Eastai olina I ni ei si
t basketball team I ri
da uv 1 pi �� '
opens in Minges Col
iseum al 2:45 pm
"I've looked al film
and talked with the
pi acticc undei w ay,
said Hai i ison "W e ap
peai to ha e some fine
talent .wd good
recruits Bui whethei
One, hard work is
demanded and ex
pected; not rewarded.
And two, East Carolina
will be an exciting
the players can till the basketball team
roles needed foi the Harrison takes over a
returning, but only tor-
waui Charles Green
started the majority ol
the games. Guard
Bruce Peartree started
50 percent to be con-
sidered a returning
type ot tense and program that has but starter.
defense 1 want to run, 1 foui returning let- Immediate problems
ate expected at center
and on the front lines.
No experienced playei
retui ns at centei, only a
sophomot e and a
freshman test int. and
very little depth is
available on the front
line.
It a strength appeals
at present, it is at
guard. Junior college
transfer 1 on Robin
son is highly touted at
point, along with in-
coming freshman Curl
Vanderhorst ol Fayet-
teville. l the big
guard, Bruce Pea:tree
and Mike I ox, along
with Bai tv tight.
who o back from a
tr's absence, prov ide
great potential
I larrison inherits the
few remains ol a 10-P
club last season and the
bottom tm.she; in the
E south.
I he Pirates will open
play No 2 at Duke
I niversity, one ol
seven i ames EC1
must face in its first
nine games.
"()ur schedule is
� ugh, especially with
� � . way the games fall,
say - Hat rison. "H il
tl n nothing is very
d anles- it's woi
.� orkine for
Cont'd hn�m Page 11
I he two houi mini
clinics will include an
1(1 praetiee session ol
fundamental drills and
will be followed b an
intrasquad scrimmage
1 he Converse I ud
Pit ale clinics will be
held Wednesday, Oc
tober 20. 1982 at rerry
Sanford High School in
1 ayetteville, NC from
6 8 p.m Saturday. (h
tober 2J at W 1
s oodson High School
in Fairfax, VA from
2 4 p.m . V ednesday.
Octobei 2 at
Williamston H ig h
School in Williamston,
( from 6-K p.m ; and
I uesday, Novembei 2
al Wake Forest
Rolesville High School
in Wake Forest, NC
from 6-8 p.m.
I he clinics are open
to all high school.
junior high, elementary
and private school
teams and other m-
div iduals w ho may w ish
to attend
I or furl her informa
tion, contact coach An
druzzi at ECl . Minj
( oliseum, or b calling
(919) 757 6384
Bobby Knight
To Visit ECU
P, D&vfc �11 ' IA M S
1(1 v Mike I pulls up I r i jumper in last uar'v action.
ACC Players Chosen
Indiana I niversity
head basketball coach
Bobby knight, the only
active coach with two
NCAA titles to his
credit, will conduct a
coaches clink al East
( arolina I niversity
irday, ci 30
Registration is set tor
12:30 ! 30 New I c I
head Chat lie Han
wii open the clinic form
2:00-4:00 with a session
on practice organiza
tion.
Knighi will have two
segments, the fit -
4;0O-5:30, while the se-
cond segment will be
6:30-7 30 Knight will
discuss his intensive
a n d def ensiv e
philosophies.
- bufl dinner
be served bet w een
knight' two segments,
o 6:30
Regist- should
the
E I basketball office
Cost ;s $15.00 pet per
son. C ontaci th 1 Cl
basketball office al
757 s42
ict i
tal
Minges i oliseum.
G R E I N S B
v I
Ma
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I i � '
i 24" w
Bl i
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ris V
Bei
and
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it the sCa-on.
It was th� l
Benish was named
isive pi
Hai a 6-foot-1,
amor ft m
Benisl
North

� .� ilso id live solo
issisi in
I ai Heels
I . e week. to then conference win
Islip, , sci a Bei ' � ! ovei Wake Forest He
third and-thiee pas- � irn had ont tackle foi a
the :
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defense with
a nd
. fens with I a tumble at
bt mg � rigers' the 1 )eacon . - ird line
I period with
Bla lo � ' television �et up a
ided in North Carolina
Va led the the 12 tad i eei t vn
�notc Bv ClNOv WAH
ECU soccer player successfully keeps the hall awa from opponent.
SELLING
TICKETS FOR
CLASH CONCERT
FRIOCT.15
WILLIAM ft
MARY COLLEGE
PHONE: 752-4935
or 756-8865
ASK FOR CHARLES
so
GOOD
each day!
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Valley
-Water
Reg $229.95
XoQ �12.000 BTirs .Cleanburning
MEDICAL SCHOOL ROUTE
I he following is the time schedule for the Medical School route. The shuttl
Monday thru Thursday between the hours of 3:00 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Hu s
operate on a trial basis through October 28th, at which tune a decision wil
nether to continue the service, depending on the amount of student use.
Departs
Mendenhall
�Odorless
�C umrs uith ounei �
mrtiiii.il siphon &
, , , batteries
�Ideal for large areas
ALL WE ASK IS - COMPARE!
Layaway Now.
Also located In Raleigh. 2741 E. 10th
Wilmington & Laurinburg 758-2080
Open Monday
Through Saturday fljft ! '
Colonial Heights
Shopping Center
3:00 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
4:00 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
6:00 p.m.
6:30 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
9:00 p.m.
1
H
Depart
Medsi'tlOOl
3:15P-in
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Ill
You Don 7 Have to Ride Your Broom
to the Health Sciences Library





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 14, 1982
13
Wolfpack To Test Heels
CHARLOTTE,
N.C.(UPI) �If North
Carolina State tries an
onsides kick against
North Carolina this
year, it had better work
or Coach Monte Kiffin
can just walk out of the
stadium and keep on
going.
Ahead 10-0 at
halftime last year, Kif-
fin decided to go with
an onsides kick. The
Tar Heels recovered the
ball in good field posi-
tion and rolled 51 yards
for a touchdown that
was the beginning of
the end for the
Wolfpack in the 21-10
loss.
That game was the
turning point in the
Wolfpack season. Go-
ing into the contest
with a 4-1 record.
North Carolina State
didn't win a game the
rest of the way,
finishing 4-7.
The Wolfpack again
goes into the game with
a 4-1 record. A 23-6
loss to Maryland and
an erratic offense raises
questions whether the
team is as good as the
record would indicate
or whether it's due for
a repeat of last year.
North Carolina also
is 4-1, but there's a dif-
ference. The Tar Heels
are ranked 8th in the
nation and are the only
team ranked in the
statistical top five in
total offense and
defense.
In total defense, the
Tar Heels' are No. 1 in
the country, allowing
only 166 yards per
game and a mere 41 on
the ground.
"North Carolina was
a fine football team in
1981, but they're a
whole lot better this
year said Kiffin.
"The reason they're
stronger is their
defense. They've
shored up their secon-
dary and they've
always played the run
tough. Defensively,
they're probably the
best in the country. For
evidence all you have to
do is check the stats or
take a look at the
films
North Carolina will
be without center Steve
McGrew, lost for the
season with a knee in-
jury, and offensive
guard David Drechsler,
a mainstay up front.
Maryland (3-2) and
Clemson (3-1-1), the
two other front-runners
in the ACC champion-
ship race, are also tak-
ing on conference op-
ponents this weekend.
The Terps are at home
against Wake Forest
(3-3), and Clemson
faces an aerial barrage
from Duke (3-2) at
"Death Valley
Virginia (0-5) takes a
much-needed week off
while Georgia Tech
(3-2) travels to Auburn.
Among the in-
dependents. South
Carolina faces Furman
at Columbia, S.C and
East Carolina is on the
road against Florida
State.
The Tigers
humiliated Virginia
48-0 last week, but it
could be a different
story this week. Duke,
led by the passing of
quarterback Ben Ben-
nett, apparently has the
ability to score points
on anyone, while the
Tigers' offense has
been lackluster against
the better teams this
season.
The key, said Tiger
Coach Danny Ford, is
to get a good pass rush
on Bennett, who he
believes is one of the
most accurate passers
in the country.
"He's the premier
quarterback on the
East Coast said
Ford. "Our defensive
line's mission is to get
Bennett this weekend. I
don't care how they get
there stunts or blitzes.
We will do anything to
get to the quarter-
back
Maryland's secon-
dary will also get a stiff
test Saturday from
Wake Forest quarter-
back Gary Schofield.
He picked the Terps
clean for 504 yards in
the air in a 45-33 losing
effort last year to set a
school record.
The Terps are much
improved offensively
this year and Coach
Bobby Ross is counting
on ball control to keep1
the football out of
Schofield's hands.
The Yellow Jackets
took Tulane by surprise
last week, downing the
Green Wave 19-13, and
Coach Bill Curry says
he thinks the team has
showed "definite im-
provement It will,
have to be to beat
Auburn, 4-1, with its
only loss to 6th-ranked
Nebraska.
The Yellow Jackets
continue to produce
with their ground
game. Tailback Robert
Lavette had 145 yards
rushing against Tulane
to boost him to 508
yards for the season.
Classifieds
PERSONAL
Photo �V CINDY WALL
Lita Lamas in action at
ECU volleyball tournament.
WHO IS THE ugliest man on cam
pus?
OINKABLES: WHAT a way to
spend the big 7 1 The surprise par
ty was a hellva lot ol Ion Too bad
we had to end the night wi�h the
neighbors in a light So what il the
noise was too loud. Us drunks were
in a cloud EVEN pin the tail on
the donkey was unique especially
since it didn't stop the keg's leak
Hope the big event was a happy
way to start you oil legal in every
state cause little woman we think
you're great OOF papa love 1st.
?nd and 3rd prue alias Mo. Larry
and Curly.
IT WAS HEAL exciting picking
you up oil the lloor. but other than
that Sat nite was a bore Girls,
beware Snu Sam
THIS IS A PUBIDIC announce
men! concerning the bet between
T. Evans and F Miller pertaining
to the end results ol the
Chancellors Cup race Being
awarded to either the Kappa
Sigma Iraternity or the Phi Kappa
Tau traternity The winner ol this
prestigious award will inherit 7
ice-cold cases ol Mich Lite No
other bets with any other bookie
accepted.
JEB AGNES and Merle came by
to see you Sat night, but you must
have been over at Frieda s Alex
and Tyrone want to see you soon
too You know, we haven't all been
together since that time at the
beach with Beulah Write me or
call I'm at Herbert's place NED.
ROOMMATE
WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE To share
7 bedroom apartment Furnished
J100 rent Cheryl 757 lS�
2 FEMALE ROOMMATES
NEEDED to live at Georgetown
Apts For Information call
7S8 �324 alter 5pm
FOR SALE
PROFESSIONAL Typo�
experience, tah!� �nrft. MM
typewriter. Cait L���e ihiee
7 54 5)01 or Gait Jwner 7S� IM!
TYPING TM� papers '�W"i
thesis, etc Can 757 ��JJ
LOSE WEIGHT HONCSTM!
7$eSM
WANTED
HAND CRAFTED rustic lur
mture at allordabie student
prices For more information call
Kim at 757 5717
FOR SALE 78 Gremlin Ph
75� 5135
2 FISHER SPEAKERS model 530s
would like to trade lor cassette
deck Call 756 877 or The East
Carolinian 757 6366 and leave
message lor Geep Johnson
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL Typist wants to
type a' home Reasonable rates
756 3660
PHYSICS 12S� leter warned win
�ng to pay reasonable amewnt and
tit time schedule around ye�rs
Contact Sandy 754 6147
USED LPl earn EXTRA CAtH
Owcksilver Records� In ��
change 1M East Filth St
YVE BUY PLAYBOY. Railing
Stone Mag Quicksilver Record
Book Exchange 1H East Fitth St
WANTED USED LPl
REWARD CASH OR TRAD!
Quicksilver Records IN last
Filth St
ARE YOU INTO pvRpetry? I am
looking lor someone to help me
with a show Ask lor Dee. 75 7733
MISC.
ANOTHER COUNTRY, anoth.r
culture Picture yeursell m Cetta
Rica this spring carrying on yewr
ECU studies at low cost want to
know more? Or Baker Brewsler
A324. Dr Bort. Brew Alt or Or
Farr Brew Alll.
LETS MAKE
A
DEAL.
ON
SHIRTS & SWEATERS
AYDEN GOLF & C.C. 746-3389
$1.00 Off
Any Plate � With Coupon
Fri. or Sat. Only - 4:30 p.m9:30 p.m.
Cliff's Seafood House &
Oyster Bar
Washington Highway (N C 33 ExtGreenville - Phone 757 3177
ONE COUPON PER PERSON
1
I
I
I
J
J.A
YOUR BSN IS WORTH AM
OFFICER'S COMMISSION
IN THE ARMY.
Your BSN means you're a professional. In the Army, it also
means vou're an officer. You start as a full-fledged member of our
medical team. Write: Army Nurse Opportunities,
P.O. Box 7713, Burbank, CA 91510.
ARMY NURSE CORPS.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
UNIFORMS
SHOPS
Bring this ad for
10 OFF
on the purchase of
one of our lab coats!
All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes, shoes,
and hose. Also - used ECU nurses
uniforms. Trade-ins allowed.
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive.
Near Hollowell's Drug and old hospita
Modern
laundromats
Close to
Campus
a
10th St. Across from
Krispy Kreme (752-6117)
14th St. 1 Block from
the "Hill" (752-963)
I
WASH
HOUSE
�Large capacity washers
�Lots Dryer
�Color TV's with cable
�Video Games
� FluffFold Service
� 10th St. � Open 24 hrs.
�Attendants
r-
i
i
I FREE WASH wthis coupon
Introductory Offer
Limit 1 coupon per visit.
Coupon expires 109
1
I
I
I
I
J
756-2414
2725 Memorial Dr
Greenville
pestaupant
- OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK -
Breakfast, Lunch, & Dinner
Gourmet Salad Bar
Steaks, Seafood, & Other Dinners
Fine Wines & Champagne
Banquet Rooms
Our goal is to make dining with us a
pleasure, with the best food and service.
A special Thank You for your patronage.
503 E. 3rd St. 752-3311
& Pitt Plaza Shopping Center 756-1 160
Homecoming is less than
2 weeks away.
Order your special lady
a corsage NOW
CORRECTION for only $5
00
For groups of 25
or more (with letters free)
only $450
Last day for group orders
is Thursday, Oct. 21st.
MAiyy'Vy. i;Z:
Clothing x j
Warehouse ' J
xr We Are Going for
r()S Volume With Permanently
XJ Reduced Prices
l � Reg. Our
Brand Price Price
lordoche 42- 27-
Calvin Klein 4� 24-
Chic34- 20"
LeeJr.AMi2� 1�
Gloria VanderWlt 46- 27-
Men's Lee Rider 25- 16-
Bayi' Lee Rider TL'E
Dm Cee 14 os. Denim15- 9-
For Men & Women UMany Others
Mock Denim SeveeJ Stylet
Gloria Vonderbilt Overalls
IUe. $42.00 OUR PRICE 29" �� W4.00 OUR WUCI 15
OVER 3,000 pairs in stock phone 756-0857
Next to McDonald's On
244 By Pass, Greenville, N. C.
The Medical Store
2205 W. 5th St. P.O. Box 59
Greenville. N.C. 27834
MEDICAL STUDENTS
SPECIAL
DIAGNOSTIC SETS
LEATHER BAGS
BLOOD PRESSURE SETS
STETHOSCOPES
A VERY HEALTHY
DISCOUNT on COMBO. SETS
PHONE 757-3490
OPEN: Mon. 2-7; Wed. 2-7; Fri. 2-7; Sal. 10-3
32 East Carolina Medical Supply Co.
1-800-682-333
Travel
with
ECU
to the
Big
Apple
Nov. 24-Nov. 28,1982
Spend your Thanksgiving holiday in style on Broadway,
at Macy's Parade, shopping, & touring the city. Space is
limited & time is drawing near. For more info, contact
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhal! Student Center.
M�

T
i
in l� i � mil � w��





u
I HI I AS1 IAROI OMAN OCTOBI K 14. 1Y82
�:�:�:�:
&SS
LIVE FROM HOLLYWOOD HALLOWEEN EVE OCT. 30
SATELLITE PRESENTATION
WITH
THE STUDENT UNION SPECIAL CONCERTS COMMITTEE
SATURDAY, OCT. 30, 1982 10:00p.m. WRIGHT AUDITORIUM STUDENTS $5.00 in advance $6.00 at door
NON-STUDENTS $6.00 in advance $7.00 at door DOORS OPEN 45 MINUTES EARLY
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER. THE RECORD BAR (Pitt Plaza)
THE RECORD BAR (Carolina East Mall). APPLE RECORDS
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
;�:�:�:�:�:
?





Title
The East Carolinian, October 14, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 14, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.223
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57505
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