The East Carolinian, October 12, 1982






She iEaat (Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.13
Tuesday, October 12,1982
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Gazebo Area Preserved In
New Building Site Proposal
By DARRYL BROWN
Confusion and controvesv con-
tinue over the proposed site oi a aew
classroom building on campus, as
the location and need of the
building have been questioned.
According to proposed plans, the
new building is to go on top of the
present steam plant and in the adja-
cent wooded lot behind Rawl
building, which includes a small
parking lot and sidewalks.
The steam plant was originally
designed so that another building
can be constructed on top of it, ac-
cording to Cliff Moore, vice
chancellor for business affairs.
About one-third of the building will
be constructed over the plant.
Objections have been voiced in re-
cent weeks, primarily by the biology
faculty and some students. They say
the new building would destroy one
of the last natural, undeveloped
areas on campus that are part of the
Sally Joyner Memorial Arboretum.
The arboretum originally included
the area on which the Austin, Rawl
and biology buildings now stand, as
well as the present gazebo area.
The officers of the English honor
society Sigma Tau Delta, in con-
junction with the Department of
English, have expressed concern
that many people have misconcep-
tions about the building project.
"We want people to know where
the building is going � to let people
know it won't do the damage they
thought it would said Keith Stall-
ings, vice president of the honor
society. He emphasized that the new
building will not destroy the area
where the gazebo is now located and
noted that the new building will be
farther away from that area than the
biology building.
Dr. William Bloodworth, chair-
man of the English department,
cited the architect's planning of the
building in preserving the area. In
addition to placing part of the
building on top of an existing struc-
ture, provisions have been made to
save specific large trees around the
building where possible. One
60-inch tree, for example, has been
identified for preservation near the
building's entrance.
Also, the parking lot to go along
with the new building will destroy
only grass and small shrubs.
"The important thing is that the
university get the building Blood-
worth said, noting the extreme shor-
tage of faculty office space in his
department as well as others.
The English Department present-
ly has faculty members sharing of-
fices in three buildings, and other
university departments have similar
crowding problems. The new
building will provide 180 office
spaces.
According to Dr. Angelo Volpe,
dean of Arts and Sciences and chair-
man of the Architect's Liason Com-
mittee for the building project, 22
percent or about 179 faculty
members are in "substandard
space which includes sharing of-
fices or working in rooms and
closets converted into offices.
Volpe also said that since 1976,
student clock hours (the amount of
time students use classrooms) has
increased 13.4 percent, with a cor-
responding growth in faculty size,
while usable space on campus has
decreased slightly. He noted that in
the last five years, ECU has been in
the very top of space utilization
among the state's campuses.
Chancellor John Howell agreed.
"We've had a fairly high utilization
of space for a long time, and we
need space he said. "There's a
good justification for the building
To objections that the new struc-
ture will destroy more of the ar-
boretum, Howell said, "A good
portion of the new building will be
built over the utility building where
the steam plant was and on the
parking lot around it, which was
never in the arboretum
Howell agreed with Stallings and
Volpe, who suggested the memorial
area be moved. Volpe wants to
"make one of the other truly wood-
ed areas on campus the ar-
boretum Stallings suggested
preservation of the wooded lot
behind the libary. Howell said he
would be willing to consider moving
the arboretum.
The new three-story building, if
funded by the N.C. General
Assembly, would be the largest
building on campus, it would have
Proposed New Building Site
60 classrooms and house the English
Department, Foreign Lanuagse
Department and part of the School
of Business.
The first floor will have semi-
circular, ampitheatre-style lecture
rooms, similar to the ones on the
television show "Paper Chase
The hallways would have windows
and seating for students. It would
also enlarge the language lab and
locate it near the language
classrooms.
"It's one of the most humanly
designed buildings on campus, with
a lot of attention to the people who
will be using it Bloodworth said.
Amtrack Gunman Surrenders After Killing Woman and Baby
RALEIGH, N.C. (UPI) An un-
predictable gunman left a woman
and 9-month-old baby dead behind
him in a bullet-riddled Amtrak
steeping car as he surrendered quiet-
ly Monday, ending 70 hours of
threats, tirades and tedium.
The Spanish-speaking man, who
had been holed up in the sleeping
compartment since Friday morning,
gave up after speaking with a man
he alternately described as a friend
and his godfather. Earlier, he had
released a 4-year-old girl who is
listed in "fair to good" condition at
Wake Memorial Hospital.
Police Chief Frederick K.
Heineman described the slightly-
built gunman as a "man of many
extremes.
"1 have never run into anyone
like him before nor have any of the
other hostage negotiators that are
here Heineman said. "He is
highly unpredictable
Authorities worked to gather
details about the man's
background. Maj. Tom Justice said
authorities have found the gunman
had a drug conviction, but he did
not know what that drug-related
charge was.
Throughout the siege, the man
identified himself as Mario and the
train's manifest listed the man in the
sleeping compartment as "W.
Rodriguez But about an hour
after he surrendered, police iden-
tified him as Evangelista Navas
Villabona, 29, from Bucaramanga,
Colombia.
He was reported to be the brother
Students Help Clean Up Tar River
As Part Of 'Clean Streams Month'
By STEVE DEAR
si�ff Writer
On Sunday a group of ECU
students removed garbage from the
Tar River.
The six students that participated
are members of the ECU chapter of
the Student National Environment
Health Association.
The cleanup, which had been
postponed due to bad weather in
September, was intended to coincide
with Gov. James B. Hunt's 1981
declaration of September as "Clean
Streams Month
"We are trying to become aware
of how rivers can be polluted said
senior environmental health student
Charles Barnett. "Hopefully,
Greenville will become aware of this
problem too
Bennett stressed how groups of
students like those in the SNEHA at
ECU are very concerned with the
well being of their community. He
said that, in his opinion, this is con-
trary to the view of ECU students
presented in a recent Raleigh Sews
and Observer article. "We are try-
ing to do our service to the com-
munity Barnett added.
The students started at the Town
Common and canoed approximate-
ly 3'2 miles north. They spent about
three hours cleaning that section of
the Tar River. They collected four
bags of litter.
Most of the garbage they found
consisted of plastic bottles, food
wrappings, and a considerable
number of florsecent light tubes.
"The attitude reflected by litter
disturbs me said Dr. Trenton
Davis, a professor in the En-
vironmental Health Department.
Davis, the faculty advisor to the
ECU chapter of the SNEHA, also
noted that certain chemicals
deposited in waterways pose a more
immediate threat than the type of
non-biodegradable garbage the
students collected.
Davis, who participated in the
first cleanup last year, said last
year's group collected three times as
much garbage than this year's
group.
Davis also said last year the group
of students also found the remains
of a Volkswagon automobile.
of the dead woman, Isabel Ramirez;
and the uncle of the dead baby,
John Ramirez, and the girl, iden-
tified as either Julie or Zulie
Ramirez.
Police investigators said they
found a bullet wound above Ms.
Ramirez' left eye but no wounds or
bruises on the baby. The 6-by-10
foot compartment was fun of bullet
holes, they added.
The four boarded Amtrak's
Florida-to-New York Silver Star
Thursday night in Jacksonville,
Fla bound for New York.
Authorities said Villabona, ap-
parently enraged by the crying of
the baby, began shooting as the
train approached the Raleigh sta-
tion.
Following his arrest, Villabona
was charged with two counts of
first-degree murder and one of kid-
napping. He was taken to Central
Prison, North Carolina's only max-
imum security institution.
"We are concerned about his
safety Justice said. "We did get a
lot of calls from people who are
irate about this thing
Heineman said the woman ap-
parently died Friday and the baby
died Sunday. The baby could be
heard crying Friday and Saturday
but the crying gradually became less
frequent and ended altogether Sun-
day morning.
Villabona had claimed at times
there also was a body of an adult
male in the compartment but Haley
said only the two bodies were found
in the room.
Heineman said Villabona had in-
sisted on talking to his godfather
before he would surrender.
"He asked the friend if we were
legitimate police officers
Heineman said.
Heineman said Villabona "had
problems with police in other coun-
tries and he was concerned about
who we were
"I think (Villabona) wanted to
turn himself in to us Heineman
said. "There was some concern as to
who we were and as to whether we
would treat him humanely
Villabona released the girl around
1 a.m. after he was told by FBI
agent Raymond Ayres "I'm going
to the hospital anywav, let me take
the child
The girl, wrapped in a pink
blanket, was handed to Ayres
through the window of the sleeping
car after negotiators convinced
Villabona they would not shoot
him.
Heineman defended his decision
not to rush the compartment earlier,
instead choosing to wait the man
out.
"I think we reacted properly he
said. "I think we acted to his wishes
when he said if we attempted to
penetrate 'I am going to pull the
trigger
Heineman said waiting a gunman
out in a hostage situation is
sometimes the best thing to do.
Morality Questioned
Examiners Call Law Grad 'Unfit'
More Than Game Spirit In His Cup
PtMt Sy STANLCV LSAMY
Light rain didn't stop most fans from enjoying last Saturday's ECU football game. The hometown fans cheered
their Pirates to a 35-14 victory over the Richmond Spiders. See SPORTS page 10.
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
The N.C. Board of Law Ex-
aminers has denied a UNC-Chapel
Hill Law School graduate admission
to the state bar after a closed panel
of three attorneys presumably
found him guilty of committing a
crime of moral terpitude.
Law graduate Alex Charns had
been arrested last March 27 for im-
peding traffic during a sit-in at Fort
Bragg Army base. He was pro-
testing the training of El Salvadoran
troops by the United States.
Charns and three other students
were subsequently found guilty and
sentenced to serve 90 days in federal
prison. In a form letter that Charns
received from the morals hearing
panel, he was told that he had failed
to satisfy the hearing panel that he
possesses the qualifications of
character and general Fitness re-
quisite for an attorney. The letter
said that Charns also did not possess
good enough moral character "as to
be entitled to the high regard and
confidence of the public
"I was saddened that those three
gentlemen decided I was immoral
and not fit to practice law Charns
said. "I followed my conscience and
took a stand against what my coun-
try is doing in El Salvador.
"You go into law with the idea
that you're going to help people �
at least I did. I was going to work
with the poor and try to make law
more responsive to people
Charns told The East Carolinian
that the hearing was a "political and
religious inquisition" because of the
tactics used by Fred P. Parker III,
executive secretary of the board. "I
feel his methods of investigating me
were unethical and unprofes-
sional Charns said. He equated
the hearing to those of the House
Un-American Activities Committee.
"It was obvious that the new Mc-
Carthyism has come to North
Carolina
According to information that
Charns received from friends, the
Parker Committee called many in-
dividuals he knew and interrogated
them at length about Charns' ac-
tivities.
During the hearing, Charns, who
is also a journalist, claimed he was
asked by the panel what kinds of ar-
ticles he writes, what protest ac-
tivities he was involved in and what
organizations he belongs to. He said
he was asked seven times to name
organizations he belonged to.
Charns, who led a student protest
at the law school during a FBI
recruitment program, said he was
accused of "physically restrain-
ing"people from interviewing with
the FBI. He denied this claim and
challenged the panel to review the
entire protest which had been
videotaped by a local television sta-
tion. "In fact I even cleared a path
for people
He also stated that Parker's panel
had requested that an attorney who
knew Charns send a "negative let-
ter" to the panel discrediting him.
The attorney refused.
Charns claims to be a Catholic
pacifist and a Democratic Socialist.
"Essentially, what they're (the
panel) saying is 'If we don't agree
with your political beliefs then you
can't be a lawyer in North
Carolina
ECU attorney David Stevens said
he felt that there were standards and
guidelines which all professions use
to evaluate individuals both from a
subjective and objective basis.
"Any profession is going to have
subjective standards that relate to
the personal character traits of the
individual as well as objective stan-
dards dealing with the professional
knowledge of the individual
Stevens said.
Members of the morals panel
refuse to give Charns any specific
reasons for his denial and claim that
the panel proceedings are confiden-
tial. The panel also refuses to speak
with the press concerning Charns'
case.
"I'm going to go as far as I have
to in the court system Charns
said. He still has an appeal to the
full body of board examiners at a
later date. "What they're doing to
me is stifling dissent

" � :i
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 12, 1982
?
r
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcement column,
please type it on an announcement
form and send it to The East
Carolinian in care of the produc
tion manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office m the Publications Building
Flyers and handwritten copy on
odd sued paper cannot be ac
cepted
There is no charge tor an
nouncements. but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you want
ano suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column tor publicity
The deadline tor announcements
is 3 p m Monday tor the Tuesday
paper and 3pm Wednesdayy for
the Thursday paper No an
nouncements received after these
deadlines will be printed
This space is available to all
campus organizations and depart
merits
HONORS
Literature of the Holocaust, the
Evolution of Human Communica
tion. banned books, Coming of Age
m the Modern South, ana
Behavioral Psychology ate the
topics of Honors Seminars spring
semester 1983 Honors sections of
ENGL 1200 and 2200. HLTH. HIST,
LIBS. PHYS 1070, aria SOCI 2110
will also, be ottered Anv student
with a 3 5 gpa or freshmen with
120O SAT is qualified te be an
Honors student See Dr David
Sanders. Coordinator in Austin
218
SIGMA THETA
TAU
Ms Geneive Foley will be the
speaker at the fall educational
meetmq on Wed .Oct 13 She is a
Clinical Nurse Specialist in
Pediatnc Oncology from the
Memorial Sloan Kettenng Cancer
Center in New York City and
received the Marie Hippensteel
Lingeman Award tor Excellence
m Nursing practice She has been
credited as a pnrr e motivator m
the establishment of a pediamc
center tor children with cancer
and tor parent supper groups She
has appeared on the Today St w.
pn,i Donahue Show. The Good Day
Show, and the Bostons Woman
Today This exciting program will
be held at the Greenville Golf and
c untry Club A cash bar and hers
d'oeuvres will be at 6 00 pm and
the program will start at 7 00 pm
Registration is $4 50 Make check
payable t Sigma The'a Tau. Be'a
Nu Chapter and turn in tc Carol
C x. ECU Soh. ,1 of Nursing by Oc
tober 6
C.A.D.P.
The Campus Alcohol ano Drug
Program will have a meeting on
Tuesday. October 12 at 5 00 pm in
the second floor conference room
v.t Erwin Hall Any student m
terested m furthering responsible
attitudes toward the use of
chemical substances is encourag
ed to attend For more mtorma
lion call 757 6793 or 6449
PSI CHI
PSi Chi nfls another informative
eveninq in stored tor its members
and interested guests This event
will take place Wed , Oct 13 a-
7 30 pm m room 129, Speight
Don't forget the Psi Chi Book
Sale held at our Library (second
floor Speight I Psi Chi is a fast
qrowinq honor society on campus
Members Help keep it that way
Support Psi ci
UGLIEST MAN
Who is the ugliest man on cam
pus? Find out at the ECU student
Store Oct ber 13 15 and 20 22
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
APO meetings Thursdays at
4 30 in 212 MendenhaH Student
Center! All meetings are man
datoryl Please make plans to at
tend, APO needs you! Future pro
lects and homecoming activities
will be discussed Anyone m
terested in a fraternity that
believes m leadership, friendship
and service will always be
welcomed Come and 10m a
fraternity that is a National Co ed
Service Fraternity See you
there
ASPA
ASPA. American Society tor
Personnel Administration, will
meet Wednesday. Oct 20. a' 3 00
p m m Room 207, Rawis At t,s
time, membership dues will be
collected Mee' the new officers
and help plan ASPA s future This
society is tor anyone interested m
the personnel relation field in
business
SAB
There win be an important
meeting of the Student Athletic
Board Wednesday. October 13.
1982 m the Multi Purpose Room of
Mendcenhall Student Cednter at
7 00 Any interested student is en
couraged to attend
SAM
The Society tor the Advance
ment of Management will be
holding a meeting on Tuesday. Oc
tcber 12. 1982 m Rawl 102 at 3 00
Jim Westmoreland ot the Career
Planning and Placement will be
discussing opportunities tor
business maiors m the Manage
ment field Any and an persons
are invited ti attend
YDHL
The Yund Gme Designers
League meets October 12 at 5 00 in
the vanlandingham Room
Furney James to speak on
careers
BE A CLOWN
Anyone who would like to star in
the homecoming parade by dress
ing like a clown and giving out
balloons, or iust for the excuse of
acting craiy m public, please con
tact John Curtis MS Center and
leave your name and phone
number Thanks!
CAMPUS WOMEN'S
NETWORK
ECU professional staff and
faculty who are interested in join
mg a womens's network are in-
vited to attend a coffee on Thurs
day. October 14, 4 30 at the Pirate
Club Janice Faulkner, former Ex
ecutive Director of the N.C.
Democratic Party, will comment
on the value and nature of net
working, and Cathy Andruzzi will
also speak For further mtorma
tion call Mane Farr at 757 6249
COMMUNITY PATRON
�Community Patron" season
tickets are now on sale tor the
Ayden Theatre Workshops 1982 83
season ot five exciting plays Oct
7,9,10 'The Children's Hour (and
a Halt) . Dec 2.4.5 - 'The
Miracle Worker Jan 27.29,30 �
"A Midsummer Night's Dream
Mar 3.5.6 � "On the Night of
January 16th and Apr
20.21.23.24 � "Carnival" The pur
chase ot a season ticket mtitles
you to membership in the ATW.
special acting and make up
workshops, the Newsletter, first
option on tours and an invitation to
the Spring Celebration, all for iust
$10 00 Write Ayden Theatre
Workshop, Box 293, Ayden, N.C.
28513, or call 746 2121, 756 7209. or
524 4250.
SING BEETHOVEN
The Beethoven Ninth Sym
phony, tor orchestra and chorus,
will be performed by the ECU
Symphony with chorus on Sun
Nov 14, at 3 15 pm m Wright
Auditorium The chorus will in
elude all School of Music choruses
and the Greenville Community
Chorus
ECU students, faculty, and staff
with some choral experience are
invited to participate m the
chorus Rehearsals will be con
ducted by Dr Brett Watson ot the
music faculty each Tuesday
(except Oct. 19) beginning Oct
12, from 3 4:00 p m. in Rm 105 ct
the Fletcher Music Center Final,
rehearsals will be Fn . Nov. 12, at
7 30 pm and Sat . Nov 13. at 2 00
pm (Interested persons may
oegm renearasals Oct 12 or Oct
26Singers should bring their own
choral scores, available from the
ECU Student Supply Store
PHI BETA LAMBDA
The Ormcron chapter of Phi
Beta Lambda win noW its next
meeting Wednesday. October 13 a'
4pm in Rawl 339 Membership
will be open to an business and
business education maiors This
will be the las1 meeting open to
new members and the last day to
pay membership dues
WANTED
A Graduate student or faculty
member to become an advisor tor
tt-e ECU Lacrosse club. Please
call for more information af'er
6 00 0 clock 758 6914 Ask for Nick
Pell or Bill Jenkins, if no answer
call 758 1418 after 6 o'clock and ask
for Brad Brown
HOMECOMING
DECORATIONS
Any organization wishing to
enter the Float of HouseDorm
Decorating competition for
homecoming should submit an ap
plication to Jen Curtis Room 203
MendenhaH by October 8
SLAP
Students m general college in
terested in maionng in SLAP will
preregister en Thurs October 14,
1982 a( 7 00 PM m Brewster D 104
It is important that all intended
maiors attend to recede mtorma
tion on program changes
CO-OP
The Co op office has a job open
mg tor an accounting position
avaibu with a local manufac'ur
mg firm Requires adding
machine experience and accoun
tmg background interested
students should inquire at the Co
op office, located in Rawl at room
313
BASIC NAUI,
PADISCUBA
Why not 10m our new class
which begins Tuesdy, October 12
Instruction will be held on campus
except for the open water dives
which are necessary requirements
for certification Registration is
limited. For more information call
757 6143
LAMBDA CHI
ALPHA
The Brothers and Little Sisters
of Lambda Chi Alpha invite all in
terested girls to Little Sister Rush
on Tuesday Oc'ober 12 and
Wednesday October 13 at 9 00 p m
It you nave any questions, or it you
need a ride, please call 752 5325
MUSIC
The School ot Music is offering
for the spring semester four ser
vice courses which quality tor
general education fine arts
guidelines In addition to two sec
lions of Music Appreciation
(MUSC 2208). the following
courses are scheduled for non
music maiors History of Jazz
Music IMUSC 2258). Music of the
Theater (MUSC 22281, and Or
chestral Music (MUSC 2218)
PRE-MEOICAL
TECHNOLOGY
MAJORS
Pre registration tor Spring 1983
will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 12 at
7 pm in BD 108. If you are unable
to attend, please call the depart
mental secretary to schedule an
alternate time.
Applications forms and informa
tion regarding entrance into the
professional phase of the program
in Fall 1983 will also be dishbu'ed
at that time. Only students who
will be able to complete a'l science
prerequisites by Fall 83 should
apply. All prospective applicants
should contact the department by
Dec. 1, 82 in order to schedule an
interview All "applications pro
cedures must be completed by
Feb 1, 83 for the class beginning
Fall 1983
LAW COURSE
The Department of Social Work
and Corresctional Services will of
fer a course in Basic Criminal Law
and Procedure during the Spring
Semester, 1983 The course should
be of particular significance for
those students who are maionng
either in social work professionals
are invited to enroll in this course
The course will be taught from
6 30 to 9 00 pm once a week on
Mondays
Further information about these
and other social work ano correc
tional services classes is available
from the Department of Social
Work and Correctional services.
School of Allied Health and Social
Professions at 757 6961
TUTOR
Phi Sigma Pi. the National
Honor Fraternity is offering tutors
for a variety of General College
subtects at competitive rates it
you are in need of a tutor call
752 3022 tor more information
HOLY COMMUNION
A Student Episcopal service ot
Holy Commion will be celebrated
on Tuesday. Oct , 12, in the chapel
ot St Pauls Episcopal Church, 406
4th Street (one block from Garrett
Dorm) The service will be at 5 30
pm with Episcopal Chaplain, the
Rev Bill Hadden, celebrating
BAPTIST STUDENT
UNION
HEY! Do you enjoy friendly
fellowship, good friends and food,
and a chance to be yourself in this
"rat race" environment at ECU?
Then come 10m us at the Baptist
Student union where we nave din
ners on Tuesdays at 5:30 for only
$1 75 PAUSE on Thursdays at
7 00 to allow us to take a break
after an almost fulfilling week,
and lots of people iust like you who
enioy others Call 752 4646 it you
have any questions Bob Clyde
campus minister
FRESHMEN
REGISTER
Freshman Registers may be
picked up m the Buccaneer office
on Tuesdays ano Thursdays from
2 00 p m till 5 00 p m The Buc
caneer Office is located on the se
cond floor ot the Publications
Building
ZETA BETA
TAU
Be a charter member! There
will be a Zeta Beta Tau meeting,
Tuesday. October 12. at 6 00 p.m.
in New Deli Restaurant. All in-
terested people are urged to at-
tend. If there art any questions
call Howard Lipman at 753 9737
COMMUNITY
THEATRE
Al Agate and Debra Wiggins are
organizing a Community Theatre
Croup made of students from
ECU. Prom its ranks they plan to
cast a full length, tun cast musical
in the Spring In addition, they
hope to support experimental pro
iects. The goal is to tap some of the
vast unused talent m the
Greemvtle area. Singers dancers,
actors, and technicians are
welcome For information call
758 9474
ECU LAW
SOCIETY
The ECU Law Society will make
a field trip to Campbell University
Law School on October 20. This
will be an excused absence tor
Law Society members For fur
ther intormation, contact Diane
Jones. 756 6554
CO-OP
Duke Power has available a
variety of co op positions AH work
experiences art for alternating
semesters beginning in January or
May 1983 and art located m
Charlotte Any interested students
with a minimum GPA of 2 0 and
maiormg m Computer Science.
Math. Business Education, Office
Administration, industrial Educa
lion, industrial Technology.
Chemistry or Environmental
Health should contact the Co op of
tice, ext 6979
POSITION FOR INDT
MAJOR
There is an opening with Long
Manufacturing Co for a Quality
Control Supervisor This perma
nent position involves setting up
and maintaining a quality control
program in Rumania tor tractors
manufactured for Long The star
ting date m immediately and the
salary is negotiable Contact Nan
cy Fillnow in the Co op office, ext
6979. tor more information.
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
COURSES
Personal Development Courses
begm
Oct 18 Getting Organized Oct 21
Real Estate Finance. Commodity
Hedging Oct 26 AerobicExer
cise Nov 17 Real Estate Ap
praisal
Oct 12 Coping with Stress.
Philosophy and Retirement For
information call 757 6143
FLASH
Snowski Christmas Break
There will be a meeting tor all per
sons interested in snowskiing on
Tuesday. October 12 at 4:00 pm in
Memorial Gym 108 A trip is being
organized tor January 2-e to
Snowshoe, West Virginia. You
may elect 10 go tor credit in the
Physical Education Department
or you may attend on a non credit
basis. Contact Ms. Jo Saunders at
757 6000 or came by Memorial
Gym 205 tor further information.
IVCF
inter Varsity Christian
Fellowship will meet this Wednes
day night at 6:30 P.m. in the
Biology Building. Room 102 North.
Linda Peterson will be sharing
slides of her trip to Africa Come
and join in song and fellowship
with us!
PPHA
The Preprotessionai Health
Alliance (PPHA) will have a
meeting this Thursday, October
14, 1982 This meeting will be held
at 5 30 pm at the Afro American
Cultural Center All members and
any others interested parties are
urged to attend
DISNEY WORLD
INTERNSHIPS
Watt Disney World's Magic
Kingdom College Internship Pro
gram will be interviewing on cam
pus Oct. 15, 1982 from 3:30 5:00pm
for their spring and summer in
terns. Students will work 30 hours
per week, and earn approximately
14.00 per hour tor 10 weeks Special
training seminars held weekly.
Students will be placed according
to their majors. Any interested
students should contact the Co op
office m 313 Rawl or call ext. 6979
PRIZEWINNER
Prize-winning pianist Bradford
Fowen will perform a recital
Wednesday. October 6, 1982. at I: IS
p.m. in the a.j. Fletcher Recital
Hall. The performance, sponsored
by the Rockefeller Foundation is
part of the ECU School of Music's
"Festival '82 83 The public is in
vi ted to attend.
in addition to his performance,
Gowen will present a masterclass
no Thursday, October 7, from 9:30
am to 11-30 a.m. in the A.J. Flet-
cher Recital hall. Interested per
sons are invited to attend the
masterclass free of charge
CO-OP FOR BUSINESS
MAJORS
There are positions available
with the General Accounting Of
tice as an Evaluation Trainee
Students must nave completed 75
hours and be available tor two
work periods beginning in the Spr
ing 1983 semester. Conversion to
permanent employment after
graduation would be likely. For
more information contact Carolyn
Powell at the Co op office, ext.
6979
CATHOLIC
NEWMAN CENTER
The Catholic Newman Center
would like to invite everyone to
join in with us for celebrating
Mass every Sunday in the Biology
Lecture Hall starting at 12 30 and
every Wednesday at 5 00 at the
Catholic Newman Center located
down at the bottom of College Hill
WOMEN'S RUGBY
its still not too late to play
Anyone interested in playing
womens rubgy needs to report to
practices Tuesday thru Thursday
at 4 00 We practice behind the
Allied Health (Belk) building. Ab
solutely no previous experience is
required
CO-OP
Part time co op framing posi
tions are available with Buehler
Mfg. Co. in Kinston. These tram
ing positions could lead to full
time opportunities in Production
Supervision Production Control
or Purchasing in the new Buehler
plant m Raleigh beginning June,
1983. All interested INDT maiors
contact Nancy Fillnow m the Co
op office, ext. 6979
PRE-O.T.
MAJORS
Occupational Therapy
Preregistration for All Pre O t
maiors will be conducted one time
only. Wednesday October 13 at
7 OOP m in BD 112 Students come
prepared to preregister tor Spring
semester
CO-OP
Black ana Decker in Tarboro
has an opening tor a part time ac
counting clerk The person must
dc able to perform miscellaneous
accounting duties such as paying
invoices and general bookkeep
ing Preferred is someone who can
operate a 10 key adding machine
Employment would start as soon
as possible For more into, can the
Co op office, ext 6979
PHOTOGENIC0
The ECU Commercial Arts
department would like to invite an
those interested in fashion and
modeling to attend our model
catologing photography session
On Wed Oct 20 � Thurs Oct
21(times will be announced), we
will be photographing and catolog
ing anyone who would like to
model tor fashion ads and layouts
Ail participants win be tiled ane
catologed tor tutute reference AH
models chosen from catolog tor
proiects wilt be paid by the hour
tor their participation.
NAACP
The ECU chapter o NAACP will
have its biannual membership
drive, Oct. 11 15 from 8 3pm in
front of the Bookstore Dues are
$10 for age 21 and over, this in
eludes a subscription to Crises
magazine For everyone under 21.
dues are S3 without subscription
and 15 with a subscription. Please
iom us. we need you There will be
a bake sale one day during the
membership drive Time and day
to be announced later.
The East Carolinian
Serving iht campus community
uncr 192
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
mg the summer
The East Carolinian is the of
ficial newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned,
operated, and published tor and
by the students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate SN yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
BuiMtug on me campus of ECU,
Greenville, N.C
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carolinian.
Old South Building, ECU Green
ville, NC 27834
I
Telephone: 7S7-J4.J7. 4JP9
NAACP
The ECU chapter of the NAACP
will have its bimonthly meetinc,
Tuesday October 12 at 6 00 pm in
Room 248 MendenhaH Studen'
Center All interested persons
please attend
GbRONTOLOGY
When you pre register don't
forget a new multi disciplinary
course that will also satisfy some
ot your general education re
quirements Introduction to
Gerontology will feature faculty
members from different depart
ments as well as a number ot in
terestmg guest lecturers This
course is listed as PSYC. SOCi,
HPRO. HOME 2400 and will be of
tered on Tuesday evenings during
next semster Be sure to pre
register tor introduction tc Geron
tology
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines. There are 33
units per line. Each letter, punc-
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end of line if word
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac
cepted over the phone. We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
75c per line or fraction of a line.
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lower case letters.
Return Hi Mr.DU BOARD office (eof FAST
CAROLINIAN office) b 1 pa. Mnadat tofort
Tundat paper and wrdnesda before Tkuredat
publication.
Name
Address.
CityState
No. lines
.Zip,
.Phone.
at 75 per line $.
.No. insertions.
.enclosed
111�
11





� I1�
1 I'l
. .I .1�1 � .
SCIENCE MAJORS
It you want it here it is Come
and get. but you better hurry
because it may not last TheCRC's
are going fast. This is your last
week to place orders in the
chemistry office between 10 a m
and 12 noon CRC of chem in
physics $25 00 and CkC ot organic
compound ID $20 00 Payment
due when order is placed Place
orders now
GUYS.
GIVE THAT
SPECIAL LADY
A HOMECOMING
CORSA GEH
FAMOUS PIZZA
Fast, Friendly Delivery
Delivery is FREE
758-5982 or 5616
ON SALE
OCTOBER 11-14
IN FRONT OF
STUDENT
SUPPLY STORE
ONL Y $5.00!
Sponsored by
Fletcher Hall.
Pick up corsages � 7-9 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 22, or 9-11 a.m
Sat Oct. 23 in
Fletcher Lobby.
v
tn
11
j
Lasagna
$299
Spaghetti wSauce
$249
Both wSalad & Garlic Bread
Golden Beverages
2:00-close Pitcher � $2.45
H.H.3-7 Mug �500
� -





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 12.1982
War Veteran Opposes Campus Recruitment
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Holding a sign
reading: "It will be a
great day when our
schools get all the
money they need and
the military has to hold
a bake sale to buy more
bombs, planes, sub-
marines, and missies
ECU education student
and Vietnam veteran
Glenn Maughaun
began his second year
of what he calls
"counter recruitment"
while standing in pro-
test opposite a Navy
recruiter's table outside
the Student Supply
store last week.
Maughaun has
become a familiar
figure of opposition to
the presence of military
recruiters on the ECU
campus. "I'd like to
call attention to the fact
that the military is tak-
ing a greater and
greater portion of the
taxpayer's dollars every
year Maughaun told
The East Carolinian,
"and it would seem, in
lieu of the present ad-
ministration's budget
cuts, that social pro-
grams are becoming
less important
WWII History Taught
With Live Film Footage
Hey you history
buffs, the definitive
course on World War
II is here. Now you can
experience the thrill of
Midway and the peril
of Normandy through
film.
ECU's Department
of History is offering
"A History of World
War II in Film The
course, which will be
taught by John C.
Atkeson in the spring
semester, will use
various types of films
as a teaching tool.
Atkenson says the
course will cover from
the causes leading up to
the war to the signing
of the peace treaties.
Documentaries, short
subjects and feature-
length films will help
emphasize certain key
points in the war,
Atkeson says.
The course is
numbered 3125 and will
be taught in Hendrix
Theatre on Tuesday
from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Seventeen hours of
film from film libraries
and the Museum of
Modern Art in New
York will be used. One-
third of actual class
time is spent watching
film, Atkeson explain-
ed.
No lab fees will be
charged. The cost of
the film and a projec-
tionist will be incurred
by the department.
Atkeson's qualifica-
tions for teaching the
course include a
30-year Army career
and graduation from
the Army War College.
The text will be A
Short History oj H or Id
War II by Robert
Stokesbtiry. Up to 150
students can take the
course.
Maughaun stood for
one hour, as he did on
many occassions last
year, opposite the navy
recruiter's table. He
openly discussed his
opinions with a number
of students who stop-
ped to inquire. "It just
seems rather ludicrous
to me that we have the
nuclear capability to
blow every person right
off the face of the earth
� totally destroy the
planet � and the
military continues to
expand Maghaun
declared.
ECU's chairman of
the Air Force ROTC
program Lt. Col.
James Thomas praised
the presence of military
recruiters on campus.
"I've talked with other
recruiters Thomas
said. "They interface
with us when they come
to ECU
Thomas claims that
the ECU campus has
developed a very good
name with other bran-
ches of the military. He
remarked that both the
Army and the Navy
have been very impress-
ed with recruits who
have come from ECU.
Maughaun wrote a
letter to ECU
Chancellor John
Howell expressing his
feelings about the
presence of military
recuiters on campus.
He also met with
Howell last week to
discuss the issue fur-
ther. "1 wanted to let
him (Howell) know I
was opposed (to the
recruiters) and I wanted
to know the universi-
ty's policy
Maughaun said.
According to
Maughaun, Howell in-
formed him that
military recruiters were
permitted to use the
campus for recruiting
purposes because they
are a government
organization and ECU
receives federal funds.
"I don't think any of
the world powers,
Russia, The United
States, England, or
China are interested in
any good faith bargain-
ing about reducing
their nuclear
capabilities
Maughaun said. "In
everybody's mind the
big question should be,
'Where will all this
nuclear capability lead
to?
"Given historical
facts, I have to come to
the conclusion that we
are not only overly
prepared for war �
we're on the brink of
it he warned.
Maughaun was
drafted during the Viet-
nam War and decided
to join the Air Force.
"The Vietnam War had
a major impact on
me said Maughaun.
"It was a senseless act,
it served no purpose
other than to destroy.
It's more sensible to
think there are many,
many more alternatives
to fighting he con-
tinued.
Thomas, who is a
graduate of ECU,
spoke of the impor-
tance of serving one's
country. "I would hope
that East Carolina
would always be open
to help serve the needs
of our nation and the
community we're living
in he said. Thomas
also stated his belief
that everybody should
be entitled to their
viewpoints.
"Students should do
some more study of
how the military actual-
ly fits into society
Maughaun said,
alluding to a deep sense
of apathy he sees
among ECU students.
"I feel that the majori-
ty of the student body
could care less � they
prefer to look the other
way. They're not in-
terested in just how
dangerous an arms race
is capable of being
"I think everybody
needs to become more
informed about the
amounts of money and
resources that are going
into the current defense
build-up said
Maughaun, "not just
in this country, but
everywhere throughout
the world
On the matter of the
military recruiter's
rights to be on campus,
Thomas said that they
should have the same
rights as any other
groups or businesses to
recruit potential
employees from ECU.
"As far as I'm concern-
ed, as long as we let any
other industry officials
or companies who are
looking for East
Carolina graduates to
employ, then it doesn't
make any difference it
it's them or military
recruiters Thomas
said.
Maughaun, who
claims to be a pacifist,
vows to continue his
counter-recruitment ac-
tivities and invites
others to join him. He
concluded by posing a
question to all EC I
students.
climb aboard the
Stagecoach
chopped sirloin
Head for
Western
Slzzlin and some mighty
fine eatin' with the
No 12 Stagecoach.
Chopped sirloin beef
ground daily by our
own butchers and
the way
ECU Society of
Journalists
7p.m.� There
with your choioe of potato
The No 12 Stagecoach, a
delicious, affordable meal
at Western Sizzlin. Can't
you just taste it sizzlin?
f NO. 12
STAGECOACH
chopped sir loin
wltli baJtod potato
or fronch trim
ttuutout
Only n.99
V all day Tuesday
ENDS
THURS.
LUCKY pg
shows LA0V
3 7 � OS
cinema tm2'3
-PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER
ENDS THURS
The
INCUBUS
&&m
IMPORTS ARE
ALIVE & WELL!
We specialize in VW, Volvo & Subaru
repair, as well as all other makes.
Service performed by Certified Niase
Mechanic �
RCL Barbato � one of the
Professionals
at
Malpass Muffler Shop
758-7676
2616 E. 10th Street Greenville
NOW
�"ZThe other side of I
World War 11.
Shows 3 7 10 9
Shows 3-8
El
ALL SEATS � 52.00 with this Coupon Tues. .0iivo2
Mitchell's Hair Styling Salon
Pitt Plaza Shopping Center � Greenville
Bring in this coupon for
51.00 off
your haircut.
Coupon good thru Oct. 16
Phone - 756-2950 or 756-4042
siiNoclT
Mobil
umen
SHELL OIL
is now accepting ALL
other major oil companies
credit cards through
November 30, 1982
no emtra charge lor credit card us.
�CLIP THIS COUPON'
(M(xw
COKE 99C
COUPON EXPIRES OCT. 30. 1912
uality Mart
752-3395 3000 E. 10th St.
OPEN 24 HOURS DRIVE THRU WINDOW
Special:
$2.99
2 ribs, fries, slaw & biscuit
on Wed. only
11-2 p.m. and 5-9 p.m.
1011 Charles Street � 752-1373 1 Block from Campus
�Vy
See us for all your
Halloween needs, including
Witches Hats, Capes, Hairspray,
Make-Up, etc
� �
��
AT BARRErLTn
iftHSIkft
.
Dancewear Specialty Shop
For all your dancing needs.
SAT
fOOSBALL
TOUR
WfiN 5
1ST PRIZt
fOOSBALL
TABU
Full Masks at greatly reduced Prices.
422 Arlington Blvd Greenville, N. C 754-670
Student Council for
Exceptional Children
Interested in helping exceptional children?
Join Student Council for exceptional
children, October 77-5, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in
the back lobby of Speight.
TUESDAY
TEZZER
WEDNESDAY
CONTROL GROUP
(STUDENTS ADMITTED FBKK)
THURSDAY
CONTROL GROUP
(LADIES UGOT NIGHT
(LADIES- ADMITTED FREE
TILL 10:00 P.M.)
FRI. & SAT.
SIDEWINDER
752-7303
M
MONDAY - PIZZA B, PASTA
BUFFET - 5 9 .11 p.no
spaghetti - S2 �'�
TUESDAY - PIZZA BUFFET - S2 49
Lodies' N.te � MARK DEATON
Ladies' M Co�ei - Free Keg
Huppr Huu S 00 spec.
WEDNESDAY - $2.15 SALAD BAR
THURSDAY - STAG.SPEC. - S2.49
Champagne Joni H.H. 9 'til 1
Lodies' - 1 st glass tree - Mot Deaton
MM. $100 spec -2SdioH
FRIDAY - MM 4-7 WALMRS
SATURDAY - MM. 4-7 THE KNK WALKERS
SUNDAY - LASACNA SPEC S2 99

EAST CAROLINA S
PARTY CENTER
TUESDAY
TIGHT JEANS CONTEST
WEDNESDAY
BEST BUNS CONTEST
PONY NIGHT - 30 ponies
Free odm. tor ECU students
THURSDAY - Sl.OOAtJm.
COLLEGE NITE - 70 cans
FRIDAY
END OF THE WEEK PARTY
New Hours - 3 30-7 30
3 30-4 30 oil poaies 30
4 30-7:30 oil co�s 6S
9:00-11 00 all coos �S
Ladies' admitted tree wH.H. stamp
SATURDAY
BEST IN DANCE MUSK
SUNDAY
LADIES' NITE
Lodies' admitted tree -
JC draft w�Uo it lost
BLUE
MOON
CAFE
T
70JE FIFTH STRE 6T
NOW SERVING
E VENiNG ME A L
SPECIALS &
SUPER BURGERS
SUNDAY �
SERVING BREAKFAST
10:00 a.m2:00 p.m.
w
SgrfMI-

Across trom U.B.E.
S13 Cotanche St Greenville
7SB-0OS0 for TAKE OUT
Open Mon Sit � B:30 a.ml :00 �.m.
HAPPY HOUR DAILY
4p.tn7 p.m.
VIDEO, PINBALL,
FOOSBALL, BILLIARDS
THURSDAY
MIKE LIGHTNING
WELLS
FRIDAY
CHAMP &JOYNER
I

NWE.SthSt.
752-13.
V��� t �: .�iX
H.H. 11:00p.m
12:00 midnight
Nightly
Sf�e f ice: as our
4-ti H.H.
DARTS
Mon. at 8:00
FREE PINBALL 3-4
HAPPY HOUR 4-7
Now open 7 days a week �
3p.nv-l a.m.
Largest selection
of imports
�i KatWlrr
lit EAST Sth STREET
7S2-B711
Open 7 Days
A Week
Daily Happy Hour
begins
at 5:30
THIS IS A PRIVATE CLU
NOT OPEN TO
THE PURLIC
;
.





!� f

�lje �aat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, c�r0�����
Mike Hughes, t$mmtm ���
WAVERLY MERRITT, mm� r "u ClNDY PLEASANTS, �����
Robert Rucks, &� Mo,��,r Greg Rideout. mm ���,
ALI AFRASHTEH, Credu Manager STEVE BACHNER, Emenainmem Ed,ior
Stephanie Groon, a�mmmmmm Juliana Fahrbach,
JONI GUTHRIE, Tecnniivl Supervisor MlKE DAVIS, Production Manager
October 12, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Draft Registration
Sentencing A Harsh Necessity
C8Z0tff8ftAAfeU
Last week, while most of us were
busy about our daily routines, a
federal judge sentenced Benjamin
Sasway to two and one-half years in
prison for failure to register with the
Selective Service. That decision,
regardless of how it fares with the
extremists on both sides, has
definite ramifications for us all.
Not only does the court's decision
exhibit an increasingly hard-lined
federal stance toward resisters, but
it will obviously act to further
spread the gap between the polar
adherents both in support of and
against draft registration.
Those opposed to the law will, as
they have all along, point out incon-
sistencies in the U.S. federal
judiciary system. They will in-
evitably call to our attention the fact
that hundreds of "murderous"
drunk drivers on American roads
get off scot-free every year, while a
young man sits in prison for a
"victimless" crime.
And, not to be mistaken, their
outrage is justified in a sense. The
inconsistencies illustrated time and
time again by the judiciary of these
United States is, to say the least, un-
just.
And the relative importance of
one young man's failure to register
doesn't really cause any direct
damage to the welfare of this na-
tion, does it?
Well, when put in those isolated
terms, Sasway's offense certainly
doesn't constitute any damage
whatsoever to the U.S. After all,
one person's failure to register can
hardly be deemed a national
emergency.
But when that seemingly insignifi-
cant threat is multiplied by
thousands upon thousands of other
non-registrants, the prospect of
serious damage greatly increases.
Simple compassion may cause
some of us to feel sympathy for Ben
Sasway. Being sentenced to spend
two and one-half years in prison for
having committed such a passive
crime may seem inordinately rnrsh.
And, indeed, the selectivity
through which the federal govern-
ment has attempted to prove its
seriousness is questionable.
Nevertheless, Sasway's sentence
was well within the bounds of cur-
rent law (which provides for a max-
imum sentence of five years in
prison and a $10,000 fine), and he
did, in fact, wilfully break that law,
knowing full well that some penalty
could be subsequently invoked.
Complain as we may about the in-
consistencies in our court system,
the American people must eventual-
ly realize that laws are not obsolete
hand-me-downs from past genera-
tions and that respect of those laws
is a prerequisite to achieving order
in any society. And enforcing these
rules and regulations is the only way
to compel that respect.
Furthermore, those people who
insist on clinging to the asinine
assumption that refusing to register
is a nobler act than complying
(generally the same people who
strive so hard for all-out disarma-
ment) are simply ignorant.
What would they have the United
States do, lay down all her arms
amidst a world of sworn aggressors?
Would it were that easy. Although
that is definitely an honorable cause
theoretically, its actual merits are
non-existent.
A law calling for registration for
a military draft is not the same as a
call authorizing an actual conscrip-
tion. As we have all heard a million
times since January 1980, when
President Carter initiated the new
federal policy, resurging an actual
draft would take an act of Con-
gress. This seems to be one of, if not
the, greatest obstacle in the con-
troversy. And until that fact is
realized (in every sense of the word
realization), the widening gap bet-
ween the proponents and opponents
of draft registration will gradually
stretch into oblivion.
WEMHRISI6UB& W WRAPS 0P1DN16HTS ABC6AM60F
HmeFQ&mmu,
Football Bites Big One In 'Great White North'
Saskatchewan Just Can't Compare
If you're an NFL fan like me, then sure-
ly you'll understand the withdrawl symp-
toms I've been going through lately (i.e
sweaty palms, bologna deficiency, etc.). I
mean, look around; there just isn't a whole
hell of a lot to do on Sundays in October
when football isn't on, is there? Oh sure,
we could all sit back and watch Canadian
football or Cathy Rigby gymnastics or
whatever, but who wants to watch a bunch
of NFL rejects named Jacque running
around on an ice Held in Saskatchewan like
decapitated chickens trying to score a
touchdown for a team called the
Elkherders? No thanks, not me. That's not
real football. Hell, those guys don't even
know the rules!
But I'll tell you, missing out on my
weekly TV football fix hasn't been good
for my health. In fact, it's made me
downright cranky. Sure, I still get to wear
my official Bert Jones matching jersey and
sox and my Hollywood Henderson boxer
shorts. And I still get to erase my mistakes
with my official Baltimore Colts No. 2
pencil but somehow, it just isn't the
same, you know?
I mean, 1 had always thought Canadians
were reasonably smart people that is,
until I sat (er, yawned) through my first
CFL football game the other day.
First of all, the singer, Pierre DuBois, or
something like that, couldn't remember
the words to the national anthem. The an-
nouncer asked everybody to "Rise for our
national anthem and everyone in the
stands put down their ales and back-bacon
sandwiches, took off their tukes and stood
up with hands on hearts, but the stupid guy
sang the wrong song! I couldn't believe it.
He forgot My Country Tis oj Theel Lucky
for him, the organist used to play in a Win-
nipeg oompa band and could improvise, so
the singer didn't look like a total fool.
Mike Hughes
Just The Way It Is
But then, as if that wasn't bad enough,
only a few minutes after that, when the
game had started, this guy for the black-
and-purple team (I think they were called
the Saddle Sores) forgets it's only third
down and punts the ball away to Calgary.
I'll tell you, it was like watching my little
sisters play. These guys really stunk!
And the players aren't the only morons
either. Their greenskeeper did a pretty nice
job on the field, but he forgot how many
yards to put in.
Needless to say, after a quarter or two of
watching the Great White North mutila-
tion of American football, my mind began
to wander.
� � �
Hey, you know what? I'm getting sick
and tired of hearing people argue over this
damned classroom thing. I mean, what's
the big deal? A bunch of squirrel watchers
who don't want 'em to cut down a few
precious loblollies here and there; and a
handful or so of James Watt protege type
who're just aching to "git behind them
bulldozers an' level the whole damn
place
Now, correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't
the answer apparent? Of course it is! The
only way to solve a problem like this one
and please everybody at the same time is to
compromise, right? Come on, sure it is.
Moralists have been doing it for years.
The only way to satisfy everyone � tree
lovers and the progress-minded alike � is
to build the classrooms up in the trees.
Aw, come on, we all loved tree forts
when we were kids. It'd be a lot of fun. We
could build ladders for the girls and
everything! Just think, when was the last
time you had fun going to class?
Editor's Sote: Mike Hughes is a senior
Jrom nearby Sear by, S.C whose
Jriendfsj can't remember that once, long
ago, he told a reasonably Junny joke.
Points Raised About Classroom Questions
Campus Forum
I have been intrigued with the recent
questions raised concerning the location of
the new classroom building. I have con-
sulted with Dean Volpe, arts and sciences,
examined the plans for the building and
come to the following conclusions:
� The area surrounding the gazebo will not
be touched. This includes what it tradi-
tionally known as the area between the
Science Complex, Rawl Annex and the
greenhouse.
� The proposed classroom building starts
PCB Marchers Get Runaround Royale
1 am writing this to hopefully inform the
student body of the situation in Warren
County. As some may know, the toxic
substance PCB is being dumped in the
Warren County landfill. About four years
ago, this substance was illegally dumped
along several N.C. highway roadsides.
They are, at present, scraping only three
to four inches off the top to be dumped in
Alton, N.C. The people of this county and
other supporters have been marching in
protest to this chemical dumping in their
area. The main problem is that too many
precautions and regulations have been ig-
nored to get rid of the chemical.
(On) Monday, Oct. 4, I went to Afton
and marched in the student march, giving
my support to the people. There were
students from everywhere, including
Chapel Hill and Duke. It was an in-
describable experience. The people are
united for a worthy cause, and prejudice
between the blacks and whites is non-
existent. I was proud of people, young and
old, laying down in front of the trucks,
getting arrested, and I was sorely tempted
to do it myself. We marched about six
miles, and the closer to the dump site, the
tighter security became.
The marchers have been given the right
to march on one side of the road facing
traffic. Late in the afternoon, we were told
that if we marched any further, it would
have to be on the side in the grass � which
is uncut and full of poison ivy. Several im-
portant leaders were arrested for only stan-
ding on the side of the road.
The march was stopped until the
highway patrol agreed to let them march
back on the road. This is one of the many
types of harassment that I witnessed. This
is an issue that can soon affect the entire
state � it has already become an interna-
tional attraction.
If anyone wants more information (on
the reasons for protest, etc.), call Ken
Feruccio, 257-1460. We can use any sup-
port!
Name withheld by request
Campus Insecurity?
Which is more important in the minds of
the campus police: the safety of a student
or the vacancy of a parking space?
Monday morning, Oct. 4, after having
spent most of the night working on an art
project, I called it a night at 5 a.m. My car
was no longer parked in front of the art
building, where I had left it. I walked to
the traffic office, having suspected they
had had it towed. I then learned that cars
unregistered were towed after 1 a.m. Mon-
day morning. I live about seven blocks
away with no way home. The officer refus-
ed to give me a ride home but suggested-1
take a cab or stay there. So I walked home
at 5 in the morning.
I seriously wonder where the priorities
of the campus police actually lay: in a ge-
nuine concern or student welfare, or in
upholding blinded regulations.
Bobbi Yokeley
Senior,Comm. Art
Military Memories
Patrick O'Neill's recent (column) "Set
Yourself Apart?" and the many comments
that followed have special meaning to me,
as they should have for everyone. Military
and defense-related issues directly affect
our lives, and those who seek to ignore the
truth or refuse to understand some part of
these complexities fail in their duty as
citizens.
It was not long ago that I became a part
of the military machine. There were
choices back then as there are now; I could
have easily slid to Canada, become a col-
lege student � all of that and more could
have been done to avoid the draft. Yet like
many others, the "excitement and adven-
ture" of military service appealed to me.
The year was 196&, and I thought I was
lucky to have landed a "safe" desk job.
There were many who thought along
similar lines, cooks, clerks, supply person-
nel, nurses who figured their roles as
"non-combatants" would see them safely
through the horrors of Vietnam. Unfor-
tunately, war has no such rule � "the non-
combatant will see no action and it was
those clerks, cooks and nurses who
witnessed the following: CholonSaigon,
1968: Air Force office clerks, typists most-
ly, are seen tossing cases of beer and steaks
to an Army tank crew. Grateful that the
Army has arrived to beef up base security,
the airmen return their Ml6s to the
weapons officer and begin cleaning up the
wreckage from a VietCong rocket attack.
Five Air Force clerks are dead; twenty are
wounded. One of the wounded is a supply
sergeant who wandered into the base per-
sonnel office to change his mailing ad-
dress. It is day one of the Tet Offensive.
The A Shau Valley, northwest of
Saigon, is the scene. It is 1969, summer-
time. An officer plays celebrity for
himself, TV crews and the nightly news.
He has his troops attack enemy positions
in order to "give the folks back home a
true document of the war
Those are a couple of my "fondest"
military memories. But my favorite took
place at Griffiss Air Force Base, upstate
New York: About 20 officer clerkstypists
are given afternoons off from their daily
jobs and begin riotcrowd control train-
ing. Equipped with rifles, bayonets and a
promise of ammunition, these airmen,
who'd rather drink beer on their after-
noons off, become partially responsible
for the base security. After three training
sessions, some six hours, the ill-prepared
airmen are told by their superiors they may
have to face an unruly civilian mob that
weekend. That was the summer of 1972.
Ten quick years have passed since that
last incident. Ten more years for the
world's military might to have gotten
stronger. Shouldn't we ask ourselves why
this need, a compulsion perhaps, for ail
these weapons? Don't tell me it's because
we need to keep the peace. Too many peo-
ple are around who have seen weapons and
armies keep "the peace Too many peo-
ple already know of the Soviet Union's,
France's, China's, England's and the
United States' capabilities to blow this
planet apart with the nuclear weapons each
adds to its arsenals daily.
The reader need not guess where my
loyalties lie. World leaders who believe in a
peace-through-strength doctrine insult my
intelligence by building nuclear weapons
and contemplating the world's chances for
survival after the holocaust. These leaders
need not save me a seat for their brand of
insanity, because the fear, hatred, racism
and prejudice they spread has no part in a
peaceful world.
Glenn Maughan
Inter. Ed.
at the edge of the old heating plant to the
south, covers this useless space and extends
north covering the present parking lot
reserved for state-owned vehicles, to
around 50 feet from Graham Building and
extends east toward Rawl Building.
� The site of the building will not increase
parking congestion on the east campus
because units going into the proposed
building are already in place in that loca-
tion.
� The new building alleviates the faculty
office space so that faculty presently shar-
ing offices on the east campus will be able
to occupy individual office space.
� The proposed building will be in the pre-
sent classroom cluster.
The alternate sites for the new building
which have been proposed offer some pro-
blems, as stated below:
� The wooded location directly back of
Joyner Library, e.g. The new building will
not easily fit into this location without ex-
tending onto Ninth Street and property
which may not be university-owned. One
�major consideration has been the element
of lime in this matter is due to the funding
procedures of the North Carolina General
Assembly. This same difficulty is present
when the parking lots directly back of
Joyner Library further towards downtown
are considered.
� An additional alternate site for the
building is the parking lot adjacent to the
Men den hall Student Center. This space af-
fords hundreds of parking spaces at pre-
sent which are filled daily during prime
class time and at night when programs are
offered at Mendenhall Center. If these
spaces were removed, there would be no
place for students and patrons to park on
this end of the campus.
� It would cost a great deal of money to
construct parking facilities, such as a high-
rise parking (deck), as a part of the new
building. The money is only proposed for a
building, not additional money for parking
facilities. It is also apparent that construc-
tion alone will take one to two years.
Emily Boyce
ProfessorChair
Dcpt.ofLib.Sci.
"�. " 'V: 4 �' � "
-�-
��
T





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 12. I9�2
Ito
I
ree
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It v.
lie
ing
To-

nil
sc-
ne
:nt
ing
irai
the
lat-
re-
Ime
e
lese
no
on
to
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lew
r a
ling
uo-
Women Plan Surprise
In Fall State Election
B PATRICK O'NEILL
In uhat began as a
response to the defeat
ot the Equal Rights
Amendment, the dual
write-in candidacy of
Fredrica Jacobson and
Manem House tor the
N.C. State House and
Senate, respectively,
has become a real cam-
paign.
"1 think they're go-
ing to surprise a lot of
people in November
said ECU Lutheran
Campus Minister
Graham Nahouse. "I
think it's a refreshing
change
The tvo Pitt County
women, both running
on the Democratic
ticket, worked for the
passage of the ERA,
which failed in North
Cars Impounded
For Loan Debts
PHI l A DEL. PHI A
(CPS) � Federal at-
torneys in the "City of
Brotherly I oe" hae
impounded the cars of
1" Philadelphia-area
residents who collec-
tive I owe some
$50,000 in student loan
payments. Federal mar-
shalls sa they'll keep
the cars until the
defaulters either pay
off or make ar-
rangements to pay off
their loans.
The action is just a
part of a nationwide
crackdown by the U.S.
Department of Educa-
tion on defaulters who
owe a total of S3 billion
in overdue guaranteed
and direct government
student loans. By late
September, the depart-
ment will also have a
computer to help push
the collection effort
farther.
Philadelphia officials
hope their car towing
will help make the
point.
'We're doing
whatever we can to get
these people to pa off
their debts to the
government said
Peter Yaira. U.S. at-
torney for the nine-
county Philadelphia
area. "We're going to
garnish wages, im-
pound cars and take
whatever property we
can get our hands on to
get these people to pay
up
Over 600 people have
since ignored "repeated
notices that they need
to come in and take
care of delinquent
loans Vaira said.
He estimates the 600
people owe a total of
S450.000 in student
loans, with an addi-
tional $450,000 in G.I.
bill money.
Vaira readily admits
the tow-aw ay action
was aimed at scaring
other defaulters.
"It had an electric ef-
fect on the whole com-
munity he said. "It
woke a lot of people up
and got them in here.
So many people take
the attitude that 'since
the government doesn't
come after us, we don't
have to worry about the
loan money we owe 1
think this shi vs them
we will come after
them
Carolina last June.
Both claimed that the
insensitivity of men to
women's issues caused
the ERA's defeat.
"I'm running
because more women
need to be in office
House said.
"We always felt that
we were irrelevent to
them (elected of-
ficials) Jacobson
said.
"I think she
(Jacobson) represents a
lot of people whose
views are not usually
articulated by those
who are running
Nahouse said.
Through her cam-
paigning, Jacobson has
noticed a lot of areas
where she feels eastern
North Carolina has
been short-changed.
She mentioned mental
health programs, roads
and other social areas.
"The point of my con-
cern right now is why
we're being short-
changed on anything.
"1 think we achieved
very quickly what we
set out to do Jacob-
son said. "That was to
make ourselves visible
to the incumbents
House said that some
Demcratic party
members have been giv-
ing her and Jacobson
lectures on the essen-
tials of party unity
because neither of them
are the nominated can-
didates of the party. "I
feel if they weren't con-
cerned about us they
wouldn't be saying
these things House
said.
One of the Greenville
City Democratic
Precincts passed a
resolution supporting
the two women.
:VJ1
WE'RE
COMING
We're offering ehallerv i career opportunities foi
future college graduates. Earn an excellent salary, benefits,
advancement, and retirement. We will train qualified ap-
plicants lor positions, guaranteed upon graduation. There
are rigid mental, moral and physical standards with highly
competitive selection. Freshman through Seniors are eligi-
ble.
Interested? Then contact the United States Marine Corps
officer selection team. We will be at the ECU campus on
October 12 & 13 from 9:00-3:00. Maybe you can be one of
us.
The hew, The Proud, The Marines
icccoeooocooooooooocooooooeooocoocoecc
jooseeo!


Located l mile past
Hastings Ford on
10th St. extension
s-

Monday, Tuesday,
and Wednesday
Ocean Perch Nuggets
$1.99
Crab Cakes
$1.99
Hamburger Steak
$2.99
Beef Tips$2.99
French Fries or Baked Potato, Tossed Salad
may be substituted for Slaw35 extra
NUTRI-SYSTEM - PROVEN EFFECTIVE
FOR ECU STUDENTS & STAFF
LILLIAN FLYTHE OF
GOLDSBORO SAYS:
"I'VE ALREADY
LOST 45 LBS.
WITH NUTRISYSTEM
"I came to NutriSystem because I had tried
EVERYTHING else. I really needed to learn how to
KEEP THE WEIGHT OFF and I felt that the
NutriSystem program could do that.
I love everything about the program. It's really easy
to follow and I don't have to worry about counting
calories or preparing food. I don't have to think about
food.
The behavior education program is retraining my
thinking about food7
Call
3552470
LILLIAN FLYTHE OF
GOLDSBORO LOST
45 LBS. ON THE
NUTRISYSTEM PRO-
GRAM!
CALL TODAY AND SEE
what NUTRISYSTEM
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FREE NO OBLIGATION CONSULTATION)
Over 500 Centers Nationwide 201 Arlington Blvd.
Greenville
Bra nutri system
MonFri.
9 to 1 & 3 to 7
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Available at AH
Balk Tyler Stores
in Eastern Carolina
larokna ent matt �Sgreenvilk
1st ANNUAL GREATER GREENVILLE
OCTOBERUN
SPONSORED BY BOYS CLUB OF PITT COUNTY,
CONVERSE ATHLETIC SHOES AND BELK TYLER
TO BENEFIT THE BOYS CLUB OF PITT COUNTY.
REGISTRATION NOW IN
PROGRESS AT BELK TYLER
TWO RACES: 2-MILE FUN RUN AND
6.2-MILE RUN (10,000 METERS)
OCTOBERUN T-SHIRTS
FOR ALL ENTRANTS
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30,
1982 AT 9:00 AM.
Register at Belk Tyler . . .
Register at Belk Tyler September 10th through October 29
(out-of-town entrants may register on race day). Entrants
will receive an Octoberun T-shirt and a discount coupon for
Converse shoes. Registration fee for 2-Mile Fun Run, $4;
6.2-Mile (10,000 meters) race, $5. Registration on race day, $6.
Events . . .
The 2-Mile Fun Run will be classified in the following age
divisions: (male and female) age 20 and under; and over age 20.
The 6.2-Mile (10,000 meters) will be classified in the following
age divisions, (male and female) ages 12 through 19, ages 20
through 29, ages 30 through 39 and ages 40 and over.
Course . . .
Octoberun - This fast 10,000 meter course starts in the back
parking lot of Belk Tyler at the Carolina East Mall, runs out to
Hwy. 11 and onto Reedy Branch Church Road to Route 903
and then back to the Belk Tyler parking lot.
2-Mile Fall Fun Run - Starts in the parking lot of Belk Tyler
and runs out to the corner of Hwy. 11 and Reedy Branch Church
Road and back again to the Belk Tyler parking lot.
Awards '
Overall winner will receive a pair of Converse Phaeton or Selena
running shoes. Medals will be awarded to the 1st, 2nd and 3rd
place finishers in each sexage category immediately following
the 6.2-Mile Run. 1st place winners receive a pa�' of Converse
athletic shoes! There will be prizes for the four classes of the
2-Mile Fun Run.
3
I

t





6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 12, 1982
District Judge
Allows Cameras
In Local Courts
By DARRYL BROWN
Auislaal Ne� Hilor
The N.C. Superior
Court on Sept. 22 ap-
proved the use of televi-
sion cameras in state
courts, provided that
strict regulations are
followed. The third
judicial district, which
includes Pitt County,
plans to allow the film
coverage in local cour-
trooms.
Senior Resident
Superior Court Judge
David Reed of Green-
ville is supportive of the
installation of camera
equipment in the
district courtrooms.
"I'm willing to make
an honest and good
faith effort to see that
it's done, within the
guidelines of the (N.C.)
Supreme Court
The states high court
set down clear regula-
tions to be followed
when using videotape
cameras during a trial.
Among other rules, the
cameras must be con-
cealed in a booth so as
not to distract witnesses
or the court pro-
ceedings. The booth
must match the
"architecture and
decor" of the cour-
troom, and is to be con-
structed at the media's
expense.
Judge Reed noted
that no application for
preliminary discussions
had been made by the
local television stations
concerning the project.
W1TN of Washington,
N.C. and WCTI of
New Bern both express-
ed interest in the oppor-
tunity of videotaping
trial proceedings but
have no immediate
plans to do so.
John Legget of
WNCT in Greenville
said that his station
also wants to use cour-
troom cameras. "We
intend to utilize that
coverage he said,
"though only in limited
cases, when it is war-
ranted by the trial
As only one camera
will be permitted in
each courtroom, the
stations will have to
share the footage taken
during proceedings and
split the cost of equip-
ment installation and
maintenence.
Judge Reed also
noted that, though
filming would generally
be permitted in the
courtrooms, each judge
presiding over in-
dividual trials will have
the authority to pro-
hibit camera use if he
feels that it would be
obstructive or distrac-
ting in any way. Reed
thought that "most
judges would certainly
be receptive" to the
television coverage,
though each may
disallow the filming if
he or she deems it
necessarv or beneficial.
COSTA
RICA
PROGRAM
Applications are now being
taken for the 1983 Spring
Semester in Costa Rica. All ma-
jors eligible. Courses taught in
English. Live with a Costa Rican
family. Field trips to various
parts of the country. Learn and
practice Spanish. Cost is about
the same as living on campus for
the semester.
For more information
contact:
Dr. Baker, Brewster A-224,
757-6084
Dr. Bort, Brewster A-201,
757-6136
Dr. Farr, Brewster A-l 18,
757-6249
r
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tmmnrmm m �-





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
OCTOBER 12. 1982 Page 7
Pet Cemeteries
Subject Of
Special Film
B MIKE BL'TZGY
si�tt Wnier
The campus Special Film ottering
for this Wednesday evening. Gates
of Heaven, is a serious film about a
tacky subject: pet cemeteries.
Now mavbe I'm different than
most people, but 1 think pet
cemeteries are funny. Not so much
the death part as the thought that
some idiot is shelling out S100 for
his parakeet Lester. And do you
think Lester really cares whether
he's buried in Forest Lawn or the
septic tank? But what's even funnier
than the tact that thousands of peo-
ple shell out their hard-earned cash
tor this, is that some bozo is actually
making money at it.
Actually, this film is not that fun-
ny. Well, it is, but not intentionally.
It deals with the aforementioned
types of people, most specifically,
the Harbert family, a veritable
hodgepodge o shattered dreams
and twisted American hopes. They
wanted to be rich in other fields, but
the only thing left to them was the
family pet cemeterv.
Director Errol Morns films this as
a documentary, and makes it a�
serious looking as he can. But is he?
1 honestl) can't tell you. Probably
not since it deals with the disillu-
sionment of middle America's mid-
dle class society. There are a lot of
sad sacks in this movie and it has a
chilling ring to it as if the harbinger
o horror himself, Edgar Allen Poe,
had written it in a strange flash of
insight into the macabre future of
his country.
See Gates of Heaven and learn
how tacky middle America really is.
You may also hear a desperate cry
behind that tackiness, and you'll
either be deeply moved, or you'll
yawn.
The film begins at 8 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Center's Hen-
drix Theatre. Admission is by ID
and activity card for students and
MSC membership for faculty and
staff.
German Epic A t
Plaza Cinema
Greenville's best theatrical offer-
ing this week, and probably this
week only, is playing at the Plaza
Cinema. Das Boot is without a
doubt, one of the finest war films
the Germans have ever made.
Although it runs two hours, it is
never boring, and will leave you go-
ing "wow" when you walk out of
the theatre.
Das Boot, translated "The
Boat is about a German U-boat's
tour of d-it during the fall of 1941
and the winter of 1942. Based on the
fine book by Lothar-Gunther
Buchheim, it follows the adventures
of a journalist named Werner, who
is sent to live on the U-boat with the
men and write a story about them.
See GERMAN, Page 8
SPYS Equipped With .38 Special For Major A ttraction A t Minges
Hot new band SPYS (pictured above) opens for .38 Special on Oct.
24 in Minges Coliseum. Two SPYS were original members of
super-group Foreigner. The band recently released its debut album
simply titled SPYS. Tickets are selling extremely well according to
Jerry Dilsaver, chairperson of the Student Union Major Attrac-
tions Committee. "They're going faster than tickets for previous
shows that have �old out Dilsaver urge students to buy their
tickets before fall break ince public tickets will of course be on sale
during the break. Advance tickets are $7 for students. S9 for the
general public and $9 at the door. Focal outlets are the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student Center, both Record Bar loca-
tions and Apple Records.
Film Industry Counting Days 'Till Christmas
It's only autumn, but the movie industry is already
counting the days until Christmas. The holiday season
historically, includes the two most important film weeks
of the year. Between December 8th and December 17th,
fourteen pictures are scheduled to open � some in wide
release, others on a very careful, limited basis � all
competing for the big holiday leisure dollars. The stakes
are obviously high, with fierce and often Byzantine
strategies being plotted to garner a winning edge with
the public.
"Movies are normally a weekend business, but during
this holiday period, every day is a Saturday or Sunday
says Marvin Antonowsky, president of marketing and
research for Columbia Pictures. "The business you can
do in those twelve days probably would take you four
weeks to do at another time of the year
David Knoph, a producer's representative who has
worked on the marketing of such films as E.T Vic-
torVictoria and Stir Crazy, contends that this market
glut is problematic: "Everybody puts out his picture
Cinema
and hopes to catch the brass ring. What happens is that
a lot of times, a picture gets lost. Of course, some of
them are going to die. So, is it a wise move? It's tough to
say. If you have a big picture, you're going to make a lot
of money at Christmas time, and the January-February
play time is good
Last year, quite a few pictures went for the
sugarplums at Christmas but barely limped or never
made it to New Year's Day. Christmas 1981 was a
disaster, arguably the worst in twenty years. It was the
season of such big money losers as Heartbeeps,
Rollover, Pennies from Heaven (playing this weekend
on campus), fodern Problems, Whose life Is'It
Anynay? and Buddy.Buddy There are always some
disasters, but will the fallout be quite as deadly as last
year's?
"Look, the average price of a movie admission is
three bucks says Antonowsky. "We're not talking
about a twenty-dollar concert ticket or a forty-dollar
theater ticket. This summer, movie business was up
because the product was there. If ou don't have the
product, they won't go.
"This year, the studios are catering more to the hard-
core moviegoer adds Antonowsky. "Last year, there
was a heavy release of dramatic pictures, and it was one
of the worst Christmases ever (For the record, this
See XMAS, Page 8
Politics & Change
Bookstore Has Different Angle
The Clash � Part of the origiiial punk movement; a politically aware band whose message is swathed in violence.
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Uriler
"We don't need no gang boss; we need to equalize
The Clash
The above verse is mentioned in the "Statement of
Purpose" of the Internationalist Books Resource
Center of Chapel Hill. They perhaps best describe the
philosophy of Chapel Hill's most unusual bookstore.
Internationalist Books is the brainstorm of Bob
Sheldon, who owns the non-profit store cooperatively
with about a dozen people. "There was a real need
throughout the Southern region to bring a resource
center which had books, periodicals and magazines
from a progressive and revolutionary point of view
Sheldon told The East Carolinian. "They don't exist in
other bookstores
Sheldon claims that because of the unavailability of
progressive reading material, "a real narrowness of
outlook" has developed among Americans. "This will
open up their eyes in order to help them see beyond their
nationalism and to have a better understanding of inter-
nationalism
Sheldon believes that Americans and other affluent
peoples need to look at the world as a single global unit
and to see beyond the national boundries.
Internationalist Books claims that since the early
1970's, there have been a series of socialpolitical
upheavals in the Third World which, taken together,
have constituted a weakening of U.S. control in the
developing areas.
They claim that the "American Empire" has suffered
losses in Indochina, Iran and Nicaragua and faces in-
creasing instability in its other "neo-colonies" like El
Salvador, Guatamala, Egypt, Sudan and the Philip-
pines.
These losses, they claim, have set a "new interna-
tional stage which will change the role of the U.S.
"First, the U.S. has had to face its shrinking empire in
the midst of the worst international economic crisis
since the depression of the 1930s.
Secondly, while the competition has intensified
among all imperialist powers, the U.Ss principal com-
petitor � the U.S.S.R. � has begun to extend its
political and military influence, thus challenging the
previously unchallenged U.S. for top-dog position
claims the stores statement of purpose.
Internationalist Books believes that the U.S. govern-
ment's response to this new stage is being based on
"increased brinksmanship and militarism
This means intensifying the exploitation at home and
making all-around preparation for war in order to in-
crease their domination around the world even at the
risk of going to war with the Soviet Union. Part of the
preparation is to call for unity and sacrifice, to rally 'the
people of America' around the red, white and blue
Internationalist Books claims that they will promote
just the opposite of the
"going-along-with-the-program" option. "To get to
this point, there will have to be very profound political
and economic changes Sheldon said. "These changes
will have to involve a complete change in the distribu-
tion of power
Sheldon believes that there aren't really many dif-
ferences between the U.S. and the Soviet Union. "I see
the U.S. being equally as dangerous as the Soviets to the
rest of the world he said.
Through the shelves of the one-room bookstore, a
customer can browse over a broad selection of new and
used books; domestic and international periodicals and
papers; and other leaflets announcing upcoming
political, musical, philisophical and artistic happenings
in and around the area. A large selection of buttons,
T-shirts and posters are also available.
People who visit the second-floor shop are also
welcome to take a load off their feet and stay a while.
Political discussions and debates abound on topics rang-
ing from anarachism to liberation theology, revolu-
tionary communism to feminism, socialism to black na-
tionalism and gay rights, just to name a few.
Sheldon said people are always welcome to visit,
browse, discuss or listen to an album on the stereo from
the shop's small library. He mentions groups such as
See CLASH, Page t
s, . M
m0Mm0i0'fm
�� m�(i�ixi� ���� n�





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 12, 1982
German Epic
'Das Boot'
In Greenville
Continued From Page 7
What he finds is a lot
different than the Hem-
ingway and Nazi pro-
paganda he's been
reading.
What he finds is
reality. The men on the
boat are not blindly
patriotic, but they are
loyal to their captain.
After all, a German
U-boat is not conducive
to military spit and
polish. The men spent
months without a bath
or clean clothes, in bad
air and mildew. The
captain is by far the
most interesting person
in the film. He is the
type of person that the
men can be loyal to
because he has the right
combination of
characteristics.
Werner signs on the
boat as it starts out,
and sees the men doing
the activity that takes
up most of their time:
waiting. Weeks go by
with no assignment for
the U-boat. Finally,
they go after a convoy
and score some direct
hits (sinking one
tanker), but the hunter
becomes the hunted,
for destroyers armed
with the new sonar
devices try to sink the
boat.
After hours of
waiting in terror and
being subjected to
depth-charges, they
lose the ships. The cap-
tain decide to make
for France, but he
receives orders that
they are to go to Spain,
and then Italy which
means going through
the British controlled
straits of Gibraltar.
When they attempt
to go through, they are
fired upon and sent to
the bottom. This is one
of the best scenes in the
Xmas Films Still A Gamble
Jurgen Prochnow in a scene from Germany's Das Boot.
Mendenhall Reveals
Fall Break Schedule
The Department of University Unions has an-
nounced the operating hours for Mendenhall
Student Center during the upcoming Fall Break.
The Student Center will remain open until
midnight on Friday, Oct. 15, but the Music
Listening Center, Crafts Center, and Bowling
Area will close at 6 p.m.
On Saturday, Oct. 16, the Student Center will
be open from 12 noon to 5 p.m. The Crafts
Center, Music Listening Center, and Bowling
Area will be closed the entire day. Mendenhall
will be open from 1 p.m. until 11 p.m with the
exception of the Music Listening Center and the
Bowling Center, on Sunday, Oct. 17.
The Bowling Area, Crafts Center, and Music
Listening Center will be closed on Monday.
However, the rest of the building will be open
from 8:30 a.m. until 11 p.m.
On Tuesday, every area of the Student Center
except Bowling will be open for their regular
operating hours. If you have any questions,
please call 757-6611.
film, if only for the
sheer, unadulterated
tension that runs
through it. They spend
too many hours on the
Mediterranean sea
floor and start to run
out of oxygen, while
desperately trying to fix
the sub.
The rest of the film is
expertly rendered and
even if it is two hours
and forty minutes long,
I guarantee you, you
will not be looking at
your watch, rolling
your eyes heavenward
and moaning "Why
me?"
And Das Boot, like
any good war film,
shows the courage of
those that serve, and
the stupidity of those
that command. Ger-
many sent 40,000 men
to sea in U-boats. Only
10,000 came back. And
watching this film you
see this part of the war
from another perspec-
tive. Face it, you'll be
pulling for these guys
even though they were
our enemies. The
universality is here.
This film could have
been about an
American submarine
and have remained vir-
tually unchanged.
Director Wolfgang
Petersen did a fine job
with the supervision of
matt drawings and op-
ticals as well. (There
aren't any scenes that
look like they're from
McHales Navy.) There
are some positively
breathtaking shots of
the submarine moving
through sunset sparkl-
ed waters, and the
camera does a lot of
moving, considering
the cramped conditions
a German U-boat pro-
vides.
Das Boot is a very
cinematic and, to some
degree, experimental
war picture. It's a little
slick but it stands on
it's own and, let's face
it, no one has tried to
make a valid film com-
ing from this point of
view. Sure, there have
been sub films before,
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but they rarely went
beyond dumb.
A word of warning:
If the past has taught us
anything it has taught
us that in Greenville we
have to be thankful for
our few theatrical inter-
national film offerings.
Films in this category
are rarely held over for
even a second week
simply because they do
not draw. So if you're
interested in Das Boot,
act before Friday. And
if you really like the
film, it may even be
around long enough for
you to see it again.
Auditions Slated
For Shadow Box
Auditions for the East Carolina Playhouse
production of Michael Cristofer's award-
winning drama The Shadow Box will be held on
Thursday and Friday, Oct. 21 and 22 and are
open'to East Carolina University students, facul-
ty, staff and to members of the local community.
The auditions will be conducted in room 206 of
the Messick Theatre Arts Center at 7:30 p.m.
each evening.
This highly-acclaimed and powerful drama ac-
complished the extraordinary feat of winning
both the Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award.
Playwright Michael Cristofer has interwoven the
lives of three afflicted people into juxtaposed se-
quences occurring in three cottages in some
woods adjacent to a hospital. Here patients are
permitted to live out their remaining days in an
experiment presided over by an omniscient inter-
viewer.
This ECU Playhouse production is to be
directed by Cedric Winchell. Performances are
set for December 2-6 in McGinnis Theatre on the
ECU campus. For further information call
757-6390.
Continued From Page 7
year's movie-going au-
dience will have to
choose from six
dramas, four straight-
ahead comedies, two
romantic comedies, one
action-adventure and
one fantasy-
adventure.)
It has long been ax-
iomatic in Hollywood
that, ultimately, pro-
duct is the bottom line.
No number of strategic
print ads, television
spots, theatrical
trailers, promotional
gimmicks or whatever
is going to lure
customers out of their
living rooms and into
the local cinemas to see
some dog.
But if the paying
moviegoer has the final
word, studios will still
make sure the audience
is aware of its choices.
The average advertising
budget for the first
week of a picture's life
is $3.5 million in the
holiday season. The
basic job of marketing
is to let people know
the picture is out there.
Each picture has its
own awareness cam-
paign.
In the case of The
Dark Crystal, a $20
million fantasy-
adventure with no
human actors but with
an elaborate world of
creatures designed by
the Muppets' creator
and the film's
coproducer-di rector,
Jim Henson, awareness
is crucial.
The picture concerns
a mythical world
dominated by an evil
breed called the
Skeksis. These
creatures' only fear is a
prophecy that says their
powers will be
destroyed by the Gelfl-
ing, an elfin race. The
Skeksis manage to
eradicate all but two of
the Gelfling, Jen and
Kira, who encounter all
sorts of bizarre and ex-
otic beings before the
ultimate showdown.
Coproducer Gary
Kurtz, drawing
significantly on his ex-
perience as the pro-
ducer of Star Mars and
The Empire Strikes
Back, began his adver-
tising campaign last
Christmas with twenty-
second trailers that
played around the
country. A slightly
longer trailer accom-
panied the release of
E. T.
"The trailer doesn't
say much about the pic-
ture Kurtz says "It's
just a collage of a few
images, but the images
are striking and unique
enough to generate
some positive word of
mouth Kurtz and
various marketing
representatives have
also been attending
science-fiction conven-
tions around the coun-
try, giving slide presen-
tations and talking
about the picture. "It's
a way of keeping in
touch with the principal
audience he says,
"the people who are in
line the first day.
They're the ones who
start that word of
mouth
One of Kurtz' key
problems is letting the
audience know that
The Dark Crystal is not
a Muppet movie or, for
that matter, a puppet
movie: "It's obvious
that certain puppetry
techniques have been
used to bring some of
the characters to life,
just as Steven
(Spielberg) used them
in E. T. and we used
them with Yoda in Em-
pire. But 1 don't think
it's fair to call them
puppets, because they
are very complicated
creatures that
sometimes take five,
six, or seven people to
operate
If The Dark Crystal
represents one side of
awareness strategy,
then Airplane II: the

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Nov. 24-Nov. 28,1982
Spend your Thanksgiving holiday in style on Broadway,
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Sequel represednts the
other. The original
writing-directing team
of Jerry and David
Zucker and Jim
Abrahams isn't involv-
ed (Ken Finkleman is
the writer-director), but
the characters played
by Julie Hagerty,
Robert Hays, Peter
Graves and Lloyd
Bridges are back, along
with a small army of
cameo players. Accor-
ding to Gordon
Weaver, Paramount's
senior vice-president
for worldwide
marketing, it's all in the
title.
"You mention
Airplane and people
smile Weaver says.
"They know it's funny
� it's predictable in
that it telegraphs the
jokes. There's no need
to tell the story. You
don't have to tell peo-
ple that this one takes
place on a spaceship on
its way to the moon. So
what we're doing is go-
ing away from the film
and being as totally
outrageous as possi-
ble
Going away from the
film means that the
trailers and television
spots will have ab-
solutely nothing to do
with the movie, aside
from repeating its title.
Shelly Hochron, a vice-
president of advertising
at Paramount, wrote
an Airplane II: the Se-
quel song. Rudy Vallee
will be filmed ringing
the tune in a follow-
the-bouncing-ball for-
mat. A marketing team
is traveling around the
country, paying clubs
and service groups to
visit local television sta-
tions and record the
song for regional spot
ads.
"If we use a spot na-
tionally, we'll pay an
additional fee, and it
will become "America
Sings for Airplane II:
the Sequel ' says
Weaver. "Now, that
has absolutely nothing
to do with the film
The pictures men-
tioned so far go into
wide release in
December, which
means they'll be play-
ing in 800 or so theaters
across the country. In
early December, Gan-
dhi and Sophie's
Choice will go into
limited release in major
cities. eventually
broadening out in
January. This strategv
is called
"platforming and it
was put to use for
Kramer vs. Kramer,
Ordinary People and
On I,olden Pond As a
studio executive con-
nected with Gandhi
puts it: "You don't
open with a thousand
prints. You basically let
the thing work for you.
You seek out coverage
in the media, and the
reviews and everything
help to launch the pic-
ture
The S22.5 million
Gandhi is the
c u I m i n a 11 n o i
producer-director
Richard Alien-
borough's twenty-year
effort to get the project
to the screen. Financed
by Indian, British and
American invetors. the
film begins with
Mohandas K Gandhi's
arrival in South Africa
in 1893 and traces his
extraordinarv rise as a
world statesman and
architect of Indian in-
dependence until his
assassination in 1948.
The title role is played
by Ben Kingsley. a
member of the Royal
Shakespeare Company
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
(xrOBER 12, 1982
le
lane It:
that
�nothing
film
inen
t i into
n
, h i c h
p I d v -
eaters
. In
r Can-
'hu- 's
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and
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re
at:
Ih
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Blvd.
Ctovi, Gang 0 Four, Kennedys
Liberate With Progressive Views
Continued From Page 7
"The Dead Kennedys,
The Gang of Four, The
Clash and per-
formers such as Peter
Tosh as playing an in-
tegral role in the
liberation-from-
oppression movement.
"They represent a pro-
gressive trend in
music he said.
Sheldon believes that
certain musical per-
formers use their music
in such ways as to
educate others about
world problems.
"They reflect the real
suffering and oppres-
sion of varied
peoples Sheldon
said. "Reggae relates to
Third World peoples'
struggles; Clash relates
to the English working
peoples struggles � the
oppresive nature of the
English empire. And
secondly, they help to
influence public opi-
nion
Sheldon, who is
employed as a full-time
nurse with the UNC
Student Health Service,
is a familiar figure in
the Chapel Hill com-
munity. He has long
been affiliated with the
progressive political
movement in that area.
The volunteer collec-
tive bookstore is owned
and operated by a
diverse group of people
that includes a truck
driver, waitress,
secretary, nurse and
several students.
"Our purpose is to
educate people to the
fact that we have no
stake in shooting down
people of other lands,
especially in the service
of those who rule the
U.S. today his state-
ment continues. "We
shall urge people to
resist becoming
mindless patriots (or
even disguised
patriots); rather, we
must become conscious
RESEARCH PAPERS
f improve youf grades' Ruah V 00 'or the
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Reararch AaeieUnc 11322 Idaho .�
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internationalists
Internationalist
Books believes that in-
ternationalism means
having no country or
national boundries.
They claim that a small
group of U.S. im-
perialists rule over the
large majority of peo-
ple who live in the U.S.
"We are united with
the people worldwide in
their resistance to all
imperialism. By no
means are we interested
in the threats offered
by U.S. imperialism,
which come from the
domination of foreign
peoples and markets
the purpose statement
reads.
Adds Sheldon, "A
very small percentage
of people in the world
� mainly the U.S. �
control the world
resources. True equali-
ty and justice must in-
volve the greatest
number of people in
our world � not the
wealthy few
The bookstore has
managed to keep its
head above water, but
only with the help of
donations, Sheldon
said. Sale of goods is
not enough to cover the
$165 rent cost and the
phone bill for his
942-REDS extension.
He sees the bookstores
as a way to influence
people's hearts and
minds.
He hopes that the
"resource center" will
help to broaden peo-
ple's abilities to unders-
tand more fully and
change the world.
"We have no interest
in keeping America
number one. And we
do not support pleas of
national unity, in fact,
we clearly recognize the
criminal nature of the
U.S. and welcome each
and every defeat she
suffers.
I nternationalist
Books has a long way
to go before its goals
are realized. But
everyone at least knows
they're around.
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THE EAST CAROl INIAN
Sports
(XTOBER 12. 1982
Page JO
Baker, Stewart Return To Excel
Spiders Snagged In Pirates' Web
By(TND PIFASANTS
SpnrK t dilor
If fans were expecting to see a
replay of Fast Carolina's notorious
"come-from-behind" wins over the
University of Richmond in last
Saturday's game, they were in for a
big surprise.
In the past two games against
ECU, the Spiders have been ahead
of the Pirates late in the second half,
but this year was entirely different.
The Bucs scored three touchdowns
in the first half and added two more
in the second to give the Pirates a
35-14 win over Richmond.
Quarterback Greg Stewart and
Tony Baker, who both missed last
week's game against Missouri, were
apparently making up for lost time
against Richmond. With Stewart
throwing the passes and Baker runn-
ing the ball, the twosome made sure
that the Pirates would no longer
have to be the comeback kids.
Baker, a freshman from High
Point, Va scored his first
touchdown of the game when he ran
four yards into the endzone. But his
second touchdown will be the one
everyone remembers for a long
time. After ECU quarterback Kevin
Ingram dished off to Baker, he
sprinted down the right sideline for
a 75-yard touchdown, the longest
offensive scoring plav since head
coach Ed Emory has been here. The
tailback ended up with 154 yards
rushing, was selected as the ECAC's
"Rookie Of The Week and was
also co-recipient of the R.W. Moore
"King Of The Gridiron" Award,
along with teammate Sfcwart.
Suffering an asthma attack before
the Missouri game, Stewart was
unable to call the signals against the
Tigers but that wasn't the case
against Richmond. Stewart com-
pleted seven-out-of 15 passed for
167 yards and threw a 46-yard pass
to ECU'S Ricky Nichols for the
touchdown.
Offensively, the Pirates finished
with a whopping 500-yards in total
offense and 333 yards rushing.
The defense held the Spiders to
one touchdown, which they scored
with only 2:07 seconds remaining in
the fourth quarter. Richmond
became the first team this season
that has scored a TD at Ficklen
Stadium so far. The Pirates are now
ranked sixteenth in the nation in
defense. Linebacker Amos Twitty
led in tackles with II, followed by
Jody Schulz, Jeff Pegues, P.J. Jor-
dan and Kevin Banks, who each had
seven apiece. Curtis Wyatt had two
quarterback sacks and Steve
Hamilton and Pegues had one each.
In the contest, Richmond put the
first points on the board when John
Roach kicked a 20-yard field goal
midway through the first half. Just
4:20 later, ECU's Ernest Byner ran
up the middle and practically crawl-
ed into the endzone to put the Bucs
ahead, 7-3. Head Coach Ed Emory
said that first touchdown made all
the difference in the Pirates offense.
"When we came back 7-3, I believe
our kids realized they could move
the hall against them.
In the second half, the Pirates
waltzed out and scored a touchdown
during the first minute of play.
Baker optioned left and ran four
yards tor another TD. "I felt like we
were completely in command at
14-3 Emory said. "Our defense
played well, but we always start
slow against Richmond due to those
wide splits
Emory's confidence, however,
was about to be rattled-but just
slightly. After a string of penalty
calls and exchanges, ECU punter
Jeff Bolch kicked an eight-yard
punt to put the Spiders on the
36-yard line. But the Spiders were
held back by the Pirates defensive
li'1 and punted in a fourth-and-13
situation. Stewart then spotted
Nichols running toward the endzone
and zinged a 46-yard bullet through
the air, upping ECU's lead to 21-3.
With a few seconds remaining in the
first half, ECU's Gerald Sykes in-
tercepted a Van McLaughlin pass.
The third quarter was constantly
filled with turnovers. On the third
play of the second half, Nichols
fumbled and Richmond recovered
at the 27-yard line. The spider then
faked a field goal but UR flanker
Kevin Jackson was tackled in the
backfield by Schulz.
The Pirates regained possession
but Ingram fumbled and the Spiders
again recovered at the 39-yard line.
Richmond moved down the field
and faced a first-and goal situation
when McLaughlin fumbled and
ECU's Hal Stephens recovered and
returned to the 10-yard line.
Another turnover, however, was
soon to reoccur. A Stewart pass was
then intercepted by UR's Mike Lon-
don but the Spiders were unable to
gain any yardage.
On Richmond's 43-yard line, the
Pirates were in a first-and-ten situa-
tion when Ingram fumbled and
Richmond took control at the 47.
The Spiders moved down the field
to the 34-yard line and Roached
kicked a 34-yard field goal to make
the score, 21-6.
With less and a minute remaining.
Baker optioned right and ran
75-yards for a TD to top of the third
quarter and expand the Pirates lead
to 28-6.
Stewart scored ECU's last TD of
the game when he ran two-yards and
fell into the endzone with 9:12 left
to go in the game.
The Spiders only touchdown
came late in the fourth quarter when
UR's freshman runningback Danny
Holly first gained 30-yards in five
plays and sprinted nine more yards
to score six points for Richmond.
Sophomore quarterback Danny
Kees kept the ball for a two-point
conversion to boost the Spiders'
point total for a final score of 35-14
in favor of the Pirates.
Emory said that Richmond was
one of ECU's toughest opponents
this year. "I hate to play teams that
have had two weeks of practice to
prepare he said.
The head coach commended
ECU's defense but was concerned
about the offense's play during the
second half. "The first half we were
good and smooth he said, "but in
the third quarter we had too many
fumbles and interceptions. We
weren't smooth and coordinated
Emory praised Richmond and
Dal Shealy, UR's head coach.
"Richmond has played a tough
schedule, and I'll be surprised if he
(Shealy) doesn't turn it around he
said. "You've got to give a coach an
equal chance
Offensive coordinator Larry
Beckish, who is responsible for br-
inging his version of the I-formation
to the Pirate squad, was glad to see
the Pirates bounce back in the Rich-
mond game. "The thing that excited
me the most was that we made the
big plays happen he said. "In
Missouri, we were on the verge of
making the big plays but never
did The Bucs wound up with only
205 yards in total offense against
Missouri which, according to
Beckish, is the lowest yardage total
bv any team he has coached. Under
his guidance, Illinois State racked
up 618 yards in total oftense in
1981. the most by any team he has
led. The Pirates will face Beckish's
former coaching ground on Oct. 23
when Illinois confronts ECU on its
homecoming day.
Meanwhile, the Pirates will be
preparing tor Florida State and
Beckish praised the Gators for being
a fine football club. "They're a
class football team with a class foot-
ball coach he said. "They'll have
the same caliber of players that
Missouri had, but you can only have
II out there at a time and that
kind've equals things out a little
bit
See STATS, Page 11
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
FCC quarterback Grey Stewart led Aerial attack against Richmond.
Bucs Down Devils To
Capture Own Tourney
Photo Bv GARY PATTERSON
Pirate defenie end disrupts fourth quarter pass.
Blown Chances Cost Richmond
Bv KFN BOLTON
For the Richmond Spiders, it was
a case o wasted opportunities in
Saturdav night's 35-14 loss to the
ECU Pirates.
That, along with a hard-hitting
Pirate defense and big-plav oitense.
resulted in the Spiders' defeat.
In the third quarter, the Spiders
recovered three ECU fumbles and
intercepted one pass but were onlv
able to convert the four turnovers
into three points.
After the game, Richmond head
coach Dal Shealy emphasized the
importance of these blown chances.
"Our defense gave us the oppor-
tunity Shealy said. "But our of-
fense didn't take advantage of it and
wasn't able to convert
The Spiders came into the contest
with an 0-4 record after losses to
Virginia Tech 20-9; South Carolina
30-10; Ohio University 23-14 and
West Virginia 43-10.
But the Spiders had more poten-
tial than the final score indicated, as
shown by their first possession of
the game.
Richmond took the openme
kickoff from their own 20 and mar-
ched all the way down to the ECU
three-yard line. On third down and
two. quarterback an Mclaughlin
attempted to sneak around the left
end but was stopped bv strong-
safety Smoke) Norris tor no gain.
The Pirates had to settle for a
20-yard John Roach Field goal out
o the drive, which was highlighted
by a 24-vard pass from McLaughlin
to split-end Clayton White that put
them on the ECU 24.
Richmond's lead didn't last for
long, as ECU took their own initial
kickoff reception and executed an
82-vard. ten-plav drive for the
touchdown that gave the Pirates a
lead that they never lost.
The Spiders didn't score again un-
til the 1:02 mark in the third
quarter, when Roach kicked a
34-yard field goal after a Kevin In-
gram fumble.
With 2:07 left in the game, the
Spiders recorded the first
touchdown scored on the Pirates at
Ficklen Stadium this year.
Reserve runningback Danny Hol-
ly scored on a nine-yard run around
the right end, and quarterback Dan-
nv Kees added the two-point con-
sion tor the final margin.
Shealv was impressed with the
Pirates but felt that the plav of his
team had as much to do with the
defeat. "We seemed to help them
out by beating ourselves he said.
"We gave up a lot of big plays.
especially on third and long
But Shealv was quick to point out
his respect for the ECU squad.
"This is the best ECU team that
we've faced in the three years that
we've plaved them said She.v
"They have the best defensive ends
that we've plaved against this vear "
Shealv was also impressed with
ECU's team speed, a feeling that
every opposing coach this season
has shared. He stated that the
Pirates had more overall team speed
than anv opponent so far. including
highly-ranked West Virginia
Even with Richmond's wir
record. Shealy remained optimistic.
"Our goal right now is simple he
said. "We have to take what we've
learned, remove the defects, and
gain consistency on offense and
defense. If we do this, the wins will
come
By EDWARD NICKFAS
S:jti VV t Mr'
In the final match of this
weekend's East Carolina Invita-
tional, a well-conditioned Lady
Pirate volleyball team beat Duke
8-15, 16-14, 15-6 to win the annual
tournament and improve their
record to 19-10.
The Lady Pirates, who won only
11 games last year, were seeded se-
cond for Saturday's tournament
after beating UNC-Charlotte, N.C.
A'T and William and Mary in Fri-
day's round-robin play. ECU's only
loss Friday came to Duke, which
placed the Lady Blue Devils in the
number-one seeded position.
ECU opened the double-
elimination tournament Friday by
beating UNC-Charlotte 15-3, 15-13,
but were in a tough situation after
losing to Duke 7-15, 6-15.
The Lady Pirates, who came into
the tournament in good shape due
to coach Lynn Davidson's reiterated
conditioning drills, beat UNC-
Charlotte in Saturday's
loser's-bracket match, forcing a
confrontation with Duke.
Because the Lady Blue Devils had
not lost a match, ECU had to beat
Duke twice in order to win the tour-
nament, and the Lady Pirates did
just that.
According to Davidson, motiva-
tion was the key factor in the
deciding matches. "The momentum
shifted back and forth the entire
game she said. "At one point, we
were really down and could have
lost the tournament. But we were
very composed, and hung in there
and came back
In the final game against Duke,
everything seemed to fall in place
with the superb conditioning of the
Lady Pirates taking effect. "In the
second match Davidson said,
"the momentum was the deciding
factor She also added, "We had a
couple of calls go our way
"I'm very excited for our kids
Davidson concluded. "They wanted
it (the tournament) badly
The Lady Pirates, who were led
by all-tournament recipients Stacey
Weitzel, Diane Lloyd and Johanna
Fry, will play their next match at
home against the University of
North Carolina on Oct. 19.
S
"If-
K
JReEl
(
P
h
I -
I �
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' mm
�� in -
Ptmtm Iv GARY PATTERSON
Richmond Quarterback Napoleon Davis attempts to escape ECU's Jody Schulz





THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 12. 1982
11
:bso
d
ner-
ihe
it his
� the
them
IE -aid
4uad.
i that
jr that
ISiealy.
ends
ear
fcd vvith
ig that
eaion
tat the
� peed
-ing
inless
timitic.
le he
i a e' � e
, and
jsc and
s Mill
I
rTERSOM
Soccer Team Beats VCU
Statistics
COUPON
The East Carolina
soccer team blanked
Virginia Com-
monwealth 5-0 this past
Sunday, upping their
record to 5-4.
The Pirates led 2-0 at
halftime and scored
three more goals in the
second half to insure
the win.
Goalie Brian Win-
chell, who has played
only two games in his
new position, earned
his second straight
shutout.
Dave Skiffington,
Mark Hardy and Mike
Swan each scored one
goal, with Doug Kelly
booting in two. Assists
were made by Chip
Baker, Jamie Reibel
and Todd Engles.
Head coach Robbie
Church said his team
played hard and scored
whenever they had the
chance. "The team ef-
fort was great and the
defense played well
he added.
The Pirates will con-
tinue with their current
home-stand this week
with matches against
UNC-Charlotte on
Wednesday and the
University of Rich-
mond on Friday. Game
time for Wednesday's
contest with UNC-
Charlotte is 2:00 p.m.
Kiihm.m4
:i
0-�r.�
I-11
: u i
- w"
5 1
s-i
1K. Carolina
Firti Downs23
Rushn-Yards?jj3
Pasting Yards167
Return Yards3
Pastes16-7-1
PununjM6.0
FumblevLmib-X
Penalties ard-12132
KKhmond i �J �
1 asl Carolina 7 147 7
Scoring:
I R � FG 20 Roach
EC � Brwr. 1 run (Heath fcfckl
EC � Baker. 4 run (Heath kick
EC � Nichols. 46 pass from Stewart (Heathkick)
I R - FG 34 Roach
EC � Baler. 75 run (Heath kick)
EC � Stewart. 2 run (Heath kick)
L R � Hollv. 9 run (Kees run)
14
35
ladWMoai statistics
Rushing CR � DuBois 46). Edmonds 5 5. Jennings
12 30. McLaughlin 8-(-2l). Gtllispie 8-27. Plaskin 15.
Jackson U-9). Williams 2-3, kees 2 1V Holls 7-44; EC -
Stewart 5 35. Walden 7-40. Byner 10-47. Baker 16-154.
Nichols 1-6. Corses MR. Ingram 1-10.Branch 1-4. Richard-
son 2-5. Lewis 1-14.
Passing: McLaughlin 9-5-59-0. DuBois II 7-69-1. Kees
I-2-13-0: EC � Stewart 15-7-161 I. Ingram 1-0-0-0
Receiving: UR � Jackson 1-16. Jennings l-ll, Lsons
3-34. (Jillispie 1-1. White J-45. Sheerer 3-15. Mehin 2-19;
EC � Nichols 3-69. Nelson 1-36. dams 2-56. Pope 1-7
Watch
the
Pirates
QXLcLCxVe
12
(This coupon must
icccmojny order)
Off Complete
Eye Glasses with
This Ad
Greenville Store Only
Offer Expires Oct. 30, 1982
10 OFF
all non-sale items
to ECU Students
Bring in od & student ID
30
DISCOUNT ON B&L
RAYBAN SUNGLASSES
IWITH G ISLeNSES)
Call us lor an eye enatnination
with ttie doctor o� your choice
VISA
REMEMBER DROP-ADD DAY
IF YOU RECEIVED A
YELLOW V.I.P. CARD,
DON'T FORGET TO USE IT.

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Photo By CINDY WALL
ECU soccer player keeps ball in play against VCU
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Major Attractions presents
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with special Guests
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Tickets now on sale �
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12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 12, 1982
Sweeting Paces Golf Team classifieds
By Jerryl Sears
Stall Wriiet
The ECU Pirates
travelled to Dunlop,
Pirates.
The Furman golf
team won the tourna-
ment by seven shots
over the University of
S.C. this past weekend South Carolina with a
to compete in the team total of 569. The
finished in second place
with a two-day total of
139. Third place went
to Dillard Pruitt of
Clemson University
with a tournament total
of 142.
Dunlop Invitational
Golf Tournament and
finished 13th out of the
24 teams participating.
The Pirates, who had
a combined team score
of 622 strokes, were led
by Don Sweeting who
had rounds of 73 and
81 for a two-day total
of 154. Following
closely behind Sweeting
was teammate David
Woodard, who shot
rounds of 77 and 78.
Kelly Stimart and Chris
Czaja had tournament
totals of 156 and 157,
respectively, for the
Gamecocks were se-
cond and Clemson
finished in third place.
ECU golf coach
Jerry Lee wasn't pleas-
ed with his team's per-
formance. "I'm unhap-
py with the way we
played said Lee. "1
really felt like we
should have played bet-
ter
Brad Faxon of Fur-
man won the individual
title after shooting
rounds of 67 and 69 for
a 136 total. Joey
Sadowski of East Ten-
nessee State University
Next up for the
Pirate golf team is the
Iron Duke Golf Tour-
nament scheduled Oct.
14-16 in Durham. Lee
is optimistic about the
Pirate's chances in the
tournament. "We
usually play pretty
good in Durham, but
the level of competition
will be much stronger
in this upcoming tour-
nament than it was at
the Dunlop Tourna-
ment said Lee.
ROOMMATE
WANTED
TWO ROOMMATES needed
4 bedroom house, J Wochs tram
campus W5 per month Call Sun
Chadwicfc. 7S�-4H1- 3Wf lit St.
NEEDED: ROOMMATE NEED-
ED for 4 Bedroom house on
Biltmore S�. Hall Mock �rom cam
pus M3.7S plus utilities. Call or
come by 405 Biltmore St. 7M-7W4.
FEMALE ROOMMATE To share
7-bedroom apartment. Furnished.
' r"t- cherV' lnVi
FOR SALE
HAND CRAFTED, rustic fur
niture at affordable student
prices. For more information, call
Kim at 7S2-J717.
FOR SALE: 71 Gremlin Ph
75 513$.
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL Typist wants to
type at home. Reasonable rates.
7M-M4
PROFESSIONAL Typing seryice
experience, quality work. IBM
typewriter Call Lame Shiwe
7St S301 or Gail Joiner 754 1043
TYPING TERM papers, resumes
thesis, etc Call 7577J3
TYPING SERVICES Resumes,
theses, research papers, etc NEW
IBM type Judith Wilson Phone
7S4-74SJ -
10 YRS typin � reasonable rates
spelling, punctuation and gram
mar corrections. Proofreading
Cindy ta.m pm 355 2444
PROFESSIONAL TYPING Rush
iotas done. Scientific notations bait
element available Good rates
Call 7S� 417
LEARN TO FLY For protes
sional flight instruction for your
private or commercial license or
tor sight-seeing tours lor you and
your date or your friends, call Joe
75443
LOSE WEIGHT HONEST
75530
WANTED
BASS PLAYER wanted, tor Part
time contemporary Country Rock
Band Band has numerous book
� ngs and has 2 45's getting a lot of
air play Serious, competent must
cians only Call 7SH773 after 5
p m
PHYSICS I3S0 tutor wanted will
� ng to pay reasonable amount and
tit time schedule around yours
Contact Sandy 754147
USED LPs earn EXTRA CASH
Quicksilver Records� Booh Em
change to East Fifth St
WE BUY PLAYBOY Rolling
Stone Mag Quicksilver Record-
Book E�change 10 East Fifth St
WANTED USED LP s
REWARD CASH OR TRADE
Quicksilver Records 10 East
Filth St
ARE YOU INTO puppetry? I am
looking tor someone to help me
with a show Ask tor Dee 7S4 7JJ3
RIDES
RIDE NEEDED to N J over tall
break Can leave at 2 OB p m
Thurs 14th 753 344
ATTN WILSON COMMUTERS
Ride needed MWF to and trom
Wilson to ECU Call immediately
33 30
PERSONAL
TUTOR NEEDED to help struggi
� ng student m computer science
course C Sci 3400) with bas.c
tortran programs Will pa
moderate salary Call '52 435
Pirate golfer lines up for a putt.
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
TRIM YOUR FIGURE
VOIRBFST
LOOK, INC.
355 26
Lose '2 15 Pounds in 3 Weeks
Programs tor Men & Women
� Medical Weight Control �
Nutritional Counseling
SKIN CARE
Individual Skin Analyse
Deep Pore Cleansing
Face & Body Wamnq
Manicure and Pidicures
Complimentary Consultation
Check phone book tor
discount coupon.
NOW
OPEN
"The Fun H ay
� I Uness"
417 Evans St. Mall � Downtown
� SOON
CO
Athletic ?WxM
Carolina East Mall
we sew
LEATHER COATS
SAAD S
SHOI�: REPAIR
113 Grande Ave.
7S8 1228
Not All Clinics Are the Same.
ABORTION is a difficult decision that's
made easier by the women of the Fleming
Center. Counselors are available day and
night to support and understand you. Com-
fort, safety, privacy, and a friendly staff . . .
that's what the Fleming Center is all about.
CALL 781-5500 DAY OR NIGHT.
rre� pregnancy testing
Saturday appointment
Very early pregnancy tests
J ARVIS MEMORIAL
METHODIST CHURCH
VAN SCHEDULE FOR
SUNDAY SCHOOL AND WORSHIP
STOPS:
1) Mendenhall Student Center Parking Lot
� 915a.m.
2) College Hill Dorms � 9:35a.m.
3) Fleming Hall (Front) � 9.25a.m.
4) Slay Hall �10:15a.m.
(Van with lift for handicapped)
J
Insurance accepted
All inclusive fees
Lp to 18 weeks
Do you get
what you 're
looking Jor?
When you look
behind you there
are no open
doors.
What are you
looking Jor?
Do you care?
510 S.
Washington St.
Downtown
Greenville
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13-U
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
(It).00 Pregnancy Test, Birth
Control, and Problem Pregnan
cy Counseling. For further inlor
mation call �3? 053S (Toll Free
Number �00-2?l-3Sa) between 9
A.M. and 5 P.M. Weekdays.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
�7 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N. C.
HAIR GALLERY
tMM
SOffORiTY
236 Greenville Blvd. (Behind Tipon Annex)
355-2076
Student Special
Guys & Gals Haircuts
$550 reg. $7.50
Stylist Expertly Trained in
Caucasion & Black Hair
Open MonSat Thurs. evening by app't.
Bring This Ad & Student ID
Good Thru Oct. 23, 1982
TuttOAV OCT. 12 ?;oo-Z:ooaw
p grafts1
SFONSoeea &v CofOB
.SVCRm0BSC-A�TOAMeK-V P.T.A
�MAPPV 5TORB 'PWAeO -MR- flATTCS � SAMMV
COCNTRV COOKfWG WARSM'S SJVF 4 �A
-fiinWES COMf BV TUG GLfiO OR CAU, lS&-t3
FAMILY EYE CARE
and
CONTACT LENSES
Adult and IVdiatric vision rare in a
relaxed and personal setting. Full con-
tact lens services Quick, accurate
eyeglass service
DR PETER W HOLL1S
OHOMnWC
CYC CAME OCMTCK
O GWtNvmf c a
TlPTONANNfx 278 GREENVILLE BLVO
756-9404
I
Any Prescription
Eyeglasses Or II
Contact Lens Filting
OFF
Musi Be Presented At Time Ot Order
Other Discounts Do Not Apply
J. A. UNIFORMS
SHOPS
Bring this ad for
10 OFF
on the purchase of
one of our lab coats!
All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes, shoes,
and hose. Also � used ECU nurses
uniforms. Trade-ins allowed.
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive.
Near Hollowell's Drug and old hospital.
Serving a variety of delicious sandwiches.
A huge 31 item salad bar. Homemade Soup, and
Delicious Chili Con Came.
SPECIAL GOOD TUES WED & THURS.
1 Choice of All Beet Regulor
S HOT DOG or Fresh
! GROUND HAMBURGER &
12 oz. DRAUGHT
for
only
I
I
I
I
I
9?S
How to make peace withlblstoy.
'���Mt
GeneraI Foods
llNTERNATJONAl CoffEES
-�����iMS��.
SWISS STYLE INSTANT COFFE E BE
c
v
�3r
If the academic wars are getting you down, declare a cease-tire. Take a break
with a rich and chocolatey cup of Suisse Mocha. It's just one of five delieiously
different flavors from
General Foods
International Coffees
OkriMW
S�saeM��
IE.117y,l
Tr.Mt.Mmtl
GENERAL FOODS' INTFJRNATONAL COFFEES.
AS MUCH A FEELING AS A FLAVOR r - , n, �
(jp
?
v.





Title
The East Carolinian, October 12, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 12, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.222
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

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