The East Carolinian, October 7, 1982






�he 3East Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No. 12
Thursday, October 7, 1982
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages,
Circulation 10,000
Presidential Election Controversy Explained
Bv ERNES! CONNER
sutl V rllrc
I asl spring in the election tor
Student Government Association
president, a major controversy was
up that is still alive today.
Kftei a run-ofl election, which
w won i 4( votes, Eric Hender-
ie winner ol the run-off, was
d with numerous campaign
improprieties. Thus began a legal
process that is battling to main
idents and understood b few.
n soon as the run-off election's
esults were in and David Cook, the
v nei ot ihe first election, knew he
st, charges were filed b Cook
icerning Henderson's campaign
ac tics during the run-ofl.
Cook, according to the charges
ed to the Review Board.
that Henderson had
tted six election rules
Ih . at es included, placing
: : placed campaign
ire in mailboxes, defacing ol
;ampaign literature, stealing ol
a en literature, illegal place-
� campaign literature, sitting
e table thai was the poll-
ice at the Student Supplv
and roaming freel) and
ted through White Dor-
and the women's section of
� )ormitory.
t Election Committee was also
ked b Cook, to investigate
's expense account at the
me.
Review Board was convened to
hai - - and according to
B Mallory, associate dean
and Judicary,
was found guilty of onlv
irges. These charges
lacement ol campaign
. be ng within 25 feet ol
- plact
Op inions Vary
Controversy centered around the
Review Board's decision and
Henderson's swearing-in ceremony
shortly after the board's decision
was announced.
Though they found Henderson
guilty of two violations, the seven-
member body chaired by ECU stu-
dent Cheryl Beasly, voted 4 to 3 not
to disqualify Henderson from the
presidency.
This led to questions being raised,
unofficially, about the conduct of
the Review Board.
Though the seven members were
sworn to secrecy about the internal
decision-making process of the
board, according to Cook and his
public defender. Hank Little, one
board member told them that the
board had voted 4 to 3 to disqualify
Henderson. And that during a break
taken by the board before announc-
ing then decision. David Brown, a
member of the board had disap-
peared tor 15 minutes. After he
returned Brown changed his vote
and thus the Review Board voted 4
to 3 not to disqualify Henderson.
Though no one would specifically
sa that Brown talked to Henderson
or anv one on Henderson's side, a
question was raised by Cook and
I lttle about what Brown did during
the 15 minutes he was gone.
Brown defended his 15-minute
break and where he went. "I was
under a lot of pressure. I had exams
and some tough decisions that I
knew had to be made. 1 went out
back (of Mendenhall Student
Center) and stood by the fire exit,
and tried to get everything clear in
my, head.
"It really hurts me that someone
would question my integrity because
1 am not the type of person that
would compromise m convic-
tions
Mike Swaim the current SGA at-
torney general, who was Hender-
son's student lawyer during the
board, stated that there was no way
anyone from the Review Board
could have talked with Henderson
'4
before the decision was announced.
"If David Brown did have a
break, he did not talk to Hencerson.
Hank Little, Eric and 1 were in the
same room during the time the
Review Board was meeting
Cook claimed that the Review
Board was supposed to be a closed
hearing and that means no one was
supposed to leave the room.
Henderson also generated some
controversy concerning the first
Review Board hearing which was
held on April 19 and 20. Ken
Hooper, then SGA attorney
general, swore Henderson in im-
mediately after the Review Board's
decision was made.
That same night, the Election
Committee chaired by Charles R.
Blake II, was scheduled to meet with
Henderson to discuss his campaign
expenses.
This was based on the investiga-
tion requested by Cook when he fil-
ed the orginal charges. Blake ex-
plained that the committee asked
Henderson to appear before them
under article 12, section of the elec-
tion rules.
The committee had sworn af-
fidavits from Jack Morgan Jr. and
Virginia Morgan of Morgan
Printers, Inc. attesting that Hender-
son had purchased $170.35 worth of
posters and small flyers. And that
Henderson had requested two bills,
each showing one half ot the total
amount.
According to one affidavit, the
reason given tor such request was
that he (Henderson) needed to turn
in bills at two different times I his
request was granted and Henderson
was given two separate bills, "each
showing one half of total pur-
chase
The committee which consisted of
Blake, Ann Dougher and Brian Kil
coyne questioned and confronted
Henderson with the affidavits
Henderson, according to a com-
mittee report signed by the three
members present, told the commit-
tee that he did not report the
$170.35 on his expense account
because he was going to use halt on
it, (the first election) the rest was go-
ing to be used in the run-otf.
The committee went on to ask
Henderson if he used the other halt
of the posters and flyers in the run-
off. Henderson, according to the
See DISPUTE, Page 6
Physics Dept. Gives
Diagnostic Exams
By BOB MORGAN
Maff Vtnirr
Science majors taking any of five
introductory physics courses are be-
ing administered a series of ex-
SGA President Eric Henderson
by a $485 grant from the university.
Golden says that five tests are be-
ing used and have been administered
during lecture and lab periods. They
test the academic abilities of the
perimental diagnostic tests because students in general algebra.
Students React To Sasway Sentence
B STEVE DEAR
-l�ff Wnlrt
'I
think it is completely
us to have a peacetime
� 'ration and to send someone to
; iring peacetime said ECU
dent Ben Ward.
Ward was speaking about the
sentencing ol Benajmin Sasway on
Monday to 2 : veas in prison for
register with the Selective
system. The chief prosecutor
:ase, Peter K. Nunez, had
led that Sasway be given
1 lm ol six months in prison.
n being sentenced Saswav
I am obligated by my cons-
ist the registration as a
moral a lull on people's freedom
1 choice 1 believe registration leads
a draft, and 1 believe that a draft
icads to a kind of unjust Vietnam
in �
cience
war.
"It's really an ambiguous point
� Sasway's not registering because
he doesn't want to go to a place like
El Salvador, but he would defend
the U.S. in the case of an invasion.
You have to be ready in all
aspects said sophomore Jeff Mit-
chell.
"The sentence was a little
severe said Representative Walter
B. Jones. Jones stressed the fact
that registration does not obligate
anyone to join the military service.
"One thing that is terribly
misunderstood is that it in no way
involves a draft. 1 don't see any pro-
spect of Congress reinstituting the
dratt law. So, therefore, this
registration means nothing at this
time. It has been over dramatized
Jones also stated that the registra-
tion's main purpose is to save time
immobilizing for a national
emergency. The present system
would save abut one month in such
a case, according to Jones.
"Basically, all people were asked
to do is register said Lt. Col.
James Thomas, chairman of ECU
Air Force ROTC. "I support that
people should have to comply
Thomas said.
Sophomore Paul Costa opposed
Sasway's receiving a prison
sentence. "They should have fined
him instead. He's not a criminal
Costa said. Pending the outcome of
his appeal, Sasway could go free on
$10,000 bail.
"His sentence seems to be being
used to scare people said Sister
Helen Shondel, ECU Catholic cam-
pus minister. "It shows the futility
of the prison system when we put
people in jail who are of absolutely
no danger to anyone and who are
perfectly capable and willing to earn
a living and take care of
themselves
Senior Joel Gould feels "It is
necessary and good that they make
an example of someone
Another senior, Brigid Findley,
feels that Sasway's sentence was un-
fair because of the large number of
other non-registrants who have not
been indicted. Sasway will appeal
claiming that he was "selectively
prosecuted" out of two million who
have not registered or informed the
government of a change of address.
"It's a personal choice said
Findley. "I'm glad I'm a female so
that I don't have to make that deci-
sion
Many students feel that because
Sasway did not obey the law he
should have to deal with the possible
consequences. They noted that
Sasway had been given many
chances to change his mind. "No
one's above the law. If he doesn't
like the law then he should go
through the proper channels to
change it said technology student
West Belch.
David Via, a sophomore physical
education student, compared the
sentence of Enten Eller with
Sasway's. "I feel it was totally un-
fair. They should have one uniform
sentence for all non-registrants
Via said.
Enten Eller is the only other per-
son to be convicted since the system
was initiated by President Carter in
January, 1980. Eller's sentence con-
sists of three years probation and
250 hours of community service.
However, last August Eller was
given 90 days to register or face the
possibility of a jail sentence.
Failure to register is a felony and
carries a penalty of up to Five years
in prison andor a $10,000 fine.
There have been reports that since
the sentencing of Sasway on Mon-
day the number of previous non-
registrants who had registered has
increased sharply.
of an increasing number of students
who are doing poorly in these
classes.
The Physics Department is con-
cerned about an increase in the
number of students who are dropp-
ing out of physics
1100,1250.1260,2350 and 2360.
Professor Carl Adler, who's been
teaching here since 1965, estimates
that the drop rate for his physics
arithmetic, reasoning and abstract
thinking. One test is a rating scale
that measures math anxiety.
"We have chosen tests that might
be able to predict who is going to do
poorly and will hopefully tell us
why said GoldenWe want to see
if performance on these tests can
predict how well a student will per-
form in the classroom
The group of approximately 350
2350 class this semester will be 20 students being tested this semester
percent. "This is much more of a
problem now that it was when I first
came here, and we are teaching the
same courses. The drop rates were
much lower, Adler said.
Department Chairman Dr. J.
William Byrd says the tests are for
two reasons. First, to find out why
many students signing up for the
classes are not prepared for the
work. Second, to discover specific
problems that students are having
and provide the proper help for
them.
"We hope to produce a correla-
tion between the performance of
our students and the preparation
that they are bringing with them.
We can only speculate that the pro-
blem has to do with something that
they are missing before coming
here Byrd explained.
This figure does not include
students who drop a class within six
weeks of the beginning of a
semester. Adler attributes the nor-
mal failure percentage to the fact
that students who stay long enough
to recieve a grade are not the ones
having problems.
Byrd and his department re-
quested the help of the Psychology
Department in studying the situa-
tion. Faculty members Dr. Jean
Golden and Dr. Susan McCammon
are conducting the tests as a
research proiect. It is being funded
will be used as a reference base for
the tests of future physics students.
Golden explains that when the
results are completed, the researcher
will have a general idea of which
tests can be successful in finding the
answers to a student's difficulties.
Students who are being tested can
recieve their scores by request.
However. Byrd does not emphasize
the importance of individual results.
"The purpose of this he said, "is
not for individual scores at all but to
study the characteristics of our
students as a whole
Graduate assistant Jack Lyle does
not see the problem at ECU as being
unique, but offers a possible reason
for it. He studied physics as an
undergraduate at both Wofford
College and Western Carolina
University.
Alder, a 17-year old veteran of
the department, admits, "We have
been teaching essentially the same
courses from essentially the same
books since 1965, with the same
type of tests and objectives
The Physics Department, accor-
ding to Byrd, is not going to use the
results of the testing to lower the
quality of education in order to in-
crease student performance. "When
a student leaves ECU with a degree
in physics, we want it to be just as
good as an education from
anvwhere else
Student A nested A t Dump Site
MMte fty STANLEY LEAKY
Hey Mom, Vm In College
These adventurous male students participated in Monday's campus-wide
pantv raid. An ECU tradition and lots of fun, these raiders got what they
went for-PANTIES!
An ECU student was among a
group of 86 people who were ar-
rested on Monday for impeding
traffic during a demonstsration
against a PCB landfill sight in War-
ren County.
Theresa Alston, 21, a senior in
home economics, was arrested while
she joined others in attempt to block
trucks, filled with PCB-
contaminated dirt, from entering
the landfill site. She is a resident of
Warren County.
"I'm against the dump because I
feel its usage is unsafe Alston told
The East Carolinian. She said she
was ready to go to jail if convicted.
"I feel it's worth it. I'm willing to
go to jail if that's what it takes
Alston was released from custody
after she signed a promisary note
stating that she would agree to not
return for future demonstrations.
Monday's demonstrations includ-
ed a large contingent of students.
Calling themselves "Students for a
Concerned Future the groups
from Duke, UNC, UNC-G and
ECU joined in with the 330 pro-
testors. Alston said she knew of
three other ECU students at the pro-
test, but none of them were ar-
rested.
"My family has really been par-
ticipating a lot Alson said, "and I
wanted to participate also
Meanwhile, another seven people
were arrested on Wednesday bring-
ing the total number of arrests to
over 500 for the three weeks of
demonstrations.
Opponents claim the landfill en-
dangers the health of the county's
residents. Leaders from civil rights
groups contend Warren County was
selected for the facility because a
majority fo its residents are black.
"I feel they picked us because they
felt they probably wouldn't have
any trouble from us Alston said.
State officials initially said the
PCB was illegally dumped along 210
miles of N.C. highways, but new
estimates indicate the total is closer
to 250. As of Wednesday 216 miles
worth of the contaminated dirt had
been dumped at the Warren County
site.
Alston claims that a safer alter-
native dump site was available in
Atlanta, but that N.C. officials
decided against it because of the
higher cost of shipping the dirt.
Inside Index
Announcements2
Editorial4
Campus Forum4
Style7
Sports9
Classifieds11
Weather Watch
The untimely Portuguese cold
front is expected to continue
through the weekend, bringing
mostly sunny days and primarily-
dark nights. Hurricanes and tor-
nados will prevail in what would
otherwise be nice days.
i





I HE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBl R 7, 1982
Announcements
PLEASE DO
NOT RELY
TOTALLY UPON
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Due 'c tie increased organution
par t i c t pa tt on in tne ar
n uncements column of Tne East
Carolinian we vwulO like to s'ress
again iiai we 'iave limited space
a id 'na' we are fryinoj to see that
m ge' as many in as we poss.biy
can A good advertising campaign
should include announcements
AZWB a"d posting flyers on
ass - : uildincj wans We d
n � -ave any Sympathy t r 'hose
iups tha
un piTes '
i o' v
a touncementt
. .ipa in out i
type it ou' Som
i�e spelling aa penmensnip
l i en year old i
tally � n an
-eir message
'ease use the
"S ,h,a' are
and please
rgara' ns
ECU LAW
SOCIETY
am
I Law 5 e' y a
pi c a npbell U i ers
� Ot � bet ?0 This
. � sed absence I �
� �. nen bet s i" ' fur
� � .� i 'ac � D'ae
6 tS6
CORSO
� � � CORSO � � �
� A ed Heal" "�
�� II al 5 30 pm All
v H 5 i a r
. ?. ano
CATHOLIC
NEWMAN CENTER
� an .
i j,
a-c
FLASH
I for all per
MS
. Ck � ' 2 a' 4 00 o
i , . 108 A 'rip is I g
ZBT
HELP START A FKATEHNI
T Y Are you considering fratern.
ty hte but missed tan rush yveii a
Zeta Beta Tau chapter is being
organised on campus Come help
us start a fraternity and make it
what you want ii lo be You can be
a clatter member An rganija
tional meeting is being held on Oc
tiber 7 at S 30 m New Deli
Resturant
GAMMA BETA
PHI
Mempers ur nex- meeting will
be held on Thursday October 6 in
Mendenhaii in room ?44 at 7 00
pm Plan Ii attend
GENERAL COLLEGE
erai C neg - ���� �,� uld
ntact their advisors prior t Oi
tl tf r 11 198? ti arrange t l
pre'eg sfral
CHOWAN COLLEGE
Alumn ao Friends I C wan
C legs wilt be having at ��
Meet "o �� ��. � i iiiie i v
evening OCtobet 11 rl im 6 00 I
8 00 pm The meet ng will be hi
n the private dining i 3'
Western Sizzl teak H � � ��'
W Greeny ille B . . at
Dr Bruce E A ' �" ' P � �
dent t Chowan i �. I � �� �
speaker
AM alumn a � - Is
Chowan � )( - - Kited
reserve � . da- I �lI Bob or Bo'
ty Doug1 ever . a '56 St28
OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPY
MIXER
�. � i's'fo in Oc c upa '
Therap c me mtxet
lenhaii Multipurpose fi
Ocl oer W8: a' 1 00 P n Me I
Juni r ano � i OI students
� i � ins T hen
:� hspiys and a film pres� a
Retreshi ervec
HOLY COMMUNION
a v k ' El - pa rervici
. . - � � � � . .
� � � � Ocl K n the chai
t V Paul iEp . � i
TESTINGCENTER
The Aided Health Professions
Admission Test iahpat i will be
ottered at ECU on Saturday
November 13 Application blanks
are to be completed and mailed to
the Psych, logical Crp 304 East
45th Street. New York NY 10017 t.
arrive by Oct oer 8 Application
blanks arc ,�tS' available at the
Testing Center. Speight 105
The Nati. nal teacher Eamma
tuns iNTEl Core Battery will be
ottered at ECU on Saturday.
November 13 Application blanks
are to be completed and mailed t(
�he Educati, nal Testing Service.
B' x W6 R Pr,n(i i N08540. t
arrive by October 11 Application
blanks are aisi available al the
Testmg Center Speight 105
TUTOR
� . � a Pi the Nal
Fraternity � rfei g tut rs
. � etv t Genet al C nege
's a' npetitivf rate it
, . .� i a '
Depar' men:
- cred
baunders a"
!�� 5tn
D r n
p m A
Rev B
10:
NAACP
me I '��� t the NAACP
i.i its bin � ' . meeting
� ues lay l I at 6 00 pm ,n
k1 ��� :jh Mi lei � a Student
Centei �'� '� � � sted pet s
please at ti
GERONTOLOGY
A � en . u ( � � egistet d n t
� � j, ' � � multi disciplinary
rse that w � - �' - I .
i . i . lucation re
� �� ents Inti � ti
Get roiogv a feat � � faculty
� . . � rs ti (ten � pat'
nents a wi I � mbet
. � � ' � ���-�
led is ps v C soi
semster Be sore ' pri
ter I � mti ducti �� � CJ i
ELEGANT
VIOLENCE
El � Rugby wil
� - �. � �
mono , - �. � ,
12 00 � i let
their R ks Ii � ai , ,�����
COOP
Black and Decker in Taroor
has ar opening tor a part time ac
counting clerk The person must
be able to perform miscellaneous
accounting duties such as paying
invices and general bookkeep
mg Preferred is someone who can
per ate a 10 key adding machine
Employment would Start as soon
as possible Fur more into, call the
C. op office e�t 6V79
AMBASSADORS
Old Ambassadors If you were
an ECU Ambassador during the
1981 196? school year and have ni t
attended a General Meeting or
'acted the Alumni Center
1757 60721 you must do so before
Friday. Oct 8. or your name will
be dropped from the official roll
Present Ambassadors Don't
forget the General Meeting on
Wednesday, Oct 6 at 5 00 p m in
the Vendenha'i Multipurpose
Km There are alot .i
H no ming Events coming up
a- want � be invi Ived m and the
Telephone Campaign is halfway
" r ugh Details -t these will be
announced at t�is meeting
Future Ambassadors All Am
bassadi r applicants will be receiv
nig a notice from the Membership
Committee bet re Weoneday, Oct
20
PHOTOGENIC0
Tt eECUC mme
oepa �Auld ii K i
�interested it
ngtia'terid
A. � P' Oi' gt 20ap'
JKtini 5 IIIbe ann
P"apQ a
�, A i
91 Arts
nviteall
� n and
m -del
V3SSi �'
rs Or-
eo A i
a' i u.
like
ac:s and layouts
a M be t.ieo ano
� reference Al
' " atolog �oi
pa'd by the ' Of
T he service a hi oe a" 5
n Episcopal Capia �
i Haoaer- ce ebi it i .
PARTY
The k.ippH � pha s Attet eiap
I . HOUt Happ, M ur Pa'
c �� � .�" aftet . ��� I � �
downtown a'o par a " the
ka s Fried. October 8 fri m 9 00
FRISBEE
LAW COURSE
edun � �
i�S3 Thi
� a iav.
e spr.g
CK" .
Mondays
F � �
UNDERSTANDING
. � � ep si �
� � �
� � �� pecif
� .v ei
� ta � " � � �
pliCity
IV Y c
: � first
aa -oi
" 59
w a - � ' � � � " � r
related i . . te
. H . mi . V all S"u
teni enter 1 �. ;� � Oc
' ' � ' at 2 30 pn � � . j.
r he F i ' � � - � o � , .
� . r a z v and
heckuval ' ' � �� �'
t whi a ; I hi �
Pi . . tf wil ' � ' � '
time � �63
. ano
lay at 4 01 it the I " -
meh �. � '
' : � � I at i
� . Ii �
iSt spring ht Flying
D C � Alt ���� i.
s - Light
Flying C � .��� at
ATTENTION JEWISH
STUDENTS
� . - I i . � � H
bet ' �' 5 30 m
248 Mi
� . . � �'� '
par'u pa"
SCIENCE MAJORS
��� . � piaci rpeis n ' �
� . - �' . tlice tH 'ween 1C a ��,
C RC i hen
physics $25 00 and CRC I rgan
n t und i D S20 00 Paymen-
��� roer is placed Place
COOPERATIVE
EDUCATION
CLUB
� � . - � I . . - rga
meeting tot I '� p Club n
1 hursday i bei t at 4 00 p.m
� KM Raw rue ub is tor
�'� �
participaf ' �
;�-� : � �' pi �' �
57 697V�
' '
HOMECOMING
DECORATIONS
entei '� � I
Di
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I Hi. US
mpptii.
uld subm
RCADE VARIETY
:ik t 5th4 Kradt i Ii
Miller
lite
$2.79
Gl Camouflaged Fatigues and
T Shirts. Sleeping Bags
Backpacks Camping Equip
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Dishes �n0 Over 700 Different
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STORE
1501 S Evans
Street
ARCADE
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Draft Beer
12-�. cup
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218 F 5th A
RcidtCirck
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re?
pock
IU0
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pRlK
HAIR GALLERY
236 Greenville Blvd. (Behind Tipon Annex)
355-2076
Student Special
Guvs & Gals Haircuts
$550 reg. $7.50
Stylist Expertly Trained in
Caucasion & Black Hair
Open MonSat Thors. evening by app't
Bring This Ad & Student ID
Good Thru Oct. 23, 1982
REMEMBER DROP-ADD DAY
IF YOU RECEIVED A
YELLOW V.I.P. CARD,
DON'T FORGET TO USE IT.
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Banquet & Party
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Friday Saturday 11am 10pm
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I nrvdjix paper and v�rdnedat hrforr fhurda
puhhtainin
Name
Address
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No. lines at 75� per line $N�nw�rtn-inv S �enUc:

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MUSIC
Tie School of Music is ottering
' r 'he spring semester four ser
vice courses wMici qualit tor
general education tine arts
guidelines In addition re two sec
tions of Music Appreciation
iMUSC 22081 the following
courses are scheduled for non
music rrj rs History of Jan
Music iWUSC 2258i. Musk t tne
T'lea'er iMUSC 2228�, and Or
cnes'ral Mush. 'VUSC 22181
CAMPUS SERVICE
T � f Fountain of L'te Cnns'ian
Fetlt ASiip a.11 sponsor a campus
service r-Oc"ooer 10 at 11 00 a m
in me Jenkins Fine Ar's
Auditorium Everyone 'S
welcome
PRE MEDS
D ctor William E aupus. Dear
' ��! ECUSC' I of Medicine a
D ct r Caiv" Smith a family
v 1 s.c ���" pra ' ng - Ais'taa
v !�� NC will speak to the ECU
r c, CiuD and ar,r pre meaicai
� � idents a � j � attend n Oc
� Per 11 a- 7 00 BN 102
Dean . aupos a.11 speak
I the ECU S �
and medical � todem life Doctoi
II I � jss the Me a
tan . ' � � er m a rura
�- rr unity
HUNGER
join the Hunger Coalition m
their Acrid Food Day'(WFD)
activites on campu Octooer 12 is
the day pu' aside Dy the Food and
Agricultural Organization of the
United Nations to educate people
about the prooiems ana solutions
of the hunger .ssue
SO 000 people die each day from
orama'ic Starvation" according
to United Nations statistics The
FCU Hunger Coalition trunks that
� unger can pe prevented Du' 'ha'
it will take a maior ettorr p� all of
us 'o do it The first step is per
sonai education
BIOLOGY CLUB
Meeting to oe held Monday Oc
tooer 11 a' 7 00 p m Gues'
speakers include Dean Laupus of
ECU Medical School ana Dr
Smith, a Family Practiti, ner Ah
s'uoems are 'hvitea to a"e"a '
De held n BN 102 if the Bi
Bu.ldmg
PRE O.T.
MAJORS
Occupa'iai r her a p y
Prereq srr- t- � r A Pre O T
maiors a II oe conducted Me ��-�re
Wednesday Oc .oer 13 a'
7 OOp m .n BD 112 S'ud I
prepared , prereg I I
Semester
PRE OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPY
PreOccopa- na ' � � 4Vi
studen-s s ,01c oe aaw s- I � �
A
Ap at forms Arz -ees � 1
?, .foer Amed Mea " pr K
s ns Admiss 'S "es must
-ece.vec d. the Ti' ng mpany
Dy Oct.Der 8 1982 Appncs-
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Testing Ceer 105 Spe g -
BuiiJ . ���� s 00 afl 1 00
a-o De'Aeei j qq a' h
Occupa' i rherapy Afl
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it pre reejistrat i
ELEGANT
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ECU Mens RiiQC, a � St A
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The Eas' Caro.mian .
are loca'ed � ,ff Oia Sec"
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THE EAST CAROL INJAN
OCTOBER 7, 1982
Graham's Message Changes
B PATRICK
O'NEILL
Miff W met
Once known for his
"fire and brimstone"
anti-communist ora-
tions, Christian
evangilist Billy Graham
came to North Carolina
with a different
message last week.
During his five-day
isit to UNC-Chapel
Hill, Graham brought
his new message, one of
world peace, a peace,
which he says, can only
be achieved by ridding
our world of nuclear
weapons.
"We are on the erge
of nuclear Armaged-
don Graham told an
opening-night audience
of 5000inUNC'sChar-
micheal Auditorium.
"With 15 nations
possessing nuclear
weapons, and 35 na-
tions and numerous ter-
rorist groups expected
to have them by the end
oi the century
The isit to Chapel
Hill was the first one
fot Graham in over 20
years. During his five
evening lectures,
Graham, 63, drew a
total of 30,700 people
to hear topics ranging
from peace to sex.
"Personal peace in a
Nuclear Age" was the
title of Graham's open-
ing night lecture, a
topic relatively new to
the born-again peace
activist.
Followers of Graham
admit that his new anti-
nuclear weapons posi-
tion has cost him some
followers, but Graham
has publicly stated that
there have been times in
his past when he wishes
he had done more
thinking before he
spoke out on certain
issues.
Graham was a strong
supporter of United
States involvememt in
the Vietnam war, as
well as a staunch
backer of President
Richard Nixon and his
policies.
Graham discussed
three levels of the peace
effort during his lec-
ture. He spoke of
spiritual peace, or
peace through God,
psychological peace,
and peace on Earth.
"It's lough to be a
Christian he said.
"The danger lies not
in a nuclear war bet-
ween the United States
and the Soviet Union,
but in a war waned bv
small countries acquir-
ing nuclear weapons
Graham said in
reference to the dangers
of nuclear war.
"What he is doing is
speaking as an
American for the
American people in his
desire for peace said
the Rev. Bill Hadden,
ECU's Episcopal cam-
pus minister. "I was
delighted with his
move. It was good to
see fundamentalist
religion move into the
area of social con-
cern Hadden added.
Graham, who recent-
ly returned from a trip
to the Soviet Union,
has been highly criticiz-
ed for positive
statements that he
made about the Soviets
while he was there.
"He's trying to per-
sonalize the whole pro-
cess of dialogue with
the Soviet Union and
the Eastern bloc coun-
tries, Hadden
saidThey make
statements, we make
statements, it's a
faceless thing. I feel
that his is absolutely
sincere
"We're all living on
the very edge of hell.
Can we stop it?"
Graham asked. "God
has a plan for the
human race � we will
survive in spite of
ourselves he said, ad-
ding some optimism to
the lecture.
"You must count the
costs and ask yourself
if you are willing to let
Christ enter your life in
the midst of a world
that seems to be blow-
ing apart Graham
said.
"I absolutely agree
(with Graham) com-
mented Hadden. "We
are heading toward a
holocaust. We are
threatened as a civiliza-
tion; the enemy is not
another nation, but the
nuclear bomb itself
UNC Baptist campus
minister the Rev.
Robert Philips was also
pleased with the
Graham visit. "He
(Graham) has moved to
a position of real con-
cern about the
possibility of nuclear
war Philips said.
Philips commended
Graham because he was
"communicating inter-
nationally" on the
nuclear issue. Philips
agreed with Hadden
See GRAHAM, Page 5
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Campus Police Start
Bicycle Crackdown
By PATRICK
O'NEILL
Slair Writer
Beginning Monday
the ECU Campus
Police will begin a
crackdown campaign
on bicyclists who
disobey traffic laws.
"We're going to start
strict enforcement of
the bicycle regulations
on Monday said
Gene McAbee, a detec-
tive with the campus
police. He said the
stricter enforcement
policy would be in ef-
fect until further
notice.
McAbee noted that
the new enforcement
practices would include
moving violations such
as running stop signs,
going the wrong way on
one-way streets and ex-
ceeding the campus
speed limit of 15 miles
per hour.
Other regulations
that will be more strict-
ly enforced include
driving an unregistered
bicycle and riding on
the sidewalk. A
driving-on-the
sidewalk violation car
ries a $5 fine, as well as
a possible impound-
ment in the case of an
unregistered bike.
"All bicycles must be
registered McAbee
said. The cost for
registering a bike is one
dollar. "We record the
serial number of the
bicycle and keep it on
file added McAbee.
This process helps in
identifying stolen
bicycles and can be
done by stopping by the
campus station on Fifth
Street.
McAbee noted that
bicycle regulations for
campus are mandatory
under the ECU traffic
ordinances which are
approved by the ECU
Board of Trustees.
He noted further that
the sidewalk between
the music and Brewster
buildings would be a
area of great concentra-
tion by the police units.
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Stye lEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, GmMvm"
MlKL HlJGHHS, Vfonax tdnor
WAVERLY Mfc'RRlTT. Oncer�tArmmt ClNDY PLEASANTS, Sporu tdu�r
Robert Ricks. kMm Greg Rideout. mm�
At i Afrashteh, , m� yianaKer Steve Bachner, gmhmm ����
Stephanie Groon. Dm Htaw Juliana Fahrbach, so�wa�
JONl GUTHRIE, fti &("�� MlKE DAVIS, Production Manager
K Vy
October "7, 182
Opinion
Page 4
New Building
,4 Com W7i Two Sides
The recent uprising among
students and faculty alike over the
possible construction of a new
classroom building has brought to
the forefront several neglected con-
siderations which require at least
some comment.
It seems that both parties in the
argument consistently disregard the
validity of points made by the other
side. But the fact is, both those por-
posing the construction and those
opposed to it have valid arguments,
and both sides must, at some time,
be heeded.
Despite claims to the contrary of
several enraged students, East
Carolina does need a new classroom
building. In the past decade, univer-
sity growth (in population, etc) has
far exceeded university expansion
(i.e residence halls, classroom
buildings, etc.). Granted, certain
central-campus buildings � most
notably Brewster � are not utilized
to capacity on a day-to-day basis.
Nevertheless, by the time a propos-
ed building becomes a reality, the
increase in student body will more
than make up for the void.
In the past three years alone,
ECU has upped its student popula-
tion by approximately 1,000. If,
perchance, that rate of growth
should continue for two or three
more years, a building proposed in
1982 will have proven itself a
necessity, not a luxury. Our ad-
ministration, as their obligation dic-
tates, must prepare this university
for the future, whatever form this
preparation takes.
However, if one of the last
refuges on campus must be sacrific-
ed to make room for yet another
four-walled monster, then
"progress" just might not be worth
the effort. Solitude is already an en-
dangered species on campus. Its ex-
tinction may depend on the eventual
location of the new building.
But realistically speaking, how
many of us can honestly admit that
we make use of the arboretum now?
Those persons desperately concern-
r-Campus Forum
ed over its hypothetical loss are a
select few � a very select few. Most
students, sadly enough, probably
couldn't care less if a few trees are
uprooted to aid the construction of
a convenient building, something
Chancellor Howell says is in-
evitable.
This, of course, is not to say that
just because those opposed to the
planned building site are few in
number that we should disregard
their opinion. No. Theirs is too
legitimate a concern to be so easily
pushed aside.
Nonetheless, deny it as we may
like to, university administration is
a political proposition. No decision
concerning this many people will
ever please everyone, so the pros
and cons of any proposal must be
weighed, and decisions must be
made based on the administration's
concept of a "greater good or at
times, a "lesser evil
Since the building plan was an-
nounced last month, various subse-
quent proposals have sprung up,
through the Campus Forum and
other media, which should be
recognized by our administration.
Alternate locations, such as the
wooded area behind the Joyner
Library and the infirmary, should
be seriously considered.
However, that coin also has two
sides. Those who have submitted
proposals to construct the new
building on what is now designated
for student parking should consider
the serious parking problem already
at hand. Taking away existing space
while increasing the demand for
parking is, to say the least, not wise.
So, a better understanding is
needed on both sides of the
classroom fence. Some sort of open
meeting should be held to give pro-
ponents and opponents a chance to
explain their positions. "Working
together despite the inherent cor-
niness of that phrase, is the only
way ECU will progress into the
future, with or without a new
classroom building
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PCB'ers Protest Hunt's Negligence
By PAT O'NKILL
More than 500 people have been arrested
in the last three weeks of anti-PCB
demonstrations in rural Warren County.
Despite Hunt administration claims that
the protests are being led by "outside
agitators most of the arrested
demonstrators have been Warren County
residents.
True, the almost daily protests have at-
tracted a few civil rights leaders who claim
the PCB dump site was chosen on racial
grounds, but most of the men, women and
children who have gone to jail are locals
who just don't want a PCB-contaminated
landfill in their neighborhood.
Opponents of the hazardous landfill
make two very strong points, which we all
should ponder. First, is the dump sate?
From the wide anety of responses that
numerous experts have been giing to this
question, I feel it is logical to conclude that
no one really knows for sure.
Second, why was a poor, largely minori-
ty populated county chosen for the site?
Again, some experts claim there were plen-
ty of more-suited areas to dump the
chemicals. It would appear that civil rights
leaders are at least partly correct. Warren
County was probably chosen because state
leaders felt certain that little or no
resistance to the dump would be generated
by poor, unorganized blacks.
Well, the decision was made; the dump
is just about full, and chances of relocating
the landfill seem slim. These facts lead us
to a new series of crucial questions. First ot
all, why is governor Hunt refusing to meet
with the opponents of the dump site? And
what's the state going to do with the hun-
dreds of people who are out on bail pen-
ding trials for impeding traffic and
resisting arrest?
Once again. Hunt is playing the shrewd
politician role. He's playing it safe, staying
out of the line ot fire � exactly the op-
posite position that he should be taking as
our state's primary political leader. These
small-town folks are asking some tough
questions. And they're entitled to some
answers.
Hunt should be accessible. He owes the
people of Warren County, as well as the
rest of us, some of his time. In fact, I am in
support of Hunt's taking a trip to Warren
County to meet with the residents and
leaders who oppose the dump.
Already, the costs of sending dozens of
extra highway-patrol officers to Warren
County to arrest the demonstrators has run
into the thousands of dollars. Most of the
people arrested are demanding trials, a
process that could go on for months and
could cost taxpayers millions. The com-
plications created by this affair could go
on for many more months. At some point.
Hunt will hae to get invoked.
The people of Warren County feel that
thev've been quite literally "dumped on
Not only are they faced with a land
may or may not be safe, but the a
that this dump could be setting a precedent
for future waste disposal locations
These factors, coupled with the r.
intervention position of Gov. Hunt, lead
me to believe that the people ol Wai
County do. indeed, have something to
worry about. like one of the
demonstrators said, he won't be convinced
that PCB dumps are safe until I
right smack in the middle ot Wake Coun-
ts Mv bet is that he neer will.
To The Gallows With The Lot!
Sidewalk Cyclists
B ERNEST CONNER
I have the solution for the problem of
cyclists riding their bikes on the sidewalk.
Make the sidewalks off-limits to pedestrian
traffic. Put the pedestrians on the roads,
and put bikes on the sidewalks.
Currently, the university policy has the
sidewalks off-limits to cyclists, and a scor-
ching S5 fine is the penalty.
But alas, here lies the problem that so
desperately needs a solution. The universi-
tv police do not enforce the policy as it is
currently on the books. And I know for a
fact that it's on the books, because I got all
my information (on the fine, etc.) from
them.
I used to think they just didn't see all the
violators, and therefore few citations were
handed out. But last Friday, as I was walk-
ing past Austin, a cyclist sped past me. I
looked up and noticed that she was headed
right toward a campus security
policewoman in a Cushman cart. I
thought. "Good, now 1 can see if they real-
ly do enforce the law
The female cyclist not only went past the
policewoman but missed getting hit by in-
ches. The security officer slammed on the
brakes, but the cyclist peddled right past
on her way to the Student Supply Store
without looking back.
Did the policewoman, trained to react to
emergency situations, try to go after the
law-breaker? No, she simply put her head
on the steering wheel, regained hei .
posure and went on about he- -
Probably to issue tickets to a
threatening parking violators
If i appear cynical here. be
because I have grown thai way afl
semesters of putting up with cj
ticallv knocking over student- on theii -vj,
to class, while the campu- police tal
solutely no action to reduce fhs pmbtemt
Laws are on the book-
excellent way to insure di
disregard for a law is not to enl Bv
their inaction, this is exactlv what the cam
pus police have done.
I'll be fair and say that I nave n M pro-
vided, in this essay, a place for the .an
police to give their side of the storv 1 d
feel their excuse for not enforcing the
would be satisfactorv. After all, act
speak louder than words in mo cases
And the action of the campus police
spoken here.
So 1 recommend, since the camp
police do not enforce the law. they should
work to have the law removed or cMar.ge
to something thev will enforce. L ndc
present situation, it would probabiv be
safer to have the students walking in the
roads on campus. Drivers at least snovv.
some deference to pedestrians, whereas
most cyclists on the sidewalks do not. And
that's what laws are for � to make the
world a safer place for society.
Greenville's Elderly Getting No Respect
Harassment of the elderly seems to be
a growing problem in Greenville, a lot of
which appears to be initiated by ECU
students. I am an ECU student whose
grandparents, in their 70s, live close to
the university and are constantly being
harassed. They are not an isolated case;
the problem extends to the community,
as I have heard several accounts of
similar harassment.
Often students tramp through their
yard, picking flowers (without invita-
tion), picking grapes and stepping on
anything in their path with no regard to
the fact that they are trespassing on
"posted" private property. Many of the
residents have stopped growing small
vegetable gardens because of the
disrespect shown to their private proper-
ty. The most recent incident was the
theft of several hanging plants and pot-
ted plants from their porch, following
several students cutting across their yard
to attend the football game. What has
happened to the ideal of the right to life,
liberty and property, when infr-
ingements such as the ones cited are be-
ing ignored?
I hear students complaining all the
time about these "old folks" not
treating them fairly. How would your
parentsgrandparents react to such in-
justice? I agree that it may be inconve-
nient to walk around these yards to go to
class or the stadium, but if 15,000 people
were to walk through your dorm room
or apartment everyday, how would it
look after a week?
1 cannot blame the residents for their
meager attempts to protect their per-
sonal property. How would you feel if
your property was stolen almost as fast
as you could replace it? I believe you
would feel violated and that your securi-
ty and peace of mind had been threaten-
ed. That is how the victims feel.
1 appeal to each of you, as one student
to another: Isn't it time we gain and
show respect for the elderly? Remember,
if they were not here, we wouldn't be
either.
Give them the respect they deserve,
and leave their property alone!
Donna Glisson
Draft Registration
Feelings run high on registration for a
possible military draft. It is a religious
issue � explicitly for Enten Eller, but
equally so for those who insist on
registration.
Why is it so essential that every
American man shuld file a particular
form when he turns 18? Failure to do so
hurts no one. The information is
available. In the cases now going
through the courts, the men have sup-
plied their names and addresses. Most
would be granted conscientious objector
status in a draft. Why are they subject to
a possible $10,000 fine and five years in
jail?
I suggest this answer: Everyone must
recognize the government's right to de-
mand a particular kind of service. The
god who stands over this nation in the
pledge of allegiance has become a god of
war. Every young man is required to do
homage to that god by filing the form.
The refusers understand this. They are
in the tradition of the Biblical Shadrach,
Meshach and Abednego, who refused to
worship Nebuchadnezzar's golden im-
age.
I don't want to take anything away
from those who obey the law when I
note that if a man is concerned merely
with his own safety and well being,
registration is the percentage play. There
may never be a draft. If there is, he may
not be selected. And even if he is, he
may escape unscathed to enjoy his
veteran's benefits.
The refusers, on the other hand, have
met the issue head on. They have not
waited for a war to begin. 1 believe they
are rendering the most important possi-
ble national service by refusing to wor-
ship the god of war.
Edith Webber
Dept. of English
We Love A
Happy Customer
As a senior at East Carolina Universi-
ty, 1 have seen many editions of The
East Carolinian come and go. Often
times, this campus newspaper is met
with much criticism and very little
praise. More often than not, I am willing
to bet, the criticism comes from people
who have no idea what it takes to put
out a paper twice a week. Frequently,
The East Carolinian is subject to
criticism, but rarely do we see action
taken by those so quick to condemn!
At this point, I want to recognize The
East Carolinian and its staff. Your late-
night efforts every Monday and
Wednesday do not go by unnoticed.
Without your energy and enthusiasm.
East Carolina students, faculty and
friends would all be without reading
material on Tuesdays and Thursdays.
Those late nights may drag, but the
paper you are producing is a good one
and one of which to be proud. Thank
you!
My special compliments go to Mike
Hughes. His special way with words,
combined with his dry sense of humor,
continually leave me overcome with
laughter. His unique ability to write
about experiences so common to all of
us is refreshing and funny I only hope
that when we lose him as a graduate in
December, his talents will take him to
another newspaper where he can help
more people see the funnier treats in life.
Best of luck with the fall semester to
the entire East Carolinian staff! 1 admire
you for your hard work. Funny, isn't it,
what a super effect a good leader can
have on a group of people. Cheers to
J.F.M.
Betty Bicardi
Senior, Nursing
Editor's Sole: My Tuesday and Thurs-
day nights are free!
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes ot verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature oj the authorise Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks wilt be permitted.
B
G
( on

A





I HI I -SI AKOI MAN
K lOBI K 7, IW2
Pe�c� Committee Plans Activities
B i MOM
I he i. ireen ilie Peat e
�mmittee is planning
se ei al activ ines foi the
coming academic yeai
rhese will i nclude
speake s v 01 kshops,
.nul films dealing with
sin � �p k as the draft,
t he ai ins i ace, and
nucleai disai mament
1 he I1' een ille Peat e
t, ommittee was staited
letnam
hat time the
Pt immittee con
dm eekl v igils at
Militarization favors
the ceni i ahat ion ol
powei and weakei he
national economy All
ol these (tends make
wai more likel
1 he Peace Commit
tee's tactics have
alw av s . onsisted ol
silent v igils, leaflets and
speakers. The commit
tee looks upon civil
disobedience as an in-
dividual's own deci
sion
Group activities are
generally planned and
iniated bv individuals
1 atet, othei members
who feel motivated to
ma give
assistance to an in-
di idual's project.
According to Web
ber, the Greenville
Peace Committee's
oal is to ha e
,i continuing dialogue
h the communitv li
ped that public
awareness ot peace
issues will be stimulated
and activism increased.
"I wouldn't say that
wai is nevei justified,
but it is a blunt instru
mem Webber said
"Man) ol the things
that vou go to war to
defend are the first
casualties oi that war,
like freedom, tor in-
stance
"It could be worth it
to go to war sometimes,
but basically there are
better ways oi resolving
differences between na-
tions on do need to
be on guard against the
Soviets, but it you
destroy the economy,
vou are destroyed as a
nation in the most
meaningful respects
Webbei said, in ex-
planation of the
group's involvement in
nucleai issues.
When discussing the
nuclear Ireee and
disarmament issue,
Webber asserts that not
only is the United
States not strategically
interior to the Soviets,
but we still maintain
superiority, or, at the
very least, parity.
Former CIA director
William F. Colby has
endorsed the nuclear
treee proposal, saying
that we now have the
ability to verify
whether or not the
Soviets are keeping
their end ot any agree-
ment we might sign
with them.
The Peace Commit-
tee has recently ex-
perienced an increase in
membership and hopes
to attract even more
members during the
coming school year.
When discussing their
activism. Peace Com-
mittee members seem
to evoke an almost
evangilical idealism and
a eal tor doing
something about the
world's problems
"1 believe, as a stu
dent, that student
apathy has increased on
campus over the
years said student
member I h e r e s a
Dulski. "As tutuie
leaders and tuture
parents, we should get
involved in issues that
will affect our tuture
and that ot tuture
generations
Dulski teels that
"students are so caught
up in coping with their
day to dav existence
that they tail to see the
immediacy ot larger
concerns "
The Greenville Peace
Committee sees student
apathv as its most fun-
damental c o n c e r n .
Most however, are op
timistic about their ef-
forts. Thev teel that,
presented with the
tacts, other students
will feel motivated to
join them in then ac
tivism or at least their
ideoloev.
Church of God
Homecoming
OCTOBI K 12
College career class
9:45 a.m.
Corner ot Skinner & Spruce
Dial A Prayer 752 136?
Church no. � 752 4967
HAVE A PROBLEM?
NEED INFORMATION?
REAL Crisis Intervention
24 HOUR SERVICE
D
XZE
man
758 HELP
312 E 10th Street
Greenville. N.C 27834
Graham Preaches Peace
l ��iinu�l From Pag. 3 "e, '�" u" Grahan! or1k l0 prevenl a
lacked an integrated nucleai war.
p isition ol what the
v general public's respon Graham's foui other
was sibilit was to prevent a topics were i it led
nuclear war. Philips "Faith and Intellect
felt that people have a "The Universit of
fret will to determine Life "Relationships"
one then tate and God and 'The Reason to
would expect us to Live
K( Df V XK1I M

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mi i si i kii ini
in mm k 7, iss:
Dispute Of President's Election Presented
Continued From Page 1
report, responded, 1 decided to
purchase rnore papei ads than 1 an
tiapared, so I didn't use them
because it would have put me ovei
m limit. Also 1 gained free use ot a
xerox eopiei
I he committee then asked
Henderson it he could "place before
this committee 1000 flyers and 350
posters?" 1 his was halt ot the
posters and tlveis purchased from
Morgan Printers b Henderson. His
response to the committee was,
"No, I have given several posters
and tleis to relatives and some
have been losi
I he report furthei explains that
aftet the questioning, "Henderson
then left the room Upon Ins leaving
the loom, the board voted im
mediateh to disqualify Mi I i k
Henderson as a candidate foi presi
deni ot the St r "
Henderson appealed this decision
to Mallon who, aftei obtaining a
legal opinion from David H
Stevens, university attorney, ovei
mined the Election committee deci-
sion to disqualify Henderson.
interest.
nh this decision, Henderson did
not become president based on an
tout day earliei letter from Stevens
which staled since there were
unresolved charges, Henderson was
not m good standing at the time he
look the oath ot office and
therefore he was ineligible to take
ihe oath.
Anothei Review Boaid was con
vened to hear the unresolved
charges which involved the Morgan
Printei incident. I he allegation that
Henderson had overspent and
falsified his expense was not con-
sidered in the initial Review Board
heaiing Cook had only requested
thai the Election Committee, which
is not a judicial body, investigate the
charge.
1 his was what the committee was
dome when it met with Henderson
and disqualified him.
So the new Review Board was in
reality the Election Committee ver-
sus Henderson and was considering
new charges relating to the firsl elec-
tion.
When the second Review Board
mei. letl Foster, who with Mike
1 he decision was based on due Swaim, were Hendeison's student
process. Stevens, m an April 26 lei
tei to Maltory, explained that while
the committee was in conformity
with the applicable SCiA election
rules, n was his opinion thai the ac
non disqualifying Henderson
should be set aside in thai Hender-
son was noi given the lull due pro
cess rights which should be accorded
to any student who is faced with
divestiture ol a property oi liberty
Lowers tor the second hearing.
I iiev made several requests tor the
board to rule on whethei or noi to
hear the case.
According to Blake, who was pre-
senl al the hearing to answer any
questions regarding the Election
Committee's actions, the board
would send the participants out bel
ween each vole. 1 he board would
then call them back in.
I his happened, Blake explained,
tour times. Each time the board
would rule that they were going to
continue with hearing the case, then
after the fourth time they ruled that
they would not hear the case.
According to Elmer Meyer, vi e
chancellor tor student life, the
review board made their decision
based on the "48-hour rule A rule
under Article XIV, Section 2 of the
SCiA Election Rules which slates a
complaint shall be filed with 48
hours after the votes have been
counted.
Mevei explained that the board
fell thai Henderson's due process
rights had been violated and
therefore it couldn't hear the
charges.
I Ins April 30th decision bv the
Review Board was made in light ot a
letter from Stevens stating thai "the
rules do noi place a time limitation
upon the Flection Committee to in-
itiate an investigation pursuant to its
inhereni power as the supervisory
authority foi compliance with the
election rules
I he Review Board according to
Meyer rejected this opinion.
On Mav 3, Blake, as chairman oi
the Election Committee appealed
the decision ot the Review Board to
i he adminstration.
�tier meeting with members ol
both sides oi the conflict, members
oi the Review Board, Blake and
reviewing othei documents, Meyei
announced on Mav 24 that the ad-
minstration was upholding the
Review Board's decision. I his deci-
sion was made in consultation with
Chancellor John Ho well, Meyer ex-
plained.
Cook, 1 ittle and Blake said that
Meyer did not follow the SCiA
prescribed rules when he reviewed
the case. They said the rules say the
appeal will be based on bnets
presented by both sides.
Meyer explained that the basic
thing in this lype of matter is that
students should decide the issue.
"Some students were looking to us
tor final resolution. We telt very
strongly that there were enough
checks and balances in the system
and that we should uphold the deci-
sion ot the students. It a crook is in
office, the students made that deci
sion
Henderson ret used repeated re-
quests tor an interview on the sub
jeet, but Swaim explained that he
thought the boards were fair. "I hey
(the final Review Board) looked at
the tacts
Manv participants in the mattei
are still bitter about the end resuli oi
all the legal battles
last Monday, a newsletter was
published calling itself, "The Stu
dent's Press I his newsletter listed
wrongs that Henderson had alleged
ly committed to become president
and taken as president Main ol the
charges bv the newsletter were fac-
tualK incorrecl or presented in a
misleading manner, bui the Morgan
Fruiter incident was included in the
newsletter's hst oi charges I he
newsletter also mentioned deman-
ding Henderson's resignation, recall
and impeachment as what students
could do about the charges.
Blake explained thai he knows
college is a learning experience,
"but it is also a place where fairness
should prevail. What bothers me
most is thai he cheated and is still
pu id nt
Furthei a tim could still be -
by various parties to rent
Henderson from office.
During the recent election, b
sides were concerned with .
enough legislators sympathetic
then side ol the story in ase ol
peachment. Swaim said. "I �
at least one-third
C ook said he doubts impea
men! would be possible and a I :
"I don't know what I'm going I
do It he was impeached, I wou
be president 1 just want
students to know what the fa
I not only cheated me H
cheated every student in the
I hat's why I m pursuing this
recall could also be
but most people involved in the pr
cess doubt how effective il
be.
Fall Election Turnout Doubles
By BOB MORGAN
siaff Wrilrr
flections chairperson Joy
Wilkens reported the general
statistics from last Wednesday's
SCIA elections Tuesday night.
In the elections for SCiA class of-
ficers and legislators, the figure was
a 73 percent increase in voter tur-
nout over last year's election. Over
1,520 students voted last Wednes-
day, compared to 879 one year ago.
With a student bodv ol about
13,000 students, that is approx
imately 8.5 percent oi all eligible
voters.
The polling places with the largesl
turnout were the Student Supply
Store and the Croatan snack bar
Two hundred votes, or 7.5 percent,
were made at each oi these location
Scott dormitory led ail residence
halls in votes with 133. White, with
over 350 residents, had the lowest
turnout oi all dorms, with only 20
people v oting.
In what Wilkens sail- a continu-
ing tradition, twice as mar
were cast by treshmen than
other class. "The higher the da
Wilkens said, "then the tewe' tl
students who went out and
Wilkens disclosed that sh-
i serve as chairperson I
elections ol the SGA executive
fleers next sprint She said I I
is very pleased ��� weel
ilts but thai
crease turnout even n
me.
Rl n
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1
re
led
fo-
ld
li e
c
s
n iE EAST C AROLINIAN
Style
OCTOBER 7, 1982
Page 1
Griswold: Keeper Of
Impressionist Colony
By JOHN i. TARRANT
Sarilhsoaiaa
In 1899 Miss Florence Griswold, a
spinster residing in Old Lyme, Con-
necticut, had become "a
gentlewomen in reduced cir-
cumstances meaning that, though
she came of excellent family, she
was broke.
Half a dozen years later she was
the Gertrude Stein of an important
segment of the American Impres-
sionist movement.
When Miss Florence's father, a
supposedly prosperous packet boat
captain, died in 1882, all he left his
widow and daughters was a large
1 ate Georgian mansions with an im-
posing colonnaded portico. Where
had the money gone? Captain
Griswold reportedly had been sup-
porting a second family in London.
Mrs. Griswold and her three
daughters, running true to the form
of the time, opened a school for
young ladies. It did not flourish. By
1899 Mrs. Griswold and one
daughter had died. Another
daughter had moved away. Miss
Florence, on her own, was reduced
to taking in boarders.
During the 1890's, Impres-
sionism, which had convulsed the
French art world for 20 years, was
ending as a coherent movement. But
it was new to the Americans. They
seized upon it, determined to move
it to America. They would not be at-
tempting the transplantation onto
hostile soil. America had taken to
the new way of painting. The
Monets and Pissarros displayed at
the World's Columbian Exposition
of 1893 in Chicago had scored a
substantial hit.
The Americans brought back the
Impressionists' love for simple
scenes, painted outdoors. But they
did not bring back the lust for
change and experimentation that ef-
fervesced in France. Once the
Americans had the concept, they
stayed with it for longer than the ar-
tists of any other country. Having
now absorbed a new concept and
risen in rebellion, the American Im-
pressionists needed a location �
their own Giverny.
Old Lyme lies at the confluence of
the Connecticut River and Long
Island Sound. Through the flat salt
meadows the Duck, Black Hall and
Lieutenant rivers � little more than
creeks, really � meander to meet
the Connecticut. In 1903 open
meadows stretched northward
toward a series of the ridges that
striate Connecticut. Stone walls
bordered the winding lanes, and
stone bridges spanned the little
rivers. The woods were dominated
by oaks and cedars. On a clear sum-
mer day there was something par-
ticularly lucid and brilliant about
the light.
Some artists were already spen-
ding their summers at Miss Florence
Griswold's house, dilapidated and
lacking in plumbing though it was.
This was because Henry Ward
Ranger had discovered it in 1899.
Ranger � heavyset, bearded, ex-
uding self-confidence � was the
dean of American barbizon
painters. He swore that he would
make Old Lyme into the "new Fon-
tainebleau There he presided over
a growing colony of "tonalists so-
called because their canvases were
dominated by one color.
But Ranger's world changed
when Childe Hassum, already a
well-known painter, arrived in 1903.
Hassam, a spruce-looking man of
medium height and powerful build,
was every bit as forceful and com-
pelling as Ranger. He liked to drink,
but this did not bother Miss
Florence, who always took care of
him when he was a little under the
weather. And he was outspoken �
his opinions of the tonalists, whom
he called the "Brown Gravy
School were well known.
This did not worry Ranger and his
colleagues much. After all, their
style was, they thought, in the
ascendant. Preparing an exhibition
of recent paintings, they joked that
Hassam's brightly colored "The
Old Bridge" would stick out like a
sore thumb. It did, indeed, but the
comparison was favorable to the
newcomer. Within two years Ranger
was spending his summers
elsewhere. During this period
Hassam was the dominant artist at
Old Lyme. Impressionism became
the prevailing mode. And Florence
Griswold was its maternal spirit.
The artists covered the walls,
doors and paneling of the dining
room with paintings. One who
didn't pay his bill suffered the ig-
nominious fate of having his panel
picture replaced. And the artists
were elitist. Beginners might find
rooms elsewhere in Old Lyme; they
were not welcome at the Griswold
House.
One thing is sure. When the
painters came to Old Lyme, Miss
Florence found her reason for liv-
ing. In later years, she would style
herself "Keeper of the Artist Col-
ony She was more than its keeper.
Hassam may have been its artistic
force, but she was its human force.
The Griswold House, refurbish-
ed, serves today as an art museum
and headquarters of the Lyme
Historical Society. The dining room
paneling still displays the work of
Hassam, Will ard Metcalf, Frank
Bicknell, Henry R. Poore, Clark
Voorhees and the others.
Florence Griswold's back porch in 1905: a convival meeting place. In foreground is Willard Metcalf.
15-Year-Old Morris
Fights Against Hunger
Planned Pethood Important
Concern For Owners As Well
As Surrounding Community
By MIKE HAMER
Staff Writer
Sooner or later, every pet owner must confront the
problem of whether or not to spay or neuter his favorite
cat or dog.
Ms. Winkie Lee, publicity director for the Pitt Coun-
ty Humane Society, feels that spaying females and
neutering male pets is the best solution to the problem
of unwanted pets. She mentioned that although the
price of spaying or neutering is expensive for a student
foster parents would have to answer phone inquiries
about the pet. The Human Society would pay for the
pet's food and medicine.
The Daily Reflector runs an Adopt-A-Pet column
every week in its Sunday edition. "Anyone looking for a
pet ought to check out that column Ms. Lee said.
The Human Society is also looking for new members.
Student memberships cost only one dollar. According to
Ms. Lee, the Society is looking for writers and artists to
help out, as well as volunteers who can help to find
�HKB&J�& i
fsTand up To? spaying -S?a up � neutVmgl it homes for animals or who can help to generate funds
actually is the most effective way to deal with the over- for the Humane Society.
population problem. "You only have to do it one
time she said.
Ms. Lee added that the best time to have a female dog
or cat spayed is when they are six months old. The best
time for males is seven months.
"Neutering a male pet will prevent his wandering
habits. According to a local veterinarian, unneutered
cats travel a 3 mile radius in one day, while dogs can
roam a 20 mile radius in one evening. She feels that
sterilized animals are more affectionate toward their
owners.
Mr. Willie Pate, director of Environmental Services
for Pitt County, said on Wednesday that approximately
SO animals are brought in to the county pound each
week. "Of these about 98 percent are exterminated
Pate said He added that animal control costs Pitt
County from $45,000 to $50,000 dollars each year. Pate
commented that the county also has to deal with packs
of wild dogs "We have to deal with 10 to 12 packs of
wild dogs each year he said. "The packs range in size
from 3 to 17 dogs
Ms Brenda Tripp, who works at the Greenville
Animal Shelter said that the shelter receives about 30
animals each week. "Only about one-fourth of thse find
homes " she said. When asked what kind of animals
usually find homes she replied that male puppies and
kittens are usually the ones adopted.
Ms. Sue Luddeke, an art student, expressed her opi-
nions on the question of spaying and neuturing pets. "If
I could find good homes for the animals I wouldn't
necessarily want to get the animal fixed she said, "but
if you can't take care of all the offspring you should
definitely get it done.
Ms Nina Freifeld, a graduate assistant at the Art
School, said that she got her male cat, "Collette,
neutered because, "he kept getting into fights and it got
really expensive to have his injuries tended to. She ad-
ded that keeping and raising young cats or dogs costs a
lot of money. .
Ms Anna Daughtry, a grad student at the art depart-
ment, feels that spaying is a good idea also. "I let my cat
have one litter she saidbut 1 really think there is an
overpopulation of little kittens
1 asked Ms. Lee of the Humane Society if there were
any discounts on spaying or neutering being offered to
students. She replied that the Human Society is only
able to help out the elderly who live on fixed incomes-
"This is only because we don't have sufficient funds to
offer this service to more people shcf?re$sed.
Ms. Lee added that the Pitt County Humane Society
is looking for foster homes for pets. A �
would keep the animal until it was adopted and the
By PATRICK ONFJI I.
stiff Writer
If visual impressions are any indication. 15 year old
Greenville resident Grayson Bray Morris appears to be
your typical everyday high school student, that is until
she starts talking.
At once the listener realizes that Grayson is tar from
typical and her main topic of conversation, hunger in
our world, is not on everyones favorite subject list.
Grayson who recently left Greenville to begin her
junior year at the North Carolina High School of
Science and Mathematics in Durham, is the founding
member of the local Greenville chapter of The Hunger
Project, a non-profit international organization which
cites as its goal the elimination of hunger on our planet
by 1997. "There are a lot of peole who don't know there
are hungry people declared Miss Morris. She notes
that 28 human beings die from hunger every minute of
the day � 21 of them are children.
Grayson also points out that even when aware that
hunger is an enormous problem, most people don't
know how to respond to it � they feel sort of helpless.
"In order for people to be effective, they have to be
educated said Miss Morris. "Im educating other peo-
ple
The Hunger Project, which was founded in 1977 by
Werner Erhard (also the founder of est or Erhard
Seminar Training), entertainer John Denver, and scien-
Gritty Drama 'Taps9 On Tap At Hendrix This Weekend
Are they rebels with a cause or -homegrown terrorists" schooled In violence by the U.S.mxl The
powerful contemporary drams Taps explores the question this Thursday at 7 p.m. and Friday amtfctar-
day nights at 5, 7:15 aad 9:30. The film will be shown in Mendenhall Student center s Hendrix Theatre,
admission is by ID and activity card for students and MSC membership for faculty and staff. "�"
George C. Scott aad Timothy Hutton (pictured above). Screenings are being sponsored by the ECU htu-
deat Union Films Committee.
tist Buckminister Fuller, also cites education as its ma-
jor goal. The Hunger Project "makes it real clear said
Grayson. what each individual can do. She adds that the
organization recommends that each person create their .
own form of participation.
One way in which she participates is through fasting.
On the 14th of eery month. Miss Morris eats no food
and drinks only water. "It mainly gets you in touch with
what it's like to be hungry she said. "And you can
better empathize with the people who are hungry
Miss Morris even chose to miss an elegant meal at a
nice restaurant on the night of the Rose High School
prom. Why? Because May 14th was the date of the
prom. She chose instead to order only water and tell
those around her the reason for her decision.
Although her efforts help her to better empathize
with hungry people, it doesn't always help her friends
and acquaintences at school empathize with her. "I get
a lot of different reactions Grayson said. "Some
think it's wonderful and some think I have flipped my
lidand some just don't care
When she first started her work with the Hunger Pro-
ject,Miss Morris tried to get other Rose students involv-
ed. "Oh that's real nice was a typical response she
would get, "but none of them really wanted to get in-
volved she said.
Morris preservered and she eventually began to see
the fruits of her work pay off. Students started to
become involved and many of them agreed to sign
Hunger Project enrollment cafds. The enrollment en-
titles a person to receive monthly copes of the Hunger
Project newspaper titled "A Shift in the Wind The
publication has a circulation of 1.5 million and reaches
members in 110 countries.
According to Grayson, the Hunger Project board of
directors say that many little efforts by individuals can
contribute to the alieviation of hunger from our planet,
but a miracle is actually what will ultimately do the
trick. Hence comes the date of 1997 as the goal, and
Gravson savs we're all part of the miraculous process.
Family support has also been an integral part of her
effort. Both of Graysons' parents, Dee and Abbott
Morris have been supportive of her efforts. Even her
younger sister Sara, 9, has helped in the recruiting work
and signed up some of her own third grade friends.
Before her involvement with the Hunger Project Miss
Morris said that most of her knwoledge of the hunger
problem came from what she had seen on television.
"That was all I knew she admitted.
But now, Grayson has become the source of a wealth
of information. Besides fasting and self-education, she
mentions that working in missionary work to help coun-
tries become more self-sufficient, donating money,
political action, and other forms of outreach are some
of the ways to reverse the problem.
Adds Miss Morris, 4lt is individual people who make
the difference � you don't have to be a millionaire or
congressman � it takes everyone. We all can do
something
Part of Grayson's resonsibilities as local coordinator
of the Hunger Project included her liaison work with
the projects eastern U.S. regional office in Richmond.
Each Monday evening, Miss Morris received a phone
call from the Richmond office to give updates on her ac-
tivities and to exchange ideas.
Now that Grayson will be attending school in
Durham, she plans to continue her hunger relief efforts
there. "One of my goals is that everyone at that school
knows what the Hunger Project is before I leave'
Grayson said. "That'll be 550 more people that know
before 1 leave
"Guilt isn't going to end hunger said Miss Morns.
"It (guilt) can consume you She would prefer that
people open their minds � creating a vision is what she
calls it.
Grayson believes that "a change of will" must take
place. "I think there will be a change, but it won't be
immediate
��i in .i���ii�n ��"� mm 'i�mt ���"
��- ���� m m ��ii � " �' "��






IHI EASTCARCM INIAN
CKTOBFR7, 1982
New Novelty Book
Has Quotes Galore
WASHINGTON (UP1) � In his
new book, "The 637 Best Things
Anybody Ever Said Robert Byrne
includes at least 12 things he himself
once said.
Byrne, 1 suppose, was exercising a
collector's prerogative. ("There's
no accounting for taste said the
old lady as she kissed a cow.) Never-
theless, anyone who resorts to ab-
solutes, as Byrne does in this title,
leaves himself open to a certain
amount of second-guessing.
One of his own utterances �
"Everything is in a state of fluv. in-
cluding the status quo � is not
what 1 consider the best thing
anybody ever said on that subject.
i prefer. "Nostalgia isn't what it
used to be
Nor do 1 regard. "Death is
nature's wa of saving 'Howdy
as the best quotation in that field.
Better, to my lights, is, "Death is
nature's way ol telling vou to slow
down
Ahead of Gore Vidal's, "A nar-
cissist is someone better looking
than you are 1 would put. "An
alcoholic is someone you don't like
who drinks as much as you do Or
even Vidal's own, "Nothing is so
preposterous that somebody won't
believe it
The book is divided into two sec-
tions: Part One carries quotations
about God, life, death, murder,
stupidity, narcissism, birth, youth,
sex, love, marriage, Greeks.
Romans, politics, literature, drink
and presidents.
Part Two is titled.
"Miscellaneous
Even though an epigram-lover
may quibble over some of the en-
tries, a book like this can come in
handy on a rainy day.
hat 1 like to do to while away
the soggy hours is play a little game
of "Who Should Have Said That?"
Here's the way it goes:
The quizmaster (me) reads quota
tions from the book and the con-
testants (also me) try to think of ap-
propriate persons, other than the
reputed authors, to whom they
might be attributed.
Following are some of Byrne's
selections along with my guesses as
to who should have said them:
"A narcissist is someone better
looking than you are (Phyllis
Diller)
"For three days after death, hair
and fingernails continue to grow but
phone calls taper off (Alexander
Graham Bell)
"A murderer is one who is
presumed to be innocent until pro-
ven insane (Jack the Ripper)
"Nobody has ever bet enough on
the winning horse (Jimmy the
Greek)
"A government which robs Petei
to pay Paul can always depend on
the support of Paul (Peter the
Great)
"It is better to have loved and lost
than never to have lost at all
(Elizabeth Taylor)
"I would rather go to bed with
Lillian Russell stark naked than
Ulysses S. Grant in full military
regalia (Mrs. U.S. Giant)
"We all have the strength to en-
dure the misfortunes of others
(Menachen Begin)
"Don't be humble. You're not
that great (Alexander Haig)
"It is better to know some of the
questions than all of the answers
(Charles Van Doren)
"It takes about 10 years to get us-
ed to how old vou are (Shirlev
Temple)
"One. Two. Three. Buckle m
shoe (David Stockman)
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Not all clinics are the same.
ABORTION is a difficult decision that's
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Call 781-5550 da or night
Insurance accepted
All inclusne fees
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EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
MENDENH ALL STUDENT CENTER
invites All Full Time ECU Students
to Participate in the
1982 ACU-1
mtmmm�:m�-�m
Recreational Tournaments
wy
V
vV
y
x
m
s
Winners will represent ECU in the
Association of College Unions International
Regional Tournament in Knoxville. Tennessee
Zournament Schedules
Ladies Meet
ECU's Finest
Thursday,Oct. 7ih
7-9:30 p.m.
Mho Room
FREE Admission
FREE BEER
ECU 1.1). Required
AYCOCK
DORM
ALL CAMPUS
CMISS
BACKGAMMON
BILLIARDS - Women
BILLIARDS - Men
No. 13
Oci 25
0� 27
No. 1 I 2
Qualifier from dorm ond day student tournomentt
BOWLING Ho. 1 bejin�
MSC'Intromufol All Campul Bowling
will determine regional participant
TABLE TINNtS No. 4
QuaMieri horn dorm ond doy student tournaments
TABLE SOCCER No. 17
QUALIFYING DAT STUDENT
TOURNAMENTS
TABU TENNIS
BILLIARDS (Men s,
Oct :
Oct 14
QUALIFYING DORM
TOURNAMENTS
TABLE TENNIS & BILUARDS to be sKedule�t by ra
dorm wirh winners selected by October 25
ZJXK
�MwiiKrnaMa.1
�rxi
l�n�-s��' �� ��uMWeVafttiititpi
�x :ric.
REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED
dorms and tournament details available
at Mendenhall s fowling and Billiards Centers
and the Intramural Office. Memorial (jum Koom 204


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Open 7 days a
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at 12 price.
We BUY & sell
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Nov. 24-Nov. 28, 1982
Spend your Thanksgiving holiday in style on Broadway,
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FULLY ACCREDITED A program ol Trinity Christian College
SEMESTER IN SPAIN
For full information�write to
2442 E. Collier S.E Grand Rapids, Michigan 49506
(A Program of Trinity Christian College)
Student Union E.C.U.
Major Attractions presents
Sunday, Oct. 24
38 SPECIAL �ffiS"
Minges Coliseum
Tickets now on sale �
$7.00 advance to ECU Students
$9.00 � General Public
at Mendenhall Central Ticket office
featuring 2 former members
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
OCTOBER 7, 1982
Page 9
Pirates, Spiders Prepare To Tangle
By KEN BOLTON
AuBlam spurts r duof
W ith eight minutes left in Satur-
day's ECU-Missouri football game,
the Tigers were holding on to a slim
14 9 lead. But in the closing
minutes, reserve fullback Eric Drain
scored two touchdowns to nail
down the Missouri victory.
Head coach Ed Emory was disap-
pointed that the Pirates weren't able
to take advantage of this opportuni-
ty to beat a Big Eight Conference
team. "We felt like this was an ex-
cellent chance to make a gain for
our football program he said.
"But we lost to a fine team with a
great tradition
The Pirate kicking game was one
of the highlights for ECU in the
contest, but it also helped provide
for the Pirate's downfall.
With the score at 7-6 in the third
quarter. Tiger nose-guard James
Lockette blocked a Larry Brobst
punt at the East Carolina 36 and
Missouri safety Brad Opel fell on
the ball at the 18.
Four plays later, sub quarterback
Brad Perry, who completed 15 of 22
passes for 176 yards in relief of in-
jured starter Marlon Adler, passed
four yards to James Cover for a
touchdown which gave the Tigers a
14-6 lead.
On the positive side, freshman
place-kicker Jeff Heath tied an ECU
record by kicking three field goals
45 38 and 42 yarders. Heath's
� rst field goal of 45 yards, which
put ECU out tront in the second
quarter, was his longest of the year
and was only four yards off the
school record of 49.
After the game, Emory felt that
the Plate's main problem was on
offense, especially in the second
half. "I thought we played excep-
tionally well in the first half, both
on offense and on defense he
said. "Defensively, we played good
enough to win
Emory was particularity pleased
with the play of defensive ends Jody
Schulz an Jeff Pegues. "I've never
been associated with a game in
which the defensive ends played any
better said Emory. Along with the
rest of the Pirate defense, Schulz
and Pegues helped account for six
quarterback sacks and three tackles
for losses.
Neither offense was able to take
control in the game. ECU, which
came into the game averaging 399
yards a game in total offense, was
able to manage only 205 yards. The
Tigers amassed 414 yards, with most
of them coming late in the game.
Both teams played without
regular quarterbacks. ECU's Greg
Stewart, who splits time with Kevin
Ingram, missed the game because of
an allergy attack. Adler, the Tiger's
signal-caller who came into the
game ranked No. 10 in the nation in
passing efficiency, went out with a
possible concussion in the second
quarter.
The Pirate offense was not able to
move the ball effectively in the se-
cond half, which Emory felt had a
lot to do with Stewart's absence.
"Kevin did not have a good second
half and he made some poor deci-
sions he said. "Your quarterback
has to keep you from getting beat
and Kevin just had too many
disasterous plays
The Pirates will have to forget the
Missouri game and concentrate on
the Richmond Spiders, ECU's op-
ponent in Saturday's game at
Ficklen Stadium.
"There is no place in college foot-
ball for self-pity Emory stated in
his Tuesday afternoon press con-
ference. "The most important game
to us right now is Richmond, the
least important game is Missouri
The Spiders have yet to win a
game this year in four trys, but their
schedule has included defeats by
West Virginia, South Carolina and
Virginia Tech.
"Richmond is the best 0-4 foot-
ball team in the country Emory
said. "They average 312 yards a
game and have eight starters on of-
fense and defense that are returning
from last year
In last year's ECU-Richmond
game, the Pirates rallied from a
poor three-quarter performance to
score two touchdowns in the fourth
quarter en route to a 17-13 victory.
Last year, the Spiders featured
tailback Barry Redden, who is now
playing in the NFL (?)
Freshman Tony Baker, who had
started every game at tailback for
the Pirates, was unable to play
against Missouri and is listed as
doubtful for the Richmond game.
The return of sophomore Jimmy
Walden was welcomed by the Pirate
coaching staff.
Walden picked up 45 yards on 14
carries against Missouri and will
handle most of the tailback chores
this weekend. Stefon Adams, who
had previously been running at
tailback, was moved to split-end to
back up Carlton Nelson.
The Spider offense has moved the
ball well in their games so far, and
they like to spread the offense out.
"There's one thing about Richmond
� they try to play you all over the
field said Emory. "The offensive
line has splits that the field is not
wide enough to cover. They try to
take away your strength and speed
by putting you all over the football
field
Another concern of Emory's is
that Richmond did not have a game
this past weekend. "I hate to play
against teams that have had open
dates Emory emphasized. "Open
dates give teams a chance to make
offensive and defensive changes, a
chance to have two weeks prepara-
tion for one team and time to get
any injured folks back in the
lineup
With two wins and two losses, the
Pirate's record is deceiving. Their
losses (against N.C. State and
Missouri) have come against teams
with a combined record of 7-2.
The 50,848 attendance at
Missouri was the eight largest crowd
before which an East Carolina team
has played. That gives ECU two of
the largest crowds ever already in
this season, as the 55,200 at N.C.
State is at the top of the list.
Player-Of-The-Week honors go
to John Floyd on offense, Jody
Schulz on defense, Jeff Heath for
offensive specialty teams, Curtis
Wyatt for defensive specialty teams,
Rolando Caparas for offensive
scout team and Paul Hoggard for
defensive scout team.
'Best Center I've Coached
Floyd: A Scrappy Competitor
EC l SPORTS INFO.
"No, I'm not really fast at all. My
strength is okay�I can bench 360,
but then Terry Long, who lines up
ngnt beside me, does 500. I have
average quickness, so the reason
I've been starting is something
else
John Floyd, starting center for
the East Carolina Pirates, is perhaps
too self-deprecating, but it is true
that he does have "something else
"Nobody intimidates John
Floyd said head coach Ed Emory.
"He is simply a super competitor.
He is probably the best center I've
coached since I've been here
Emory added that four years ago
John was a walk-on in both baseball
and football and he stuck with it for
three years before getting a scholar-
ship.
"College coaches and the pros are
always looking for that Utopian
center�6-4 or 66-5. 250-pounds
Emory said. "Like Dolly Parton,
those guys are just born different.
John is about 245-pounds, but he is
only 6-0. He makes up for that
though because he is such a super
competitor
In a 28-9 loss to Missouri Satur-
day, Floyd did a veteran's job on
heralded Tiger nose guard James
Lockette. The Pirates got the lion's
share of their rushing yardage up
the middle as Floyd teammed with
guards Terry Long and Tom Carnes
to dominate play where the Tigers
figured to be the toughest. "John
Floyd just played great against
Missouri Emory said. "It was the
best center play we've had since I've
been here. Only once did the nose
guard from Missouri get him
down
According to Floyd, Emory has
given him a great deal of advice,
which has finally paid off. "Coach
Emory always tells us not to let your
body tell you that you can't do
something Floyd said. "If you
want to do it, your body will find a
way. When I'm out there on the
field, and I'm determined to block
somebody, he's not going to get
around me. I just won't let him. It
all has to do with desire and condi-
tioning
During his four-year stay at ECU,
Floyd said the football program is
getting better with each year.
"Nobody really understands how
far the program has come since
Coach Emory's been here he said.
"We have a weight program, and it
has really made a difference.
Against State, for example, we
should have won that game�we
beat them everywhere except the
scoreboard. But when we lined up
later in the game, they were coming
up to the line hanging their heads.
They were beat, and our guys were
moving them out
Floyd, a junior who was red-
shirted during his freshman year,
was recruited by Pat Dye from Fair-
mont High School where he was all-
conference his junior and senior
years. He was also selected to play
in the 1979 East-West all-star game.
He was a stand-out catcher on his
high school team and has played
some baseball at ECU in the sum-
mer league. His high school coach at
Fairmont was Wayne Floyd�his
father.
"I guess it was a little different
he said. "Everyone else went home
with their father, but I went home
with the coach. But re lly it wasn't
any different. He treated me just
like one of the guys at practice. He
was definitely my major inspiration.
He was the one who always told me
to keep on going, not to give up
When Coach Emory came to
ECU in 1980, Floyd was still a
freshman, having been red-shirted
his first year. That first year under
Emory he played on the specialty
teams. In 1981 he started the last
four games after Tony Hensley went
down with a neck injury, and he has
started ever since with the exception
of the first game of this season
against N.C State, in which he still
played about half the game. An
ankle sprain just a few days before
the game was the cause.
After a disappointing loss at
Missouri, Floyd is looking forward
to Saturdayjs game with Richmond.
"The spirit and unity on this team is
unbelievable Floyd said. "Most
of us have been together for two or
three years now. It's like a big fami-
ly. Everyone wants to win, and we
all believe that we can
Floyd praised new offensive coor-
dinator Larry Beckish for con-
tributing to the team's intensified
spirit. "He is a very intense man,
totally committed to winning, to
perfection he said. "At first I
didn't know if I would like leaving
th wishbone behind, but now I real-
ly love our new "I" (formation).
The whole team knows that we can
really move the ball on offense,
especially through the air. We can
strike fast, put seven points on the
board fast
See PIRATE, Page 10
Swim Teams Start
Season With A Bang
The ECU swim teams have
already gotten the year off to a good
start, breaking two records in the
team's first pentathlon of the '82
season.
In the 100-meter breaststroke,
ECU's Eric Sepnick swam for a time
of 102.47 and Kaki Wilson finished
in 113.0 to set two individual marks.
Head coach Rick Kobe said he
was very pleased with both teams'
showing in the inter-squad competi-
tion. "The swimmers that we had
from last year all swam a little ahead
or right at their times from last
year he said.
The swimmers competed in Five
events, which included the
200-meter individual medley,
100-meter butterfly, 100-meter
backstroke, 100-meter breaststroke,
and the 100-meter freestyle race.
The swimmers were awarded
points in accordance to the times
they swam. The men's point leaders
were Kevin Richards, 2,103 points;
Doug McMillan, 1,836; and Stan
Williams, 1,739.
For the women, Nan George led
with 3,138 points. Kaky Wilson
finished with 3,042 and Nancy
James wound up with 2,370.
In one-meter springboard com-
petition, diver Roy Johnson placed
first, Steve Thomas finished second.
Dale Swanson ended up in third
place and Bernie Van Benthem plac-
ed fourth.
Rene Seech captured first place in
the diving event, with Kim Lowe
finishing second.
All-state diving champion Scott
Eagle was not able to participate
because of back problems.
The swim teams will hold the
Purple-Gold inter-squad competi-
tion on Oct. 20 and will meet James
Madison University on Nov. 5.
Pfcotos By DAVE WILLIAMS
Freshman kicker Jeff Heath shows his soccer-style form during ECU's
bout with Missouri. During this kick, Heath booted a 45-yard field goal
to put the first three points on the scoreboard. Heath also kicked a
37-and 42-yarder against the Tigers.
Spikers Host Invite
mM �v OAtV PATTERSON
Coach Jerry Lee instructs ECU golfer. The Pirates will travel to Pickens,
S.C for the Dunlop Invitational this weekend, Oct. 9 and 10.
By TAMMY PARHAM
Sports lafo. Whirr
The Lady Pirate Volleyball team
will host its fifth annual ECU In-
vitational Tournament in Minges
Coliseum this weekend.
The tournament will include
Duke, UNC-Chapel Hill, A&T,
William and Mary, and defending
champion UNC-Charlotte.
ECU head coach Lynn Davidson
feels the Lady Pirates have a good
shot at winning their own tourna-
ment. "We probably have the
strongest team in the tournament
she said, "but we'll have to play
very well to win it
At this point, coach Davidson
should not be too worried. The team
won eight of its last 11 matches, and
last weekend's victory over Francis
Marion in the Carolina Classic ac-
counted for the Pirates' twelfth vic-
tory. In 1981, ECU managed only
11 wins the entire season.
"Right now, the team is playing
the best volleyball I have ever seen
played by a team at this university
Davidson said. The head coach
competed against the Pirates while
playing at N.C. State from 1975 to
1979.
Davidson believes the key to this
year's newly-acquired success is ex-
perience. "Even though we do have
a limited amount of playing ex-
perience, we are using what we have
to our advantage she explained.
"I'm getting a lot of effort from
the team. The kids are beginning to
use their talents and abilities as they
have been taught Davidson added
that the team also has a lot of untap-
ped potential.
According to Davidson, the
players are sharpening their mental
aspects of the game. Davidson
credited assistant coach Sue Martin
for helping the Lady Pirates develop
positive mental attitudes about
themselves and their opponents.
"Being mentally tough is essential in
volleyball Davidson said. "I think
80 to 90-percent of the game is men-
tal. The rest is basic fundamentals
Davidson, as well as the players,
are looking forward to the tourna-
ment, and the head coach believes
the invite is going to be a good one
for the Lady Pirates. "Our kids are
going to be ready to play she said.
"They've lost to Charlotte in the
Finals for the last two years. I don't
thing they're going to let that hap-
pen again
The Bucs begin tournament play
on Friday at 12 p.m.

-������ IMMMIM1
T





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 7, 1982
Natural Light Bicycle Race To
Be Held During Homecoming
By KIP SLOAN
Some ot the fastest
bicycle racers in the
United States will com-
pete in Greenville on
Sunday, Oct. 24 in the
l
1982 Greenville Natural
Light Critenum. The
race course will consist
of a loop of the
downtown area, star-
ting on First Street
(next to the Town
Commons), circling the
downtown area on
Reade Street, passing
by the girl's dorms at
Cotanche Street, and
returning to the finish
line on First Street by
way of Greene Street.
Seven different races
will be held, including a
one-mile race for
novice riders and a five-
mile race for college
students and faculty.
The event is spon-
sored by Jeffrey's Beer
and Wine Co. and the
East Carolina Road
Club, a new bicycle
club formed this year.
More than $500.00
worth of cash and mer-
chandise will be up for
grabs by the expected
racing crowd of close to
100 racers and
students. The races are
scheduled to begin
around 11:00, with the
last and most spec-
tacular event, a 50-mile
Senior 1,2,3 race,
beginning at 2:00. The
best of the racers will
average close to 30
MPH for the entire
distance, reaching
speeds close to 40 MPH
by the campus.
Bicycle racing is not
a new sport in the
United States, although
American cyclists have
only in the last few
years been competitive
on a true international
scale. Although
"amateur" in status,
racers are allowed to
win up to $200.00 a day
in cash and merchan-
dise. Amateur racers
from other countries
have long received cash
in international racing,
and only the money has
encouraged Americans
to endure the tremen-
dous time and effort
needed in training in
order to be com-
petitive. A top-level
cyclist may average
70-100 miles a day of
riding, piling up more
than 10,000 miles in a
single season.
Pirate Center Opens Up Middle
Cont'd From Page Nine
Coach John Zer-
nhelt, the offensive line
coach, said the key for
Floyd against Rich-
mond will be the same
as it has always been �
Floyd's com-
petitiveness. "John is a
true competitor. He
fights to win with every
fiber of his body Zer
nhelt said. "He is simp-
ly a tremendously
scrappy guy and a good
leader on the field and
off. And he's a great
individual; his team-
mates have a lot of
respect for him. He's
not tall, but he's
perfect for us. He'll
play a taller opponent,
but use his lower center
of gravity to his advan-
tage
Despite the N.C
State and Missouri
losses. Floyd is op-
timistic about the re
mainder of the season
"We want to prove that
we are ready to com
pete on a level with
West Virginia and
Florida State (two of
ECU's opponents this
year) he said. Wc
want to go 9-2 Oils
season and go to a
bowl, and we all believe
we can reallv Jo it.
because � are all pull-
ing together, because
we are very strong -
in great shape, because
w e' e gol gr
coaches, and because
we've go: great tan
fWS
The event promises
to be an exciting one,
and will offer plenty of
action. For more infor-
mation on the race or
the bicycle club, con-
tact Kip Sloan at
756-0246 or 757-1680.
Po�o B. DAVE WILLIAMS
ECU punter John Williams avoids oncoming block attempt.
"ThSLLLOJli.
Photo By kip SLOAN
Junior National Champion John Patterson (foreground) will be one off
the man competitors in the Greenville race.
muktM'A Ha'u- gttiiHa Academy
Pitt Plaza Shopping Center - Greenville
: , !
I Bring in this coupon for I
! 1.00 off i
your haircut. s
Coupon good thru Oct. 16
I -
y
The best Pizza
�& in Town � Honest r
LUNCH BUFFET Mon thru Fri 11-2 only 2.89
2.9T
EVENING BUFFET-Mon and Tues 5:30 8pm only m.ww �
SPAGHETTI Wed-all you can eat Compare at only 2.25-
IMPORTS ARE
ALIVE & WELL!
jf4
itti
Phone - 756-2950 or 756-4042
'All new game room and game machine's�
ffkOrive-up window for 'to go' orders. "
BIG SCREEN TV
"Enjoy the SOAPS with lunch or
CURRENT MOVIES(PG) Sat 7pm ?pm
k"lv Open Mon. Thurs. 11 30a.m It p m.
Fri andSat�11:30a.m. 2 p.m.
300 E. 10th ST -
Ll. 758 6121 � J
It's the fun
place to eat.j
(V
AK
We specialize in VW, Volvo & Subaru
repair, as well as all other makes.
Service performed by Certified Niase
Mechanic �
RCL Barbato � one ot the
Professionals
at
Malpass Muffler Shop
758-7676
2616 E. 10th Street Greenville
WE'RE
COMING
The Shoe Outlet
We're offering challenging career opportunities for
future college graduates. Earn an excellent salary, benefits,
advancement, and retirement. We will train qualified ap-
plicants for positions, guaranteed upon graduation. There
are rigid mental, moral and physical standards with highly
competitive selection. Freshman through Seniors are eligi-
ble.
Interested? Then contact the United States Marine Corps
officer selection team. We will be at the ECU campus on
October 12 & 13 from 9:00-3:00. Maybe you can be one of
us.
The tew, The Fraud, The Marines
201 West 9th Street
NAME BRANDS at
DISCOUNT PRICES
50-75
Off Regular Price
Men's & Ladies' SHOES
Acme r .
Dingo BOOTS
Hanover
Name Brand Leather Clogs
$4.95-$10.95
Ladies' Dress & Western Boots
$10-$27.95
& AOT
Sororit
presents
Tues Oct. 12
9:00 til 2:00
Admission SI.00
Bar Specials
Mrs. Tight
Jeans
Contest
Prizes
BASS FREEMAN
HANOVER TOPSIDER
FLORSHEIM DINGO BOOTS
Next door to
EVANS SEAFOOD
, �-v �
1st $75
2nd $35
3rd $20
Plus a keg &
1 year s free pass to the Elbo
Plus other Prues &
1 year's free pass to the Elbo
Plus other Prizes &
1 year's free pass to the Elbo
SPONSORED BY:
SHEER HAIR DESIGN
P.T.A.
PHAROS
HAPPY STORE
MARSH'S SURF N SEA
Entries � can sign up
at the club or call 758-4591
Come
EarlvM
Cl
LOJ
ro
LOS'
r�'i.
6 0 . i � � I
G'M' �f
c
SI
PSOESS
��p� " I
PM iMt
-
� - . N
T Y P S ,
Bv
0 �BS ��-
c
(
F23
I
FREE DELIVERY - ECU DORMS & HOSPITAL
FOR TAKE OUT CALL: 7571701
$
x
Eating House
All you can eat �
Spaghetti & Meatsauce
$1.99
7 days a week
SunWed 11 a.mll p.m.
ThursSat. 11 a.m2 a.m.
507 E. 14th Street I
J. A. UNIFORMS
SHOPS
Bring this ad for
10 OFF
on the purchase of
one of our lab coats!
All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes, shoes,
and hose. Also - used ECU nurses
uniforms. Trade-ins allowed.
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive.
Near Hollowell's Drug and old hospital.
F
F
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 7, 1M2
11
his
lo a
he e
it,
ili-
lause
and
puse
It. a i
Classifieds
ft
i
AMS
LOST AND
FOUND
Lost in FOUR SEASONS
restaurant: Lady's yellow gold
Buiova watch engraved on back.
Great sentimental value. Reward.
Call 7M-7V03 and ask tor Sherri.
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL Typist wants to
type at home. Reasonable rates.
JSIIW
PROFESSIONAL Typing service
experience quality work, IBM
typewriter. Call Lanie Shive.
�S� SMI or Gail Joiner 7S 107
TYPING TERM papers, resumes,
thesis, etc Call 7S1 4733
typing SERVICES. Resumes,
theses, research papers, etc. NEW
IBM type Judith Wilson Phone
7U-74S1.
10 YRS typing � reasonable rates
� spelling, punctuation and gram-
mar corrections. Proofreading.
Cindy-1 a.m. t p.m jjfrjMg.
TUTOR IN SPANISH available,
call Oscar (native speaker)
7Sa-QS17.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING- Rush
lobs done. Scientific notations ball
element available. Good rates.
Call 7M-�fl7.
RIDES
HAND CRAFTED, rustic fur-
niture at affordable student
prices. For more information, call
Kim at 7SS717.
BACK PACK S4S; backpack MS;
tent MS; 2 helmets SIS 7SS-7240
after 3
FOR SALE 7t Gremlin Ph.
7HS11S.
TWO ROOMMATES needed
4 bedroom house, 2 blocks from
campus S7S per month. Call Bun
Chadwick. 7S2-4W1. m 1. 12th St.
PERSONAL
LOSE WEIGHT.
7S-fS30.
HONEST
RIDE NEEDED to N.J. over fall
break. Can leave at 2:00 p.m.
Thurs. 14th 7S2-3A4.
I NEED A RIDE to N.J. fall break
please call 3SS-2eW.
ATTN. WILSON COMMUTERS
Ride needed MWF to and from
Wilson to ECU. Call immediately.
243 30ft
RIDE NEEDED TO Asheville
area for tall break. Will help with
gas. CALL MARY 7S0-0MI.
FOR SALE
FREE KITTENS
Six weeks and
7 5317
to good homes,
house-trained.
WANTED
BASS PLAYER wanted, tor Part-
time contemporary Country Rock
Band. Band has numerous book-
ings and has 2 4S's getting a lot of
air play. Serious, competent musi-
cians only. Call 7st 177: after S
p.m.
PHYSICS 1J50 tutor wanted will
ing to pay reasonable amount and
fit time schedule around yours.
Contact Sandy 7S� 17.
ROOMMATE
WANTED
NEEDED: ROOMMATE NEED-
ED for 4 bedroom house on
Biltmore St. Half block from cam-
pus M3.7S plus utilities. Call or
come by 40S Biltmore St. 7Se-7tt4.
THE FIRST home man's rugby
match will be hew Sat. Oct. 3rd
against UNC-G at 1:00p.m. behind
Allied Health BMg. Bring a cooler
and a blanket. Everyone Is in-
vited;
OLLIE, Happv h-dayii Sorry you
have to study, but we'll make up
for it in the years to come 11 Good
luck on your test. God Mess yal I
love you, Stanley or 5.B.
KAPPA ALPHA after happy hour
happy hour party. Come on over
and party with the KA's Friday
night Oct. 0, t until. At the corner
of nth and Charles.
DAN F. you have the proclivity of
being very intolerable, domineer-
ing, and not to mention, very ar-
rogant. Love S.P. a.k.a. M.D. II
A.K.A. M.D. II, I can't help it, I'm
glad student. DAN F.
MIKE Happy list b'day. You're
the greatest! MIKE.
FAMOUS PIZZA
Fast, Friendly Delivery
Delivery is FREE
758-5982 or 5616
Athletic fvforld
C irolina East Mall
LET'S MAKE
A
DEAL.
I
SHIRTS &SWIATERS
A YDEN GOLF & C.C. 46-3389
e
Lasagna
Spaghetti wSauce
$249
Both wSalad & Garlic Bread
Golden Beverages
2:00-close Pitcher � $2.45
H.H.3-7 Mug �50c
L
ritv
Home of Greenville's Best Meats
m r
PIRATE COUPON
5 DISCOUNT
Expires 101682
on all orders $10.00
or more.
K ;me
A i .
ID abet.
Am of Purchase.
211 Jarvis St.
2 Blocks from ECU
PRICES EFFECTIVE THURSSAT.
Overtoil's Finest Heavy Western
Sirloin Steak
u, $199
T-Bone Steaks
$2.09
Lb.
Fresh
FRYER BREASTS Lb. 99C
FRYER THIGHS Lb. 59C
FRYER DRUMSTICKS
Lb 650
Sliced 7-9 Chops
Vi Pork Loin
$149
1
Lb.
Kraft Singles
American
Cheese & oz. pkg.
$-139
1
Chef Boy-Ar-Dee Frozen
Pizzas
FLORIDA FRESH OLD SOUTH
ORANGE
JUICE
98C
2 Gallon
paper
carton
12 Oz. Pkg.
99C
Truckload Sale
No Limit
All Coca-Cola
Products - � ,A
� . 2 Liter
87C -
ea.
Crest
Toothpaste
6.4 Oz. Tube
$149
1
CAMPBELL'S
TOMATO SOUP
10 Oz. Can
4$l
00
Natural Light
Beer 6 pack 12 �z cns
$199
Miller Beer
6 pack �12 Oz. Cans
$229
Crisco
Shortening
$188
3 Lb. Can
Limit one with $10.00 food order.
MRS. FILBERT'S
MARGARINE
Lb. Pkg.
Mix or Match
each I
Duncan Hines Family Size
Brownie Mix oz.
Duncan Hines Chocolate Chip
Cookie Mix WOz.
Duncan Hines
Blueberry
Muffin Mix 130.
Duncan Hines
Bran Muffin
MiX 9.75 o�.
JUST A DIME 4
2 PENNIES
White Potatoes
Green Cabbage
12C
Lb. -

r
� �-�
.�. .� �� a
M�.�H �� W"f
J





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 7, 1982
1
ftlQGBT Uh�.
Sale EvWt
v
Q&ih�,
hW Section of Tahiti4kt World '

U.B.E
SMS. COTANCHE 21 '
All Omer tfOrhMM On Aif fao .�iiiIiii,c.O
-oo
V? VLt purple, joty wKjM. aa, yifc .roua f. majoon. keify, bjM Wut, Auifcr 0Oc 5'H
0 ftp Uifrt Coupons 4 Count on faun to tec us
tea 1095
5 ?co
fet
Wf 7w�
ttf�W�

ft4 bK
ZK t�P '�Hlft A
R(,A,ifT-OrrV
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yjtt hifyf how bouAhJuJs
tt�- I CeO&uft torttS ran (VoW btu'itS
!Lf
1
liJt-� Wfc hnit rV Ni telethon, in fat (vorfd.
IrO Ca&ertv SRov
618 S. COTANCHE ST. � GREENVILLE. N.C. 27834
First annual
tt� �. oot
WILEY saLE
Oct. 6-7-8-0
Art & Camera I
5118. COTANCHE ST.
GREENVILLE. H C MM
FRAME
SHOP
20 off
ANY COMPLETE FRAMING
ORDER BROUGHT IN OC-
TOBER 6.7.8.9. VOID Oct. 10.
1982. NOT GOOD FOR PICK-
UP.
Art & Camera
JUS. COTANCHE ST.
GREENVILLE. N.C.ZTI34
FRAME
SHOP
20 off
ANY COMPLETE FRAMING
ORDER BROUGHT IN OC- �
TOBER 6.7.8.9. VOID Oct. 10.
1982. NOT GOOD FOR PICK- �
UP.
1�Alley Sal� (next to University Book Ex-
change)
-damaged merchandise
-discontinued items
-things that were dampened in our
summer flood
2�20 off on all art supplies
310 off our regular price on all 35MM
cameras.
410 off our regular price on all Nikon and
Canon lenses.
5�30 off our regular price on all zoom
lenses (except Canon and Nikon).
�P 6�20 off our regular price on all Kodak
cameras and projectors.
mm 7�20 off our regular price on all Polaroid
g cameras.
- 8�20 off our regular price on all
. binoculars.
9�20 off any photofinishing order brought
' in during sale with coupon.
I 10�Register for free prizes.
Art & Camera
�It COTANCHE ST
GREENVILLE. N.C Z7I34
FRAME
SHOP
20 off
� ANY COMPLETE FRAMING
� ORDER BROUGHT IN OC-
TOBER 1.7,8.9. VOID Oct. 10.
11983. NOT GOOD FOR PICK-
UP.
Art & Camera
BM COTANCHE ST.
GREENVILLE. N.C. 2734
FRAME
SHOP
20 off
JlrO '$ THlr ta ' v5fiop
s � �. roiAwi vi . i.miN.ttt � C I '� M
ART & CAMERA SHOP BIGGEST LE OF
THE YEAR. UNIVERSITY BOOK EX- . OR0ER BROUght in oc
CHANGEGIANT SPORTSWEAR SALE & - mSSoSI
BIG REDUCTIONS ON MANY OTHER ITEMS. � J� NOT GOOD FOR P,CK
BOOK BARNGRAND OPEN- BIBBaBB
INGREGISTER FOR FREE PRIZES & GIFT
CERTIFICATES.
I "aliey sale coupon" I "alley sale coupon"
� Mhr�� B,�,o �Ho, wm�1m p.r�P Ml N � " �?- f- " � -? �- � �2"ll� IZ, �
Good for ?) off �m t- r ptirttp-
finiHIng q, dn t� B (0j'�t in
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bronqht in irith KVolii �011
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bet�v-m October 6-e. M "
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foQhl � rtt ��
fy�nbe 10. IV?
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FL
JZtV y( Ca&ewL SRov
518 S. COTANCHE ST. � GREENVILLE, N.C. 27834 "
6-7-8 -9
$ Canon
PPDGRAN
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Plus Shutter-Priority Sopftstication.
stem Integration.
The CanoR AL 1 PHOGRAM is th sophisticated SLR camera that's
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Or. set it yourself it's a sophisticated camera capable of profes-
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picture-taking situation Automatically!
Pr�wt Wi'Kjtf A2 A jnfl
Mom r'uvw MA .ivj.idbi
tf rdt�K( ieotteno- sOOi.r�q
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malir lljy rfol(K)raplty
��� � . ��, H Cjn.i-i FD Ilium
Canon AE-1 PROGRAM
wlensFD 50mm f 1.8
$
249.95
. Vau won't
believe your eyes!
When you see the great pictures you get with a
Canon Snappy Camera. Large 35mm film gives you
bigger and better prints And they're so easy to use:
�Focus-Free Canon 35mm lens � Automatic Exposure
� Automatic Film Loading, Advance, and Rewinding
� Built-in Flash � Handy Wrist Strap
Snappy 20
Available in Five Colors
$69.00
Snappy 50
With Automatic Focusing H
89.00
Canon
SlOlU5020
Canon
The first computerized,
shutter-priority automatic SLR.
The last word in value.
The AE-1 is changing the way cameras will be made and the way
photographers take pictures Its shutter-priority automatic exposure
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your subject�yet with all the versatility that Canon s more than
forty FD lenses and multitude of accessories makes easily possible
To really appreciate the AE-1 you have to pick it up and use it It
just may change the course of your photography'
Slurtef-CKXity aulcunalK:
exposure SLR
? incredibly itght ��qhl
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louse
� estant 'esoortse sens-
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metenng
� Co�xact Power Winner A
�c� motoriec) segueniiai
shooting
SpMdiita 155A and
Powe- Winder A
shown optional
Speecmies '31A -SSA
t7?A and '99A auto iiasf
units set snutle' ano
aperture tor pe"eci Masr-
snots
Accepts ail Canon FD
tenses c� AE opcation
Unbeatable oe-tcmance
at an unbeatable price
Canon AE-1 wiens
FD50mmf1 8
$ 215.96
518 S. COTANCHE ST. � GREENVILLE. N.C. 27834
10 OFF Regular price on all CANON Lenses
20 OFF all accessories
"ALLEY SALE" WILL BE IN ALLEY NEXT
TO U.B.E. ON SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9.

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Title
The East Carolinian, October 7, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 07, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.221
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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