The East Carolinian, October 5, 1982






�he lEaHt Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.ll
Tuesday, October 5, 1982
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages,
Circulation 10,000
Students Protest Building Site
B PATRICK O'NEILL
Maff Vtnirr
The controversy over the planned
construction of a new building on
campus continued last week as three
ECU students took their objections
ot the proposal directly to the office
of ECU Chancellor John Howell.
Students Glenn Maughaun, Mike
Hamer, and Gerlinde Tolson met
with Howell last Thursday to
discuss with him their objections to
the placement of the building in an
aiea which they claim is one of the
tew natural areas lett on campus.
The proposed building would be
built in the area located behind the
Graham building. Rawl building
and Rawl annex.
Maughaun. an ECU education
indent who organized the group,
claims that the proposed area for
the site is part of the Sally Davis
loynet MJoretum which was
dedicated in the 1930s.
The Davis Aboretum was part of
a campus beautification project that
was originally slated to include five
or six acres Davis was a charter
member of the ECTC faculty in the
Department of History. ECTC
became ECU in 1967.
Maughaun, who researched the
history ot the beautification project
by looking at old copies ot the
Techo Echo (now The East Caroli-
nian) and The News and Observer
on microfilm, noted that two large
granite pillars that are still in place
near the area were originally con-
structed as entrances to the
aboretum. "Now when you look
through that stone gate, you're not
going to see anything but that
building Maughaun said.
"The area is supposed to be
preserved
Howell, who claimed he hadn't
even heard of the aboretum until
recently, said that for the most pan
the original plans tor the beautifica-
tion project were abandoned in
150. but that a possible memorial
of some kind commemorating Davis
may be considered.
"The campus should hae some
kind ot recreational area where
there are trees, away from the hustle
and bustle said Tolson, who is a
senior in finance. "They're going to
build a building in one o the few
places we have
Hamer, who recognized that there
is a real need for the new buiding,
said that he felt Howell had trouble
understanding the distinction bet-
ween trees and a quiet, natural
place. "1 didn't think he understood
what we meant by a quiet place
Hamer said.
"1 would say there are quieter
places on campus than that said
Howell, disputing the claims of op-
ponents to the project hat's not a
quiet place he said adding that the
area in question leaves a great deal
to be desired.
Howell also disputed opponent's
claims that the area was being used
for solitude or any other reason for
that matter. He said that the area
has no benches for people to sit on
and that it hasn't been maintained.
"They don't sit there - 1 challenge
that - people don't sit there
Howell said.
According to Howell the universi-
ty plants a good many more trees
than it cuts down. "I don't feel very
guilty about cutting down a tree
he said. Opponents say that many of
the most beautiful trees on campus
will be lost to the construction.
Howell claims that the university
has purchased over 777 trees in the
past 14 years. "That's an average of
about 55 trees per year he added.
Tolson said that the figures
relating to the number of trees
planted to the number cut down
created a "distorted rationale"
because larger trees that have been
growing for decades can't be replac-
ed by planting seedlings. "We don't
want our campus to be nothing but
concrete she added.
Recently 21 members of the
biology faculty petitioned Howell to
change the proposed site of the new
building to the parking area behind
Joyner library.
Howell claims that this alternative
plan is not viable because the park-
ing area is necessary and can't be
replaced. He states that there are
two groups, the parking place group
and the tree lovers group. "I don't
jump at pleasing one to arouse the
other" he added.
"We're not going to construct a
building anywhere on campus
without cutting down some trees
said Howell.
Ptwto f
"Someday You 7 Go To ECU
Photo By SCOTT LABSON
A future Pirate takes a cautious look at student life around Ml as a
more experienced eve points out some features of campus.
Governor's Council Holds Local Hearing On Handicap Law
B PATRICK O'NEILL
staff W nier
About 200 people attended the
Governor's Advocacy Council tor
Persons with Disabilities hearings
that were held in the Willis building
last rhursday night.
The hearings were held to discuss
proposed changes in Public Law
(P.l .) 94-142 which would affect
services to handicapped children
and adults.
Earlier in the day there was some
speculation that the hearings ma be
The Student's Hress
canceled in light oi the news from
Washington D.C. on Wednesday
that the Reagan administration was
backing down from its original pro-
posals because ot the "storm of pro-
test" which was being created bv
people opposed to the PT . 94-142
changes.
Education Secretary Terrel H.
Bell announced Wednesday the por-
tions of the regulations that, what
he called, "the major source of con-
cern and apprehension" were being
withdrawn. Bell was speaking
bet ore a crowded hearing oi a
House select education subcommit-
tee.
Despite Bell's welcomed state-
ment, the hearings continued amid
fears that the withdrawn proposals
would in fact be resubmitted in
mildei or subtler forms. "The news
out ol D.C is something that I'm
putting no stock in at the moment
ECU assistant profesor of
psychology Mvree Hayes told The
Hast Carolinian.
Hayes, who presided over the
Handout Accuses President
Thursday hearings, felt that con-
tinued lobbying pressure would be
needed to assure the complete
withdrawal of the proposals, which,
it implemented, would relax the
rules that guarantee equal education
for handicaaped students.
"I just hope that parents, profes-
sionals and interested lay people will
respond to their state and national
legislative representatives in regard
to matters pertaining to the educa-
tion of handicapped children and
adults said Dr. William Martin,
an ECU professor in the School of
Education ji.u a member ot trie Pitt
Count) Association ot Retarded
Citizens. Martin was one of more
than 25 people, mostly the parents
of handicapped children, who spoke
during the two hour program.
He agreed with Hayes that despite
B (,RE(, RIDKOIT
n intormation sheet titled The
Student's Press hit the newsstand
yesterday with accusations that
SGA president Eric Henderson was
unfit to hold office.
Tim Mer whose name appears
on the 8 : 1 news sheet as editor in
chiet. said the paper was printed
because the students have a right to
know. He said the information con-
tained in the sheet was obtained
from public record, campaign trial
documents, and people connected
with Henderson's campaign.
Among the charges listed on the
sheet are that Henderson cheated in
last year's campaign, made several
questionable appointments, has not
kept one campaign promise and
took an expense paid trip to
W ashington D.C. on student fees.
Henderson called the sheet
"garbage" and said he wished the
people involved would get their
tacts right. Henderson denied the
cheating charges, and said he was
keeping his campaign promises.
"Changes as widespread as a
book rental take some time
Henderson explained. "1 never pro-
mised to do anything concerning a
tow truck
Mertz said he feels he and the
"group of concerned students" who
put the broadsheet together have the
records to prove their charges.
Henderson pointed to two
statements in the sheet which were
untrue. One said Henderson was
quoted in The East Carolinian as
saying that politics were involved in
his recent appointments. Attorney
General Mike Swaim made that
statement.
The other misstatement concern-
ed Henderson's and SGA vice presi-
dent Bob Mill's trip to a student
go varment convention in
Washington D.C. The Student's
Press claimed that the trip cost
S2.000 and was payed for from stu-
dent tees. The trip actually cost bet-
ween S600 and S800 dollars. Men
admitted to these errors.
Four-thousand copies of the
paper were printed, according to
Mertz. They were done by a Green-
ville printer and cost about $40
dollars. The money to finance the
newssheet came from private dona-
tions, he said.
Henderson said that was a
disgruntled David Cook supporter.
"Why keep crying over in his cof-
fee, even if I am impeached, David
Cook wouldn't become president
Publications of this kind are re-
quired to be approved by the Stu-
dent Life office. Mertz said that as
far he knows, one of the people in-
volved got Dean James Mallory's
approval.
"If he's (Mertz) so concerned,
why doesn't he get directly involv-
ed Henderson said
Pitoto By STANLEY LEAKY
Hey Officer, You Forgot One
This conscientious student tries to help out the campus police department. He diligently puts down traffic cones
to further the cause of justice.
the Bell announcement, the problem
was not resolved. " The difference is
going to come when the bucks keep
coming added Martin.
He praised the parents who spoke
during the hearing. "The parents
spoke up in defense ol the program
that their children were getting -
theywant a continuation ol the
funds to sustain those pro-
gramscontinued Martin. "The
parents did it pretty much bv
themselves
N.C. State Senator Vernon I
White and N.C. State Rep. Ed War-
len were present ai the hearing.
Representative Sam. D. Bundv
could not be there. All three men are
running for re-election next month
to their democratic seats. Manem
House and Freddy Jacobson, who
are running as write-in candidates
tor the Senate and the House resp -
tively, were also present.
Both Martin and Haves wei
pleased with the iarge turnout at the
hearing.
Martin felt that the proposed
in the program were especially un-
fair in light ol the fact that the pro-
gram was never fully funded in the
first place. "Now they're planning
on cutting upwards of 30 percent
Martin said. He dddu thai the
announcement showed that the peo-
ple have strength in their numbers
"We are hopeful - we're not
ing to stop working -we'rt
keep those letters goii -
W ashington said Haves "We
can't be thinking that now we have
it made and be apathetic we still
need to push
Infirmary Stops Giving Tylenol
The ECU Student Health Center
has discontinued the dispensing of
all Tylenol products as precau-
tionary measure until further infor-
mation is available concerning the
recent deaths of seven people from
the Chicago area who ingested
cyanide-laced Extra-Strength
Tylenol capsules.
"What we've decided to do is not
to give out anv Tylenol at all said
ECU Student Health Services Phar-
macist Bill Bass. He added that the
SHC presently doesn't handle the
Tylenol Extra Strength which have
been taken in all seven of the fatal
cases.
"Basically what we have is the
regular tablets Bass said. "We're
not going to give out any of those til
this thing clears up. We're just play-
ing it one step safer by just not giv-
ing out any at all
The two most recent deaths from
Tylenol cyanide poisoning both oc-
cured on Friday. Both victims, like
all the others, were from the
Chicago area.
Nineteen year old Theresa Janus
died of cyanide poisoning at 1:15
pm. She had been hospitalized
Wednesday night after her husband
and brother-in-law also died of
poisoning. The seventh victim was
35-year old flight attendant Paula
Prince, who was found dead in her
apartment Friday night, a few steps
from a 24-capsule bottle of Extra
Strength Tylenol she bought at a
near-by drugstore.
Although only five bottles of the
contaminated Tylenol have been
found, the Food and Drug Ad-
ministration (FDA) has urged con-
sumers nationwide to stop using the
capsules pending more intormation.
Bass advises students who have
recently purchased the product (in
the last week or two) to return it to
the place of purchase. "If they've
got a bottle they've had for a fairly
long time 1 wouldn't worry about
it he added.
So far, four different batches of
the capsules have been found to
have been laced with the cyanide
poison, lot numbers MB1833,
1801MA, MC2880, and 1910MD
have been involved in the seven
fatalities, but only the latter two
have been recalled thus far.
Distribution of the four lots has
been wide spread throughout the
eastern and southern states and even
some west of the Mississippi river.
Experts working in the case
suspect that the bottles of the pain
reliever have been tampered with.
possibly by a psychotic killer, at the
retail level, not in the distribution
chain. Bass also believes that
retail contamination is probably the
case. "We're just being extra
cautious in case thev would find out
that it's been contaminated in theii
plants and that it's more than just
the capsuleshe said.
ECU freshmen general college
student Susan Van Arnam said her
roommate had some of the suspect
Tylenol Extra-Strength capsules.
but that the numbers on their bottle
were one number above the
numbers they said to watch out for
"We heard about it and we check-
ed the numbers an Arnam said
"We still have it. but most likely
we'll throw it away
"I couldn't believe it said
another ECU student, computer
science major Theresa Gallagher "1
had taken them before, but 1 won't
take any now
Gallagher said that her roommate
Robin Muzzarelli had some of the
Tylenol capsules, but that thev were
thrown away by a third roomate. "i
don't think I would ever bu anv bv
the same company again added
Gallagher.
Registration Resister Sentenced
A 21 year-old college student has
been sentenced to 2Vi years in
federal prison for refusing to
register for the military draft.
Benjamin H. Sasway, formally of
Humboldt State University in Ar-
cata, Calif is the first person to be
jailed for wilfull non-registration
since the Vietnam war.
The decision was handed down by
U.S. federal Magistrate Gordon
Thompson, who previously had said
he respected Sasway's conscience
but that he could not respect his
position because it was against the
law.
Thompson told Sasway's at-
torney, Charles T. Burner, that an
appeal bail of $10,000 could be ar-
ranged if Burner could assure the
court that Sasway would . ot try to
flee prosecution.
"I only ask that you let your con-
science be your guide, as I have let
my conscience be mine Sasway
told the judge while reading from a
prepared statement.
Local response to Sasway's plight
was strong from both sides. "I
would think the individual had prior
warning of the possible legal im-
plications of not complying said
the chairman of ECU's Air Force
ROTC Lt. Col. James Thomas.
"The adjudication would seem to
me to be fair
"It's a tragedy that judges cannot
understand the consciences of the
most moral people of our time
said Dr. Carroll Webber of the
Greenville Peace Committee. "That
people of less conscience are m a
position to punish those of greater
conscience � the sentence is bar-
banc
"It's a tragedy in American
justice said Barbara Fay Mann, of
the Draft Information Service in
Raleigh. "Are the ideals on which
this nation was founded truly served
by subjecting these dissenters to
sentences such as this? The Draft In-
formation Service thinks not
Sasway's mother Dolores C.
Sasway said she was not surprised
by Thompson's harsh decision. "I
just hope that the country will listen
to these young people. We can't
take away these peoples freedoms
just because they disagree

f





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 5, 1982
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
It you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcement column,
please type it on an announcement
form and send it to The East
Carolinian m care of the produc
tion manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications Building
Flyers and handwritten copy on
odd sized paper cannot be ac
cepted
There is no charge tor an
nouncements, but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you want
and suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column for publicity.
The deadline tor announcements
is 3 p m. Monday tor the Tuesday
paper and 3pm Wednesdayy tor
the Thursday paper No an
nouncements receivea after these
deadlines will be printed
This space is available to all
campus organizations and depart
ments
SCENES FROM
THREE OPERAS
The ECU Opera Theatre
presents An Evening of Scenes
from Opera F nday, October 8. at
8 15 pm m the A J Fletcher
Recita. Hail The public is invited
to attend, and no admission will be
charged
Scenes to be featured in this an
nual program are from Verdi's
FALSTAFF. Ravel's LENFANT
ET LES SORTILEGES, and Of
tenoach's BA TA CLAN
Dr C Hiss is Director ot the
Opera Theatre Special
choreography tor this pertor
mance was done by Paula Johnson
ot the ECU dance faculty
Student performers are. Melvyn
T. Waddell Sandra S Quick,
Jayne Humphrey Daphne A
Dunston Elizabeth S Evans.
Catherine Oldham Alderman K
West. Robert Todd. Timothy K
Ward. Alderman K West, and
Mark Gansor
There will be no Saturday, Oc
tobcr 9 performance, as previous
ly announced
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
COURSES
Persona: Development Courses
begin
Oct 18 Getting Organized Oct 21
Real Estate Finance. Commodity
Hedging Oct 26 Aerobic Exer
cise Nov 17 Real Estate Ap
praisat
Sep' 79 Mime Sept 30 In
vesting m the 80 s Oct 5 Basket
ban Officiating Oct 12 Cop'na
with Stress Philosophy and
Retirement For information call
757 6143
GAMMA BETA
PHI
Members, our next meeting will
be held on Thursday October 6 m
Mendenhall m room 244 at 7 00
pm Plan to attend
KAPPA SIGMA
The Brother. Pledges and the
Little sisters ot the Kappa Sigma
Fraternity would like to thank all
of the ECU Ladies who came out
tor our Little Sister rush Party,
because we think that you are all
great Thanks so much for ex
pressing an interest in being part
ot the Greek system Hope that we
will be seeing you again real soon
IRSOUTDOOR
RECREATION
The IRS Outdoor Recreation
Center (113 Memorial Gym) is
sponsoring horseback ndmg trips
twice a week Transportation
provided Reservations and pay
ment tor Monday afternoon trips
are due by 2 30 p m each Monday
Reservations and payment for
Thursday trips are due by 4 00
p m each Wednesday Rates are
J5 00 per hour Both trips leave at
3 40 p m and return approximate
ly 5 30 p m For more information
stop by tthe Outdoor Recreation
Center or call 757 6911
BIG BROTHER
RUSH
AOTT soroify will have a Big
Brother Rush on Oct 5 from
9 00 11 00 pm All interested guys
are invited For more information
and a ride call 758 4290
FLORIDA
The ECU Student Athletic Board
(SABi invites any interested
students to attend the ECU
Florida State game on October
16th via charter bus The bus will
leave Mmges Coliseum at 2 00 am
and arrive m Tallahassee by game
time (7 00 pm) with a scheduled
departure from Tallahassee im
mediately after the game The
charter must isvf 46 passangers
a' a cost of S53 per person tor the
bus and $12 for the game ticket or
a total ot 165 round trip
Anyone interested should bring
the money to Pam Holt in the
Director ot Athletics Office.
Mmges before 5 pm, Tuesday Oc
tober 5th
SLC
There will be a silent dinner a'
the Treehouse on Wednesday. Oc
tober 6 a' 6 30 pm Come on down
and Oin m with members ot the
Sign Language Club
INDT Majors
Part t.me co op training posi
tions are avilable with Buehier
Mtg Co m Kmston. These tram
mg positions could lead to full
time opportunities in Production
Supervision. Production Control
or Purchasing m the new Buehier
plant in Raleigh beginning June,
1983 All mtersted INDT maiors
contact Nancy Fillnow in the Co
op office, ext 6979
I.S.A.
The International Student
Association will hold its first
semester meeting tor all Interna
tional students and all those who
are interested in the Internaional
Student Affair On Saturday Oc
tober 9, at the International House
on 9th Street, starting at 330 pm
Please come and join us and meet
new friends.
BAHA'I
The BAHA'I association of ECU
will be holding their first bi
weekly fireside Anyone interested
in discussing the great religions of
the world and how they apply to
mankind today is welcome The in
formal gathering will be held
Wednesday evening October 6 at
5 00 pm for about an hour in 212
Mendenhall.
ECU LAW
SOCIETY
The ECU Law Society will make
a field trip to Campbell University
Law School on October 20. This
will be an excused absence for
Law Society members For fur
ther information, contact Diane
Jones, 756 6556
I. L. O.
The International Language
Organization will be meeting on
Wednesday, October 6 The
meeting will be held in BC 305 at
3 00 pm There will be further
discussion on both Noche Latma
and the revision of the constitu
tion. All persons interested in
foreign languages are 'ged to at
tend You do not nave to be a
foreign language maior or minor
IVCF
"See how great a love the
Father has bestowed upon us, that
we should be called children ot
God. and such we are " (1 John
3 12)
Inter Varsity Christian
Fellowship meets Wednesday
nights at 6 30 in the Biology
building, room 102N Come join in
song and fellowship with us.
PHI ETA SIGMA
The Phi Eta Sigma National
Freshman Honor Society will
meet Tuesday, October 5, at 5
pom in Room 212 at the
Mendenhall Student Center Plans
will be made for the National Con
vention so all members are urged
to attend
GENERAL COLLEGE
General College students should
contact their advisors prior to Oc
tober 11, 1982 to arrange tor
preregistration
COLLEGIATE
JOURNALISTS
An organizational meeting ot the
Society ot Collegiate Journalists
will be held on Tuesday, oct 5. at 7
p m in Austin 208 Any jour
nalists, would be lournalists, or
other mtersted persons are in
vited Those unable to attend or
who would like additional mtorma
tion may contact Alex Albright,
English Annex (Old Security
Building) 102. or phone 757 6412
COMMUNITY
THEATRE
Al Agate and Debra Wiggins are
organizing a Community Theatre
Group made ot students from
ECU From its ranks tney plan to
cast a lull length, full cast musical
in the Spring, in addition, they
hope to support experimental pro-
jects The goal is to tap some of the
vast unused talent in the
Greenivlle area. Singers dancers,
actors, and technicians are
welcome. For information call
758 9474
PRE MEDS
Doctor William E. Laupus, Dean
ot the ECU School ot Medicine and
Doctor Calvin Smith, a family
physician practicing in Winstead
vine, NC will speak to the ECU
Biology Club and any pre medical
students wishing to attend on Oc
tober 11, at 7 00 in BN 102
Dean Laupus will speak concer
nmg the ECU School ot Medicine
and medical student life Doctor
Smith will discuss the lite o� a
family practicioner in a rural
community.
OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPY
MIXER
interested in Occupational
Therapy Come to our mixer in
Mendenhall Multipurpose Room n
October 7, 1982 at 7 00 p.m. Meet
Junior and Senior OT students,
faculty and area clinicians There
will be displys and a film presenta
tion Refreshments will be served
See you there!
U.S. NAVY
INTERVIEWS
The Career Planning and Place
ment Service in the Bloxton House
will have representatives from the
U.S. Navy Recruiting Office here
on September 29 between 9am
and 4 pm to talk with Seniors A
sheet is available tor those
registered with us to sign up tor an
interview All maiors are
welcome, the most demand will be
for those in the Health and
technical fields You must sign up
on or before September 28
AEROBICS AND DANCE
Noontime classes in Aerobics
(already m progress but
newcomers welcome) for faculty
and staff are held on Monday,
Wednesday, and Friday in Room
112, Memorial Gym Noontime
classes in Ballroom dancing (start
October 7) for Faculty and Staff
will be held on Tuesdays and
Thursdays Both ot these classes
are tree and you may call Jo
Saunders 757 6000 for further m
formation
CORSO
There will be a CORSO meetmq
in room 101 (Allied Health) Mon
day October 11, at 5 30 pm All
SOCW and CORS maiors or in
tended maiors are invited to at
'end CRSO is the organization
tor students m Social Work and
Correctional Services
CATHOLIC
NEWMAN CENTER
The Catholic Newman Center
would like to invite everyone to
10m in with us for celebrating
Mass every Sunday in the Biology
Lecture HaH starting at 12 30 and
every Wednesday at 5 00 at the
Catholic Newman Center located
down at the bottom ot College Hill
PRCCLUB
The PRC Club will hold its
meeting on Tuesday, October 5th
at 7 30 in the Mendenhall Multi
purpose Room Club Bylaws
Secretary election, and T Shirts
will be discussed r�mbers and
prospective members please at
rend
CHOWAN COLLEGE
Alumni and Friends of Chowan
College will be having an Alumni
Meeting m Greenville on Monday
evening, October 11 from 6 00 to
8 00 pm The meeting will be held
in the private dining room at the
Western Sizzim Steak House at 610
W Greenville Boulevard
Dr Bruce E Whitaker. Presi
dent of Chowan College will be the
speaker
All alumm and friends of
Chowan College are invited To
reserve you place, call Bob or Bet
y Dough evenings at 756 5128
PRE-OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPY
Pre Occupational Therapy
students should be advised of the
following
Application forms and fees for
November Allied Health Protes
sions Admissions Test must be
received by the Testing company
by October 8, 1982 Application
forms are available at the ECU
Testing Center, 105 Speight
Building between 8 00 and 1 00
and between 2 00 and 5 00
Occupational Therapy Admis
sion Packets will be available in
the Occupational Therapy Depart
mental Office October 4, 1982 and
also at pre registration
ZBT
HELP START A FRATERNI
TY Are you considering fraterni
ty life, but missed fall rush Well a
Zefa Beta Tau chapter is being
organized on campus Come help
us start a fraternity and make it
what you want it to be You can be
a charter member An organtza
tional meeting is being held on Oc
tober 7 at 5 30 in New Deli
Resturant
WOMEN'S RUGBY
Its still not too late to play
Anyone interested in playing
womens rubgy needs to report to
practices Tuesday thru Thursday
at 4 00 We practice behind the
Allied Health (Belk) building Ab
solutely no previous experience s
required
COOP
The Co op office has a iob open
mg for an accounting position
avaible with a local manufactur
ing firm Requires adding
machine experience and accoun
ting background Interested
students should inquire at the Co
op office, located in Rawl at room
313
SCIENCE MAJORS
Need some light reading" The
AC S S A is taking orders tor the
CRC Handbook of Chemistry and
Physics and the CRC Handbook ot
Tables for Organic Compound
Identification tor J25 00 and $20 00
respectively A reference must tor
any science major! Place orders
in the Chemistry office located in
Flanagan between the hours of
10 00 and 12 00 Sept 20 through
OctPlace your orders now
Payment due when order is plac
ed
FRESHMEN
REGISTER
Freshman Registers may be
picked up m the Buccaneer office
on Tuesdays and Thursdays from
2 00 p m till 5 00 p m The Buc
caneer Office is located on the se
cond floor of 'he Publications
Building
PIANIST
Prize winning pianist Bradford
Gowen will perform a recital
Wednesday, October 6 1982, at
8 15 p m in the A J Fletcher
Recital Hall The performance,
sponsored by The Rockefeller
Foundation, is part of the ECU
School ot Music's "Festival
'82 83 " The public is invited to at
tend, and no admission wit be
charged In addition to his pertor
mance. Gowen will present a
masterclass on Thursday. October
7. from 9 30 am to 11 30 a m m
the A J Fletcher Recital Hall in
terested persons are invited to at
tend the masterclass tree of
charge
INDT Major
There is an opening with Long
Manufacturing Co tor a Quality
Control Supervisor This perma
nent psition involves setting up
and maintaining a qual'ty control
program m Rumani tor tractors
manufactured for Long The star
ting date is immediately and the
salary is negotiable Contact Nan
cy Fillnow m the Co op office, ext
6979, for more info
SCIENCE MAJORS
It you want it here it is Come
and get. bu' you better hurry
because it may no'last TneCRC's
are going fast This s your ias
week to place orders in tne
chemistry office between 10 a m
and 12 noon CRC of chem in
physics $25 00 and CRC of organic
compound I D $20 00 Payment
due when order .s placed Place
orders now! (
HOLY
COMMUNION
A student Episcopal service of
Holy Communion will be
celebrated on Tuesday. October 5.
m the canpei ot St Paul's
Episcopal Church Loca'ed a' 406
4th Street (one block from Garre"
Dorm) The service will be a' 5 X
p m with the Episcopal Chaplm,
the Rev B H Hadden ceiebra' ng
DUKE POWER
POSITIONS
Duke Power has available a
variety ot co oppositions AHwur�
experiences are tor alternating
semesters beginning in January or
May. 1983 and are located in
Charlotte Any mteres'ed students
with a minimum G P A of 2 0 and
maiormg in Computer Science
Ma'n. Business Educa'ion, Office
Administration. Industrial Educa
tion. industrial Technci . �
Chemistry or Environmi
Health should contac' the Co op
office e�t 6979
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines. There are 33
units per line Each letter, punc
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end of line if word
doesn't tit. No ads will be ac
cepted over the phone We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
Tsc per line or traction of a line.
Please print legibly! L'se capital and
lower case letters,
Rrlurn in MIDI BD4RI) office innl r AST
4.ROI IMAN office! t 2 p.m. Wi.ndji hrforr
iurdii paper and M rdnrsdat brfnrr hurvdo
puhllcullon.
Name
Address
CityState
No. lines
.Zip.
Phone.
at 75 per line $.
.No. insertions.
enclosed
1�"1�-


1
11


��

1��J,��
FLASH
Snowski Chns'mas Break
There will b- a meeting tor all per
sons interested in snowsknng on
Tuesday October 12 at 4 00 pm in
Memorial Gym 108 A trip is being
organized for January 2 6 to
Snowshoe. West Virginia You
may elect to go for credit in the
Physical Education Department
or you may attend on a non credit
basis Contact Ms Jo Saunders at
757 6000 or came by Memorial
Gym 205 for fur'her information
TABLE TENNIS
TOURNAMENT
All Day Students who are full
time students with a 2 0 GPA mar
participate m a singles Tables
Tenms Tournament sponsored by
the Department of University
Unions The tournament wiH be
held at 6 00 PM on Tuesday Oc
totoer 5. 19t2 m the Table Tenms
Room of Mendenhall Student
Center
Winners of this competion will
be eligible to compete in the Ail
Campus Table Tennis Tourna
ment to be held on Thursday
November 4, 1982 Register at the
Billiards Control Center at MSC
HOMECOMING
DECORATIONS
Any organization wishing to
enter the Float ot House Dorm
Decoratmn competition for
homecoming sl-ould submi' an ap
plication to Jon Curtis Room 203
Mendenhall by October 8
SIGMATHETA
TAU
Ms Geneive Foley wii be 'he
speaker at the fan educational
meeting on Wed OC 13 She s a
Clinical Nurse Speoaiis' in
Pediatric Oncology from tne
Memorial Sloan Kettenng Cancer
Center in New York O'y and
received the Mane Hppens'ee'
Lingeman Award tor Excellence
in Nursing pract.ee She has Oeer
credited as a prime mc'iva'or m
the establisbment of a pediatric
center tor children wtr cancer
and tor parent support groups She
has appeared on ne Today Snow
Phil Donanue Snow, The Good Day
snow, and 'he Bostons Woman
Today This exc 'ng program will
oe held at 'he Greenville Goit and
country Club A cas" bar and nors
d oeuvres ili be a' 6 00 pm and
the program anil s'ar- at 7 00 pm
Registration is $4 50 Make c"eck
payable to Sigma Tne'a Tau Be'a
Nu Chapter and turn in M Car
Cox, ECU School of Nursing by Oc
'ooer 6
CAREERS
Which career tits you bes-7
Career Br Choice Not Chance is
a two part mini series offered a
Nc Cost by the University Counsel
ing Center It is offered on October
5 in 305 Wright Annex '757 666"
from 3 00 PM 5 00 PM The
Strong Campbell Voca'ionai
'erest inventory will Oe ad
ministered m the Firs' Mee'mg
No advance regis'ra o" s
necessary
BUSINESSMAJORS
There are posi'ions available
wi'h the General Accounting Of
tice as an Evaluation Trainee
Students mus' r ave cempie'ea 75
hours and oe available tor �.
work periods beginning m "it Spr
mg 1983 semester Corv �
permanent emplcyme a
gradua'ion would be likeiy F r
more information contact Car
Powell at the Coop office e�'
6979
CO OP
Black and Decker .n Tarbor
"as an opening tor a par' 'me ac
coun'ng clerk Tne perv.
be able to perform m sceuaneous
accounting duties sue as Pa ng
es and general oookeep
�-q Preferred s someone a-
operate a 10 key adairq n �
Employment would s'ar- as soon
as possible For more -�
Co op office, ex 6979
AMBASSADORS
Old Arr.Dassac '�- � . . �
an ECU AmDassadcr Our - g � �
1981 1982 school iear ana nave nc'
a"ended a General Mee'
contacted "e �'� i Center
757 6072) you must do sc bet're
Fr Jay, Oct 8. c- .
be dropped from me It
Present Ambassadors
forge' Tre General Meet
Wednesday OC 6 a 5 OC -
'he Mendenhall Muitifj
Room There are a I
Homeccm.ng Ewer's com
we wan- 'c oe invt �ec - arc the
Telephone Camca c-
through De'a �; al these bi
announcea a' hi s meet rtg
Fu'ur Arroassacrs A An
bassaaor appi car's a r 'ece v
"Qa"cCerV-
; t'eeMre Aeo-ec?
20
PHOTOGENIC
The ECU Ce a Arts
aepar'men would like nv "e a
those nterested n ��
mooe'ng tc a'e"c
ca'oioging pne'ograp !r
On Wed Oc' 19 � Thurs
. � mes will be announced ���
a oe pneograp ng a"0 ca"
ng an fOe a' a . �
mooei tor fashion aos ana layc's
All par'iopan's z � - a- -
ca'oiogea tor fuhjle reference -
moaeis encrsen from zac �
pr -�;�� De pan: d, i
tor 'ner par'iopa'ion
COMMUNITY PATRON
irtmui '� Pa't ' seasor
'icke's are now n sale KM
Ayden Tneatre A I�If p s 1982 83
season ot five exc ng plays Oc�
7 9 10 the C' � Hour and
a Halt Dec 2 4 5 The
Miracle A rkt-r ,dn 27 29 30
A Midsummer Nigh' s Dream
Mar 3.5.6 Or tne N.gr- �
Janua'y 16'n ana bpr
70 2123 24 Cam�a TnePur
-�sr � r. vt-as ' ' kel " ' �
� en bersi c �- a t a
special acng and make up
no) s ItIO Newslf
pi tours and a1" n, 'a'
'he Spring Ceiebra' en all tor .�
$10 0C A- to Awtfe ra'
A rfcSl P 6 � 293 Ayden NC
28513 � � u . . '� ;
524 4250
I
Ml
I
I
DISNEY WORLD
INTERNSHIPS
t. � World's Vag

erviewtng
pus Oc � � -
.
terns Sja- � a wort
� � - '�
$4 00 pe .vexs ipeoa
� � .
S'uder ' p arc a.
terested
i
COOPERATIVE
EDUCATION
CLUB
111
p
l.90 p rr
s � I
� .
. -
progra
a E . �� � �
� �
m
mm
STUOCMT UNION
la OUKjUU J�rtV
The Kast Carolinian
Pub � �� ac
-
tear m
- �
rhe East
� E as'
Caroina �med
Dy tm � lenfj - - us' Z3 na
. � s '�
SubscC'CKi Rate SlOyei' �
The East Carolinian of�icei
are located in 'he Old Sou'h
Building on 'he campus o ECU
Green'Ht N C
Send a:c-es'
- � �� ' 3-
ee-
N . - -
Telephone '57 ei� �37 JO�
BASIC NAUI
PADISCUBA
A no' iom our new class
whicn begms Tueso� Oc:oe- 13
instruction will oe "eio on ca � c.
except for 'he open a'e- d .
w"ich are necessar recto.reme
tor cer'ifica'ion Regis"a"c- ;
limited Fcr ere informa'icn ca
757 6143
EAST CAIOUNA UMVftSiTT
1907 1982
REMEMBER DROP-ADD DAY
IF YOU RECEIVED A
YELLOW V.I.P. CARD,
DON'T FORGET TO USE IT.
&2
Western SteerQ
Family
STEAKH0VSE
Banquet & Party
Facilities for 15
to 150 Persons
Take Out
Orders Call
758-8550
3005 E. 10th St Greenville
Open SunThur. 11am-9pm
Friday-Saturday liam iOpm
-saw vw �w Kf saw Me�. mm MM 3MC-
AT BARRE,ltd.
SeeusoCail
qfrma Haltow&n Nmds.
Dancewear Specialty Siop
For all your dancing needs.
422 ARLINGTON BLVD.
GREENVILLE, N.C.
(91?) 754-4470
Pepsi and the Pirates
a winning combination
30C
DOC
DOC
:xc
DOC
DOC
DOC
N.X.VXXN.XVNN.XN.S.VVVVVNXXVVXVVN
Located 1 milepast
Hastings Ford on
10th St. extension
Tuesday, Wednesday
& Thursday
POPCORN
SHRIMP
$295
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad may be substituted
for Slaw354 extra
'

?
I"





I HI 1 ASI C AKOl IM N
ikh B1 k M9H2
3

Student Health Concerns
Breast Cancer Discussed
Breast cancer is (he number
one cancer-killer of American
women.
1 his year an estimated 100.(XX)
nevN caes oi breast cancer will be
diagnosed These newl diagnos-
ed women will hae seeral times
the number ot close female
relatives who will be concerned
about their own breast cancer
risk I his is attributed to beliet
that a family history ot breast
cancel increases one's own risk ot
the disease.
But jusl what are the chances
ol deeloping breast cancer in a
woman with a family history ol
the disease' How much increased
risk is there to sisters and
daughters of such individuals?
In the United States the
average woman's probability ol
developing breast cancer is about
nine percent. One in every 11
� men will develop the disease in
hei lifetime. The risk ol dying
?m the disese is about 3 per
cent However, the risk will vary
according to the age ol the p.
tient. Foi instance, in the 20-30
age range the risk ol developing
breast cancer is 05 percent, but
in the 50 70 age range the risk is
nosl foui percent, and one out
� every tour will die from the
Studies have shown that in ad-
ion to a family history ol
�. cancer, other tactors are
. ated to increased risk
rhese divide into major and
� nor influences on risk . 1 he
ones are family historv,
oid benign breast disease
1 he minor factors are onset ol
menstrua! period prior to age 12.
menopause greater than age 50,
absence ol childbirth before age
md hight bod tat content,
t actors carrying noincreased risk
are breast feeding, breast size and
number ol children.
Nevertheless, a family history
breast cancer has been the
erriding, major determinant ol
risk ol cancer, and a woman who
has a mother or sister with the
sease has been found to have a
' in times higher risk than
i ��� -man without such a family
ry. Recent recognition ol
other factors such as menopausal
laterally of disease and
age al diagnosis has further serv-
ed to more accuately assess pro-
bability in these women of higher

Furthermore, in some cases
considerable apprehension will be
�v ed by the determination ol a
risk no higher than that ol the
general population, for example,
il a woman's mother or sistei
develops breast cancer in both
breasts following menopause the
woman has. over her lifetime, a
four-fold increased chance ol
developing breast cancer.
A woman with a mother or
sistei with pre-menopausal and
bilateral disease will have about a
live-fold increased risk ol
Ok eloping the disease in the
course ol her lifetime. The same
individual, it the relative has
unilateral disease and is post
menopausal, will have a pro-
bability ol disease veiv near that
of the general populaiton.
More recently, risk determina-
tion has been based on two af-
fected individuals in a pedigree,
and the pattern ol breast cancer
occurrence over two generations
has been used. Results ol these
surveys indicate that tor a close
relative (sister oi daughter),
where a mother and daughter had
bilateral and premenopausal
breast cancer, the risk for the
relative is 50 percent greater than
the general population.
It both affected cases are
unilateral and post-menopausal
when they developed the disese,
the risk to the relative is only lh
percent.
In the situation where two
sisters in the family have bilateral
pre-menopausal disease, a close
relative (sister or daughter) would
have a one in two chance to
develop the disease in her
lifetime. It the index cases have
unilateral and post-menopausal
disese, a close relative would only
have the same average risk as the
general population, a realization
that will reassure main overly ap
pre hen si ve individuals. Ot
course, the relative risk will vary
between these extremes. 1 his risk
information is of great practical
significance to both patient and
physician. Patients, at relatively
low risk, can be reassurred. The
truly high-risk patients can be
managed more appropriately by
trequent physical exams, more
frequent mammography testing
and prompt biopsy ol suspicious
lesions.
I ven mote aggressive manage-
ment may be indicated in those
individuals where a dispropor-
tionate iisk exists bv way ol
preventive mastectomy, although
this is still a controversial pro
cedure at this writing.
Although there is no known
protection against cancer, the
best weapon is a periodic com-
plete health checkup. In addition,
every woman should learn to per-
form a self-breast exam and
should become diligent in perfor-
ming the self-breast examination
on a regular monthly basis. In-
formation and insrtuctions on
self-breast examinations are
available at the Student Health
Center on request.
RESEARCH PAPERS
� net au .
Gi Ca .� jyed Fa'iqut-s ana
Sri : f-tp.ng Baqs
� - Well! Camp,no Equ.p
S'et : Toed Snoes
D me d-a Over ?00 Different
"0 Used Items Cowboy
Boo's S3� 9S
ARMY-NAVY
STORE T-
ABORTIONS
24 weeh terminations
App ts Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1 800 321 0575
:cu sth St
oAppp cofids
SALE
ITEMS
ve �e
NOW
$5.99
rolling stones
steve winwood
george matcher
bruce springstein
mike mcdonald
kool & the gang
KENNY LOGGINS
AEROSMITH
BILLY JOEL
RUSH
�Others unadvertised
also on sale
COUPON
COUPON
WE SEW
LEATHER COATS
1iW
f
SAAIVS
SHOE REPAIR
113 Grande Ave.
758 1228
S3.00off reg priceANY GIANT PIZZA
.OOoffreg prlceANY LARGE PIZZA
WE SUPPORT
ECU
ST et-nvilli b d Phone 756 082
S6 0825
Not ai'd wilt jn( other specials i ;cupo� Exemts OCTOBER li t�I
No B.S. Jewelr
Repair (Custom
(rafting � Fair
Prices &
Guaranteed Work) I
hv I.KS JEWELRY.
� 120 E. 5th St.
728-2127� 10-5
ruesSat.
Bring thts ad for 20
off UK chain repairs.
I
TRIM YOUR FIGURE
VIM K HIM
I OOk. IN
Proqrams or Men 1 Women
� M. dr al Weight Control
Mu'i ��onai onselinq
; ' I
Individual S� vsis
Deep Pore Ci "9
Face A Body W�ing
Manicures and Pedicures
Complimentary Consultation
Check phone book for
discount coupon
FAMILY EYE CARE
and
CONTACT LENSES
Ad till anil Pediatrk vision care in a
relaxed and personal setting Full on-
tart lens services Quick, accurate
'� egiass sen i i
DR PETER W HOI.US
C�rQMOigC
OSCAACCQTCR
TiPTONi Af � , H
'I IE BlvD
756-9404
jsonoo
i
20
OFF
Any Prescription
Eyeglasses Or
Contact Lens Fitting)
Musi Be Presenter! At T,me O Order
I Other Discounts Do Not Apply
Conservative Paper
Appears On Campusl
B KEITH BRITTA1N
Mall Wrilrr
An alternative
newspaper has hit the
campus, Freedom's
Defense. It is a monthly
publication published
b the N.C. Federation
ol College
Republicans.
Freedom's Defense is
available to every ma-
un campus in the state
including Wake Forest,
N.C. State and UNC-
Chapel Hill.
"It has been brought
about because ot a need
to present students with
another side ol the
issues. Students need
something else besides
liberal newspapers,
such as I he Fast
Carolinian said Den
nis Kilcoyne, president
ol the republican group
at ECU.
Kilcoyne, a
sophomore in political
science, also writes tor
the paper. He main-
tains that the
philosophy of the
t e d e r a 11 o n a n d
Freedom's Defense is
"to support the spirit
o t d em oc r a t i c
capitalism
I he conservath e
newspaper is funded
entirely by private
donations, according to
kilco)ne. It reciexes no
money from the Con
gressional Club or the
Republican Party.
There are reported to
be 200 conservative
newspapers on the
drawing board or
already in circulation
throughout the coun-
try.
Freedom's Dejense is
published in Raleigh
and distributed to the
various campuses in the
state.
The newspaper ad-
dresses issues from a
conservative viewpoint.
The first issue contain-
ed articles on the war in
Lebanon and the future
of the mid-east.
Freedom's Dejense
and the N.C. Federa-
tion o 1 College
Republicans have a
platform that is similar
to the 1980 Republican
Platform. The Federa-
tion sees itself as more
conservative than the
country club
republicans or much
of the GOP.
The publishers of the
paper, Kilcoyne said,
would like to put out
the paper more than
once a month, but
because it is privately
funded this is impossi-
ble.
"I ike it or not, there
are nations, such as
Russia, that are out to
destroy us We think it
is very important tor
students to be aware of
this.
ONE FOR
THE ROAD
-J&&�&i:&k
CrQ PIONEER
jg&H
4 V
JhW
ITALIAN NITE
LASAGNA
Ato-oxo-
c
�y
: s
AND
TS-165 6 2"door-mount
speakers. 20-oz. magnet.
I Coaxial 2-vvay speaker.
2"tweeter. High-o mpli-
ance woofer. 2 watts
power handling.
SPAGHETTI
YOU-CAN-EAT
WlTr
Garlic Broad

'S
UKP-5600 A mini in-dash cassette with AM FM
stereo. Supertuner II. Separate bass and treble
controls. Built-in PNS noise suppressor. 5 Station
preset pushbutton tuning. Music Search. ATSC
(Automatic Tape Slack Canceller Key-off pinch-
roller release. FM auto mono switch. Auto replay
and auto eject. Locking fast forward rewind.
Loudness control. Automatic mutiny on FM auto.
FM stereo indicator. Hard permalloy head
JUTSP
EVERY WEDS.
cSHCNEYS
432 Greenville Blvd.
296
in
Installed
��
9 6 M. Th.
9 8 Fri.
9 5 Sat
107 Trade St.Greenville
ATiTICL
SAT
IOOSBAU
TOUR
1ST PRIZk
FOOS8ALI
� ABU
TUESDAY
PROTEUS
WEDNESDAY
BUDDY &
THE HIT MEN
(Ml DENTS FREE)
THURSDAY
SUPER GRIT
(LADIES' LITENITEJ
FRIDAY
SUPER GRIT
SAT. ASIA
SAINT
752-7303
MONDAY PIZZA & PASTA
BUFFET S 9 oil p.nol
spoahetti - S 2 79
TUESDAY PIZZA BUFFET - S2 49
todM' Nit - Chai & IK
Ladict - No Co� � Fre�fcr9
Happy Hour $1 00 �ptc
WEDNESDAY - $2.1S SALAD BAR
THURSDAY - STAG SPEC - $2 49
Ckompoa,nc lorn H.H 9 'til 1
Ladiei � l�t glass Free - Mark Deaton
HH Jl 00 spec - 2SdaH
FRIDAY - HH 4-7 Free hors d BRUCE FRYE
SATURDAY - HH 4-7 BRUCE FRYE
SUNDAY - LASAGNA SPEC 12 99
TUESDAY
MALE BEST BODD CONTEST
WEDNESDAY
PONY NIGHT - 30� ponies
Free adm tor ECU students
THURSDAY - $1 00 Adm
COLLEGE NITE - 70 cons
FRIDAY
END OF THE WEEK PARTY
New Hours - 3 JO-7 30
3 30-4 30 oil pomes 30
4 30-7 30 all cans 6S
9:00-11 00 ail cans 6S
Lodies od��itted Free w H H stomp
SATURDAY
BEST IN DANCE MUSIC
SUNDAY
LADIES' NITE
Ladies admitted tree
SC atati Mi �� lasts
0� E FIFTMSTR
NOW SERVING
EVENiNG MEAL
SPECIALS S:
SL PER HI RGERS
SUNDAY �
SERVING BREAKFAST
10:00a.m. 2:00 p.m.
'i
Across Irom U B 6
SI3 Cotanche S . Greenville
8 0080 lor TAKE OUT
Open Mon Sat - 8 30 a.mI-00 a.m
HAPPY HOUR DAILY
4 p.m 7 p.m.
VIDEO, PINBALL,
FOOSBALL BILLIARDS
FRI. & SAT.
PROTEUS
(PROGRESSIVE JAZZ)

Starting Thurs.
H.H, 11:00 p.m
12:00 midnight
Same prices as our
4-8 H.H.
;

109 E. 5th St.
752 1361
DARTS
Mon. at 8:00
FREE PINBALL 3-4
HAPPY HOUR 4-7
Now open 7 days a week �
3 p m. 1 a m
Largest selection
of imports
tf fcttvUlrr-&
ffl&S
�:�
0.
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmsk - ; - -m Ite wm.
mgrn
IM EAST Sth STREET
rst-0ii
Open 7 Days
A Week
Daily H. H.
begins
at 5:30
This is a private club.

!





IHfcl-ASI AROl INIAN (KTOBhR?. 1982
Soviets Attack
Reagan Policy
B PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Wnle-r
In a strongl) worded
speech to the 37th ses-
sion oi the United Na-
tions Genera! Assembly
o n Friday, Soviet
Foreign Minister An-
drei Gromyko accused
the Reagan administra-
tion ol planning tor
nuclear war with the
"cold blooded com-
posure oi gravedig-
gers
During his speech
Gromyko combined his
attack on I .S. defense
policies with a proposal
tor a worldwide
� - atorium on all
iclear explosions, in-
. uding peaceful ones,
as a mean oi impeding
he development of new
. eai weapons.
G 1 o m k o
characterized the U.S.
bsessed with "the
� has to be
ne militari-
st
� sa
hi So let I nion
r e c o g n .
e' s right to
superiority.
ee to M that
happen
n address
6 a embl on
d a v. I S
ed some criticism ol the
Soviet role in
Afghanistan and sup-
pression of human
rights at home. Shultz,
who's comments were
reviewed as less severe,
was not present during
Gromyko's address.
Outside the U.N.
building about 200 peo-
ple demonstrating
against Soviet interven-
tion in Afghanistan
burned a Soviet flag
and hanged an ettigv of
soviet President
1 eon id Brezhnev.
Gromyko also pro-
posed that the U.N.
assembly adopt a
resolution that would
call on all nuclear
powers to freeze the
production and deploy-
m e n t oi n u c lea i
weapons.
A similar freeze
measure has been en-
dorsed b over 200
members of Congress,
a well as countless citv
and town governments
throughout the U.S.
President Reagan has
taken a strong position
oi opposition to the
freeze proposals
because he believes that
the I SSR has a decisive-
advantage in nuclear
weapons and that a
freeze would onlv serve
to lock in that advan-
tage.
Election
Corrections
Aing are corrections in the election
. teed in the Sept. 30 edition ol The
- �represenitive is Missv
Hei name was inadvertentiv left
Bam Pec, h the freshman class presiden-
i icinda Alston.
Tht ia represenitives that were listed did
: win. Thev were Lynn Jackson, Rick Belcher
Michae Rabon. The winners were Kirk
uck Blake and Mike Sommersett.
Y-m
PKTSk 1
VILLAGEiS jL
L 7 H yV
reg 27 99 SALE $22.99
ig reg 5 1 99 SALE $1 29
O He r G oc T - �� Of '3
1 so
1 umplrlf iini- ol Irrvh A su 11 tt�� r supphrv
Available every day of the year
J.D.
DAWSON CO.
2818 t. 10th St. Greenville
Gold Lance Class Rings-2-4 Week Delivery
Church of God
Homecoming
OCTOBER 12
College career class �
9:45 a.m.
Corner of Skinner & Spruce
Dial-A-Prayer 752-1362
Church no. � 752-4967
A
FOOD TOWN
$gZH32HflJiP
USDA Cheie Best Round Whole
LFPINCSCVAGA
These prices good thru
Saturday, October 9, 1982
USDA
choice:
10-12 Lb. A9-
Sliced Free
Lb.
USDA Ckelea Beef Rib 10-12 Lb. A�. - Slieai FfM
Whole
Rib Eyes
USDA
choice:
Lb.
USDA Ckelea Faeally Peak
��

Roan1 - Tftt�M�t
USDA Cheie Beef
Rib Eye Steaks
u 39
Steak
USM Cheie. 6( R�M
Sirloin Tip Roatt
. 2"
Seedless
Crapes
1.S Liter - Hearty Bera.iaa'y
Rkita, Ckaklla Blane
Pk. aU 12 0t. Caa
Budweiser
Pk. af 6 12 02. Cam
Miller Beer
1.S Liter - laakraeee Biaace Raaata
2 Litar meaBMI
Riunite Coca
Wine r Cola
,iWi
WK
22 Oiaee
9
23 02. - Biaker Hill
0W
J
i
Wky Pay '1.09
7.25 02. - Feoa Ta�a
1
Wky Pay '162
V
Wky Pay 2 61'
ISS�
ttO S.mii - Urj. I.II
Towels
Wky Pay 97
J
r
$
i
49 Oz. - .Soft.tr
Q.irl
Fab Detergent JFG Mayonnaise
1 Ik. - Marjarina Quartan
Mrs. Filbert's Jeno's Pizza
o

�JEW-
12 0i. Lare,e C JT'i -
489
6.5 or 6 Oz. - Tim Tim ICkleke Beef
2 Liver Turkey t 6ik!eti - Cat Foal
Purina 100
i rif - 4 Riii rick
Edon Toilet Tissue
� (mm. 2.99
18.5 Oz. - Anertaa' Cake Mlxai ITBOUlllU 1 96 Oz. 50 Off Daamy
Duncan Hines
Fabric Softener
t
�y refflFr
si
M
32,
Half Oellea 50 Off
32 Oaaea
15 Oi. - De Feea - Stan
Ken-L
Ration
Wky Pay 277
lf?
Wifk
Wisk
Wky Pay �3 33
TOMATO
CATSUP
P
Del Monte
Wky Pay M 19
Prices �ood at Greenville Food Town Store oaly

t





6THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 5, 1982
OOK
arn
�6r� Perf-Colas
�frefr- HaKmak' )ahhookS
i
tefljjja iMt Giving
6tyen h II 0fm
Wfl&,mtfrl;Ocfb-d
E FIFTH ST
GREENVILLE, N. C 27834
JZtV Cameras vSfioip
B18S. COTANCHE ST. � GREENVILLE. N.C.J7S34
Annual
m saiE"
0-7-8-9
Art & Camera
511 S. COTANCHE ST
QREENVILLE . N.C 27134
FRAME I
SHOP �
20 off �
ANY COMPLETE FRAMING �
ORDER BROUGHT IN OC- �
TOBER �,7.l,9. VOID Oct. 10.
1M2. NOT GOOD FOR PICK-M
Art & Camera
511 S COTANCHE ST
QREENVILLE. N.C. 77t34
FRAME
SHOP
20 off







ANY COMPLETE FRAMING
ORDER BROUGHT IN OC-
TOBER 6.7.8,9 VOID Oct. 10.
1M2 NOT GOOD FOR PICK-
1�Alley Sale (next to University Book Ex-
change)
-damaged merchandise
-discontinued items
-things that were dampened in our
summer flood
2�20 off on all art supplies
3�10 off our regular price on all 35MM
cameras.
410 off our regular price on all Nikon and
Canon lenses.
530 off our regular price on all zoom
lenses (except Canon and Nikon).
6�20 off our regular price on all Kodak
cameras and projectors.
720 off our regular price on all Polaroid
cameras.
8�20 off our regular price on all
binoculars.
g20 off any photofinishing order brought
in during sale with coupon.
10�Register for free prizes.
ART & CAMERA SHOP. BIGGEST SALE OF
THE YEAR. UNIVERSITY BOOK EX-
CHANGEGIANT SPORTSWEAR SALE &
BIG REDUCTIONS ON MANY OTHER ITEMS.
BOOK BARNGRAND OPEN-
INGREGISTER FOR FREE PRIZES & GIFT
CERTIFICATES.
Art & Camera
SM COTANCHE ST
QREENVILLE N C 2734
FRAME
SHOP
20 off
ANY COMPLETE FRAMING
ORDER BROUGHT IN OC
TOBER 6.7.�.� VOID Oct 10.
1�S1 NOT GOOO FOR PICK
UP
Art & Camera
51� COTANCHE ST
QREENVILLE. N C 27134
FRAME
SHOP
20 off
ANY COMPLETE FRAMING
ORDER BROUGHT IN OC-
TOBER 6.7.8.9 VOID Oct 10
192 NOT GOOD FOR PICK
1
'�� r-MANKr i , niiS. , � i a 4 "
Jlrl' 'I fat Ict� � V-Sfi�p
"alley safe coupon" "alley sale coupon"
GoM f0� ?"I off �� � pttnlfi
I l� iShing 0, ir. b' DfM "�
rt�n fVtfb' � 0 Miff
H" qff" �� pi' k �
Annual
IriJ Cameras vSfiop
518 S. COTANCHE ST. � GREENVILLE, N.C. 27834 "
0-7-8 - 9
nfLE
Canon
PRDGRAfv"
Programmed Automation
Plus Shutter-Priority Sophistication.
System Integration.
1 I . Canon Af 1 PROGRAM is the sophisticated SLR camera that's
' is-and-shoot simple to use1 Its computer brain is programmed
to give you perfect pictures in any light - even with flash' Concen-
ir ite nn your ,ubect and let the AE-1 PROGRAM do all the work
set it yourself - it's a sophisticated camera capable of pro'es-
sional results, and can use nearly fifty Canon FD wide-angle, tele
pi to and zoom lenses plus additional accessories to cover every
h lure idk ing situation. Automatically!
')�� A2. A jtxJ
v� MA .Ivjilablr
vq.(�� st'Ool"i
'88 A s-ts spetnJ
ir�- 'u tullv �i�lU
I. i itejraphy
N Canon D Inaa
. Ylhi won't
believe your eyes!
When you see the great pictures you get with a
Canon Snappy Camera Large 35mm film gives you
bigger and better prints And they're so easy to use
� Focus-Free Canon 35mm lens � Automatic Exposure
� Automatic Film Loading, Advance, and Rewinding
� Built-in Flash � Handy Wrist Strap
Snappy 20
Available in Five Colors
$69.00
Canon
The first computerized,
shutter-priority automatic SLR.
The last word in value.
The AE-1 is changing the way cameras il! be maoe anc: the a.
photographers tae pictures its shutter-Dnonty automatic exposo-e
and sensitive silicon photo ce'i fee you as never before to approach
your subiect� yet with ai1 the versatility that Cano- s more Thar-
forty FD lenses ana multitude ot accessories makes easily possp'e
To realty appreciate the AE-i you have tope it up ana use � I
list may change the course ol yow photography
Snappy 50
With Automatic Focusing
89.00
Canon AE-1 PROGRAM
wlens FD 50mm f1.8
249.95
Canon
Snappy 5020
�SrkjneF-pnonr) auO'nat'C
��"POSu'eSL
� inceoWv hgN ' ti
zzvac' ai: easy

�irram -eiocse se"S'
� boon f'0suie
-rvete'ing
�Cooac? w�' w lei a
� � - � ted �� iiiai
shoo�ng
Soeedi'te 'b5A�na
Poer wnaef A
sivf oDtonai
ana 'A sutc -ji-
ar fs s- SM '�� 0
Siiluil ' . � � " l .i
A�-c��c:i
. � �
� � ibeaiat - c
Canon AE-1 w tens
FD 50mm f1 8
$ 215.96
IrO f( Cameras v5fi
518 S. COTANCHE ST. � GREENVILLE, N.C. 27934
10 OFF Regular price on all CANON Lenses
20 OFF all accessories
�f
"ALLEY SALE" WILL BE IN ALLEY NEXT
TO U.B.E. ON SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9.
A
r

f





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QQSST (J5�
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U.B.Ei
516 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE. N.C.
rC
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P
an of MiiiM mm
(X ottw tforkwr on iALf km
puple, opti, ufefe n�Y. .royd, mooonM, Uft blot, butter, prifed!
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100
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2 price "wen
ML LodifA
V?K ' flpuhlit
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tiuJted uoeAjrk
poet ycnpon
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Add I00 for frwSfw 0 per litter for p&rionaii'zoJTon
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AgporHweaf fie) j
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f






8
HI EASTC ROl 11 W
i K 1 OBI K ?. 1982
ECU Bank Helps Staff
B ANTHOW BOl)
Ivso o'clock in the
morning, an ECU pro-
fessor has nisi taken his
vs11c to Pitt Memorial
Hospital. He later
lea:ns that she must be
transferred to the Duke
Uni ersit Medical
Center The transfer
will cost monev mone
the professor doesn't
have
1 his stor doe- ha e
.i rtapps ending. 1 he
professoi belongs to
the 1(1 Facult And
Stall Credit I nion.
v : Di William
Durham, i ha i man ol
. Business 1 ducation
1 )epai'men' auA lied I
ti eas t' didn't
d gettmi ip at two
make the
. lei loan. He
describes the credit
union as a "famih
; ?d" opei ation
� e :red i r has
i n ope rat n lot
2 2 years 1' was
rganized in 1 fsii
because there vas no
credn union in Green-
ville at the time Facul-
t � d � r' membei -
id trael to Raliegl
use -i ci ed i union.
ccording to D i
Dui ham, the ECl
credit nion i- :om-
ble to t he taie run
" e otter a re 1 atie-
a!e esi ment w - h
thai aei age
n that invest-
said Durl n
rhe ci edit union cui
rent pa - a 12 percent
rej rted assets
� SI 65 million. In-
resi rates on loan-
� ictuate and large
pel n 'he type ol
loan and i he : i ai ?i i
He ed v p esei i the
PK ranees from 10.8
peicent to 18 percent
The major benefit to
credit union membei- is
the life insurance plan
The plan matches
dollar t oi dollai
amount in an account
F or e a m p I e it a
member die- with
$4.(XX) m the account,
then the survivors
recene S8.000
Dr. Dui ham has
been involved with the
credit union almost
since it began He
recalls ihe times he has
had to run the da -to-
da operations on his
lunch hout 1 he cred i
union has - hanged ol
fices man "mho- Di
Dui Mam i ememb .�: s
one ifl t at � as tust
big eno igl for a desk,
a safe and one
customer
1 he credit union now
has : v o full t i m e
em pIoyees Ci ediT
utv m op � are
e c 1 u s i e 1 b
membei - 1
new officers e ti
n lanuai � 1 ted
officers nle
board f directors, loan
��� :et and i �m-
and super-
- ard �' directors I � -
o: members.
; nm ttee
has three mem bers
headed bv loan officer
Di Ra lone-
cre committi
screen- � u ip
plicat - rhe , m
mittee uses standard
banking pi �. ed .
det e : iii: t" in
1 a
members . � ha -
tei ire and stall
bee em .ed tor at
rhe supervisor) Credit Do ision and the rates and finance
committee is the credit federal government. charges. The regula-
tion watch dog. The tions also prohibit
committee conducts in- Dr. Durham said discrimination. Dr
ternal audits and makes that one ol his mam Durham said, " I here is
sure the operation run- concerns is complying more to getting a loan
smoothly. 1 he credit with federal truth and than paving interest
union is also closely lending regulations. He suggests shopping
supervised bv the State The regulations require around to get the best
Commerce Department disclosure of interest rates.
Women Get Support
bo
Bv PA IRK K (VNEI1 1
M�fl W
I u o Greenv ille
women itave begun a
series ol eieht
w orkshops on the sub-
ject Ol women and how
thev can bettei unders-
tand then place in to-
day's fast moving
world.
"W omen li e" is
the title ol the series ol
intensiv e grow th 21 oup
sessions " 1 he series is
designed to expand
your ability to ex-
perience sat is facti 1
d aliveness in youi
i elationship to yoursell
md others stated a
p ibl :it flyei : ��
pi giam, "I Ovus areas
: ; ide ' he body. sex-
uality and barriers to
comm :ation in rela-
tions! ps
�' me n - a t o
themselves, 'I should
b e a c e r t ai n way
VVomei � ha
f socia ati
� nmenta pro-
eran ming said i � 1
d 1 r ec 101 ' w 11 .1
Air. e N01 ma 1 ew is
1 e w : who 1 - a
� egistered nurse tl it
a orks pi te � nally in
the field of psycl
� - : - nai i men see
a id in their live
" I hey feel a 1 eal sense
� � �id,
e
she contn led
1 ewi- has teamed up
with Dee Morris, a
counseloi in the
psychology field, to try
to respond to the vOld
they see. Each ol the
eight houi -and-a-hali
sessions deal v ith a dif-
ferent subject. I hey try
to help participants
become more aware ol
the everyday problems
women face, and how
they c a n e f f e c t i v eh
deal with them.
1 ew is claims tl ai
most support c ups
tot womei come trom
a political foundation
T hese eroups hav e
ni imai
work i
H
on
the Equal Rights
�mendmem move-
ment, but women who
aren't political a r e
usually left without a
group thev can identify
w � h
. imen l e is try -
e to reach out to these
types ol women. I ew is
ud tha .vome ften
unconsciously accept a
pre pi ammed image
�t what society says
they -houi be like.
Lewis behev es
the ' rst step is to help
a men make choices
about then ehes, and
lot them ' cme 11
� gr 'c theii ow n
Ue qua les. I :io is
done in most cases by
stressing indivduality.
Lewis also thinks
a certain mvths tor
w omen a r e c o n -
tributing tact or- to the
negative sell image that
some women have.
"Most women believe
that the should nur-
ture other people, that
other's live- should
c 0 m e b e t o r e I heir
own she said
I ewis doesn't agree
with that conclusion
and think- women must
develop a sense ol self-
love before anvthing
else.
Physical appearance
can also be a stumbling
block for some women.
Women hate their
bodies or body parts,
1 ewis -aid. Thev often
don't take .ate ol theii
bodies, but mead ig-
nore or punish them
because thev d �n'i liv e
up to society's
"glamour" standards.
W omen li � e tries to
help women to love
their bodies � even it
they're not erl
and to take bettei . 11
ol 1 hern.
lewis said the
response from tl ;
women who took pan
in the initial �
Alive program ha I
enthusiastic
session will beg r
Oct 5 and is
1 2 pai tic ipants. I he
sessions are d I in-
to tw0 group a
�up and an eve
croup.
Student Union
E.C.U.
Major Attractions
presents
Sunday, Oct. 24
.35 Special
with special Guests
Spys
featuring 2 former members
of Foreigner
Minges Coliseum
Tickets now on sale �
S7.00 advance to ECU Students
S9.00 � General Public
at Mendenhall Central Ticket office
Greenville Record Bars &
Apple Records
Free
GeneraI Foods
Sample Pack
Nl TRI-SYSTEM � PROVEN EFFECTIVE
FOR ECL STUDENTS & STAFF
LILLIAN FLYTHE OF
GOLDSBORO SAYS:
TrishMnhaJWint
TBskMZT.
i t
ip e Pack tr e
d "ere" one-ct
Gratis
Oil'FfMNT
OlNIRAlKxxIS
i BaBaBgBflaMjm
(Cappuccino
U 3 t�lo�
roorr. ' cl" �'� " " c
1 VJ � .

Gratuit
Smoor and T' French st e
Kostenfrei
0W.CUPSt.IMNG
GfNtRAltqpds
hltKNAlk
Baii�iiiiiia
CaFe Francajs
.m-V- 5TLl N'S'AN7 lOFFfcl BttBAit
()Nl CUP SI HVlNt.
OneraILv
hit hnauonaI CoHi I s
Car 'I
tenna
Viennese st e .�. "
c r romor
Saor
Delicous Like a chocolate after-dinner mint
Gratis
Rich and chocolatey Swiss
0W CUP Sf RVINC
Ot Nt KAl hXXJv
hllRNAIJONAl CoWttS
lrisb?AocbaMint
BBHSTYU NSWNTCOffEEBFVERAGf
�K���SE�V�C
OtNtRAl Nxxh
liNimisAiioNAlCoHtts
So isse Mocha
SV�iSS SWE iNS'AN COtfEE BtvEPAOE
LILLIAN FLYTHE OF
GOLDSBORO LOST
45 LBS. ON THE
NUTRISYSTEM PRO-
GRAM!
rvE
ALREADY
LOST 45 LBS.
WITH
NUTRI
SYSTEM
"I came to Nutri System because I had
tried EVERYTHING else. 1 really needed
to learn how to KEEP THE WEIGHT OFF
and I felt that the Nutri System program
could do that.
1 love everything about the program It's
really easy to follow and 1 don't have to
worry about counting calories or preparing
food. 1 don't have to think about food
The behavior education program is
retraining my thinking about food
MonFri
9tol
3to7
STUDENT SUPPLY STORES
HAS YOUR FREE SAMPLE PACK OF GENERAL FOODS INTERNATIONAL
COFFEES. CLIP THIS COUPON AND HAVE A TASTE ON US.
Limit-one request per customer Sample packs are avaiiaoie at your
college bookstore niie supples last This offer expires December 15.
1982
tl sample pack is not available at your college bookstore,
send coupon, along with your name and address, printed on a
3 x 5 card to General Foods' International Coffees Sample
Pack Offer, PO Box 4051. Kankakee, III 60902
FREE
Genera Foods I srporat ' '�'
FREE
CALL TODAY AND SEE
what NUTRISYSTEM
CAN DO FOR YOU!
FREE NO OBLIGATION CONSULTATION)
SAVE 50
f it i �f�tscoupon�!��y o� mMulri S��'e'
A(g�' loss MeO'cai Ce'es hs�o �na w H
OeOUC' 50"� trom your program OHer valid Of
lew events only O" discount per person Ex
piresOC 13 !��
nutri system
I i�i i ��� ii cvMlerSi
201 Arlington Blvd
Greenville
Call
355-2470
Over 500 Centers Nationwide
nutrisystcm
weight loss medical centers
�x
A
I
I
� K


� v.

Par I
� ew
Oc
open
j
� B
I A
an-
.shbi
26, J
I rich
undersd
� St. ta
Oct. W
medkui
hospital
� Tales
p.m (;
Stepheri
South fl
Monke
� SrwtH
at 8 p.
brotherj
ranchh
nders
� Hit hi
ting O
millioni
frequeri
for thef

f
'





I k
IHt 1-AST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
(KTOBER 5, 1982 Page 9
.38 Special:
Gunning For
'Permanence'
left to right: Don Barnes. Larry Junslrom, Donnie Van Zant, Jack (.rondin, Jeff Cariisi and Steve Brookins of .38 Special.
.38 Special and guest band SPYS
will be performing at Minges Col-
iseum on Sunday night, Oct. 24, at 8
p.m. Tickets Jor the pairing went on
sale yesterday at the Central Ticket
OJJice in Mendenhall Student
Center, as well as both Record Bar
locations in Greenville and Apple
Records. Student tickets are priced
at $7; tickets for the general public
are $9. All tickets sold at the door
will be 59. The following article first
appeared in the October edition oj
The Record magazine. (Use by per-
mission; all rights reserved.)
By DAVID GANS
I hr Record
OAKLAND, Ca. � "The longer
it takes for you to get there, the
longer you'll be there when you
make it says Don Barnes,
guitarist, vocalist and co-producer
of .38 Special. "We really believe
that, because you learn so many
lessons along the way Having
been taught ten years worth of
lessons in the gritty grind of
American rock 'n' roll, Barnes and
his five bandmates have of late
developed a more sophisticated
sound in an effort to escape the
"southern boogie band" label that
has dogged them since they emerged
from Jacksonville, Florida. Their
struggle wasn't helped along any by
lead singer Donnie Van Zant's kin-
ship to I.ynyrd Skynyrd's late
vocalist Ronnie Van Zant (Donme's
the middle button .n the Van Zant
clan, with brother Johnny being the
youngest of the three); and, as
Barnes admits, the early .38 Special
wasn't all that special.
"On our first two albums we tried
to get into that little niche of what
was successful at the time he says,
referring to the hard-attack style
popularized by Lynyrd Skynyrd and
capitalized on by dozens, if not hun-
dreds, of bands. "All that did was
make everyone categorize us as
'Lynyrd Skynyrd junior
J8 Special began to evolve
See .38 SPECIAL, Page 10
N.C. Has Best Video Game Players In U.S.
B CATHERINE CHAPIN
1 hr Charioilr Ohwrr
I eo Daniels, by any standard you care to apply, is a
professional.
He began planning his career in 1978, while a
sophomore at John T. Hoggard High School in Wilm-
ington. N.C He spent $700-$l,200 a summer (all in
quarters) in 19"9 and 1980 learning his trade.
This year it paid off.
Daniels, 21, is the most successful video game player
in the United States, with five national records recogniz-
ed by Twin Galaxies International Scoreboard, the only
service in the country that logs video game scores cer-
titied by video arcade owners.
' Ops' is my career now says Qaaiels, who manages
the Light Years Amusement Center in Wrightsville
Beach. "I'm managing my own arcade. We're going in-
to national franchising of Light Years so I'll be promo-
Video
tional material for that. I'll also put on demonstrations
of games
And Daniels isn't the only one to make a name for
himself from video games.
Nine other players in North Caroina are national
champions, making the state home to more video game
champions than anywhere else in the country. The 10,
including Orlando Funderburk of Charlotte, have set
records in 15 games.
Battling It Out
Networks Vying For Top
FROM WIRF REPORTS
Here is a list of all the new series on the three com-
mercial networks, arranged by day of the week. ABC
and CBS each have seven new series; NBC has 10.
� Riplev's Believe It Or ot � ABC, Sundays at 7 p.m.
(Already premiered.) Jack Palance hosts this weekly
tribute to the unusual, based on the popular newspaper
column by Robert L. Ripley.
� Voyagers! � NBC, Sundays at 7 p.m. (Already
premiered.) Jon-Erik Hexum and Meeno Peluce travel
through time and witness great events of history.
� Matt Houston � ABC, Sundays at 8 p.m. (Already
premiered.) Lee Horsley stars as a Texas millionaire
who passes the time by playing detective and wearing
tieht jeans.
� Gloria � CBS, Sundays at 8:30 p.m. (Already
premiered.) Archie Bunker's daughter, now divorced
and living in upstate New York, goes to work for a
veterinarian. Sally Struthers and Burgess Meredith star.
� Square Pegs � CBS, Mondays at 8 p.m. (Already
premiered.) Written and produced by Anne Beatts,
formerly of Saturday Night Live, this comedy centers
on two teenagers, Amy Linker and Sarah Jessica
Parker, as they cope with high school life.
� ewhart � CBS, Mondays at 9:30 p.m starting
Oct. 25. A writer drags his wife to Vermont, where they
open a country inn without knowing the first thing
about running it. Bob Newhart and Mary Frann star.
� Bring 'em Back Alive � CBS, Tuesdays at 8 p.m.
(Already premiered.) The adventures of real-life wild
animal hunter Frank Buck serve as the basis for this
swashbucker. Bruce Boxleitner stars.
� Gavilan � NBC, Tuesdays at 9 p.m starting Oct. 19
or 26, depending on the World Series schedule. Robert
Unch stars as a former CIA agent who works for an
undersea research institute. With Kate Reid.
� .S7. Elsewhere � NBC, Tuesdays at 10 p.m starting
Oct. 19 or 26. From the producers of Hill Street Blues, a
medical drama tinged with humor, set in a large, busy
hospital.
� Tales of the Gold Monkey � ABC, Wednesdays at 8
p.m. (Already premiered.) A cargo pilot played by
Stephen Collins fights Nazi spies and other nasties in the
South Pacific whenever he's not raising an elbow at the
Monkey Bar on the island of Bora Gora.
� Seven Brides for Seven Brothers � CBS, Wednesdays
at 8 p.m. (Already premiered.) We start with seven
brothers but just one bride all living together in the same
ranchhouse in Northern California. Richard Dean
Anderson and Terri Treas star.
� Filthy Rich � CBS, Wednesdays at 9:30 p.m star-
ting Oct. 6. Comedy about a looney family led by
millionaire Big Guy Beck (Slim Pickens), now dead but
frequently seen on videotaped messages he left behind
for the benefit of his oddball relatives. Charles Frank
also stars.
� Family Ties � NBC, Wednesdays at 9:30 p.m.
(Already premiered.) Michael Gross and Meredith Bax-
ter Birn'ey play former student radicals whose children
don't hold to quite the same beliefs.
� Tucker's Hitch � CBS, Wednesdays at 10 p.m star-
ting Oct. 6. Catherine Hicks and Tim Matheson star as a
husband and wife detective team, with the wife having
the dubious advantage of extrasensory perception.
� Star of the Family � ABC, Thursdays at 8:30 p.m.
(Already premiered.) A fire captain, deserted by his
wife, tries to rear a teenage daughter who aspires to a
career as a professonal singer. Brian Dennehy and
Kathv Maisnik star.
� Cheers � NBC, Thursdays at 9 p.m. (Already
premiered.) Comedy set in a bar run by a former big-
league baseball pitcher. Ted Danson and Shelley Long
star.
� It Takes Two � ABC, Thursdays at 9:30 p.m star-
ting date to be announced. Comedy about marital
strains between a woman laywer and her doctor hus-
band. Patty Duke Astin and Richard Crenna star.
� The Powers of Matthew Star � NBC, Fridays at 8
p.m. (Already premiered). A friendly alien (Peter Bar-
ton) tries to lead a normal human life as a high school
student, but creepy enemy aliens give him a hard time.
Louis Gossett Jr. also stars.
� The iew Odd Couple � ABC, Fridays at 8:30 p.m
starting in late October. The only thing really new about
this comedy is that the two lead characters are black.
Fortunately, they are played by Demond Wilson and
Ron Glass.
� Knight Rider � NBC, Fridays at 9 p.m. (Already
premiered.) An urban answer to The Dukes of Hazzard.
The characters don't have Southern accents, and the car
is filled with computers, but the car is still the star. Also
featuring Edward Mulhare and David Hasselhoff.
� The Quest � ABC, Fridays at 9 p.m starting in late
October. Four unlikely Americans compete for the
privilege of ruling a small country in the Mediterranean.
Perry King and Noah Beery Jr. star.
� Remington Steele � NBC, Fridays at 10 p.m.
(Already premiered.) Stephanie Zimbalist stars as a
private detective who creates a fake male boss so that
clients won't worry about turning their jobs over to a
young woman. Then one day someone claiming to be
that man shows up at her office, ready to take over.
� Silver Spoons � NBC, Saturdays at 8:30 p.m.
(Already premiered.) Ricky Schroder, as a 12-year-old
boy reared in a military school, is shocked to learn how
lazy and immature his millionaire father is. Joel Higgins
also stars.
� The Devlin Connection � NBC, Saturdays at 10 p.m.
(Already premiered.) A former spy who runs a civic
auditorium learns he has son, now grown and working
as a detective. Rock Hudson stars.
"They are superstars in North Carolina says Walter
Day, who runs the Twin Galaxies International
Scoreboard in Ottumwa, Iowa. "Most of the records on
important games are held by North Carolinians says
Day. "The quality of mindbody coordination is in-
credible
Why North Carolina has earned this singular honor
seems to be, in large measure, because of Daniels and
the Light Years Amusement Center. Eight of North
Carolina's 15 records have been set there.
"We started Light Years with me because I had more
world records than anybody else says Daniels, who is
vice president of the firm owned by businessmen Andy
Howell and Louten Hedgteth. "When we opened, we
advertized for people to come down and try to break
records or challenge me.
"Instead of them having to go somewhere else and set
a record, we'd like them to come here and set a record
he says. "Were willing to stay open as long as it takes
The attraction of an "as long as it takes" arcade is no
small consideration for aspiring video game champions.
"The first time 1 went for a record with Asteroids (at
a Carolina Beach arcade), I played 201: hours and the
owner came along and unplugged the machine on me
says Daniels.
Daniel's longest stretch on one machine was 42 hours,
10 minutes in his second record-setting attempt on
Asteroids. He had to quit with a nervous stomach. He
played 27 hours, 13 minutes to set the national record
on another game, Robotron. His Robotron record was
just broken by Chris Quade of Chapel Hill.
Daniels tutors other national champions in the fine
art of mastering the video game.
"He taught me a lot of things, strategies to most of
these games says Scotty Williams, 15, who holds a na-
tional record on Vanguard set at Light Years. "Ive been
playing (video games) since they first came out, but I
was never very good at it until Leo came along
If you think it's easy being a video champ, think
again. Besides skill, potential champions also need time
and money.
Williams, a junior at Hoggard High School in Wilm-
ington, spends 25 hours a week practicing on his record
game and others he wants to master.
"1 usually pick games I'm pretty good at and try for
those he says. "It somebody's going for my record
and 1 think they might beat it, I'll go for it that (same)
night. Leo talks to Walter Day (at the scoreboard) right
much and he lets me know all that stuff
Charles Brown, at age 11, is the youngest video game
champion in the country, on a game called Looping.
And, you guessed it. he plavs at Light Years.
Brown, a rising 7th grader at Lake Forest Junior High
School in Wilmington, says he spends S50 a week hon-
ing his skills. He earns his pin money � about S100 a
week, he says � mowing lawns and cleaning the glar
on video games for Daniels.
"1 try to pick the biggest yards and charge them more
money says Charles. "I don't spend all of it at Light
Years. Besides my mom won't even let me. She makes
me put some in savings
Charles isn't sure what he'll do for playing money
once school starts, but says hopefully, "Sometimes my
mom will give me some
Orlando Funderburk says he has spent about $50
mastering a game called Phoenix on which he holds a
national record.
"1 just keep going back everytime I get money says
Funderburk, 18, a rising senior at Gannger High
School.
Funderburk is more casual about his champion status
than most record-holders.
"1 drop in from time to time he says, to see if his
record still stands. But he's not practicing for any other
records.
Once video game players approach championship
caliber, there are other things to consider before setting
a national record � like stamina, the ability to digest
See VIDEO, Page 10
v;
' ilSfc.
p

� "
.���� ' '


-
Dance Theatre Auditions Set For Tomorrow, Thursday
The East Carolina Dance Theatre has scheduled auditions for its January production tomorrow and
Thursday at 7:30 p.m. in Dance Studio 114 of the Messick Theatre Arts Center. Dance Theatre produc-
tions are performed each year for the University and area audiences. This year the program will feature
modern ballet and jazz pieces choreographed by members of the dance faculty. Auditions are open to
the community, ECU students, faculty and staff. Dancers planning to audition should be warmed up
and ready to dance at 7:30. Appropriate shoes for ballet and jazz should be worn; auditions for modern
pieces require no shoes. January 27, 241, and 29 are the production dates in McGinnis Theatre. For fur-
ther information about the auditions, participants should call 757-6390.
A






10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 5, 1982
Video Champions
N.Cs Best Give Trade Tips
Record Sales Plummeting
Continued From Page 9
food quickly and a lightning-paced speed bet-
ween machine and bathroom.
"You have to loosen up before you start
says Daniels of his championship technique. "I
usually get these foam rubber pads and stick
them on the machine underneath my palms. The
first time I played Asteroids (without pads) it
made my wrists swell.
"1 have a stool there, always ready he says.
"Usually my mother gets me something to eat
and feeds me
And then there's that nagging problem, how to
heed nature's call during a frenzied record-
breaking attempt.
"You station yourself (on the screen) in a pret-
ty safe place and run for the bathroom as fast as
you can he says. "You can be gone about a
minute
Daniels doesn't recommend getting too much
sleep or taking pills to stay awake before a record
breaking attempt. He learned that the hard way
during his second try for an Asteroids record.
"I took a No-Doz and that doesn't help at
all he says. "The caffeine gives you a nervous
stomach. That's why 1 had to quit. I got sick
When video champs nationwide set a record,
they call Twin Galaxies scoreboard.
"We get calls at 2 in the morning, 3 in the mor-
ning said Day, who began the service this year.
"For the first time, if a person wants to know
how they stand in the nation, they call and they
know immediately he says.
"Somebody has to keep a solid record that's
certified says Carl Hayes, who owns Gaston
MiniGolf and Games in Gastonia. "In North
Carolina and South Carolina, this organization is
recognized in most arcades. Nobody else is
Day is building a scoreboard at his Kirksville,
Mo arcade which he hopes will become a mecca
for aspiring video game champs.
"Imagine a scoreboard about 18 feet high and
about 35 feet long with 12 black-and-white TV
monitors on it he enthuses. "It's going to be
one of the most glamorous spectacles in the
world
Dav says the board should be finished next
month at a cost of $15,000-$20,000. He's also
starting a poster service with the latest champion-
ship scores. The posters will be sent to video ar-
cades nationwide every two weeks, starting Tues-
day.
And Day, 33, is looking into a syndicatd radio
show and a cable TV show on video games.
Meanwhile, Leo Daniels has co-authored a
book on video games, How To Master Video
Games, Book II (Bantam, $2.95). It's due in
bookstores this month.
All for the love of colored blips dancing across
a computer screen.
But that's not the way Daniels sees it, of
course.
He likes the special effects. "On some games
it's the graphics and the sounds effects he says.
"On some games, it's the themes. Then you have
the cartoon characters, like Donkey Kong
But most of all, Leo Daniels likes to get away
from it all as he controls the action on the screen.
"For a quarter, you can blow away a galaxy or
take a trip beyond says Daniels. "And if you
get good enough you can make your quarter last
for two days
By KURT LODER &
STEVE POND
Bo4Uat Sloae
NEW YORK � The
U.S. record industry is
in the worst shape in its
history. Consider the
following facts:
Record executives
estimate that in 1982,
record and tape sales
have decreased by as
much as fifty percent
from last year, and
possibly more. And
things were already
bad: after 1978, the in-
dustry's last "boom"
year, the retail record
business declined from
a gross of more than $4
billion to a 1981 level of
$3.6 billion � a drop
of $400 million (a total,
in constant 1982
dollars, of closer to
$500 million).
Current best sellers
no longer sell in the
quantities they used to.
For example, REO
Speedwagon was able
to sell some 6 million
copies of its High In-
fidelity album, but this
year's biggest seller so
far is Asia's debut LP,
which has sold about 2
million copies.
Despite the decreased
revenues, the record
business as an industry
has not made realistic
investments in
marketing and advertis-
ing campaigns to regain
lost sales.
In the midst of all
this, the companies
have been slow to res-
pond to the challenges
of new technology �
home taping, an up-
surge in the use of
cassettes and the
decline of the vinyl
disc.
Not surprisingly, cut-
backs have become
commonplace. Since
1979, more than 1,000
people directly
employed by American
record companies have
lost their jobs. On
August 13th, CBS
Records, perhaps the
largest record company
in the world, let go of
more than 300
employees. One month
earlier, a reorganiza-
tion at ElektraAsylum
Records severed five
executives, and a few
days after the CBS
shake-up, Atlantic
Records dismissed for-
ty staffers. Most
recently, on August
27th, Warner Bros.
Records let go of
twenty-nine employees.
The extent of the
CBS cutback was startl-
ing. Fifteen percent of
the company's salaried
staff, including nine
vice-presidents, was let
go, and all five of its
regional offices �
along with nine of its
nineteen smaller branch
offices � were shut
down. Such a Draco-
nian option may not be
available to smaller,
more financially strap-
ped record companies.
ElektraAsylum is
rumored to be on the
verge of absorption by
its larger sister com-
pany, Warner Bros.
Records, and further
firings, at the very
least, are widely feared.
"This industry is
hurting real bad says
M. Richard Asher,
deputy president of the
CBS Records Division.
. 38 Special Find Musical Niche
Continued From Page 9
musically in 1979 with their third
album, Rockin' Into The Night. The
title track received substantial FM
airplay, paving the way for the
massive success of 1981 's Wild-Eyed
Southern Boys and the
breakthrough single, "Hold On
Loosely
The band's latest album, Special
Eorces, and the first single,
"Caught Up In You have reached
the trade charts' top ten, indicating
that sales will equal or surpass its
predecessor's platinum-plus perfor-
mance. "People ask us if we feel
like we're selling out with a pop
sound says Jeff Carlisi, who
shares guitar and production duties
with Barnes. "We're just trying to
fit into what radio wants. We've
been educated over the years about
what the industry needs � all the
elements � but we're playing
because there's nothing any of us
would rather be doing. Everyone in
.38 Special gives his full 110 per-
cent
Barnes, Carlisi and Van Zant �
along with stage manager Larry
Steele and Survivor's Jim Peterik
(who penned "Eye of the Tiger")
write the lion's share of .38 Special's
songs, with occasional contributions
from bassist Larry Junstrom and
drummers Steve Brookins and Jack
Grondin. On Wild-Eyed and Special
Eorces, Rodney Mills (of Atlanta
Rhythm Section fame) is listed as
producer, with Barnes and Carlisi
credited as "production
associates But Barnes notes that
Mills "doesn't override us. It's ac-
tually a three man production team.
Nobody can tell the group how to
sound or direct them better than
somebody who's been in on the
molding of the band for ten years
The collaborative approach to
songwriting and production extends
to everything .38 Special does.
That's one part of the "good ol'
boy" stereotype that doesn't bother
Barnes and Carlisi. "No one person
is the star in this group Barnes
asserts. "We approach everything
as a team. It's so different from
anything we've been exposed to with
Skynyrd. They approached it pretty
much like an athletic team
What holds .38 Special together
more than anything is friendship:
the six band members have known
each other since they were kids in
Jacksonville, and Barnes points out
that this near-blood relationship
creates "a feeling of permanence
Their bond proved especially impor-
tant early on, when Peter Rudge,
who managed Skynyrd and .38
Special, became, as Barnes says,
"disenchanted" with the music
business after the Skynyrd plane
crash. "He wasn't helping us at all,
and we saw that as our time to get
out he relates. "A&M figured
we'd break up, because that's what
most bands would do. They sent a
little bit of money to keep us going,
but they were astonished that we
were still writing songs and staying
together after all these problems.
But it never entered our minds to
break up
Instead, the crisis pulled the musi-
cians together even tighter. "After
the first two albums, we realized we
were going nowhere fast says
Barnes. "We revamped the for-
mula, updated everything, and tried
some new things. We learned from
being so close to Skynyd that you
have to put your own character into
the music. People relate to character
more than proficiency in playing
Although the material rewards of
a pair of platinum albums cannot be
denied, both Carlisi and Barnes
maintain that .38 Special's values
are the same as they've always been,
"We came from point zero, Satur-
day night in a bar with ten people
who didn't care if we lived or died
Barnes explains. "We were exposed
to the big time before we were big
time � whatever that term means �
and we've seen so many people get
taken down by the business. We've
had the chance to learn from other
people's mistakes.
"It's nice to have financial in-
dependence, but soul and spirit and
character are more valuable. We're
richer in spirit and character and
camaraderie within ourselves and
our friends than we are in money
J. A. UNIFORMS
SHOPS
Bring this ad for
10 OFF
on the purchase of
one of our lab coats!
All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes, shoes,
and hose. Also � used ECU nurses
uniforms. Trade-ins allowed.
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive.
Near Hollowell's Drug and old hospital.

"Somebody's got to
give us a break
The "break" sought
by industry lobbyists is
a legislated royalty on
consumer home-taping
equipment, which, thev
claim, violates the
royalty rights ot artists
and record companies.
Not everyone buys this
argument. Ben Karol of
New York City's King
Karol record-store
chain refers to the in-
dustry's elaborate
home-taping survey as
"a crock of shit And
even Joe Cohen, who
heads the National
Association of Recor-
ding Merchandisers
(NARM), and who
favors the royalty, ad-
mits the home-taping
issue is "a two-sided
sword. With the 20
million Walkman-type
units that were sold, we
sold a lot of prerecord-
ed tapes � and a lot of
people learned to start
taping at home. We
have to accept the good
with the bad Without
the Walkman, people
would not have bought
as much music last year
as they did
While record ex-
ecutives continue to
froth over home tap
ing, critics have
discerned more tangible
problems in the in-
dustry. Aside from the
national recession, thev
cite poor management
and the increasing
burden ot extravagant
long-term recording
contracts. For example,
it was recently reported
that Glenn Fre and
See RFC OKI). Pane 11
ST. JAMES
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
UNIVERSITY STUDENT
PICK-UP SCHEDULE
Students who wish to attend Sunday morning worship ser
vices, but do not have a ride, may attend the worship ser
vice at St. James United Methodist Church by observing
the following schedule. The church van will be used to
transport students to and from the church.
10:10
Methodist Student Center
10:12
Garrett Resident Hall
10:15
Jarvis Resident Hall
10:17
Fleming Resident Hall
10:20
Cotton Resident Hall
10:25
White Resident Hall
10:27
Umstead Resident Hal
10:30
Tyler Resident Hall
10:40
St. James United
Methodist Church
OPEN24HOURS DRIVE THRU Wl NDOW
Special:
$2.99
2 ribs, fries, slaw & biscuit
on Wed. only
11-2 p.m. and 5-9 p.m.
No Take Outs
1011 Charles Street �752-1373 1 Block from Campus
Athletic fUlbrld
Carolina East Mall
"The Fun Way
to Fitness
NOW
OPEN
26
classes
a week
to choose
from.
Not all clinics are the same.
ABORTION is a difficult decision that's
made easier by the women of the Fleming
Center. Counselors are available day and
night to support and understand you. Com-
fort, safety, privacy, and a friendly staff . . .
that's what the Fleming Center is all about.
Insurance accepted Free pregnancy testing
All inclusive fees Saturday appointments
Up to 18 weeks Very early pregnancy tests
Call 781-5550 day or night.
The Fleming Center makes the difference.
jfff t Sr S 20 Located 1 mile past
-T w -fr Hastings Ford on
ll 1 1 .WSr5 10th St. extension
Monday, Tuesday,
and Wednesday
Ocean Perch Nuggets
$1.99
Crab Cakes
$1.99
Hamburger Steak
$2.99
Beef Tips$2.99
French Fries or Baked Potato, Tossed Salad
may be substituted for Slaw35c extra
Wednesday
"Original Ladies' Lockout
Thursday � Appearing �
The CATALIN AS
Happy Hour � 7:30-9:00
Friday
The Best In Dance
Open 8:30
Saturday
Beach Night
with John Moore
Sunday
Lambda Chi Pony Night
For Members & Their Guests Only

River
Bluff Rd
Behind
Putt Putt
( ontij
Dor,
for m
L.agi
adv
�lek
$1
mi!h
tor
albui
has
copi
100,
Heni
ship(
spca
dcai
the
lab-
prec
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"HE LAi.1 CAROI IMAN
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82 Record Sales Are Off
C untinued From Page 10
Don Henley, the two
tormer leaders of the
I agles, had been paid
advances by
1 lektra Asylum of
$1.5 million and $2
million, respectively,
for their debut solo
albums. Frev's record
has sold only 2(X),000
copies, and only
100,000 copies of
Henley's LP were even
shipped, leading to
speculation that those
deals alone might tip
the balance in the
label's already
precarious financial
situation.
Joe Smith, chairman
o 1 the board of
t-lektra Asylum, says
that the Frey and
Henlev deals were part
o i "an Eagles
renegotiation and
that the actual ad-
vances paid out were
about "Fifty percent
lower
"But we do make
ridiculous deals
Smith agreed. "CBS is
paying Billy Joel $5
m'lion an album. I'm
sure the) made that
deai figuring he was go-
me to sell 5 million
copies of ever) album.
He won't (CBS
declined comment on
its contractual arrange-
ment with Joel.)
Smith says the record
business may be off as
much as sixty percent
this year, "although
that may be a little
astic. If you could
have sold 2 million
copies of an album last
year, maybe you'll sell
12 million this year.
But it's hard to com-
pare figures like that.
Queen's last album
(The Game) sold 3.5
million, and the new
one (Hot Space) hasn't
hit 1 million yet; but
that doesn't mean the
business is off sixty per-
cent � it means that
the new Queen record is
not as good as the last
one. It never would
have sold 3.5 million,
because it doesn't have
the hits on it
These days, even the
best-selling chart acts
aren't moving
anywhere near the
number of albums they
used to. Fleetwood
Mac, who sold 12
million copies of their
Rumours album in
1977 and 2 million
copies oH the eclectic
two-record set Tusk in
1979, have sold just
over 1 million copies of
their new FP, Mirage.
And though RFC)
Speedwagon has
likewise sold more than
a million copies of its
new FP, Good Trou-
ble, in the first two
months of release, it's
highly unlikely that the
record will approach
the 6 million mark
reached by its
predecessor. Hi In-
fidelity. (REO's Nine
Lives, which came out
in 1979, sold in the
neighborhood of
500.000 copies.)
Blond le's The
Hunter peaked at
Number Thirty-three
and then dove down the
charts, having sold just
over 500,000 copies;
their previous album,
Autoamerican, sold
more than 1 million
copies last year.
Heart's Private Audi-
tion only made it to
Number Twenty-five
and Dolly Parton's
Heartbreak Express
didn't even crack the
Top Hundred.
When prestige acts
fail to generate record
sales, chart position
becomes a moot issue.
At the time of the CBS
firings, twenty-four of
the lop Hundred
albums on the
Billboard magazine
chart were by CBS ar-
tists, as were seventeen
of the Top Hundred
singles, including the
Number One record,
Survivor's "Eye of the
Tiger "Nothing is
selling said one ex-
ecutive "It's grim out
there, and we're all get-
ting hit m a heavy way.
In 1979, business drop-
ped, but lots of com-
panies bounced back
and made money the
next year. This time
around, people are say-
ing that nothing like
that is going to happen.
They say this is going to
be the new record in-
dustry
One factor in the
declining consumer in-
terest in records is the
$8.98 list price for
albums, introduced
three years ago, which
continues to meet con
su mer resistance.
Record companies said
the) needed the higher
list price because unit
manufacturing costs
had gone up: since
fewer records were be-
ing shipped, fewer were
being pressed, thus
raising the cost per
unit. Logical, but
loathsome to con-
sumers. Savs Russ
Solomon, owner ot
California's lowc
Records retail chain:
"We in the industr)
have, by need and bv
greed, raised the price
of record- so high that
the youngest group ot
tans cannot afford
them anymore. Those
are the fans that sup-
port the heavy hitters in
rock & roll � the
thirteen fourteen
and fifteen-year-olds.
They don't have as
much money as thev us-
ed to, and when
everything they want to
buy is eight or nine
dollars, that's too
much
Jim Greenwood,
owner ot the Fos
Angeles-based licorice
Pizza chain, agrees.
Greenwood says his
sales are generally
down by only fifteen
percent this year, "but
the best sellers, the big
artists, are down more
than that EP's,
however, are moving
briskly. Greenwood
says he is selling as
many copies of the re-
cent Missing Persons
FP on Capitol, which
lists for $5.98, as he
sells of the new Fleet-
wood Mac album.
"The companies
should release more
$3.98 and $4.98 pro-
duct. At $8.98, the
sales aren't there
And if the sales
aren't there, retailers
can't afford to keep a
record around. Until
the late Seventies, retail
record outlets could
essentially be capitaliz-
ed by extended consign-
ment credit from the
record companies. The
stores paid for their
records as they sold
them. With the rise ot
interest rates into dou-
ble digits, however, the
c o m p a n i e s b e g a n
demanding their money
more quickly. Many
retailers got caught in
the crunch
" Their insistence on
payment within sixty
days is so unrealistic it
could put the industry
out of existence says
Ben Karol. "We have
the facilities to expose
whatever record the
companies make, but
we're not gonna pay
for it before we sell it,
and it's not gonna sell
in sixtv davs. We're
lucky if halj of it sells
in that period. To say
we have to pay that
quickly is ludicrous.
It's the greatest stumbl-
ing block for exposing
new acts. They all can
make a profit if they'll
get it through their
heads that the record
business doesn't
operate like the meat
business
According to Karol,
the major companies
"got carried away with
their big successes" in
the mid-Seven ties,
"and now we've got a
lot of idiots running the
record business. They
are supplying absolute-
ly no promotional sup-
port anymore. All they
say is 'Give us the
money. We don't care
about anything else,
just give us the money
It's like they don't care
if the records sell or
not, because they just
won't support them
anymore
Another problem,
according to CBS'
Asher and others, is
album-oriented radio.
N ARM's Joe Cohen
says it "must become
far more exciting than
it has been m the last
year
There are no quick-
ti solutions to the
record industry's pro-
blems, but not
everyone is panicked
vet. Records and tapes
aie still selling, after
all. The Rolling Stones
have two albums on the
charts now, the .1. Ceils
Band has sold over 3
million copies of Us
Freeze-trame I P. and
the new Go-Go's
album, iacation, sold
600,000 copies in its
first three weeks,
foreigner is now up to
6 million copies on its
most recent album, �.
released late last vear.
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 16
WEEKS
c � FURTHER EXPENSt
.10 P" ynncy Test. Birth
ai uivm Preqnan
cy Counseling For turthr- tnfor
mation call 83: 0535 (Toll Free
Number 800 ?2i 2548) between 9
A M and 5PM Weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
917 West Morgan St
Raleigh. N C
Art and ideas, ad-
vertising layouts,
attention-getting
headingsall the
elements ot quality
advertising is at
your serviceand
3t no extra cost
when you adver-
tise with us! The
Metro advantage
means advertising
to YOUR advantage)
Nov. 24-Nov. 28, 1982
Spend your Thanksgiving holiday in style on Broadway,
at Macy's Parade, shopping, & touring the city. Space is
limited & time is drawing near. For more info, contact
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Center.
To advertise
call 7576366
HAPPY
TUESDAY,
LADIES!
Announcing
"LADIES' cfi
NITE" '
(Every Tuesday) a
"The Four,
Seasons"
Featuring our
House wine for 25C
a glass for ail
ladies between
10-12 p.m.
Also
Daily Happ Hours
4:30-6:30
10:00-2:00
301 Evans St. Mall
(At the corner of 3rd St.
and Evans Mall in
basement of the
Minges Bldg.)
" Closed Sundays
y Must be 21
" ID. Requited
752 546
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available lor sale at or
below the advertised price m each A&P Store except as specifically noted
m this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT OCT. 9. AT AAP IN GREENVILLE. N.C.
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
703 Greenville Blvd.
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville, N. C.
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(LIMIT2PKGS)
Fresh Fryer 8�Pkg
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED
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Bottom & Eye
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BONELESS BOTTOM
Round Roast
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A&P QUALITY FRESHLY
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3 lbs. or
more
lb.
ALLGOOD
Hot Dogs
97c
12 oz
pg
RUDY FARMS
Pork Sausage
78
SAUSAGE
PATTIES ;
SAUSAGE
LINKS
�2 oz
12 oz
179
189 Mb.
1 Pkg
1
EFAR
CALIFORNIA CRISP SOLID ICEBERG
large
heads
FLORIDA GROWN
PINK OR WHITE
GOLDEN YELLOW RIPE
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P&Q BRAND
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Groc,
Savings
Sandwich Bread
P&Q BRAND
24 oz.
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Soft Drinks
2 liter
plastic
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79
HOMESTYLE OR BUTTERMILK
Ann Page Biscuits
4 k 790
cans m ww
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ICE CREAM PARLOR TASTE
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179
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SAVE 40
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Instant Coffee
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ON THE PURCHASE OF 1-LB. QTRS
MRS. FILBERTS
Margarine
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SAVE 20
ON THE PURCHASE OF 32 OZ.
HUNTS
'I
I
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I
Tomato Ketchup!
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Bath Tissue
687
GOOO THRU SAT. OCT 9 AT A&P
UNIT ONE WITH COUPON ANO 7 50 OROER
PI
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ON THE PURCHASE OF GAL. CTN.
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Orange Juice
689
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UMTf ONE WITH COUPON AND 7 50 OROER
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ON THE PURCHASE OF 64 OZ. CAN
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Chunk Tuna wa,er
690.
GOOD THRU SAT OCT. 9 AT A&P f
UMtT ONE WITH COUPON AND 7.50 ORDER M
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GOOD THRU SAT. OCT 9 AT AAP
UMTT ONE WITH COUPON AND 7 SO OROER

m
i
t





THE EAST CAROL 1N1AN
Sports
OCTOBER 5, 1982 Page 1 2
Mizzou's Final Rally Assures Win
By CINDY PLEAS A NTS
Saorlst-dllor
If the people of Missouri didn't
know where Hast Carolina was
from, they certainly do now.
The Pirates lost to Missouri, 28-9,
but the score was no indication of
how the Pirates played defensively.
In an awesome snowing, ECU's
defense held the Tigers to one
touchdown and 102 yards rushing in
the first two quarters of the game
and was responsible for two in-
terceptions and four quarterback
sacks.
The Pirate defense performed
well, but the man of the hour was
freshman sensation Jeff Heath. The
soccer-style kicker booted a 45-yard
field goal in the second quarter to
put the Pirates ahead of the Tigers
3-0. Heath went on to kick another
38-and 42-yarder, scoring the team's
only points against the Tigers.
Now making his fourth game
debut, Heath apparently hasn't had
any difficulty adjusting from small
hometown crowds to stadiums filled
with over 50,000 people. "I just
concentrated on following through
when I went out there and I blocked
everybody out Heath said. The
former all-state kicker also wanted
to give credit to the offensive line,
his snapper, Whitley Wilkerson and
holder, Greg Stewart.
Stewart, who has been FC'U's
number one quarterback in the last
three games, suffered an asthma at-
tack and was unable to play Satur-
day. The loss of Stewart's throwing
arm could definitely be seen on
Missouri's Faurot Field, with the
Pirates winding up with a mere 205
yards in total offense. Head coach
Ed Emory said that without Stewart
in the ball game, the Pirates were
unable to throw the ball well. "We
needed to make the big plays on of-
fense but never could ECU has
rolled up 399 yards per game offen-
sively, which ranked the team 28th
in the Division I-A ranks last week.
ECU's other quarterback, Kevin In-
gram usually alternates with Stewart
but had the chance to call all the
signals against Missouri. Ingram,
known for his running ability, com-
pleted 7 of 17 passes for a total of 85
yards.
Much to the Missouri fans' sur-
prise, the Tigers led by only one
point at halftime, 7-6. But the
Tigers broke loose in the final half,
taking advantage of a few key
mistakes made by ECU in the third
quarter. With the third, quarter
just underway, a punt by Larry
Brobst was blocked by Missouri
noseguard James Lockette. Mizzou
recovered on the 19-yard line and
drove for a touchdown to boost the
Tigers' lead, 14-6. "That blocked
kick was the turning point in the
game Emory said. "The third
quarter made the difference
Missouri kicker Todd Richmond
attempted a 37-yard field goal in the
last two quarters of the game but
both went wide.
In the final quarter, the Pirates
made a valiant effort to come back
with Curtis Wyatt recovering a fum-
ble after Missouri's Rick Doby
mishandled a 42-vard punt bv
ECU's John Williams.
The Pirates, however, didn't have
possession for long. The Tigers
drove to the goal line and Mizzou's
freshman prize runningback Eric
Drain ran for a two-yard
touchdown when Brad Perrv dished
pnoio By DAVE WILLIAMS
Place-Kicker Jeff Heath follows through on 45-yard field goal.
off to him. Now 21-9, ECU moved
toward the endone once again, but
a pass batted down by Missouri's
Randy Jostes followed by a no gain
play sent Williams in to punt.
With only 2:35 remaining, Perry
found Drain once again and the
backfielder ran 59 yards down the
right sideline for a touchdown.
Outside the locker room after the
game, Emory said there were three
reasons whv the Pirates lost against
the Missouri Tigers. "1 said before
the game that we had to do three
things to win he said. "One, our
kicking game had to be sound, but
we gave up the blocked punt, then
had poor coverage and our kickoff
returns were poor
"Second, we had to keep from
giving up the big play. We held'em,
hit'em. but did gie up the big play.
"Third, our offensive got stale.
But they have a great defense, the
best defense we've faced this year.
They kept the pressure on us
Emory was extremely pleased
with the defense, especially since
eight linebackers have been sidelin-
ed, including ECU's leading tackier
Ron Reid and defensive tackle Barry
Smith. "Yes, the loss of eight
linebackers, the top four today, had
a great, great effect on our ability to
have good pass coverage Emory
said. "You take that many
linebackers away from any team, no
matter who they face, and you'll
have major problems
Defensive end Jody Schulz led in
tackles with 14. Clint Harris, who
had an interception in the first
quarter of the game, placed second
with 10 and Smokey Norns and Jeff
Pegues had eight apiece. On
Missouri's offensive players, Pegues
said the Tigers were definitely big-
ger, but were not as mobile as the
other teams the Pirates have faced
in the past. "Basically they were just
a power offense he said, "that
came straight at us
Offensively, the Bucs missed
freshman runningback Tony Baker,
who was out with a sprained back.
But another freshman Reggie
Branch, Jimmy Walden and Ricky
Nichols combined for 114 yards
rushing. Nichols, who led in pass
receiving with 43 yards, com-
plimented the Missouri team on
having a good defensive strategy.
"They did a lot of switching around
on defense and we just had to adjust
to them
When asked whether or not he
was intimidated by the Big Eight
football team, Nichols had an
answer waiting. "No, not really and
I don't think anv ot the rest of the
guys were either
After backlashes from the
Missouri press, the Pirate should
have left little doubt in the mine
thousands of Missounans that H I
can compete against a Big light
team
"I think thev know who we arc
now Emory said, "1 think we
definitely have the talent to plav in
this league and we look forwa-
coming back here Oct. 1 next vear
ECU plays Richmond on Sal
day at 7 p.m
t arotmsMr �
12�o�n
50-120- .
10Pawing � Rjetui
17 0Pass.nii-
9 38 4Pur
4 '
J WPrru
l-avarotma�
Mi�o�n� - u :�
Scoring
ECL - FG Hmh 44
M Ba-K a ' - � . .
i ' - r-G Hraif.
M 1 i-r-4 pas-fn rr Pen . .
Ed FCHril4;
M DrainI R -
M - r'iir.59 (R. .
isdixdtiai StaaMei
Rushing B I B'a - 1 " �
Nichols 1 14. S Ada- i . - -
. . Draw �" Ma -
HrJvtrn � 4 tdan �-( I
Passing - FCl Ingram " 0 1
t. dlcr 3 4 -4
Revci ng I N -
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snjcr. i 5 tbiei : '�
4.1'fnaanvr 141
All
Thirti
betwi
one fi
7
Hungry Tigers Kept Eyes On Tasty Pirates
By CINDY PLEAS A NTS
Sports r dilor
"THE EYE OF THE TIGER
That's what Missouri had when they
met the Pirates Saturdav afternoon
at Faurot field, especially after be-
ing shut out at Texas, 21-0, the
previous week.
The Tigers, however, weren't see-
ing too well in the firs' I alt. The
Pirates, led by defensive ends Jody
Schulz and Jeff Pegues, blinded
Missouri's offense, holding the
Tigers to 102 yards rushing in the
first half while the Bucs racked up
130 yards. Mizzou coach Warren
Powers was aware of ECU's
nationally-ranked defense, but was
a little surprised by how well the
Pirates executed against a Big Eight
football team.
"I thought we could pass on
them he said. "They gave us some
problems, stacking up the center, so
we went outside. We planned to
throw dropbacks on them and we
did that pretty well
The Tigers didn't score until mid-
way through the second quarter
when Missouri runningback Santio
Barbosa flipped over an ECU defen-
sive player's back into the endzone.
Todd Richmond kicked for the ex-
tra point to put the Tigers ahead,
7-3.
Missouri definitely had trouble
moving the ball in the first two
quarters of play. At the half,
Missouri led by a single point, 7-6.
On offense, Missouri also alter-
nated quarterbacks with Marlon
Adler and Perry splitting time.
Then one of the Tigers actually did
have trouble seeing against the
Pirates. Adler suffered a concus-
sion and a possibly a damaged retna
in the second quarter of the game.
Missouri's number one quarterback
was constantly hampered by ECU's
Schulz, who sacked Adler in the
first quarter for a loss of six yards
on the play. "Marlon started seeing
double en the sidelines and that's
why Brad Perry came in
Perry, a 6-2, 204-pound junior,
completed eight out of twelve passes
in the first half for 95 yards. Adler
was four-for-five for a total of 34
yards passing.
Under the direction of Perry, the
Tigers scored three more
touchdowns in the second half.
With 10:23 left in the third quarter.
Perry threw a four-yard pass to split
end James Caver, who was standing
in the endzone. In the fourth, Perry
found full back Eric Drain who ran
two yards for another TD and with
1:50 second remaining, Perry again
passed off to Drain who ran down
the right sideline for a 59-yard
touchdown.
"I thought he (Perry) did a real
good job Powers said. "It's nice
to have someone who doesn't get
nervous wno's been in the big bat-
tles before, and we didn't have to
adjust our game plan at all
In the second half, Missouri
began moving the ball better. Ac-
cording to Powers, the real turning
point in the game for the Tigers was
after Heath kicked a 42-yard field
goal at the beginning of the fourth
quarter. "Coming off a tight game
(at Texas), they were a little low in
confidence. After their field goal
that made it 14-9, that drive(MU),
really picked them (offensive line)
up Caver ran for a 16-yard pick-
up after Heath's field goal.
In final statistics, the main dif-
ference between ECU and Missouri
was the passing game. The Tigers
completed 19 of 27 passes for a total
of 210 yards. The Pirates finished
with 85 passing yards, and 7 out of
17 pass completions. Greg Stewart,
ECU's passing quarterback, was
unable to play due to sickness.
Missouri was ranked tenth na-
tionally in passing offense last week,
with a 267-yard average. Tiger QB
Adler was also tenth in passing effi-
ciency with a 146.9 rating and six-
teenth in total offense with 215.7
yards per game. Adler was four-
for-five for a 95-yard gain before he
was injured in the game. Perry took
over, completing 8 of 12 attempts
for 95 yards.
Adler and Perry connected with
receivers like split end senior James
Caver and freshman runningback
Santio Barbosa. Barbosa had 73
yards rushing in the first half and a
touchdown. Caver wound up with
78 yards receiving and 5-11,
182-pound split end Curtland
Thomas led the Tigers with 82 yards
on five carries.
Defensively, Missouri's Jay
Wilson and Randy Jostes headed
the most tackles list. Wilson, a 6-3,
209-pound junior, had 14 tackles
while Jostes, a 6-5, 257-pound
senior, finished with nine.
Mizzou's senior noseguard James
Lockette probably made the biggest
play of the game in the third quarter
when he blocked a punt by ECU's
Larry Brobst. The Tigers recovered
on the 19-yard line and went on to
score a touchdown.
In total offense, the Tigers ended
up with 414 yards, which was short
of the 467-yard average they have
achieved so far this season. Missouri
had 23 first downs to ECU's 12, a
44.0 punting average, and called 76
offensive plays.
After a disappointing loss, head
coach Ed Emory congratulated the
Tigers for a job well done. "1 con-
gratulate Missouri on a fine win
he said. "Missouri is good, but our
players are very, very disappointed.
We really thought we could win
Powers praised the Pirates for a
good game plan. "They had a big,
strong offensive line and they came
at our defense pretty good he
said, "In the second half, we put
more heat on them and finally got to
him (Ingram).
� -EtunonT
rf�ottj Bv DAVE WILLIAMS
Jodv Schulz and Company Sack Missouri Quarterback.
Travelling Pirates Handle MU
Insults With The Utmost Ease
ECU Pirates Board Plane For Game in Missouri.
Photo By DAVE WILLIAMS
The ECU football players, along
with a few Pirate fans and media
people, landed at the Missouri air-
port around 6:30 p.m. on Friday
Oct. .
When arriving at the Hilton Inn,
the East Carolina clan immediately
noticed that many Missourians were
wearing bright yellow buttons on
their chests, with the following
slogan in bold, black letters:
"Where in the hell is East
Carolina?" A few Pirates, who were
lucky enough to get their hands on a
button, wore them proudly and just
dared anyone to say something to
them about the whereabouts of East
Carolina University.
Unfortunately, the game officials
and the radio hosts couldn't even
get the name right either. Head
coach Ed Emory said, "The referees
didn't even know who was playing.
They kept calling us 'Eastern
Carolina We're not Eastern
Carolina, we're East Carolina
The radio hosts finally got it
straight by the second half of the
game.
Even Mizzou's souveoier football
magazine insulted ECU. On the
cover, a Pirate dressed in all the ap-
propriate garb had just been trampl-
ed by Missouri's marching band.
That was the straw that broke the
camel's back.
The Missouri press, along with
the 50,848 fans who attended the
game were somewhat amazed by the
Pirates first debut in Missouri and
were downright scared when the
Cindy Pleasants

A Look Inside
Bucs trailed by only one point at
halftime. At this point, Emory said
he was feeling very optimistic. "I
really thought the difference in the
baligame would be a field goal he
said.
Meanwhile, up in the press box,
Missouri writers were ranting and
raving about the Pirates' defense.
After all, they had heard so much
about ECU's defense. One thinc's
for sure, they must have been think-
ing about the possibility of having
to eat a few words�written words.
that is, that they had previouslv
written.
Despite the biting words the press
printed in Columbia, St. I ouis, and
Kansas City, the football plavers
were poised during the entire trip.
Ah, the marking of a true Pirate
But 1 must get in one last parting
shot. Does anyone reallv know
where Columbia is?
The Pirates take on the University
of Richmond at Ficklen Stadium on
Saturday. The Pirates beat the
Spiders, 17-13 last year when Jody
Schulz set up both Pirate
touchdowns in the fourth quarter
with a 24-yard interception return
and a 26-yard return of a field goal
attempt blocked by corncrback
Gerald Sykes. What is ECU defen-
sive end Jeff Pegues prediction for
this year's game? "Its gonna be
just like the other games we've
played he said. "It's gonna be a
war
Dai
1
X


I





he
THE EAST CAROL INIAN OCTOBER 5, 1982
13
v
�i
A

le
:eten
� �
rtna be
we've
a be a
Braves Capture Championship
ATLANTA (UP1)
Thirteen years elapsed
between the Atlanta
Braves two division
championships, but
one thing remained the
same.
Down the stretch,
when it counted the
most. Phil Niekro was
the Braves' "money"
pitcher.
Just as he did in
14, the mflappable
knuckleballer. now 43
years old. closed
strong. Thai year, he
had five oi his 23 vic-
tories m September and
the Braves, who grab
the lead for keeps with
nine games to play,
beat runnerup San
Francisco by three
games in the first
season of divisional
play
Niekro, winding up
17-4, the best won-lost
record in the majors in
his 19th season with the
Braves, closed with two
straight shutouts this
time, blanking Los
Angeles on just two
hits, then doing the
same to San Diego with
a three-hitter.
Niekro is the only ac-
tive Braves player who
was on that '69 team
which lost in three
straight in a playoff
against the New York
Mets who went on to
win the World Series.
The Braves went into
deep hibernation after
that one division title -
never coming close
again until this season,
and Niekro had to
wonder if he'd ever
have a chance to plav in
a World Series.
So little wonder he
was the one who ap-
peared most emotional
when the Braves,
despite a closing loss at
San Diego, won the
division championship
when the Dodgers, one
game behind, lost at
San Francisco.
"This is what I've
been waiting for all
these years said
Niekro. "This is why
I'm still in baseball. It's
been worth the wait
Joe Torre, who
returned this season as
manager, had been a
teammate of Niekro for
five years but wasn't on
the '69 Braves, having
been traded to St.
Louis in the off season.
In his place on that
division winning club
was first baseman
Orlando Coeda who
hit only .257 but had 22
home runs and 88 rbi.
The '69 Braves had
Hank Aaron (44
homers), Rico Carty
(.342 average), Felipe
Alou and Tony Gon-
zalez in the outfield;
Clete Boyer at third,
Felix Millan at second;
Gil Garrido and present
Braves coach Sonny
Jackson sharing short;
and a rookie named
Bob Didier catching.
The top pitchers on
that team were Niekro
(23-13); Ron Reed
(18-10); who is still in
the league but pitching
for Philadelphia;
George Stone (13-10);
and Pa Jarvis (13-11),
now the sheriff of near-
by DeKalb County
(Cia.).
This year's team,
with no .300 hitter and
Niekro its only consis-
tent winning pitcher,
lost four more games
than the '69 team, but
attracted a lot more at-
tention.
There was little ex-
citement when the
Braves won the Na-
tional League West 13
years ago, partially
because it was the first
year of divisional play
and partially because
few realized it would be
so long before it hap-
pened again.
Also, this year's
team had its fans feel-
ing like they were on a
roller coaster ride.
"We can't let up
now said Niekro.
"Just winning the divi-
sion championship
won't be enough. We
want the National
League pennant, then
the World Series.
That's what these next
two weeks are all
about
Niekro, who joined
the Braves farm system
in 1959, the very next
year after the Braves
last played in a World
Series, shares the blame
for the Braves failure to
get past the National
League playoff in '69.
He started the first
game, gave up nine
runs in eight innings,
and the Mets went on
to a 9-5, 11-6, 7-4
sweep.
Two Star Recruits Reunited as Pirates
R HOKU K
McCORMACK
Sports i"1,1 flllr
e are carefully
tec I e d and
d upon bv col-
.iinters as it they
were precious uncut
gems Once chosen.
sy are polished if the
sntial to shine is
; u! it it is lack-
and of course.
from the less
H gems, their
former teammates.
1 hese standouts are the
college football
recruits.
Two years ago, while
in high school. Last
Carolina's 6-2,
223-pound linebacker
P.J. Jordan and 6-3,
210-pound split-end
Damon Pope found
themselves in this
quarry of recruits. But
no college, from the
Georgia Bulldogs to the
Big Ten schools, could
break the inseperble
bond between these two
former recruits. As
high school recruits,
they found nearly every
football honor possible
following their names
in the state's
newspapers. Im-
mediately, Jordan and
Pope began to shine.
P.J. Jordan and
Damon Pope came
from Clark Central, a
high school ranked
number two nationally
their senior year, and
nowhere else but in
Athens, Georgia, home
oi Herschel Walker's
Georgia Bulldogs. They
were raised in a city
that praises the pigskin
as if it were religion.
"In Athens, football
seemed to be year-
round said Jordan.
"It had to be in order
to preserve the high
standards of Georgia
football in our high
school
During their stay at
Clark Central, P.J. and
Damon became ex-
tremely close friends
both on and off the
field. "We developed
great respect for each
other. P.J. gave me
confidence when 1 was
down stated Damon.
"And he did the same
tor me added Jor-
dan. While being
recruited, they both
thought the "good
times" would end.
They never anticipated
being roommates for
the next four-years. But
the friendship proved
to be thicker than all of
-tfce pfomises of per
s u as i v e college
recruiters, except for
ECU's of course.
P.J. and Damon
desired a change from
the disadvantages that
accompany being from
a large, football
oriented city. "That's
one reason why we
chose ECU states
Jordan, as Pope affir-
mingly nods his head.
"We were constantly
exposed to large city
football. Even our
mothers worked for the
University of Georgia.
We saw ECU as
somewhat of a refuge
tOsjust relax and enjoy
playing football
After one year,
roommates Damon
Pope and P.J. Jordan
are now sophomores at
ECU and still as tight
as uncut gems. "We are
still as close as ever
said Jordan. "We've
been through some
tough times, adjusting
Damon Pope
P.J. Jordan
to college life and in-
juries. Sometimes 1
may not feel like going
to class because I'm
sore or bruised from
practice. But Damon is
there to give me en-
couragement I need,
and I go despite the
bruises. We give each
other support we could
only get from our
famiilies
"Coping with college
football is very dif-
ferent from high school
football, not just cop-
ing with bigger and
stronger players, but
academics stated
Pope.
"We are both the
first in our families to
go to college, and we
never forget it. Our
parents did a lot to get
us here and we take a
great deal of pride in
pleasing them
academically as well as
on the field added
Jordan.
"We came here with
our minds filled with
just football stated
Pope. "Although we
still appreciate it, we
stress our academics
even more. All college
players dream of that
day with the NFL, but
P.J. and I dream more
about the day we get
our degrees
"I just wish that
more high school
recruits would open
their eyes to the impor-
tance of the books
said Jordan. "Both
players realize that the
biggest asset to suc-
ceeding as a college
player is not how much
weight you can lift, nor
how many solo tackles
you average, but how
wed you tackle the
books
Nevertheless, neither
Pope nor Jordan has
forgotten that they are
here to play football.
Jordan had his first
start at linebacker in
the N.C. State game,
ECU's season opener,
holding the Wolfpack
to only 97 yards
rushing. Although he
had to miss the East
Tennessee State game
to weather a shoulder
injury, Jordan returned
two weeks ago against
Central Michigan, in-
troducing himself with
an interception.
The coaching staff
also has some impor-
tant plans for Pope.
"He's a hard worker,
not just with a football,
but with anything he
sets out to do. He's one
of our most talented
athletes and in-
dividuals said assis-
tant coach Ricky Bus-
tle.
Inseperable Damon
Pope and P.L Jordan,
a year ago raw gems to
eager, prospecting col-
lege scouts panning the
country for athletes,
are now being molded
and polished as promis-
ing future starters and
future graduates of
East Carolina Universi-
ty.
KATZ
proudly presents
THURSDAY NIGHT
TheCATALINAS
One of the best bands
to come to the
Green ville A rea.
Pfcoto By GARY PATTERSON
ECU Rugby Team In Action
PEP
RALLY
at Pitt Plaza
Shopping Center
8:00 p.m.
Thurs Oct. 7
Ed Emory &
members of
Football Team
E.C.U. Cheerleaders
&
E.C.U. Band
Drawing for Prizes
donated by Pitt Plaza Merchants
FREE PEPSI & PEPSI T-SHIRTS
WHILE THEY LAST
For members &
Their Guests Only

f





u
1 ill
i W
i H loHl-K 5 , 1982
Wine hell Leads Hooters
Kl HOI KIN
-i .in
1 he I
an
i
I
Doi
er a
tatch
da aftei
del tted
V
-
-
was �-
tie sa
ht
, .
ran it's record to 4-3
v lule Guilford dropped
to 4 6 1 Foi Guilford,
ill three goals were
ei scored by Robert 1 a
ECl goalie loin
Rechnei recorded 10
saves as Guilford took
12 shots-on-goal as
compai ed to ECl ls 24.
f lei consecutive
ictoi ies on ei Elon Col-
ted lege, Virginia Wesleyan
by scoi and Guilford, the
Mso Pirates will now pla
l 1 what Church calls "the
biggest match ol the
A eai w her, c ampbell
College comes to
c ireenville w ednesday
afternoon at 3:00 p.m.
1 he Camels, �ho
ted curi enth boast a record
of 5-3, ait always one
ofl . � the strongest teams
'W( ��' ; he south, according
. ai i Inn eh 1 his year is
t exct ption as Camp-
is now the th-
anked team m the
vampbell I nivei
� . , � 1- taken
� ;ei iousl. Since
the do not have a tool-
ball team, the students
are active participants
m the soccei program.
1 he Camels usually
draw anywhere from
l(XX) to 1 500 spectators
for each match.
As an incentive, the
Pirates will have a
revenge motive going
into the Campbell
match. I ast yeai. I�( 'U
was deteated In the
Camels 3-1. Coach
Church and the test ol
the team hope to have a
good crowd as this will
be a big match foi the
Pirates
s Church puts it.
the team is playing the
best that the can, but
they need to tighten up
a little bit on defense
"To beat a quality
'earn like Campbell, we
can't give them any
goals Church said
" I his is a good c hance
for the tans to see some
real hard nosed sot,
cer
Classifieds
PKRsr
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KORJsAI.I-
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SERVICES
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Band Band has nv
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INTERESTED In lot
1 � � n physics
phr iC S ,r C ' �
rour Crf 464
.�ninqt,
RIDES
HIDE NE EDE D t
D hi. Car � a - �
Thurs 'in
n7
ulr1 i ki,
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� �. �� n
in � ��- hLU students
as our customers, we are looking
ring 1 . our every hair care need
'� � : i jemand certain stv Ies
� "� �'UPPfcR is accustomed to domq
' jes & I hurs nights till 9 30 p m
forappoM rment at 7 8 I 505
A H'Jrr '
f
Ingram pitches out during Missouri game.
Volleyball Team Places Fifth In Tourney
MC kl s
- il w
In this weekend's
t si i ai Iina las
e ECl lad P rates
? olleyba tm proved
ould " : te s 11 h
. name schools. I h
loin nameni. w hit. h wis
Id .it the :
o Si ' � na, co n
� la with
!I linishine : HI
1 he toui nament was
divided into two days
ol pool pla In I.
da 's ai tion, I he I adv
Pirates defeated
M ississippi State 15-9,
7-15, 15-5; Francis
Marion 15-11, 15-12;
and College ol
Charleston 15-6, 15-12.
I c L's onl loss on Ft
da was to Georgia
8-15, 15-11, 8-15.
Davidson was pleased before losing to the them
with the team's pertor Lads Tigers 15-10,
mance aftei Friday's 5-15, 10-15. After the
pool pi �� � 'Overall, we C lemson mauh, coach
played prettv well1 she Davidson �a impre
said "We beat the ed with the team's per-
Hea
� a
� �
111;
team wc were suppos-
' � beat and gave
Ge i gia a fod
match
In Saturday's action.
1 c I went up agamst
pi iwerful ('lemson and
got ott to an early lead
formance.
"We came out and
lumped on them in the
first game ated
Davidson. "In the se-
cond game, theii ol
fense reallv � i and
we couldn't
Da
plimeni
put fort
Irv, 1
tain s
Diane I
nan 1
tournan
The 1 ad

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ruesdav. Oct. 5. 1982
9:00 'lil 2:00
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3tye !EaBt (Eawlintan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, c�w���
Mike Hughes, &&&
WAVERLY MERR1TT, unaoroj MwrW� ClNDY PLEASANTS, s,u.m Ld��r
Robert Rucks, �U1,� mmm Greg Rideout, � &,�,
Ai i Afrashteh, cm� vu,r Steve Bachner. tn(,�u���,�,t(��,
Stephanie Groon. cmmmmir Juliana Fahrbach, &&,
JONl GUTHRIE, fnftimuif "tonmiiiiii MlKE DAVIS, Products Mnmrti
October 5, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Racial Injustice
Alive And Well 20 Years Later
Twenty years ago, most of us
were far more concerned with walk-
ing and talking than the events of
our turbulent nation and world.
Rolling in the safety of our cribs, we
were practically oblivious to the fact
that "the last battle of the civil
war" was being fought in Mississip-
pi.
Little did we know at that time
that a young black man named
James Meredith was etching his
name in our history books. Little
did we know the changes that
awaited us in our lifetimes.
Like the classical American hero,
Meredith had fought the uphill bat-
tle against a seemingly-
insurmountable foe, the United
States government, and won. But
unlike the typical hero of our
childhood, Meredith's victory was
not without bloodshed. And twenty
years later, in 1982, the victory has
yet to be fully realized.
On Sept. 30, 1962, the small town
of Oxford, Miss broke out into a
series of race riots as the University
of Mississippi's first black student,
James Meredith, was escorted by
federal officials onto campus to
begin the fall semester.
Amid the hordes of protestors,
the burning cars, the gunshots, the
flying bricks and teargas cannisters,
two people on the Ole Miss campus
died, another fifty or more were in-
jured, and one man silently wound
his way to class.
That event, or more properly,
that series of events, was among the
first in a string of civil rights cases
that virtually "changed the face" of
our nation in almost every aspect.
But today, 20 years later, the battle
is still being fought.
Sure, we no longer hear of mob
lynchings or the riots that were so
very common in the '60s. We find
blacks and other minorities in all
walks of life. But the discrimination
and prejudice which were so readily
apparent then have all but disap-
peared today. To say the least, the
bigotry is less outright. Nonetheless,
it exists, although in a different
form, in the 1980s.
Naturally, to think that an
editorial in a small college
newspaper could possibly make any
difference in the racial prejudices of
even those people on campus is
naive at best. Those among us who
still judge the value � academic,
athletic, etc. � of others by the col-
or of their skin (be it black or white)
will continue to do so regardless of
the random preachings and
teachings of those aroung us. This is
simply a sad fact which has proven
itself true time and time again.
And furthermore, the purpose of
this writing is not necessarily to
sway opinion one way or another
but rather to increase, if possible,
the awareness of what has yet to be
accomlished.
And as much as we may like to
deny it, we are all guilty, to a greater
or lesser extent, of the same pre-
judice which characterized the
1960s. After all, how many of us
honestly believe the world and the
United States have reached racial
equality? Sure, we've come a long
way.
But we've got such a long way yet
to go.
Reagan Considers Issuing
Sanctions Against Israelis
By JACK ANDERSON
and JOE SPEAR
WASHINGTON � In his televised
speech on the Middle East last week, Presi-
dent Reagan came very close to accusing
the Israeli government of being totally
responsible for the massacre of hundreds
of Palestinians in the Shatila and Sabra
refugee camps.
It wasn't the first time this month that
Reagan was tempted to lock horns with
Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin.
The president came close to delivering an
ultimatum to Israel when he delivered his
Middle East peace proposal on Sept. 1. But
at the last minute, Reagan crossed out
several points in his speech that he decided
were too strident.
The original text, for example, warned
Israel that its stubborn stand on the
Palestinian problem would precipitate a
"major crisis" with the United States. But
the president deleted the reference to a
"major crisis
Any talk of a "major crisis he knew,
would imply a threat to cut off military aid
to Israel. That threat is a powerful
weapon, but it's like a nuclear bomb: It's
more effective as a threat than it is actually
to use. There is no halfway measure the
United States can invoke.
So, Reagan decided not to threaten sanc-
tions � in other words, not to apply U.S.
pressure on Israel. Instead, he chose to br-
ing world pressure on Israel. This was the
purpose of his Middk East peace plan. He
hoped it would mobilize world pressure
against Israel.
Then the Israelis moved into west
Beirut. On Sept. 15, the president received
a secret state department report. It charged
that the assassination of Lebanon's
President-elect Bashir Gemayel had
presented "the opportune moment for
consolidation of Israel's presence in
Lebanon
Reagan was angry over the occupation
of west Beirut. But again, he avoided a
"major crisis Again, he sought to bring
world pressure on Israel.
Then came the slaughter of the Palesti-
nians. Now, the "major crisis" is closer.
There is renewed talk in the White House
of cutting off military aid to Israel.
HEADLINES AND FOOTNOTES:
Does the Navy have too many admirals? In
1945, there was one admiral for every 130
ships. Today, each admiral has charge over
about two ships.
� Intelligence sources say they have
spotted a new Soviet weapon deployed
near the Chinese border. But U.S. military
experts can't decide whether it's a laser
weapon or something else. So, they've
nicknamed it "Tora That's the word the
Japanese used to identify their surprise at-
tack against Pearl Harbor.
mmuH&0&tS
Y6AH YOU, JOHNSON �, I PiDNT S6E W SAVING
Don't Blame Me; You Asked It
Answering Letters As Best I Can
Ah, the perils of tame and fortune!
Eer since I've become famous as a star
of stage, screen and newsprint, letters hae
been pouring in b the ton from all over
the state asking question after question
about eerything from my favorite color
and scent of toilet tissue to what I look for
in a bran cereal.
Now, although I do appreciate the gravi-
ty of the situation � people are reportedly
losing sleep over unanswered questions �
the truth is, I just don't have the time to
answer all of your wonderful letters per-
sonally. And since I cannot rightly include
all of your questions in the Campus
Forum, I will, as a service to you � the
few, the faithful � attempt to answer, as
best 1 can those eight questions most often
asked in your letters.
Dear Mr. Hughes: I think ou're the on-
l one who can help me. Please settle a bet.
My friend Jeb says the Professor on
(iMigan's Island is now married to (finger
Great. Is that true?
To the hundreds of letter writers anx-
iously awaiting a response to this question,
let me just answer that with a resounding
NO. Although vicious rumors were spread
all over Hollywood following the cancella-
tion of that legendary TV show in 1966,
Russell Johnson is not now, nor has he
ever been, married to Tina Louise.
However,a frustrated Johnson did tie the
knot with the Skipper (Alan Hale) only
months after the progam got the axe. Un-
fortunately, that relationship ended in
legal separation in 1976. Johnson is now
gamefully employed with Dura-Cell Corp
where iie is chief technician in the fledgling
coconut-battery division.
Dear Mr. Hughes: We know from your
column that you've got class, so answer us
this: Who's your favorite guest star on the
Love Boat?
Whew! That's a toughie. There are so
many fine entertainers to choose from �
Charo, Bob Denver, Jim Nabors, Arte
Johnson just to name a few. But, I guess
if 1 had to choose one, it'd have to be
Donald O'Connor's amazing and talented
seal, Clarabel. Her excellent performance
as a jealous wife in the touching episode
with Georgette Baxter won over my heart,
and, thus, my vote.
Dear Mr. Hughes: You work for the
paper, right? Tell me something: What's
Patrick O'Neill really like? Is he anything
like those editorials he writes?
Boy, I can't count the number of times
I've read that one. But let's see, that's
another thinker Well, I'm sure this will
come as a surprise to a lot of people out
there, but all in all, Pat is just a regular
guy. Sure, he's got a few idiosyncrasies �
sometimes he orders the empty-plate
special when we go out to lunch and that
kind of stuff. But for my money, there
isn't a better pal around. Who else do you
know who'd lie down in the middle of 10th
Street just so his friends could get across to
Mr. Gam's?
Mike Hughes
Just The Wa It Is
Dear Mr. Hughes: I'm new in town, and
I was wondering, where can a gladiator get
a good mixed drink around here?
Boy, I must get eight to 10 letters like
this every week. But the truth is, gals, I just
don't know. All the great gladiator joints,
have gone out of business in Greenville,
you know, with the big run on video games
and all. And if they wouldn't serve you at
the sorority house, I just have no idea.
Sorry.
Hev Hughes: You got change for a
buck?
Once and for all: NO.
Dear Mr. Hughes: I've got all the books,
but they just don't help. So, do you have
any tips on grooming care for my
Chihuahua?
There are four or five ladies who w rite in
week after week with this one. Let's see
now aren't Chihuahuas those little
rodents with bug eyes that bark at anything
that moves? Ah yes, as a matter of fact, I
do have a few helpful hints: First of all,
don't waste your time clipping the little
thing; hair just grows back. Instead, use
electrolysis, especially on the face, back
and paws. Then, clip off that excess appen-
dage on the ears ou know, the part that
sticks out. Don't worry, it doesn't hurl
him. Sure, he might shake a little, but
Chihuahuas are babies anyway. And fur-
thermore, he doesn't need :hose sill claws
either. They're unattractive and a nuisance
to both you and your canine companion
So, be sure to trim those down as close a
possible. Pay no attention to bleeding;
doesn't bother him a bit.
I hope these tips will heir vour tine dog
look his best. Believe me. your neighbo
will thank you He'd thank you too
he could.
Dear Mr. Hughes: W e know you're a big
fan of little theatre. So please answer this
for us. Is it true that Hene ellachaize. the
world-renowned Tatoo of lantasx Island
fame, will be moving over to NBC to star
in his own new series this fall?
It is. indeed, heartwarming lor me to
discover that such a fine actor as Herve
such an active following in Greenville
people really know great performers when
you see them. But, regretably. the Tatoo
charm didn't get the same reception at
NBC. Vellachaize's pilot for NBC's latest
blockbuster. Josh Ramsey:
Caseworker, just didn't pan out with the
studio heads, and his world premier was
subsequently cancelled. Nevertheless, their
loss is our gain. Herve will once again
charm the screen with his oriental mystique
this year in yet another season as the il-
lustrious Tatoo, sidekick of Boss and
champion of young and old alike.
And finally the question most often ask-
ed in viewer mail:
Why do you always lie in your Editor's
Notes? You're not really from the
Galapagos Islands, are you?
Well, I guess you've got me there. 1 have
to admit, I've never even been to the
Galapagos Islands. And I'm not certified
in arc welding either, although I once
burned my hand on a soldering iron. What
can I say? You called my bluff.
Sleep well.
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes is a senior
Jrom Oyster Mountain. Tenn where he
has spent the past three summers as presi-
dent oj the Boxcar Hilly Fan dub and
Laundromat.
Campus Forum
Observer Observations Yield Unfair Image
On Sunday, Sept. 26, an article writ-
ten by Marney Rich appeared in the
News and Observer. The article, titled
"Having a Wild Weekend emphasized
the drinking and partying of the ECU
student body. Because of the fact that
virtually the same circumstances can be
found on almost any college campus,
because one cannot judge a student by a
few, because of the misuse of statistics
and because of the positive aspects of
ECU, Ms. Rich's article must be
refuted.
The partying mentioned in the article
exists at all state universities in North
Carolina. However, I have seen no such
article relating to the renowned party at-
mosphere at UNC-Chapel Hill, for ex-
ample. If analyzing party atmosphere in
colleges and universities, why not in-
clude all other major state institutions in
the article?
The article was based primarily on a
few fraternity parties, including inter-
views with frat brothers. Fewer than
four percent of the ECU student body
belong to fraternities. It is unfair to
judge an entire student body on the opi-
nion of such a small group.
In the article, words and phrases were
added that were strictly the opinion of
the writer, with no basis whatsoever.
Statistics were also badly misused. For
example, Ms. Rich points out that the
ABC store closest to campus sold 1,051
bottles of booze that night. This par-
ticular store serves most of the city of
Greenville. She also says that a Green-
ville beer distributor delivered 90 kegs of
beer. Delivered to whom?
Finally, the article didn't mention any
of the positive aspects of ECU. East
Carolina has an excellent academic pro-
gram, including one of the finest schools
of business in the South, to mention on-
ly one. A university's primary objective
is to provide a quality education. Con-
sidering the fine academic record of
ECU, which has produced many fine
businessmen and women, teachers and
other community leaders, it is evident
that the clear majority of students at
ECU have preparation for the future as
their first priority, not partying.
ECU is not just a party. Perhaps ar-
ticles such as this one attract students
seeking easy classes and a party at-
mosphere. 1 wonder how many of these
students are among the nearly one-half
of the freshmen at ECU who don't make
it back for their sophomore year.
John Parnell
Israeli Rebuttal Rebutted
It is ironical that Mr. Resnik whisked
a "judicious" editorial, yet his own let-
ter is a reiteration of the Zionist
"justification" to minimize the hideous
nature of the massacre of the innocent
and unarmed Palestinian civilians of
Chatila and Sabra camps in Lebanon by
labelling it is a mere "repitition of what
has been tolerated in silence by the world
over the last 10 years
Contrary to Mr. Resnik's claim, Israel
has been acting for the past few years in
a manner which could be labeled as
anything but peaceful. There are cons-
tant attempts to further complicate an
already-intricate ArabIsraeli conflict
by creating numerous Jewish settlements
largely by blowing up Arab homes and
by confiscating Arab land; bombing the
nuclear facility in Iraq and declaring us
"right" to do so again in the future; an-
nexing the Golan Heights and East
Jerusalem � territories acquired
through military operations, murderous
raids in Lebanon in the name of
"retaliation and then creating several
holocausts in Lebanon since June 6.
George Ball, former undersecretary of
state under the Kennedy and Johnson
administrations, was right when he
thought that Israel should be saved from
its own precipitous acts, which are sow-
ing the seeds of hatred toward the
Jewish state in the Middle East. This
hatred might not be lessened even after
several decades. As a friend of Israel,
Mr. Resnik, and those who think like
him must strive to save Israel from Begin
and Sharon, who are not acting as the
decendents of the victims of the
holocaust but the decendents of its Nazi
perpetrators.
Cordially,
Mohammed E. Ahrari
Assistant Professor
Poly. Sci.







Title
The East Carolinian, October 5, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 05, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.220
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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