The East Carolinian, September 28, 1982






&ht �aat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57No.il
Tuesday, September 28, 1982
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
C irculation 10.000
Biology Faculty Wants Review
Of Construction Site Proposal
By (.RM, RIDEOUT
Vr��� I dttiM
The EC U Biology Department
has sent a recommendation to
Chancellor John M. Ho well to re-
evaluate the administration's deci-
sion to construct the new building
behind Raw I Annex.
The recommendation, dated Sept.
22. was signed by 21 biology faculty
members. It states the department's
wish that the building be built in the
parking lot behind the Joyner
Library, adjacent U Ninth Street.
Dr. Charles 1 Bland, chairman
of the Biology Department, said the
recommendation is just a way of
asking the administration to take
another look at theii decision. He
said the Biology Department is not
opposed to the c ction ol a
new building, and they recognize the
fact that one is needed.
Howell commented that he had
read the petition and would consider
the situation. He said they are will-
ing to talk about the placement of
the building, but he doesn't think
plans will be changed.
The proposed building is schedul-
ed to be built in one of the last
wooded areas on campus. The
building, when completed, would be
the largest on campus. It would
house liberal arts classrooms and
faculty offices.
Howell commented that the of-
fices are badly needed, saying that
some teachers are still sharing office
space.
Bland said the Biology Depart-
ment would like to see more discus-
sion. He said they are willing to be
convinced that the area selected is
the nghi area.
Dr. Vince Bellis, a biology pro-
fessor, initiated the recommenda-
tion. He is the chairman of the
faculty's University Facilities Com-
mittee. He said his committee was
not consulted on any matters con-
cerning the new building.
Bellis said faculty are not the only
people concerned about the situa-
tion. He said students and alumni
have also voiced opposition to the
building.
Howell said the architect who
proposed the sight tor the building
had two choices, the area behind
Raul Annex or the area near tb
hhrarv .
" Isn 7 The Beach, But It M ill flo"
pnoto 8 STANLEY LEABV
Students take advantage of a temporary lake on C ollege Hill and one of the few remaining warm da left it. the
vear, after rains flooded dreenille last week.
ECU Staff Member Recalls Nuclear Testing
Bk PMKKk O'NEILL
SIill Writrf
n ICT stallnember was one of
the parl panIsin t ho atomic
weapons testingin1957.
Joev aider.1icad ol ECU'S
Department olPublic Safety was
amonea groupof10 to 15 officers
trom tlte !vAt borne Corps at
Forl Br;Ig : whoi un teered to go to
e adato i t.� hi z plosions in
the fall� 1957I wei it there
with adetail onen, 100 enlisted
men 1r went was a
volui te:alder.
i � v JUSI 5: that these tests
�N rc gox-number of peo-
WC1� volunteers
C aid �"� I hey didn't tell
us i i � js dai .they didn't tell
us it was nor Janeerous
Calder, who is 62-years-old and a
veteran of three wars, is not among
the groups of veterans who are
presently demanding that Congress
and the Veterans Administration
gie them service connected disabili-
ty payments because of their ex-
posure to the radioactive fallout
from the tests. He also added that
there were more than enough
volunteers willing to participate in
the tests. "I had to pull strings to get
to go Calder said.
Calder was "right under" one o
the detonations about a quarter ol a
mile to half of a mile from ground
zero.
He was an observer of the atomic
explosions on two other occassions
during his seven to 10 day stay in
Desert Rock, Nev. (approximately
60 miles trom Las Vegas). 'The
conditions had to be just exactly
right (alder said, referring mostly
to the level and direction of winds
on a testing day. "We went out
there h bus m the middle o the
night
Once at the sue Calder said they
wete all told to go down into tren-
ches and communication was main-
tained by radios trom a command
post. I his went on all night until the
detonation ol the bomb took place
stnutK before dawn. Calder said.
1 hey
old U!
rh
to get down in the
bottom ol the trenches, put our
head between our legs, (and) close
our eyes (aider said.
At the moment o detonation
Calder recalled that he saw a flash
4 'Please sir, just one more chance
Photo By DAVE WILLIAMS
This driver tried a desperate but unsucessful solution to solve the familiar ECU problem of inadequate parking.
A-Bomb Test Effects Disputed
By PATRICK O'NEILL
sialf VSnlrr
Approximately 250,000 U.S.
soldiers participated in about 230 at-
mospheric atomic bomb tests, ac-
cording to Defense Department
figures.
Many of these veterans, as well as
citien groups living near the test
areas, now claim that dispropor-
tionately higher rates ol cancer are
occurring among them. This is due,
they say, to exposure to the radia-
tion.
"It is my guess that the people
were definitely radiated from fallout
and sustained injury as a direct
result said ECU physics professor
James Joyce. "I believe the govern-
ment does bear some liability
towards these people
Defense Department officials
acknowledge that many of the
former servicemen who serve at
testing sites are ill. They deny that
the illnesses are related to the radia-
tion they were exposed to.
"Our people are dying at alarm-
ing rates, and the government
refuses to help said John Smither-
man, president of the National
Association of Atomic Veterans
(NAAV).
Senator Alan K. Simpson,
R-Wyo chairman of the Senate
Committee on Veterans Affairs,
agreed last week to hold hearings
next year to explore whether the il-
lnesses suffered by the participants
in the atomic tests had been caused
by their exposure to the radiation.
Simpson's decision to hold hear-
ings came after he met with Smither-
man and other NAAV represen-
tatives. NAAV has been pressing the
Veterans Administration for three
years to grant "service connected
disabilities" to radiation exposed
veterans and to acknowledge that
their illnesses were related to this ex-
posure.
"The government should have
been aware of the dangers Joyce
said. He noted that mistakes were
being made because the atomic
technology was in its infancy. "Still,
they should not have exposed
citizens to that fallout he added.
A Veterans Affairs Committee
spokesman said the hearings would
also focus on whether the Defense
Department and Veterans Ad-
ministration withheld information
from veterans.
In related events, a federal suit fil-
ed by 1,192 residents of St. George,
Utah has come to trial. The suit
claims that fallout from the atomic
bomb tests caused an increase in
cancer deaths in communities down-
wind from the Nevada test site.
During testimony, a former
Public Health Service (PHS) official
told the court that the government
warned the people of'St. George to
wash radioactive fallout from their
cars after a 1953 test, but it
neglected to tell them to clean
themselves.
Harry Butrico, an engineer with
PHS in the 1950's said the govern-
ment set up roadblocks at Caliente,
Nev where cars were decon-
taminated. He said the vehicles were
washed and vacuumed, and the
passengers were advised to take
showers and discard their clothing.
Butrico said the people of St.
George were warned with radio
broadcasts to stay indoors and wash
the dust from their cars. They were
not, however, told to discard their
clothing or to bathe.
"We should have been equally as
See RADIATION, Page 6
of light right through his closed eyes
and the ground shook. "It was just
like a flash, right through your eye
lids he added.
Calder then said they were told
that they could get out ol the tren-
ches and watch the cloud that ap-
peared after the explosion. "We
could see the cloud we just stood
out there and watched he said.
He added that the tower on which
the atomic device had been mounted
for the explosion had completely
disintegrated alter the test. "It was
gone Calder said.
After the explosion (.alder said
the men were told that the wind had
unexpectedly changed and some ol
the "stuff" (atomic tallouti may
have blown hack on the men. 1 hey
Opinions Voiced
brushed us off with brooms, all they
used were brooms he added.
Calder said that the men really en-
joyed the experience because they
were able to spend most ol their
tmie in Las Vegas while they were
waiting tor the next test. He said
there green and red signal lights in
I as Vegas which informed the men
of how much time they had before
another test was scheduled.
"It was a good time, it was an en-
joyable time Calder said. "I
couldn't say that I have suffered
anything trom this no ill effects
that 1 know ot
He said that he didn't personally
know of anyone who has developed
cancer as a result of the tests, but he
had heard rumors that a major in
his group may have, bin he wasn't
sure. "I haven't had any contact in
seven or eight years with them
(the men he was with) he added.
Calder said that the fed
government had kept track ol him
tor a few years, hut he hasn't h�
trom them lately. He was giver; a
toll-free phone number I
should he have any question
"It the situation were the same
today as it was then. I'd still go, I'd
volunteer again Calder ited.
He added that it he d;d develop
cancer he would feel diffei.
the experiences. "If 1 was
here, and I had stomach cancel
throat cancer I'm sure 1 wo .
differently, I'd probably fee 18 I
degrees the opposite way I
eluded .
Abortion Still Controversial
By PATRICK O'NEILL
"I think it's the women's choice
whether or not she wants to have the
child said ECU dance student
Valerie DiSciuIlo. "She's the one
who has to carrv it tor nine mon-
ths
DiSciuIlo was commenting on
what she sees as a women's right to
decide to terminate a pregnancy.
Abortion, the more common term,
is probably one ol the most con-
troversial topics o this day. The
controversy has become especially
hot in the last two years as anti-
abortion groups have been pressing
Congress to pass legislation to
outlaw abortions.
"To those of us who are repulsed
by abortion and really think it's
murder, we can't see any situation
where abortion should be left as a
matter of choice said another
ECU student, political science ma-
jor Dennis Kilcoyne. "The innocent
human life should always he con-
sidered first
"The parent needs to have the
choice of whether or not to become
a parent and assume that respon-
sibility said Francine Rees, an
BureauAnd a child deserves a
parent who wants and loves her or
him
Kilcoyne says that abortion is
otien opted for as a matter ol con-
venience or tor birth control pur-
poses. He sees intercourse as naving
two purposes, tor expressing one's
love to his or her partner, and to
have children. "Sex is not purely
recreational he added.
DiSciuIlo recalled a number ol
her high school friends who became
pregnant and had abortions, i just
don't think that they were at all tit
to be mothers. I could not see how
those children could have had a nor-
mal life
Considering the tremendous
amount ol time, energy and respon-
sibility you invest in parenthood.
you have to love the child to furnish
these needs added Rees, who is
the mother of a 3-year-old baby and
a 14-year-old stepson.
Dr. Jarlath Mckenna. a penn-
tologist (specialist in the manage-
ment of high risk pregnancies) with
ECU Medical School's Department
of Obstetrics is personally opposed
to abortion and refuses to perform
them. "I find it difficult to be
engaged professionally in the sur-
vival ol the fetus one day I
destruction ol the fetus the next
he said. Mckenna agrees itfi kil-
coyne that most abortions art done
� � contraceptive purpose
does not support anti-abort
legislation nor a constitutional
amendment outlawing aborti
"You can't legislate morality -
Mckenna.
kilcoyne does support a c
rial amendment outlawing a
tions and he would also be in favoi
ol taking criminal action against
women who opted tor abortion. He
has smpathv for women who
choose to have abortions and
believes that most of them are under
extreme mental stress and are highly
confused when they make their dtv:
sion.
"1 do have sympainy tor these
women and I don't think I could
support capital punishment tor
abortion kilcoyne added. He did
feel that life in prison was one of the
possible sentences a woman could
receive for aborting her child.
"If it comes down to the termina-
tion of a pregnancy or having an un-
See ABORTION. Page o
employee with the ECU News
Med School Holds Health Law Forum
Physician & Staff Duty Emphasized
By DARRYL BROWN
sM(�nl Sf� fdiior
The ECU School of Medicine last
Friday conducted a seminar at Pitt
Memorial Hospital, focusing on
medical jurisprudence and the
maintenance of quality health care
in hospitals.
The forum was for physicians,
hospital administrators and health
care attorneys, as well as medical
students, and had qualified speakers
from across North Carolina and the
surrounding region.
For medical students, according
to program chairman Ed Hollowell,
the importance of the forum was to
make students aware of real life
laws in medicine, legal issues dealing
with patients, and the physician's
responsibility to provide quality
care.
The forum also emphasized the
duty of the hospital medical staff to
maintain health care standards and
the quality of staff physicians.
Quality assurance to the patient and
public accountability of doctors are
the staff's continuing responsibility.
The medical staff reviews its own
doctors for compentency through a
system of checks and balances that
includes peer review and credential
verification. Every physician is sub-
ject to periodic reappraisal to insure
that he or she can give patients the
best possible service.
A licensed practioner does not
have the automatic right to a
medical appointment, stressed
Hollowell. Once licensed, the physi-
cian must meet and uphold a
hospital staff's standards. The job
of the medical staff is to "select and
maintain" qualified physicians for
the hospital, according to
Hollowell.
The seminar also dealt with the
problems of the impaired physician.
Again through peer review, the staff
must deal with doctors who may
have any one of a wide range of pro-
blems that could affect his or her
patients, such as alcohol or drug
abuse.financial problems, or a too
old or uniformed physician.
The medical staff and hospital
governing board are legally respon
sible for health care, and must bring
to attention a colleague who cannot
meet the high standards of the pro-
fession. Dismissal from the medical
staff or deliniation of clinical
privleges may result in a doctor who
cannot meet his responsibilities.
William E. Laupus M.D dean of
the ECU School of Medicine, over-
saw the forrth annual program that
included speakers from UNC and
Duke medical schools.






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 28, 1982
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
It you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcement column,
please type it on an announcement
torm and send it to The East
Carolinian m care of the produc
tion manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications Building
Flyers and handwritten copy on
odd sued paper cannot be ac
cepted
There is no charge for an
nouncements, but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you want
and Suggest tha' you do not rely
solely on this column tor publicity
The deadline tor announcements
is 3 p m Monday tor the Tuesday
paper and 3pm Wednesdayy for
the Thursday paper No an
nouncements received after these
deadlines will be printed
This space is available to all
campus organizations and depart
men's
WZMB
Join Keith Mitchell on AZMB
tor the Electric Rainbow Radio
Show II is run Saturday nights
trom 12 midnight to 4 am and Sun
day nights trom 12 midnight to 3
am Album specials begm at 2 am
This weeks album specials are the
Stone's Get you Ya Ya sOut on
Saturday, and the new Uriah Heep
album ' Abommog on Sunday
The metal will fly so don't miss
out!
FRESHMEN
it you are intelligent, en
'husias'ic and interested in getting
involved in SGA. there is an open
mg m the Attorney General s CM
fice tor you If you would like to
serve as Assis'an' Attorney
General, please call or stop by
Room 228 Mendenhall Student
Center before October 1. 1982, be'
ween 8 00 a m and 5 00 p m All
interested persons male or
female win be considered
CAREERS
Which career fits you best1
Career By Choice No' Chance is
a two part mini series offered at
No Cost by the University Counsel
ing Center It is ottered on and Oc
tober 4 or and October 5 in 305
Wright Annex 1757 6661) from 3 00
PM 5 00 PM The Strong
Campbell Vocational interest In
ventory will be administered in
me First Meeting No advance
i-egis'rahon is necessary
PLANT SALE
The Biology Club will have a
plant sal ;n 'he Biology
Greenhouse S 111 Thursday Sep'
30 and Fnaay. OC 1 trom 7 30 am
1 00 pm
COMMUNITY PATRON
Community Pa'ron" season
'icke's are now on sale to' ' e
Ayden Theatre Workshop s 1V82 83
season of live exciting plays Oc'
7.9,10 "The Children's Hour tand
a Half)" Dec 2 4s - "The
Miracle Worker. Jan 27,2V,30 �
"A Midsummer Nigh's Dream"
Mar 3 5 6 O" 'he Nigh' of
January 16"1' and Apr
20,21.23.24 � 'Cam.val' The pur
chase of a season ticket mfi'les
you to membership in the ATW,
special acting and make up
workshops the Newsle'ter. first
option on tours and an -nvitation To
'he Spring Ceiebra'ion, all for just
S10 00 Write Ayden Theatre
Workshop, Box 293. Ayden, N C
28513. or call 746 2121. 7S6 7209, or
524 4250
SAM
The Society tor the Advance
ment of Management will be spon
soring a field trip to the Empire
Brusch Company on Thursday the
30 of September All members are
invited to attend and any in
terested guests The group will be
meeting at the factory parking lot
at 3 06, to go on 'he conducted
tour The factory is located on
Highway 13 lust North of the Hoh
day inn For further information
call 758 5258
SLC
There will be a silent dinner at
the New Deli on Wed . Sept 29. at
�30pm see ya there
COOPERATIVE
EDUCATION
CLUB
There will be an organizational
meeting for hte Co op Club on
Thursday, October 7 at 4 00 p m
in Room 306 Rawl The club is for
returning Co op students and those
interested in participation in the
Cooperative Education program
at ECU Call 757 6979 for more in
formation
EAST CAIOUNA UMVOBITY
1907-mi
RESERVED PARKING
This letter is to bring to your a'
tention that a limited number of
spaces are available in the reserv
ed parking lo' tor staff faculty,
and students The fee is S120 per
year, prorated information can
be obtained regarding the reserv
ed parking lot by contacting Ms
Barbara Heath 757 6294
GEOLOGY CLUB
The Geology club would like to
invite everyone to meet 'he newes'
member ot the aepartment Dr
Lee One He w n speak Monday
night a' 8 00, OC 4, in Grahm 301
Dr 0"e will talk about the
ecological geological research he
has dene in th southeast U S We
would like to ex'?nd a special m
vita'ion to anyone intersted in
biology or geclogy
PHI SIGMAPI
Phi Sigma Pi national honor
fraternity will hold its dinner
meeting on Wednesday,
September 29 at 5 00 p m at Tar
Landing Seafood The meeting will
be followed by dinner at 6 00 p m
EPISCOPAL
COMML ION
A student Episcopal
service of Holy Commu-
nion will be celebrated on
Tuesday, Sept. 28, in the
chapel of St. Paul's
Episcopal Church, 406 4th
street (one block from
Garrett Dorm). The ser-
vice will be at 5:30 p.m.
with the Episcopal
Chaplain, the Rev. Bill
Haden, celebrating.
CADP
The Campus Alcohol and Drug
Program will ave a meeting on
Tuesday. Sep' 28 a' 5 00 p m in
'he second floor conference room
of Erwn Hall Any student m
'eres'ed in furthering responsible
attitudes 'oward 'he use of
chemical substances is encourag
ed 'o attend For more intorma
tion call 757 6793 or 757 6649
HOMECOMING
DECORATIONS
Any organization wishing to
enter the Float of HouseDorm
Decorating competition for
homecoming should submit an ap
plication to Jon Curtis Room 203
Mendenhall by October 8
WHAT'S NEW ON
CAMPUS
Is the foundation of your career
is in the personnel and industrial
relation field, this organization is
tor you, ASPA, American Society
for Personnel Administration, will
form a chapter at ECU The socie
ty will meet Sept 29 at 3 00 p.m. in
Rawl 207 at that time the officers
will be elected To those who are
intersted, come and help ASPA
habe a guaranteed future with
your support.
PPHA
The Preprotessional Health
Alliance (PPHA) will hold its first
regualr biweekly meeting on
Thursday, September 30, 1982
This meeting will be held at 5:30
p.m at the Afro American
Cultural Center New plans tor the
upcoming year will be discussed
All members and any other in
terested parties are urged to at
tend
PSICHI
Come and see what creatures go
bump m the ECU forest You can
find out first hand at the Psi Chi
cookout party to be held
September 29 (ramdate Sept 30)
from 4 30 to 7 pm The trolick will
be held in the dell between 10th
street and Biology Greenhouse
Reserve your tun and buy a ticket
at the Psi Chi library for $2 00 or at
the cookout for S2.S0 (pays tor
food sooa and beer) You will
never know who you will mee'
unless you come
U.S. NAVY
INTERVIEWS
The Career Planning and Place
ment Service in the Bloxton House
will have representatives from the
U.S. Navy Recruiting Office here
on September 29 between 9 am.
and 4 p m to talk with Seniors. A
sheet is available tor those
registered with us to sign up for an
interview. All maiors are
welcome, the most demand will be
for those in the Health and
technical fields. You must sign up
on or before September 28.
AEROBICS AND DANCE
Noontime classes in Aerobics
(already in progress but
newcomers welcome) for faculty
and staff are held on Monday.
Wednesday, and Friday in Room
112, Memorial Gym Noontime
classes in Ballroom dancing (start
October 7) tor Faculty and Staff
will be held on Tuesdays and
Thursdays Both of these classes
are free and you may call Jo
Saunders 757 6000 tor turther in
formation
FRISBEE
Fnsbee Rush Party OC 1 , Ask
club members tor details or better
than that come throw and lay
ultimate at the bottom of the hill
every tue and Thurs at 4 00
SCIENCE MAJORS
Need some light reading? The
A CSS A is taking orders tor the
CRC Handbook of Chemistry and
Physics and the CRC Handbook of
Tables for Organic Compound
Identification tor J25 00 and S20 00
respectively A reference must for
any science maior! Place orders
in the Chemistry office located in
Flanagan between the hours of
10 00 and 12 00 Sep' 20 through
Oct. 8 Place your orders now
Payment oue when order is plac
ed
FRESHMEN
REGISTER
Freshman Registers may be
picked up in the Buccaneer office
on Tuesdays and Thursdays from
2 00 p.m till 5 00 p m The Buc
caneer Office is located on 'he se
cond floor of the Publications
Building
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
COURSES
Personal Development Courses
begin
Oct. 18 Getting Organized OC 21
Real Estate Finance, Commodity
Hedging OC 26 AerobicExer
cise Nov 17 Real Estate Ap
praisal.
Sept. 29 Mime Sept 30 in
vesting in the 80's OC 5 Basket
ball Officiating. OC 12 Coping
with Stress, Philosophy and
Retirement For information call
7576143.
SEMINAR
During Spring Semester 1983 the
Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Program will offer the inter
disciplinary seminar, ASMR 5000.
on the topic "The Flesh in the Mid
die Ages and Renaissance " The
seminar will meet on Thursdays
from 6 30 9 30 pm m Brewster
D 313 and will be directed by Dr
Gregory Ross ot the Philosophy
Department The seminar is open
to all students interested in
medieval and Renaissance
Studies For further info, see Dr
Ross (Brewster A 333! or Dr
Bassman (Foreign Languages and
Literatures Brewster A 424) If
you are interested in the Medieval
and Renaissance Studies Program
or it you need special permission
to pre register for the seminar,
see Dr McMillan, program coor
dinator (Dept ot English Austin
315)
VX 'x
' LH
HARRIS RECITAL
Violinist Susan Hams ot
Charlotte, senior student in the
East Carolina University School of
Music will perform in recital
Thursday, Sept 30 at 7:30 p m
She will be featured In 'he Vi'ah
David Chaconne in G Minor,
movement trom Brahms Sonata
No 2 in A Maior and "Perpetual
Motion' by Ries
Her accompanists will be
pianis's Carla Snow and Joel
Lane
Ms Harris is a s'udent of Dr
Paul Topper ot the ECU strings
faculty and a candidate for the
Bachelor ot Music Education
degree
Her parents are Edgar and Bar
bara Harris of 4370 Kings Way.
Marietta. Ga formerly of
Charlotte
PHI BETA LAMBDA
The Omicron Chapter of Phi
Be'a Lambda will hold i�s nex'
meeting Wednesday. September
29. at 4 p m in Rawl 339 Member
ship is open to all persons maior
ing in business and business
education
FNIM STUDENTS
There will be a meeting of all
Foods. Nutrition and insli'u'ionai
Management students and anyone
else mteresled In finding ou' more
abou� the various routes to becom
mg a Registered Dietician
This will be followed by a
potluck dinner an the regular mon
thly meeting of the Student
Dietetic Association The meeting
will be held Monday, Oct. 4, at 5.15
m the dining room of the Home
Economics building All interested
persons are welcome
PHYE MAJORS
All students who plan to declare
physical education as a maior dur
mg change ot maior week tor the
Fall Semester, should report lo
Mmges Coliseum from 1 00 3 00
p m on Wednesday September 29
tor a motor and physical fitness
test Satisfactory performance on
this test is required as a prere
quisite for official admittance to
the physical education maior pro
gram More detailed information
concerning the tes' is available by
calling 757 6441 or 6442
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
COURSES
Yoga Sept. 29 Oct. 13 For more
information call 757 6'43
DISNEY WORLD
INTERNSHIPS
Wal' Disney World's Magic
Kingdom College internship Pro
gram will be interviewing on cam
pusOC 15 1982 trom 3 30 5 00pm
tor their spring and summer in
terns Students will work 30 hours
per week, and earn approximately
V4 00 per hour tor 10 weeks Special
training seminars held weekly
Students will be placed according
to their maiors Any interested
students should contact the Co op
office m 313 Rawl or call ext. 6979
ECMUG
East Carolina Microcomputer
Users Group is a new club formed
last January open to all people m
the Greenville area interested m
microcomputers The club holds
meetings 'he second Thursday of
each month a' 7 30 pm in
Mendenhall 221 For further info
call Rick Athey. President, at
756 8793
1756-00881
w �, The World
S ' According to
Qgrp.
Mon. Thurs 3 7 9: 30
cinema V2m3
' PITTPIAZA SHOPPING CtNTSB
LOVE DESTINY HEROES
HQHQHH
Mon Thurs. J-7-�:0S
��nHHMi
-STAR
TWEKJL
xcVVrVATH
ofKHAT1pg
Mon. Thurs. 3-7-9
ALL SEATS �2�� with this coupon r�
sssss
Tar Landing Seafood
Restaurant
Tar Landing Seafood
Restaurant
ZcJ
m
i�i

Cross Green Street B'idqe
Takt ifft at 1st Lmht
Located one block down o
eft

Airport Rcai
Greenville. North Carolina
SunThurs. � 11-9 p.m.
Fri.&Sat. �11-10
MonThurs. ALL DAY
Sat. � Lunch 11-3
Reg. Daily Special
Flounder
&
Shrimp Plate
$2.89
TAKE OUTS
AVAILABLE
758-0327
CRAFTS
MSC is offering a variety of
crafts workshops tor Fall
Semester. 1982. and are available
for enrollment immediately The
workshops are tree to all members
ot the Crafts Center Each
member may enroll in one (1)
workshop The cost of a Crafts
Center Membership is J10 00 per
semester which includes "e use ot
the facilities, tool check out. use of
library materials, and aid ot ex
perienced supervisors
All faculty and staff, 'heir
spouses and dependen's who are
Mendenhall S'udent Center
members may iom the Crat's
Center Dependents must be eigh
teen years of age or older to be
elegibie to iom
Crafts Center Memberships are
available during regular
operating hours. 3 00 PM until
10 00 PM. Monday through Fri
day. and 12 00 Noon until 5 00 PM
Sa'uroa Following is a list of
available workshops Floor Loom
Weaving Thursdays (September
30 October 28i 6 9 PM Pottery
Mondays (September 27
November 1! 6 9 PM Basketry
Wednesdays iSepiember 29
November 3) 6 9 PM Photography
Thursdays (September 30 Nov
417 10PM JewelryMe'als Mon
days (November 8 December 6)
6 9 PM Darkroom Techniques
Mondays (September 27
November 1) 6 30 9 30 PM
ALPHABETAALPHA
The Alpha Beta Alpha (ABA
Library Science Fraternity will
hold its pledging ceremony for
perspective members Member
ship s open to all library sciene
maiors, faculty members, and
those interested m the library or
'he library profession The pieog
ing ceremony will be held on
September 28 at 5 30 in room 219 of
the Library Science building if m
teres'eo pleasecome 'o 'he library
science department office for
more information All presn- '
members arc required to attend
CATHOLIC NEWMAN
CENTER
The Catholic Newman Center
would like to invite everyone to
iom in with us for celebrating
Mass every Sunday m the Biology
Lecture Man star'mg at 12 30 and
every Wednesday at 5 00 at the
Catholic Newman Center located
down at the bottom of College Hill
INTERVIEWING
SKILLS WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning ana Place
ment Service in the Bloxton Mouse
is offering these one hour sessions
to aid you m developing better m
terviewing skills for use in your
lob search You may select a time
from those listed below
September 28. 1982 Tuesday
4 00 p m
October 4, 1982 Monday 3 00
p m
A film and discussion ot inter
viewing through the Career Plann
mg and Placement Service will be
shared
PRE OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPY
Pre Occupational Therap
s'uden's should be advised of 'he
tollowing
Apphca'ion forms and fees tor
November Allied Health Protes
Sions Admissions Test mus' be
received by 'he Tes'mg company
by Oc'ober 8. 1982 Apphca'ion
forms are availaDie a' 'he ECU
Testing Center. 105 Speight
Building between 8 00 and 1 00
anc between 2 00 and 5 00
Occupational Therapy Admis
sion Packets w.ii be available in
the Occupational Therapy Depart
mental Office October 4. 1982 and
also a' pre regis'ration
BASIC NAUI,
PADISCUBA
Why not iom our new class
which begins Tuesdy. October 12.
instruction will be held on campus
except for the open water dives
which are necessary requirements
for certification Registration s
limited For more information call
757 6143
IRSOUTDOOR
RECREATION
The IRS Outdoor Recreation
Center 113 Memorial Gym� is
sponsoring horseback ndmg trips
fw.ee a week Transportation is
provided Reservations �nfl pay
ment for Monday at'emoon trips
are Oue by 2 30 p m each Monday
Reserva'ns and payment for
Thursday trips are due by 4 00
p m each Wednesday Rales are
5 00 per "our Both trips leave a'
3 40 p m and return approxima'e
ly 5 30 p m For more information
stop by "he Ou'door Recreation
Center or can 757 6911
SIGMA TAU
DELTA
The Sigma Tau Dei'a English
Honor Society �rill hoid its frs
meeting of 'he tan semester nex�
Thursday Se'ember 30. trom
5 00 7 00 a' 'he New Dei ioca'ed
on Co'anche Street downtowr
Greenville AH members are en
couraged 'o at'ena Other m
'eres'ed persons are cordially n
vited to a'tend
LACROSSE
mere m oe a acrosse
meeng Wed 'he 29 a' 4 00 in 104
Memorial Gym Prac'ices are
neld a' 'he bottom of College Hill.
3 5 p m Tuesdav and Thursday
FRISBEE
Congratulations tc ECU s L
Burt wno is me NC Mnwnam
Around Frsbee Champ c
won me 'i'�e a' me s'a'e cnam
p.onsh.ps r. Raieigr Sep- anc
12 Georgia S'a'e Champ.oosr ps
are IMS weekend HI Augus'a a
members wnc wan' to go contac
Pe'er Lauber' An,one w
terested m piayng urMmato
teaming �r sbee sk.ns should
the club ever, Tes and Thurs a"
the bottom of college - a' 4 0C
FRiSBEE RUSH par onOC
Ask any rree' " �
detans Thanks le v w rh
arranging 'he demc a" re
School tor the Dea' a' '
members den -sj'ec
'augh' fr soee had
O'M
Ma
s
The Fast C arolinign
ran f�M
Published evf. TuCVtti
Thursday tfuf '5 " � �
year and every Aednes3.
,ng 'he so mat
T� Eas' Car niari !
Metal "fviSDiCf ' Eai'
Carol -a Univars�v
ope'a'ed anc put:1 iltM ' '
Dv 'he s'uden's of Eas' Ca-E
University
Subscription Rate S20year,
The East Carolinian affrcei
art located m the Old Sou"1
Building on the campui o EC.
Greenville N C
POSTMASTER Send ad
changes M T"e Eas" Car
Old South B- d � g I
vile NC 27834
Telephone '5" 636 �J6
6 JO
I
.
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines. There are 33
units per line. Each letter, punc
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end of line if word
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac
cepted over the phone. We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
(VII ads must be prepaid. Enclose
75 per line or fraction of a line.
Please print legibly! L'se capital and
lower case letters.
Krlurn lo MtlMV BOARD eMu mill EAS1
( 4ROIIM4N n(fieri hi 2 pm Mondat hrfnrr
I urvdyi paper and Vrdiwda beforr Ihursdat
publication
Name
Address
City State.
No. lines �
Zip.
at "5C per line S.
, No. insertions.
.

1 11i!Mill1� -ir � t ' Mill.�III
1i 1t!j1 -lL��141�. . i
1 1i1 M i i111 1. ��i�i
1!iiT T 1 lIll .
1 1! 1i,
1 1! i -i i 1: i ;
111 1 1 1 1 1
1! ' � � ! 1 �
1 11ill T II! lit
1.�.1 i i i ii�1 i i i i i i. i i
VOTE
SGA Elections
Wed Sept. 29
9:00 a.m. -6:00 p.m.
Polls located at
I dorms, Mendenhall, Croatan,
Student Supply Store,
Bottom of College Hill
& Allied Health
Building.
Voting for dorm reps
day reps & class
officers.
?







THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 28. 1982
Counseling Available For Drug, Alcohol Abuse
O'NEILL Bj PATRICK
NUfl Mniri
"All people at one
time or another need
omebod they can talk
to said Dr. Phyllis
McAlister, a counselor
with the ECU Counsel-
ing Center. McAllister
is one of the 5
counselors who is on
duty every weekday at
the center to provide
students with help on a
wide range of topics.
"As far as we're con-
cerned no problem is to
minor McAllister
said, "whatever is im-
portant to them,
whatever is bugging
them is important
Anxiety over grades,
tests, or studies, con-
cern over an ap-
propriate major or
career path, problems
related to family or
friends, lack of con-
fidence, negative self
image, depression or
loneliness, andor hav-
ing difficulty in manag-
ing time, events, and
people are some if the
areas the counseling
center can provide help
with.
"Somebody who is
Kansas State University Leads
Schools In Attracting Presidents
CPS
lucked awav in a roll-
ing prairie. Kansas
Suite University enjovs
an admircablv solid it
unspectacular academic
renown, according to
the I add-1 ipset rank-
ing ot collegiate reputa-
tions. Athletically, it's
terrific in basketball,
traditionally lousy in
otball.
And it seems to at-
tract presidents like
flies.
Though the records
are hardly definitive,
unhkelv k-State has
been more successful in
attracting U.S.
presidents � and the
attendant publicity �
�campus than any
other college.
The most recent was
the Sept 7 visit of
Ronald Reagan, whose
populantv at colleges is
depressed by his stance
on militarv registra-
n. his cuts of student
aid. and his administra-
tion's disruptive delays
m making aid awards.
But Reagan's Kansas
ate wit drew some
1 1,000 enthusiastic,
supportive listeners.
When in 1970 Presi-
dent Richard Nixon's
poll ratings plummeted
after his invasion of
Cambodia, the killings
at Kent State and a na-
t ion wide student-
protest strike, he also
went to Kansas State,
where he met a cheering
crowd of students.
Two years before.
Sen. Robert Keennedy
made his first presiden-
tial campaign speech at
KSU.
Republican con-
tender Nelson
Rockefeller "was sit-
ting in a New York City
restaurant, reading
these glowing stones of
Bobbv Kennedy's spec-
tacular reception here,
and said, 'I could draw
there too ' KSU ad-
ministrator Carl
Rochet says. "So he
scheduled a lecture here
for later that year,
too
Gerald Ford spoke at
KSU. and D wight
Eisenhower "visited his
brother, who was then
president of the univer-
sity, here many times
adds Rochet, who
believes Theodore
Roosevelt was the first
president to campaign
in Manhattan.
"1 think any place
that'll give you a stan-
ding ovation in front of
TV cameras when your
polls are dying is bound
to be popular with
politicians explains
an aide to David Garth,
a political campaign
consultant.
Out of "thousands
and thousands and
thousands of invita-
tions the president gets
each day the KSU
visit made sense to
President Reagan for
many reasons, says
White House
spokesman Doug
Flmets.
It also helped that
"it's an agricultural
school, and he had
some things to say
about grain sales to the
Soviet Union
"Students here are
less antagonistic, less
likelv to demonstrate
JTT
sns
M �
� m
peioKG cupper
Hair Salon Unisex
With a large number ot
ECU students (male & female) as
our customers, we are looking forward
to catering to your every hair care
need. College students of today
demand certain styles that the
PEKING CLIPPER is accustomed to
doing. We stay open Tues. & Thurs.
nights till 9:30 p.m.
Call for appointment at 758 1505
rted 1 2 mile from ECU at I 005 A Hamilton St
take a tip from
Western Sizzlin
Here's some good
advice that could give
you 10,000 flavor
buds of savory enjoy-
ment. It's the No. 3
Sirloin Tips at
Western
Sizzlin. USD A
Choice Sirloin
Tips sea-
soned to
perfection
with onions and bell
peppers and served
with your choice of
potato. So come on in
and follow up on
some good advice at
Western Sizzlin.
NO. 3
sulloin
TIPS
with peppera
dr onions,
baked potato
or french fries
a taacaa toast
he says.
Maybe it's the nature
of the students. Maybe
it's the midwest
character. Maybe it's
the nature of the
school. I don't know
for sure
To be sure, one stu-
dent group did plan a
peaceful demonstration
against student aid
cuts, the nuclear arms
build-up and other ad-
ministration policies.
But generally students
stressed the honor of
having Reagan visit.
"When I come back
as an alumni adds
junior Mike Daven-
port, I'll be able to say,
'Yes, I was here when
President Reagan
spoke
"I think that any
time you can get the
president of the United
States here, whether
you agree or disagree
with his policies, it's
major honor to the
university says
political science pro-
fessor and lecture series
Chairman William
Richter.
lonely and just wants
somebody to talk to
can come here � that's
alright too
McAllister said.
For the students who
feel more comfortable
talking to another stu-
dent for support, the
Campus Alcohol and
Drug Program (CADP)
provides an alternative.
"It's run by students
for students said
ECU Student Gregg
Festa, who is the Presi-
dent of CADP.
CADP operates as an
educational, referral
program which is com-
mitted to the promo-
tion of a campus en-
vironment that is con-
ducive to responsible
decision making con-
cerning alcohol use or
non-use by all members
of the campus com-
munity.
In pursuit of their
goal, a campus
AlcoholDrug Infor-
mation Center is also
available which pro-
vides information and
referral on alcohol and
drug-related issues.
"We like to think
CADP provides a fami-
ly atmosphere and en-
courages people to feel
more comfortable
Festa said.
CADP also conducts
breathalyzer test pro-
grams, with the
cooperation of the
N.C. Highway Patrol,
at the dorms
throughout the year.
"Students aren't aware
of how much alcohol it
takes for them to get a
DUI (Driving Under
the Influence) or how
much it takes to impair
their driving Festa
said. "We just promote
responsible drinking,
we don't say don't
drink � if you drink,
drive responsibly
McAllister sees the
counseling center as a
"support system"
which students can
utilize until they are
able to build their own
systems. Festa sees
CADP as also pro-
viding this type of sup-
port from the non-
professional, student to
student dimen-
sion "Counseling is a
process of developing
insight � it is not tell-
ing you what to do -
you make the deci-
sions states a
brochure distributed by
the Counseling Center.
"It emphasizes your
responsibility for con-
ducting and making the
most of your own life.
The counselor's job is
to help you to achieve
the self-understanding
which will enable you
to attain your max-
imum personal satisfac-
tion
"Anything that goes
on here is confiden-
tial McAllister said.
Festa guarantees the
same from CADP.
CADP says a drink-
ing problem exists if a
person needs alcohol in
order to function, or if
alcohol is used in such a
way that it impairs
one's functioning. Ap-
proximately one third
of ECU's freshman
class do not return in
their sophomore year.
According to CADP,
research indicates that
much of this high attri-
tion rate can be at-
tributed to chemical
misuse and abuse.
"Heavy chemical con-
sumption can prevent
you from taking care of
your primary educa-
tional goals through
missng classes or being
so hungover you can't
participate fully while
in class stated a
brochure entitled
"Your Decision"
distributed by CADP.
There are five doc-
tors who are available
for appointments at the
counseling center. It is
open from 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. Monday through
Friday.
The counseling
center, which is located
in Room 307 ot the
Wright Annex
building, is a private,
inconspicuous area for
students concerned
about annonimityv
Wright Annex is adja-
cent to the Student
Supply Store. The
center's telephone
number is 757-6661
CADP also provides
walk-in hours during
the weekdays. Thev
have a student statt ot
approximately 20 to 2
people. They welcome
visitors who would like
to stop in for a cup ��
coffee. CADP i
located on the third
floor of Erwin Hall in
rooms 301-303. Their
phone number i
757-6793.
"I think there are
always some people out
there who for one
reason or another do
not reach out, and thev
probably could benefit
it they did McAHistei
concluded.
BULLOCK'S
BARBERSHOP
Corner of W. 5th & Ford Streets
Phone: 758 6498
(Service to ECU since 1967)
8:30 a.m5:30
Brody's for men has an opening
for a part-time salesperson. Must
be able to sell men's clothes.
Experience preferred. Requires weekend
& morning work.
Apply at
Brody's for Men
Pitt Plaza
2-5 p.m.
for men
Local and
Out of Town
Newspapers
Full line of Magazines,
Paperbacks & Greeting Cards
Central Book
&News
Greenville Sq. Shopping Ctr.
Open 7 days a Week
9:30-9:30
756-7177
& Thursday
POPCORN
SHRIMP
$295
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad may be substituted
for Slaw35$ extra
ATiTIC
TUESDAY
SKYLINE
WEDNESDAY
BADGE (College Nite)
THURSDAY
BADGE (Ladies Lite Nite)
FRIDAY
BILL BLUE BAND
SATURDAY
DIAMONDS
SUNDAY
Anita kKOfdlng Artist
THE DREGS
MON - PIZZA I PASTA
BUFFET S 9 alt piiio 4
ipoghatti - $2 79
TUK - PIZZa BUFFIT S2 49
Uxjin Nit w Choi Lahnn i.K Lottin
Lodts - NoCo�et Fre Kog
Happy How SI 00 ipec
WED - 2 IS SALAD BAR
THURS. - SPAG SPIC - S2 49
Chantpofrt Jam H.H 9 'til 1
LodW - iitolaiitraa - Mart Daato�
HH $1 00.pet 2Saratt
FP.I - H H 4-7 tra hon d BRUCE FRY(
SAT - H H 4-7 BRUCE FRYE
SUN - LASAGNA SPEC S2 99
EAST CAROLINA S
PARTY CENTER
TUESDAY BEER BELLY
WEDNESDAY
PONY NIGNT - 30 ponies
Free odm. tor ECU students
TNURSDAY S1 00 Adm.
COLLEGE NITE - 70C cans
FRIDAY
END OF THE WEEK PARTY
NcwHoufi - 3.30-7.30
3 30-4 30 all poin 3(H
4 30-7 30alUoni6S
9 00-11 00 all com 6S
ladiei oamittcc! Fro � H H ttamp
SATURDAY
I4ST IN DANCE MUSIC
SUNDAY Loa�, o4m-ml�
LADIES'NITE ������
Across from U.6.E.
S13 CotancM St. Grtenvillt
7M 0040 lor TAKE OUT
OponMon. Sat�B:30a.mI:00a.
HAPPY HOUR DAILY
IF.ffi.7pm
VIOCO. PINBALU
POOS ALL. RILL I A OS
Thurs.
Laura Newborn
Fit & Sat.
Laughing Matter
109 E
Starting Thurs,
H.H. 11:00p.m
12:00 midnight
Same prices as our
4-8 H.H.
SthSt.
1361
DARTS
Mon. at 8:00
FREE PINBALL3-4
HAPPY HOUR 4-7
Now open 7 days a wteh � 3 p.m. 1 a.i
Largest selection
of imports






r
QJJfe iEaat (Karnlmtati
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Mii i ik, ,�,� ftHmx,
Mikf Hughes, �������,
WAVERI V MFRRITT, n,r ClNDY Pi EASANTS, v� �,
Robert Rucks, ��� ��� Grlg Ride out, �,��
At i Afrashteh. ��, � Steve Bachner, ��,��,��,�, tlllll�
Stephanie Groon, em w�a Jui iana Fahrbach, v.w
Joni Guthrie, ,t,��1J s�v MIKt Davis. ,�rfui���
Variant'?
September 2K, 182
Opinion
Page 4
Student Councils
Politicos Faced With 'CRAP'
Anyone who has, at one time or
another, found himself disgusted
with the East Carolina SGA, for
whatever reason, will be pleased to
learn that our beloved student
government is not alone in its short-
comings. Other schools � from
coast to coast � have also had to
put up with the same annual trash.
The only difference is that angry
students from other colleges and
universities don't just sit idly by and
complain about their unsatisfactory
councils; they do something about
them.
Last year, for example, a group
of students at the University of
Virginia, the Committee to
Remove Arrogant Politicos
(CRAP) set out to abolish their
student council because, according
to them, no one took student
politics seriously.
Chuck Wehland, one of the foun-
ding fathers of CRAP, says that the
group formed because UVa's Stu-
dent Council had become far too
political and corrupt. He claimed
that the council members were "out
for themselves" and "had done
nowhere near the job of represen-
ting students and their opinions
But efforts to disband student
government are not unique to the
University of Virginia.
According to the College Press
Service, in just the past four years,
schools such as the University of
Texas-Austin, Dartmouth, Georgia,
Northern Colorado and Southern
Illinois at Edwardsville, to name a
few, have disbanded all or parts of
their student governments.
Most of these institutions have
since re-instated the disbanded
systems, but students at the respec-
tive campuses claim their govern-
ments and councils are now more
representative of students and less
political. Student "leaders" have
sacrificed the campus limelight in
order to promote a more trusting at-
mosphere with students, something
ECU could greatly benefit from.
Practically anyone who's been
here since last year realizes what stu-
dent government at ECU has
become � junior politics. Last
year's SGA executive election � or,
rather, elections � were enough to
make even biology majors gag for a
long time to come. But, unfor-
tunately, the heritage extends much
further back than that. Campaign
charges of impropriety, mud-
slinging, election rule violations
you name it; ECU's seen it and
probably more than once.
But it doesn't have to be that
way. "Student government"
doesn't have to be synonymous with
"politics After all, SGA (until
proven otherwise) still stands for
Student Government Association,
not Society of Greenville's Anar-
chists.
Sure, our student government
does a lot of good things too. At
least, 1 think they do; otherwise,
why would they have all those
meetings every Monday afternoon?
But it has become far too apparent
in the past that some of our
"student leaders' " priorities are (to
say the least) not in the students' in-
terest.
What's the use of having a stu-
dent government when several of its
most outspoken and influential
members have yet to gain our trust?
What's the point in putting up the
facade of student representation
any longer? The students of East
Carolina haven't been adequately
represented for years. And any
change in the practices of student
legislature on campus will probably
take years to be realized.
Someone correct me if I'm
wrong, but I think ECU students,
on the whole, are plenty tired of the
same ol' crap year after year. For
crying out loud, this is a college
campus! One of the thousands of
college campuses across the U.S.
And contrary to the beliefs of many
an SGA member, this is not the
"big-time
Now, this newspaper is not
necessarily advocating the forma-
tion of a CRAP society on the ECU
campus. The merits of such an
organization are definitely ques-
tionable.
However, should such a group
decide to form on campus, for
whatever reason, give The East
Carolinian a call. We'd be more
than happy to have someone cover
your meetings.
M.H.
&r&Pmoc&asioew'
S
THCrao MUSTBCPOWN AGAIN 1ft ANOTHER
BATCH OF MEXICAN BANKERS '0MNU,MtK
Mexico's Image: For Better, For Worse
Across The Border
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
American Journal
1 ike most Americans, I know verv little
about Mexico. Oh, I've been there a couple
of times � sort of. I've visited the sad
border towns where norteamericanos go to
drink tequila and practice their high school
Spanish. On my last brief visit, I brought a
cheap bottle of Cuervo Gold back across
the border, plugged in Hank Williams'
Greatest Hits into the tape deck and drank
and talked as the moon rose over the desert
on the drive back to Tucson. I had a good
time, but I didn't learn anything about the
people who sold me the booze.
I blush to think it, but I suspect that is
the way most U.S.citizens relate to this im-
portant neighbor to the south. Our images
on pinatas and sleepy burros have been up-
dated with footage of busy oil rigs, but we
are still mystified by Mexico. What are we
to make of a country that seemed on its
way to petrolium-based affluence only a
year ago and is now shaken by devaluation
of its currency and nationalization of its
banks in the teeth of a mammoth $80
billion foreign debt?
To find out, I spoke recently with
representatives of an opposition political
party, here on a rare visit to the United
States. Members of COCEI, a coalition of
workers, peasants and students in the
southeastern state of Oaxaca, they gave me
an unorthodox, inside look at Mexican
politics. Their spokesperson was a short,
round, young man named Daniel Lopez.
The way Lopez tells it, the virtual col-
lapse of the Mexican economy is at-
tributable to the bankrupt policies of the
outgoing president, Lopez Portillo of the
ruling Pkl party. "Portillo Lopez said
through an interpreter, "developed the
economy around oil, in a clear strategy of
attractive investments. However, this
policy failed, due in large part to the oil
glut internationally and to the considerable
lowering of the price of oil
In addition, Lopez continued, the upper
classes "led the fight of hard currency out
of the country converting millions of
pesos to U.S. dollars for their own use.
This deepened Mexico's balance of
payments deficit and stalled repayment of
its foreign debt. Last month, a desperate
regime announced it could pay only the in-
terest on the debt. Mexico's incoming
president, de la Madrid, appears set to im-
pose a tight-money policy during his six-
year term.
"In the next six years avers Daniel
Lopez, "a policy of austerity will bring
about conditions of extreme povertv" for
the average Mexican. "COCEI stands for
the formation of a nationwide front
against the policy of austerity Lopez
asserted, and for a grassroots alternative to
the PRI. The PRI has run Mexico since the
revolution of 1910, when the party promis-
ed land reform to the country's dirt-poor
campesinos but has stopped well short of
achieving that goal.
COCEI has done more than talk about
providing an alternative. The organiza-
tion, illegal when it was founded in 1974,
registered as an above-ground political
party in 1980 and promptly stunned
political observers by electing a mavor in
the city of Juchitan. The PRI had never
r-Campus Forum-
lost an election there. Juchitan. population
120.000, is the second largest city in Oax-
aca. Despite its size, Lopez said. Juchitan
in 1980 had "only one health clinic, with
one doctor and 16 beds. It had a bar on
every corner, but only five secondary
schools. It had one paved street
Immediately after the election, COCEI
went to work rebuilding the crumbling citv
hall, launching a literacv campaign, install-
ing a sewer system and paving streets. The
party also started pushing for higher wages
for local workers and the land reform that
Zapata fought for "0 years ago. The land
of Oaxaca, I opez argued, "was stolen
from the Zapotecan Indians who owned
it communally. Most of the people in the
area are Zapotecans.
COCEI also started building more
schools. For this and other bold "strokes,
the party has paid a high price. Several
weeks ago. on their way to dedicate a new
school, two COCEI members were killed
by a rightwing hit squad similar to those
who operate in El Salvador. "In the last
seven years Lopez reported. "26
members of CO'El have been killed and
dozens have been jailed and persecuted
Lopez believes that the PRI government
winks at the death squads. In the mean-
time, virtually no state or federal aid has
been finding its way to the citv of Juchitan.
That is the grim reality for the people
who sell us tequila and bullfights and live
and die. virtually unnoticed by Americans,
south of the border. It's not pictaresque,
and it's not festive, but it's something we
will be hearing more about as the crisis in
Mexico deepens.
O'Neill Column 'Overly Judgmental'
I would like to comment on the
(column) "Set Yourself Apart written
by Patrick O'Neill in the Sept. 23 edition
of The East Carolinian.
I am disappointed that Mr. O'Neill is
given typespace not to make an infor-
mative, intelligent comment about the
operation and policies of the nation's
defense but merely to express a few
derogatory opinions. No attempt was
even made on his part to get above the
childish name-calling he seems to be so
fond of.
Mr. O'Neill says in his column that we
are being lied to when the military says
there is a challenge, commitment,
leadership and pride to be had in the
military. Those things are only said to
entice us into an organization whose
goal is to kill and maim and to use poor,
unsuspecting suckers to do it with.
Well, call me a sucker, because I fell
for it. In serving four years in the
Marine Corps, I came to understand
that a commitment of self to doing the
best you could was needed. Therein lies
the challenge, and the reason for pride.
To do the best you can at something dif-
ficult, different and useful. Having he
ability to "destroy the world at the push
of a button" is not the reason for the
military's existence. The sacrifice it
takes to serve is great, and to do it at all
takes a certain amount of pride and
commitment in oneself and his country.
Sure, everyone would like to have
stable world peace, but as long as we
have aggression-oriented communist
governments, peace will only be achiev-
ed through strength, not weakness. Our
military provides the strength, and if
you do not think so, ask the people in
Afghanistan why they have a military
organization (such as it is).
To make comments and criticism
about the policies of the defense is fine,
but let us keep them in the right focus.
Deriding the approach of enlistment and
ultimately slandering those who have
served or will serve in the peace-keeping
defense of this country by calling them
stupid for not being able to see past the
so-called deceit in advertising, is, in my
opinion, egotistical and overly judgmen-
tal.
Russell W.Carlson
Sophomore, Music Ed.
Wanted: 4PeiT pal
I am a convict whe is very lonely and
am ready to give up on life, but I can't as
yet.
My name is Kurt Douglas Raymer.
I'm a "white male 26 years old.
Everyone calls me Doug or "Rebel
I am very lonely and need some
friends in the "free world I just got
life and two 20-year sentences for a
crime I'm not guilty of. I've also just got
through doing 10 years, from 1972 to
1982, and was free from May 7, to June
14. Then I was arrested for two robbery
charges 1 didn't do and got 20 years on
each one. But to beat that, I was given a
life sentence as a persistent felony of-
fender, because of my past convictions.
I stand a good chance of getting out
when my appeal comes up. If not. my at-
torney said she would get the persistent
felony offender charge dropped. Then
I'll be elligible for parole in four years
and four months, when they drop the
P.F.O. and run the two 20s together.
If anyone is interested in writing me,
I'll be glad to answer any and all ques-
tions and letters. I'm reaching out to
touch someone who will be a friend, so:
Don't say yes,
But don't say no.
Just take my hand.
And don't let go
In Struggle, REBEL
Kurt Ravmer, 46604
600 W.Jefferson St.
Louisville, Ky. 40202
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes oj verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature oj the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed.






I
I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SGA Platforms
SEPTEMBER 28, 1982 Page 5
Senior Citizens
My name is Linda Bishop, and 1 am
running for senior class president. 1 was
the junior class vice president last year,
and 1 have served in the SGA for the
past three years. I am pro-anything that
promotes educational opportunities and
the good image of East Carolina Univer-
sity. I am a sincere believer in represen-
tative student government. Don't ask me
what I can do for you � I want you to
TELL me! 1 am representing YOU �
the student. One issue that concerns me
and is close to our pockets is student
loans. I have been on committees that
had the task of ironing out the problems
of the SGA Emergency Loan Fund.
These committees started with a clear
goal, but twice our attention was
diverted by petty political in-fighting.
When people start to bicker and fight,
they lose their perspective of what their
role should be in the student govern-
ment. I don't play these games! The
SGA is to be FOR the students. I try to
accomplish things without much fan-
fare. Bring the issues that concern you to
me � tell me what I can do for you by
being your representative. But most im-
portantly, I need your support! Please
come out tomorrow and elect the people
who can best represent you, and don't
forget your ID and activity card.
Linda Bishop
Candidate
Sr. class president
spring of '82 elections, that I am the best
qualified candidate for the job.
It is my belief that one of the major
roles of the senior class vice president is
to support and help the senior class
president in an advisory role. Another
important role which the senior class
v.p. must play is that of obtaining feed-
back from fellow seniors to try to make
sure their needs are heard by both the
senior class president and the legislature.
It is my firm belief that I can serve the
seniors at ECU in a responsible and
understanding fashion so as to make
them heard and not swept under the rug.
So vote Chuck Blake senior class vice
president.
Chuck Blake
Candidate
Sr. class v.p.
My name is Chuck Blake, and I am
running for senior class vice president. I
am a senior majoring in management. I
hae been involved in many activities
since 1 have been here at ECU, but my
most enjoyable experience has been to
be affiliated with the SGA. 1 feel that
through my experiences with the SGA,
where I was voted best legislator and
elected as elections chairperson for the
My name is David Cook, and I am
currently a senior majoring in accoun-
ting. 1 have been involved in numerous
activities as a student here at East
Carolina and feel that I am in the
mainstream of student life. Through my
SGA experience, 1 have gained a greater
awareness of and sensitivity to the con-
cerns of the student body. 1 feel 1 would
be able to offer a sense of fairness, ob-
jectivity and sincerity to the students as
senior class president.
Once again, 1 will wholeheartedly sup-
port all art, drama and music bills,
because I feel that the arts are a vital
part of every student's education. 1 op-
pose the move initiated by some
members of the executive board to
restrict funding of the arts. Because of
major budget cuts by the government,
these schools desperately need our help.
Another major issue this semester will
be the revision of the election rules, and
because of my experiences in the last few
elections, 1 feel 1 will be a great asset in
assisting with these changes. Hopefully,
these revisions will eliminate many of
the conflicts that always seem to arise
after every SGA election!
Above all, I pledge to you my hones-
ty, sincerity, objectivity, fairness and
concern. I want to work with you to best
represent you so that together we may
secure the best possible student govern-
ment vote David Cook for senior
class president!
David Cook
Candidate
Sr. class president
Being a voice for ECU students is a
difficult yet challenging responsibility
with the wide latitudes students
themselves have brought to the universi-
ty. Concerns of ECU students involve
increasing awareness of what is going on
on campus and in the SGA and letting
organizations have a stronger voice in
the issues that affect them. Students
should be concerned with improved
communication between themselves and
the many facets of the entire campus
body.
Remember Sept. 29 is an important
day; ECU is dependent on responsible
voices to be our leaders, and on Wednes-
day, you will have to make that decision.
I make it my sincerest intention to be a
responsible voice for students, to pro-
mote campus issues and listen attentively
to all students and act to accomplish
results! A vote for Guy Dixon will
strengthen the student voice in student
government, the student body, campus
and the university as a whole. Vote Guy
Dixon on Sept. 29, and see what a sur-
prise you can make!
Guy Dixon
Candidate
Sr. class sec'treas.
Day representative
One Hundred Names Follow
CLASS OFFICERS
FRESHMAN CLASS PRESIDENT
Kirk Shelley. Bob Morgan- � Lassiter. Kel,n l �mbe. R�b Poolc
FRESHMAN CLASS VICE PRESIDENT
I ucinda Alston. Barry Peele
SOPHOMORE CLASS PRESIDENT
Jill Tippett
SOPHOMORE CLASS VICE PRESIDENT
David E Fuirelle, Howard Lipman
JUNIOR Cl ASS PRESIDENT
Jimmy Henderson
JUNIOR CLASS VICE PRESIDENT
Tommy Overcash. Lisa K Roberts. Terry Leamy
GRADUATE C L ASS PRESIDENT
Gary Vfcilliams
GRADUATE CLASS VICE PRESIDENT
(no candidates officially running)
SENIOR CLASS PRESIDENT
1 inda Bishop, David Cook
SENIOR Cl ASS VICE PRESIDENT
Tom Robinson
SENIOR CLASS SEC RETARY TREASURER
Guy Dion
DORM REPRESENTATIVES
AYCOCK(2reps )
David Brown. Blake Eudailey. Barry Peele. Henri Lassiier
BEl K (2 reps )
J David Barnhardt. Jill Tippett. Lisa Maness
CLEMENT (2 reps I
Stacey Cole, Lori Svendsen. Jackie Ro�t
COTTENli rep
Michelle Bailey. Terrv 1 eamy. Holley Ross
Fl EMINCU repl
Rhonda Rice
Fl ETC HER (2 reps )
Gina Lynch
GARRETT2rej� )
Sharon Bun
GREENE 12 reps I
Doreen Henry. Amanda Smnh
JARVISll rep )
Jonathan Greit
JONES (2 reps )
Tommv Overcash Brooks Thomas
S OTTl2reps I
Jim EaSOT, Rob Poofc, fotnta) Raines. Daid L rdle Jirnrrv
Henderson. Jim Monarty, Bill lurnev
SLAY (I rer I
Paul Naso. Joe Admire
TYlER(2reps )
Louise Lilley. Ardieih 1 upion
LMSTEADG rep I
Marls Hardin. Carafe Patterson, kvle Grubbv Nainan Skeei-
NAHITt (2 reps 1
Jama Cunningham
DAY REPRESENTATIVES
(23 pouOOU available. ��
Harlon Seal
Chris Townsend
Ashley DeLappe
Mike O'Connor
ken Adams
Mike Summerset!
Dennis KtkOJfBC
1 isa Dawson
Phillip I ee Aiesander
I isa Barnes
Tom Robinson
Becks Stnnc
Marshal Tucker
John Greer
Eluabein BvrJ
Vvilliarr McVickCI
Chuck Blake
Kim Sheiton
Michael Rabon
Gary WUbaav
CavoryaHiil -
Laura Parker
jr: Bates)
M . s-KPiarland
Kyle Sd �
Lvn Jj �
Sc:ia A.ien
Dar B -
'��
H -
David sx I
lauren V- j
Kcvn k.a
XXif 1
K . -

Ml
(,u.
I Ban
-
'� - �
k rl SJ
The East Carolinian urges all students to utilize their right to vote. You can't com-
plain that there aren't enough polling places. In fact, vou'll probabh pass b two or
three just in Wednesday's daily routine. So, don't stand bv and complain later. Pack
up your ID and activity card and get to a poll then, if you still feel the urge,
plain.
com-
Ire
i :
t
we
Is in
I
I -
ho
lo:
P5
or
uth
hers
land
iher
tiers
tees.

��A
i
Editor's Note: As announced in last Tuesday's East Caroli-
nian, the letters printed on this page are platforms of those per-
sons running for SGA representative and class offices. Not all
the candidates are represented here, because not all the can-
didates turned platforms in. Some others were received later
than the 11 a.m. deadline Monday.
Those platforms printed here are not to be misconstrued as
either supportive or non-supportive of any candidate. Equal op-
portunitv was given anv and all candidates to have their plat-
forms printed. This page represents a good-faith effort on the
parts of The East Carolinian and candidate Linda Bishop,
whose request initiated this forum.
h m i�8 warn
Polling Places
SECT
On Wednesday, Sept. 29, polls for
SGA elections (for dorm represen-
tatives, day representatives and class of-
ficers) will be open from 9 a.m. to 6
p.m. Students may cast their ballots at
any residence hall, Mendenhall Student
Center, the Croatan, Student Supply
Store, at the bottom of College Hill or at
the Allied Health Building.
feWgW.
rCampus Forum
From The Residence Halls
If I am elected, my two top priorities
will be:
1) To deny the East Carolina Gay
Community any funds, whatsoever.
2) To have Patrick O'Neill removed
from the staff of The East Carolinian.
The ECGC is a disgrace to this univer-
sity. The majority of students are oppos-
ed to this organization. Yet, the SGA, in
its infinite wisdom, continues to give
funds to this atrocity. There is no excuse
for this. I will do everything within my
power to keep the ECGC from receiving
one penny of university funds.
Every Tuesday and Thursday, we are
subjected to Patrick O'Neill's childish,
naive, left-wing propaganda. We could
care less what the ex-convict thinks.
He's living in the 1960s. What's more,
he is not even an ECU student at this
time. Why is he still on the East Caroli-
nian staff? I do not have the answer, but
I can assure you that 1 will work for his
removal.
1 will appreciate your vote on Wednes-
day. Thank you.
Nathan G. Weeks
Candidate for legislature
Umstead Dormitory
(Editor's Sole: To save yourselj time,
Jile your complaint about this
newspaper's staffing policies with the
Media Board. They are the governing
body who approved Patrick O'Neill"s
non-student membership on the stafj of
The East Carolinian.)
My name is Johnny Rainey, and 1 am
one of five candidates who wish to
represent Scott Dorm in the SGA
legislature. I am presently a sophomore
majoring in political science.
It is sad that so few people vote in the
SGA elections. The annual elections give
students the opportunity to express their
choice of candidates for office. Many
students do not realize the importance of
the SGA. The SGA appropriates money
from student fees and is the official
voice for student opinion.
Junior Samples
My name is Jim Henderson. I am an
industrial technology major running for
Junior class president. I am enthused
and interested in serving as your junior
class president. I will support sound
legislation towards the betterment of
student organizations and our universi-
ty. Your vote and support will be greatly
appreciated.
Jim Henderson
Candidate
Junior class president
Hi. My name is Terry Leamy, and I'm
a candidate for the junior class presiden-
cy. With one year of active participation
in the student government behind me, 1
am confident that I have the abilities and
dedication to fulfill the position which I
seek. I am both willing and able to serve
the junior class and wish the opportunity
to do so. 1 would appreciate your sup-
port on Wednesday, Sept. 29.
Thank you.
Terry Leamy, jr. class
president candidate
On Wednesday, Sept. 29, it is my
sincere hope that Scott Dorm will have
one of the highest voter turnouts on
'campus.
I look at the chance to represent Scott
Dorm as a personal challenge for me. I
feel that I can strongly and effectively
represent all the residents of Scott
Dorm.
I would appreciate your support on
Wednesday, Sept. 29. Thank you.
Johnny Rainey
Scott Dormitory
Representative Candidate
'Circus Of The Stars'
Once again it is time for that Circus of
the ECU Political Stars. Yes, I'm talking
about SGA Elections. One must admit
that the past history of this monumental
annual event is at best murky and at
worst stagnant. There are several of our
old friends returning to the ECU
political scene. Scanning the list of
names, I see Gary Williams is back in the
action, as well as David Cook. Could the
old machine (and I use the term very
liberally) be gearing up for action again.
Let us hope not. One interesting ques-
tion will be answered during this elec-
tion. Can David Cook make it through a
whole election without pressing charges?
I doubt it.
There are several bright spots in the
list of candidates also. Jimmy Hender-
son, junior class presidential candidate,
and Bob Poole, freshman class presiden-
tial candidate, are very promising. Also,
there are many good candidates for
dorm representatives, such as Brooks
Thomas for Jones, as well as day
representatives, such as John Greer and
Dan Brown. All in all. it is a promising
list of candidates, providing that there
are not too many tears from those who
feel that they have been wronged simply
because their constituents do not desire
to be represented by them. The show
must go on!
Jeff Foster
Senior Corrections
�i
Freshmen Register
Dear Freshman,
Hello, my name is BOB MORGAN! I
am a political science major running for
the office of freshman president to serve
you in the SGA legislature.
Why should you vote for someone
with the name BOB MORGAN? First of
all, 1 am knowledgable of the workings
of the SGA and can represent you better
than any other freshman on this cam-
pus. Second, BOB MORGAN is not
representing any special interest or cer-
tain individual in this election like some
candidates. I will be responsive to the
needs and interests of the entire
freshman class.
BOB MORGAN supports the follow-
ing:
� no increase in student fees
� a balanced SGA budget
� the option of a book rental system
� the appointment of more
freshmen to important positions in the
student government
� a larger role for all students in the
decisions of East Carolina University
If you want a leader who will listen to
your concerns, then you should vote for
BOB MORGAN. If you want the
freshman class to be represented in the
SGA legislature, then you should vote
for BOB MORGAN. 1 am the best can-
didate for the job.
Please call me at 756-6252 if you have
any questions about my candidacy,
Wednesday's elections or the SGA.
Thank you,
BOB MORGAN
My name is Rob Poole, and 1 am a
candidate for freshman class president.
My primary interest will be to represent
the freshman class in the SGA
legislature. 1 would like to see the SGA
offer more services to the students such
as the escort service for the protection of
the girls on campus and a copier service
located in the dorms and Student Supply
Store. The election is Wednesday, Sept.
29. Your vote and support will be greatly
appreciated.
Rob Poole
Candidate,
Freshman class president
t





I HI I M i K( l INI
M t'l I MUl K � 198
Robots Build Planes In Future Factory'
ox �, i 1 I x 'We look oui Ihc future facton airplanes. Ciraphite, in
(I pi) When Don blinders ofl and went concept weds two one form, is the soft
Stansbargei ot Noi to work We admitted modern technologies black carbon in load.
in v orp 'ms! pro people would laugh al foi maximum efficien pencils In another, it's
posed a factors ot the us ho said, "and sure cs a lubricant
future making enough, the did I he firsi is automa But treated different
airplanes with robots Stansbargei is Noi tion, robots I he so K, n is a lightweight,
people laughed, but throp's managei foi the cond is the use ol strong, tensile material
idea is becoming a Factory ol the Future lightweighi graphite in thai van be formed and
realits division the construction ol ui like fabric and used
Radiation Debated
Continued from Page 1
Butrico said he was
asked to monitor other
nuclear tests later but
dec lined because oi his
exposure during an ear
K test "I had a great
respect foi radiation
and its effects he told
I x District Judge
Bi v lenkins, � ho is
heai ng the case
w ii houl a jur
i poi t testimony v as
en b Di loseph 1
I yon, a I ni ersits
I tah professor and
CtOI
t I
- coui I that I here was
as
rcent in leukemia
deaths among childi
five counties ah
the Utah Nead a
bordei that received
fallout from the tests.
1 von is the author ol
a landmark 1977 stud
on fallout a n d
childhood leukemia.
lso Monday , a
formei I S 1'uhlu
Heath Sen ice monitor
testified thai radiation
levels at Xt George
aftei a Ma 1953 test
were so high "thai the
noodle ol the instru
ment was of 1 t he
scale
Huh �. i' said Monday
thai ht alerted the
mayoi to the high
idings and thai a
: adio a i i mncemeni
was in � - udcnts
to take covei Bui dui
ing whal he estimated
to be the highest fallout
lime, school children
were outside at recess,
he said
'Radiation is a
k n ou n v a u so ol
leukemia. 1 on said.
and added that ii was
the only cause ol
leukemia that reseai
chers involved in the
study could identify in
southein I tah
concerned about the
populat ion as cars,
Butrico said
But, he said, health.
' I icials w et e won ied
about public reaction
to the tests it people
a ere told to bat he a
throw a way t h .
clothes, in addition to
being v ai nod to stay in
dooi s.
Butrico said he
showered as many
times as he could the
day ol the lest and was
told by supei iors
tin ow aw ay his clot lies
"In retrospeci
was good enouj
me, ii was good enou
foi the people ol
c ieorge he sa
Formei Into:
Secretary Slea ai
I dall, �h ai' oi ney foi
the
then families, asked
" WI
I

d t
foi ail plane skins.
"It is halt the weight
and three times as
strong and as siitt as
a I u m i n u m .
Stansbargei said in an
interview
He said the future
factory currently uses
1 I .imm) square feel ot a
525,000 square tool
plant "It is the stai t ol
i he automated factoi .
thai will ho Finished
tow aid the end ol the
decade he said.
When n is com
pleted, he said. "I will
walk in and a robot will
be running the fa
tO!
I he idea ot t he
i obol assembly line,
the futuristic factory
whoie machines do the
work, came about a
Stansbai gei sti uggled
with the problem ol
how to incorporate
non metallic matei ials
into airplane design.
he said -
stai ted in 19t

as wo I
knew tha
1990 mho frame
everything kepi going
the way it should
would see '
tl lie
also f( .
it v ould not piodu
t competitive
"I alwavs dreamed bv hand techniq i

ol an .i plane that �
ho percent graphite in
Abortion Controversy
Continues At ECU
With Students, Staff
said "We
in 1974 15 a
a mild be a new
lory, a factory
tuture
"1 suggt
industry it
plane
hniq
mod( rn can in
onlinued from Page I
tnted child, I would
sa terminate Rees
McKenna, who has

volsed map1
inseling decision
Kikono al
� up
personal and religious ports adoption �
obiections to abortion, alterna
said that he isn't allow He added lany ol
to let his personal ,n people wh
bias come between him repuls I
and his patient. He in- � thai iuld
I his patients have the child ms'
ol his personal feelinj ' ' killed
before he becomes m abori
Vs.
facility Ii
Internatioi .
Ii
;

tl
��
m
mm
STUD�N7 jNiOh
FAMILY LYE CARE
CONTACT LENSES
OfTOMTTUC
�CAEC�HT�a
'
I
y
? .s9
O s.
V2 f cP
. V
r
00
o

s
-gw
PEP RALLY for
ECU PIRATES
Thursday Night
8:00 p.m.
at Ficklen Stadium.
Be on hand to support
the Pirate & Pepsi Spirit for
what could he the liiggest Game
of the Year.
Drawings will be held for
lots of prizes which include:
FREE GIVEAWAY
T-Shirts � Umbrellas � Cases of Pepsi �
Coolers � all provided by Pepsi of Greenville
Scheduled to attend are:
The ECU Football Team
Coach Emory
ECU Band
ECU Cheerleaders
ATTENTION SENIO
VOTE

SENIOR CLASS
PRESIDENT
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 29

FAMOUS PIZZA
Fast Friendly Delivery
Delivers is I Rl I
758-5982 or 5616
Buy Any Large Pizza
Get 6pack or pitcher
of golden beverage
FREE
HAPPY HOUR � 7 Days a Week
2 P.M. until CLOSING
Pitcher $1.79 Mug35C
Wine 50C
Spicy Italian or Creek
Taco � $1.99
6Pks.
Busch � $2.49 Bud � $2.99





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 28. 1982
TVA Tests Incinerator
S ODD Y DAISY,
renn. (UP1) TVAwill
!r to become one of
;he nation's first
itihties to burn
adioactive trash pro-
duced at atomic power
plants een though tests
ol the incinerator still
are incomplete, of-
ficials sa
The agency's board
already has approved
spending $35 million to
build an incinerator
despite protests from
environmentalists who
feai the machine will
vollute the air vuth
adiation
I V spokesman Bill
Steverson said Monday
the agency plans to ap-
ply for a Nuclear
Regulatory Commis-
sion license within
several months to use
an incinerator at Se-
quoyah Nuclear Plant
now that approval has
been won to store the
low-level radioactive
garbage in thick, con-
crete containers.
Steerson said the
machine's complex
system of filters will
prevent release of
radiation above NRC
limits.
"Our calculations
show that if a person
sat at the plant boun-
dary for one whole
year, that person would
receive less than one
millirem of radiation in
that entire year
Steverson said.
"If you watch color
television like an
average American, you
are exposed to one
millirem a year he
said.
But Steverson said a
prototype of the in-
cinerator still is being
tested by its manufac-
turer. Aerojet Energv
Conversion Corp. of
Sacramento, Calif. He
said TVA has delayed
ordering the incinerator
built until the tests are
finished.
The used mops,
brooms, gloves and
other rash con-
taminated during nor
mal nuclear plant
operations would be
stored in four.
200-foot-long con-
tainers at Sequoyah un
til burned in the in-
cinerator, Steverson
said.
The NRC Friday
gave TVA the first
license ever for such a
storage container.
People who live near
TVA's Browns Ferry
Nuclear Plant at
Athens, Ala are
fighting use of the con-
tainers already built at
that facility because ot
fears the storage will
lead to construction of
an incinerator there.
Federal approval for
the containers at
Browns Ferry has been
delayed while the issue
is considered by NRC
boards. Environmen
talists said they failed
to meet the deadline to
file objections to use oi
the containers at Se-
quoyah.
Social Workers Set Meeting
O'M-ll 1 B PATRICK
�Muff nlrr
1
eighth annual
ence of t he
Carolina
ssociation of Black
Social V orkers will be
d at Greenville's
da Inn Friday
KM ! and Saturdav
Oct. :
"Black Survival in a
ite is the theme of
year's gathering.
'Basically, we as black
human-serv ices
workers are seeing this
as a time of crisis
said Ann Speight,
president of the eastern
- .onal Association
of Black Social
Workers. She is also
t coordinator oi the
. onference.
She noted that cut-
icks in social pro-
rams, unemployment
id denial of the poor's
asic needs are some of
he topics which will be
addressed.
Dr. Stanley Smith,
president of Shaw
University, will give the
keynote address. Other
speakers include
A m i nif u Richard
Harvey, consultant and
counselor for the Com-
mission for Racial
Justice in Washington,
DC; the Rev. Thomas
Walker, pastor of
Ebenezer Baptist
Church, Rocky Mount;
Bruce Bridges, history
and government in-
structor at St.
Augustine College; and
Dr. John McAdoo,
associate professor in
the University of
Maryland School of
Social Work.
We're talking
about basic everyday
survival needs said
Lauretta Lewis, ECU
Associate Professor in
the Department of
Social Work and Cor-
rections. Lewis, who is
also a member of the
Association of Black
Social Workers, said
the conference would
be dealing with contem-
porary issues that are
affecting black people
directly.
"I think our theme
depicts togethei ness
Speight said. "It is only
through unity that we
as black people will be
able to collectively
utilize our technical
skills to solve pro-
blems
Other topics to be
addressed include voter
registration, will
writing and probating
and cultural health
needs. A special session
titled "Farmers'
Resource Forum" will
discuss the more effi-
cient use ot farm land
owned by minorities.
"The conference will
look into the areas
where we. as human
service workers, can in-
tervene in the black
community to give
Election Candidates Set
B BUDDY CONNER
Malf Ytnirr
Tomorrow's student
government election
has drawn over 61 can-
didates runnng for 57
positions.
The election, for
which voting opens
tomorrow at 9 a.m. and
runs until 6 p.m has
43 students running for
25 day representatives
positions, 19 can-
didates running for 11
class officers and 31
hopefuls trying for 21
dorm representative
positions.
This total includes
approximately 15 can
didates, whose status as
legitimte candidates
was not clear at press
time. This was because
some candidates failed
to provide the election
committee with all the
required documents.
The list also includes
several cndidates who
are running for more
than one position.
More students ap
plied for the various
positions, but accor-
ding to Joy Wilkins,
election chairperson,
some candidates were
disqualified because
they didn't meet GPA
or other filing re-
quirements.
Only two positions
will have to be filled by
an SGA screening com-
mittee. These positions
� dorm representatives
for White and Jones
dorms � did not have
anyone file for them.
Only a few students
are running unoppos-
ed.
Wilkens expects bet-
ter voter participation
this vear than last
year's election turnout.
Last vear onlv 89
students voted in the
tall election. The lowe
turnout was at th
Allied Health Buildiru
where only 17 vote
were cast. Cotten dorr
also had only 21 vote-
cast. The highest vote'
turnout was at the Stu
dent Supply Store.
This year, there will
be 20 polling places
These include all th
dorms, the Croatar
the Student StuppL
Store, Mendenhall, th.
Allied Health Buldine
and the bottom of
lege hill.
:oi
some assistance
Speight said.
The conference is
open to members of the
association, poten-
tional members of the
association and other
human-services
workers. Students of
Social Work,
Sociology, and allied
disciplines are also
welcome.
"It would be to the
benefit of our students,
who are interested in
basic humanitarian
issues, to participate in
this (conference) and
similar activities
Lewis said.
"We encourage
students and human-
services workers to at-
tend the workshops, to
become involved in the
conference and to come
together; uniting to be
of service to the black
community, not only
collectively, but as an
individual Speight
added.
VOTE
PHIL ALEXANDER
RICH BELCHER
MICHAEL RABON
MARSHAL TUCKER
SGA DAY REPRESENTATIVE
"They Care How Your Money
is Spent
VOTE
JIM
HENDERSON
Jr. Class Pres.
Wed Sept. 29,1982
P
P
K
T
Z
Wednesday
"Original Ladies' Lockout'
Thursday � Appearing �
The Original Drifters
Happy Hour � 7:30-9:00
Friday
The Best In Dance
Open 8:30
Saturday
Beach Night
with John Moore
Sunday
Lambda Chi Pony Night
For Members & Their Guests Only
NUTRI-SYSTEM � PROYEN EFFECTIVE
FOR ECU STUDENTS & STAFF
LILLIAN FLYTHE OF
GOLDSBORO SAYS:
TVE
ALREADY
LOST 45 LBS.
WITH
NUTRI
SYSTEM
"I came to Nutri System because I bad
tried EVERYTHING else I really needed
to learn how to KEEP THE WEIGHT OFF
and 1 felt that the Nutri'System program
could do that.
I love everything about the program. It's
really easy to follow and I don't have to
worry about counting calories or preparing
food I don't have to think about food
The behavior education program is
retraining my thinking about food.
LILLIAN FLYTHE OF
GOLDSBORO LOST
45 LBS. ON THE
NUTRISYSTEM PRO-
GRAM!
Mon -Fri.
9tol
3to7
CALL TODAY AND SEE
what NUTRISYSTEM
CAN DO FOR YOU!
FREE - NO OBLIGATION CONSULTATION)
SAVE 50
Af.5 ass Meo-cai Canton .se� aoo wf h
�auci SOS 'rom ycur cmjrjn 0�er valid tor .
n� � Of� - � Cr person Ex
piresOc' 12 tK
nutri system
201 Arlington Blvd.
Greenville
Call
3552470
Over 500 Centers Nationwide
EBB nutrisystcm
weight loss medical centers
f
i





rut EASTCAROl IN1AN
Entertainment
sppijmhik � P
Tokyo String
Quartet Play
Hendrix Soon
Tokyo String Quartet: Peter Qundjian (violin), Kikuei Ikeda (violin), Kazuhide Isomura (viola) and Sadao Harada (cello).
The Tokyo String Quartet. having
performed all over the world for the
last twelve years, will at last be per-
forming on campus on Mondav.
October 4 in Mendenhall Student
Center's Hendrix Theatre at 8 p.m.
This ensemble burst in on the
music world in 1970 when thev won
first prize at the Coleman String
Quartet Competition, a Young Con-
cert Artists Award, and first prize in
the 1970 Chamber Music Competi
tion in Munich. Since that time thev
have toured North America. Europe
and the Far East many times over,
usually including more than 100
concerts per season.
The growing catalogue- of recor-
dings enhances their fame around
the globe, and they have awards and
Grammy nominations for several ot
their recordings.
Since 1974, the Quartet has per-
formed during the summer and
presented master classes for Vale
University, and in 19 were ap
pointed resident quartet of the
university. Thev are aho the reM
dent quartet at American Lniversi
The Tokyo string Quartet per-
forms on four great matched
Amatis which have been graciouslv
loaned them bv the Corcoran
C.allerv in Washington D.C I
strument- were created h the
Italian luthier. Nicok) Amati. bet-
ween 16 and 1677
The program tor the pertormance
includes Mozart's Qua B-riat
major, K 458 x-
Quartet No 8, Opus 110 and
Schubert Quartet No 14 in D
minor. Opus Po-th
Tickets are on - he
Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall. Monday-Friday, 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Ticket
$2.50 tor EC I Students and $1 I
tor ECl faculty anc
genera! public I - kets -old at the
door will be I
The pertormanv.
-ored bv the '82 MSC V
Sene-
Coming t( Hendri � I heatr
Octobei 21 i- tht f rm
-oprano Joan Morris a -ni
William Bolcom. (The two are tx .
brought to campus
arrant- I Sha�
Bolcom and Mori
peared in a numbei ' and
recital
albunv aim
� � � f their si vie
Children Come Of Age On Network Television
BySALLi BEDELL
Sew �rk I inifv News vn k t
NEW YORK � Edward Stratton 111 is 35, wealthy,
dim-witted, naive and hopelessly immature. He spends
his days playing video games in his private arcade and
riding around his mansion atop an oversized toy train.
Ricky, his 12-year-old son, is a bright and
sophisticated computer whiz, as responsible as dad is
feckless. When Ricky tries to engage his father in a
serious discussion, Edward Hops to his knees to
demonstrate his favorite game. Swamp Wars. Asked by
Ricky if the computer controlling their household
gadgets had a "random access memory Edward is the
picture of slack-jawed bewilderment.
Ricky and Edward belong to Silver Spoons, a new
situation comedy on NBC that presents a striking exam-
ple of television's view of contemporary childhood. On
television today, the children are usually the grown-ups,
and the adults often seem more like children.
Of 24 new series tumbling into prime time this fall,
nine revolve around children or incorporate juvenile
roles into their weekly lots. Most of these youthful
characters conform to the image of what sociologists
call the "adultified child epitomized by Gary Col-
eman's wisecracking Arnold on NBC's Diffrent
Strokes.
Such characters transcend the winsome precocity of
the Shirley Temple variety; the children in prime time
tend to be miniature adults, possessing the tastes,
mores, sensibility, knowledge and even cynicism that
until recent years were the exclusive province of maturi-
ty-
Their portrayal is probably exaggerated, and to some
eyes it may represent mere innocent fun. But the televis-
ed view of children may also have more troubling im-
plications. Television not only reflects currents of
popular culture; it also has the power to impose values.
Just as the images of the Nelson children on The
Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet in the 1950s and '60s
represented one vision of childhood, so today's por-
trayals set up a new televised ideal that filters into the
way we regard children not to mention adults.
In today's ideal, children are freighted with the same
range of problems and preoccupations as their elders.
Role models have been torn down, and authority has
become ambiguous- in a world where everyone, despite
age, is on an equal footing. �'What is being offered on
television as a model and legitimate notion of childhood
is an adult trapped in a child's body says Rose
Goldsen, professor of sociology at Cornell University in
Ithaca, N.V.
The most obvious melding of juvenile and adult
behavior can be caught in the television child's ar-
ticulate expression of pop psychology and social trends.
In NBC's new series Family Ties, daughter Jenniter, 9.
explains her frequent summons to the telephone by say-
ing, "It's probably Chrissie again. She's going through
a personal crisis
On Square Pegs, a new - med BS,
the lunchroom percolates with trendv ren i � ike "1
think it's o unfair that guys d g� eilulitc
Beyond shared perspecti eandlanj
dav video children seem supei i i often
elder An NBC pubhcitv release make- the cas
Silver Spoons crystal dear: "Rick) helps Edwa
an adult and Edward teaches his -on the pleasure- of
childhood Rickv also has considerable - s, which
demonstrates when he deftlv shift- to traditional little
boy chatter ("I bet you make a billion zillion dollars")
to disarm the accountant he knows en monev
from his lather.
In Star of the Family, a new corned) on ABc a
talented 16-vear-old girl tries to make a career a- a
singer despite'the clumsv efforts ot her father, a
fireman, to shelter her from the horrors ol si �
business. She is tolerant of hi- foolishness up to a point.
See 1 Kll)s. Paye 10
The Old Country
German Films On The Mark
B MICH 4hi S. BITX.V
SUM Wnler
Tomorrow evening in Mendenhall Student Center's
Hendrix Theatre, the Student Union Films Committee
will present two films trom Germany, Werner Herzog's
Stroszek and the late Rainer Werner Fassbinder's
Marleen.
Stroszek will begin at 7 p.m. and I Hi Marleen at 9
p.m. Admission is by ID and activity card for students
and MSC membership for faculty and staff.
With Stroszek, Herog, the current wunderkind of
Cierman cinema, tells the tale of Bruno Stroszek, who,
after getting out of jail, meets two other people with the
same lot in life as himself � namely, a bad one. Eva, a
hooker, is frightened of her boyfriend, who likes
beating her to a pulp and other sorts of sadistic things.
Along with Eva, Herr Scheitz joins Stroszek as they
make their way for the land of opportunity, the United
States of America.
The three of them take up residence on the farm of
Herr Scheitz' nephew in a mobile home. And things go
well, for a little while. But then Stroszek falls behind on
the installment payments, and turns back to his old life.
He and Herr Scheitz rob a bank, and Scheitz gets caught
within minutes. Eva takes off to Vancouver with a
trucker, leaving us with only the original character,
Stroszek.
And of all places in the world, where does Stroszek
hail from? You guessed it. North Carolina. But that is
all 1 will reveal. Though I will tell you that the ending
may be the most bizarre footage you will ever see in
your life. (No, come to think of it. Pink Flamingos was
probably the most bizarre footage one could ever see;
but this is up there.
Herzog sees America as a land of plastic smiles and
false optimism. (Which doesn't hold a candle to Lili
Marleen). I, however, being an American, take offense
to this. I will not deny that America is the land of
Ronald McDonald and 3-D television. But why is it that
European directors expect so much from us, are disillu-
sioned, and then pick on us for it? I mean, I'm sorry
that we're not as perfect as they'd like us to be, but ob-
viously they're not living in any perfect society to begin
with, if they're looking elsewhere. Heavy stuff, huh?
If you want to talk about illusory society than Lili
Marleen is the movie for you. This film, directed by the
late Rainer Werner Fassbinder, the past wunderbar of
New German Cinema, is based upon fact.
Lale Anderson, one of seven chorus girls in a caberet,
records a song entitled "Lili Marleen and becomes the
darling of the Third Reich. This became "the" wartime
song in Germany, and it was so popular, the British
wrote their own version of the song, entitled "My Lili of
the Lamplight which is no small accomplishment,
considering the, rightfully so, utter distaste for Germans
that the British had at the time.
Anderson is played by Hanna Schygulla, whom you
may remember from The Marriage of Maria Braun. She
has become the best-known of current German actresses
getting exposure in the United States. This is one of her
better roles, though Maria Braun probably still stands
as her best.
The story tells how Anderson becomes a film and
singing star and lives in the Nazi dream. In one scene,
she masturbates under a large mirror in her opulant
bedroom. However, while the lie of German society
goes on, realism creeps in. Scenes of Lale look almost as
if plucked from a Doris Day movie and mixed in with
images of the Russian front.
The reality is that the thousand-year-reich is crumbl-
ing and Nazi high society refuses to believe it until it is
too late. Everyone is so caught up in their social whirl,
most of all Lale, that they don't know what to do when
it becomes impossible to carry on anyomore. The rich
are accustomed to being rich. That is why the scenes of
German soldiers freezing and dying on the eastern front
are so powerful.
Both of these are worthwhile films if one wants to get
an insight into the mind of the New German Director.
Germans have been pivotal to Film since its inception,
from F.W. Murnau right down to Fassbinder and Her-
zog. There actually was a day when Hollywood didn't
rule the film world, and Russian and German directors
were much better than 98 of their American counter-
parts.
The First important science Fiction in Film was in
Metropolis, directed by Fritz Lang. He also made one of
the first movies with a believably psychotic character,
M, starring Peter Lorre. (Yes, that Peter Lorre).
Murnau himself was a master of horror movies, mak-
ing The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, still regarded by some
as the most frightening movie ever made, and the classic
Nosferatu, the first Dracula movie.
So, as you can see, the Germans have a large stake in
film. And I think both these Films, by and large, live up
to that claim. Fassbinder and Herzog may not be Mur-
nau and Lang, but they're better than most of the direc-
tors we've got.
Herzog Paired With Late, Great Fassbinder For Twin-Bill
Above, Bruno S Eva Mattes and Clemens Scheitz in a scene from Werner Herzog's modern-day classic,
Stroszek. The film will be shown on campus in the Hendrix Theatre this Wednesday at 7 p.m. as the First half of
a German Cinema Double Feature. At 9 p.m the late Rainer Werner Fassbinder's I Hi Marleen will complete
the twin-bill. This Thursday, Friday and Saturday night, the Student Cnion Films Committee will screen George
Lucas' lucrative Star Wars, also in Hendrix Theatre. The rest of the local movie scene offers old as well as new-
Plaza Cinema (756-0088) � Star Trek II The Wrath of Khan, The World According to Carp, Inchon; Buccaneer
Movies (756-3307) � The Tempest, An Officer and a Gentleman, Satan's Mistress; Plitt Entertainment Center
(756-1449) � Beast Master, E. T Pink Floyd the Hall, Amityville II; Park Theatre (752-7649) � Quest for Fire;
264 Playhouse (756-0848) � Seka's Fantasies.
!)i
H

Sol
' I
I
� I
-I
to
II
I
1
Snl





THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 28. 1982
I
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advert.sed -terns -s requ.red to be -ead.iy ava.iable tor sate at or
bltow the advert.sed pnce xi each A&P Store except as spec.t.caily noted
m this ad
DD.rcc peepTTIVE THRU SAT , OCT. 2, AT A&P IN GREENVILLE
�T?MS OFFERED"orIJlENOTAVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
703 Greenville Blvd.
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville N. C.
D
Arista Recording Artists The Dregs Performing At Attic Sunday Night
Dres. vill perform one slum onl this Sunda oening at nUIiis- Hr turtner imormam
(KmnioHn (.reemille's Attic nightclub. The five-man unii 752-7303.
Who Groveling For Bucks
s�

B DAVE MARSH
"Put Your Producl
on Tour read the
lull-page achertisement
in a recent issue of
Jertising Age, the
Madison Avenue trade
magazine. "The Who
lour of America it
-aid just below. The
rest of the page con-
tained the pitch:
'�Who: The hottest,
most celebrated Rock
"n" Roll band in the
world. What: A
precedent-setting, high-
profile corporate spon-
sorship. W h e n:
hall Winter. 1982.
Where: The Top U.S.
Markets: Nev. York,
I os Angeles. Chicago
and many more impor-
tant A.D.I, 's. Why:
Capture the Young
Adult Market! Spon-
sorship ot the 1982 Who
Tour of America will
generate positive brand
image and product
loyalty which means
high volume and high
profits! You'll reach
tens of millions in a
specially produced
media campaign. An
unparalleled cross mer-
chandising opportuni-
ty And it concludes
with How: the name
and address of some
marketing clown in St.
Louis.
Well, I ask youIt
was one thing when
Rod Stewart, and then
the Rolling Stones,
decided to cash in on
greedy corporations by
performing beneath
their logos. Neither the
Stones nor Stewart has
ever been anything bu
frankly shameless, in
the first place, and it is
hard for me, at least, to
imagine that anyone
continues to invest very
much idealism in them.
The Who, however,
is the band which cares
See GOING, Page 10
ITALIAN N1TE
LASAGNA
AND
ISPAGHETTII
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
Plus Garlic Bread �Q9
EVERY WEDS.
PHONEYS
432 Greenville Blvd.
IZQjTi
LACOSTE V3
PHI KAPPA
TAU
Little
Sister Rush
Tues. & Wed.
Sept. 28 & 29
9:00-until
409 Elizabeth St.
Phone 752-4379
irt
sj
V
-�
Nft?

-mu
n-day classic,
le first half of
will complete
screen deorge
is ell as no:
�pn; Buccaneer
inmeni C enter
'Juest for Fire;
i-A
THE CHOICE OF CHAMPIONS
�-4OIV
Some men h� a �yl. � � own � J"
that, wny th�y choose lod L-coit. It � a
comb.n.t.00 of quahty. �vl� �"�� �ault.�s d�.gn
Llke ,tm class.c Orion' acryl.c pullover .weater
�nth nbbed V neck, wa.stband anH cuffs In color,
w,th nooea v � $nirt$ ,ack, ,nd other ,port,wear
)�lo7llZIS, -oner, S. � L XL. .00.00
GORDON FULP PRO SHOP
Located at the Greenville
Country Club-750504
All Hod Sw�.t� Short St Sh,rt�
Stve23S.X 40-50 OK
� ' We will sell f
no wine before
our time9 j
But after five .
You can have all
the Paul Masson Chablis &
Our All You Can Eat
Buffet for only
On
Thursday, Sept. 23
"The Four Seasons"
Restaurant &
Lounge
301 Evans St. Mall 752 5476
(Corner of 3rd St. and Evans Mall)
i 7 IT a? Urn 4m
t�m

i
PfcMeat Specials X&
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED
BOX-O-CHICKEN LB. 440
Whole
Fryers
2 in a bag
Limit 2
Bags
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN
GRAIN FED BEEF
Boneless Roast
Customer's Choice � Shoulder
�Sirloin Tip �Chuck
A&P
WESTERN
Sirloi
9121b.
avg. ,b
1
68
QUALITY HEAVY f JAMESTOWN
ERN GRAIN FED BEEF 1 �� J ��
whole beef Sliced Bacon
irloin Tid LU-T'i -icn
A&P QUALITY FRESHLY
TALMADGE FARMS
Ground Chuck I IChicken Franks
168 j ags 5Q0
3 lbs. or
more
WE'VE GONE
EfARVT
' CALIFORNIA RED TOKAY-BLACK EXOTIC-THOMPSON
Last Years QQc
Price lb
Seedless
Grapes
lb.
49
LOCALLY GROWN SOLID
LIBBY
Banana Frost
Drink Mix
S� 59e "�
290
GOLDEN YELLOW RIPE
Dole Bananas I Crisp Cabbage
00
lbs.
only
1
P&Q BRAND
Soft Drinks
v Savings y
A&P QUALITY
Cola � Orange
Ginger Ale 2 Itr.
plastic
bottle
79
Paper Towels
mm roiis I
ALL NATURAL
r�:
Breyer's
CANADIAN BACON � PEPPERONI �
HAMBURGER � SAUSAGE � COMBINATION
Totino's Pizza
I
I
I
l
I
I
l
AP
LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON AND 7.50 ORDER
683
GOODTHRU SAT OCT. 2. AT AAP IN GREENVILLE bOJ J
SUPER SAVER COUPON
SUNSHINE
� Krispy
KR,spY Crackers
16 OZ
pkg.
I
I I MMfc LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON AND 7.50 ORDER
I fJkJm GOOD THRU SAT OCT. 2, AT A&P IN GREENVILLE
39
�I
I
I
I
I
I
I
684 I
0
SUPER SAVER COUPON
T
I
I
I
I
I
LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON AND 7.50 ORDER 6g5 J
GOODTHRU SATOCT. 2, AT A�P IN GREENVILLE �.�,�-� J
A&PFROZEN
Orange
Juice
12 OZ.
can
48
0
t





10
HI EAST RO! IMN st I'll MBER28, L982
ioing Out Of Business
The Who Organize Clearance Sale
TV Kids Grow Up
porate sponsorship of
superstar rock tours is
that no one has been
savvy enough to ra-
tionalize that this sort
of deal is necessary to
keep the cost of admis-
sion from soaring even
tut her. Consider this in
light ot �hat rock tans
have been asked (and
are willing) to believe
about tour economics.
1 mean, it S13 is a
reasonble price for a tee
shirt, then the sky's the
hnut tor the ticket that
gels you into the
building where the tee
shut is sold, right?
In the end, it cor
porations are going to
t hiow around t h e
stockholders eash on
ads convincng people
to buy things they don't
want or need, 1 would
tust as soon have them
spend it on rock hands
as on network televi-
sion. (Magazine adver-
tising is another issue,
with which 1 will not
screw around, at least
in these precincts,
thank you )
lt especially hard to
begrudge such intu-
Panasonic
Bicycles!
Road Racing
Equipment �
Tubular Tires,
Rims, Freewheels,
Etc.
Kip Sloan � 756-0246, 8-5,
757 1680 after 6
Continued From Page 8
more about its tans
than even their own
parents, according to
Pete Iownshend. Per-
sonally . 1 believe this to
be true. I know for a
fact that it Son) or
some other company ot
sufficient ie were to
otter mv fathei two or
three hundred thou-
sand dollars with the
single stipulation that
once he grabbed it. mv
rent would rise, that I
would soon be writing
larger checks on the
first of the month. 1 wo
to three hundred thou
sand dollars a man is
about how much the
W ho can expect to pull
down, it they can find a
s p on so r for their
American junket
(which is probably an-
nounced for the first
time in this dd).
But what about the
ticket prices' The mosl
amazing aspect ot the
phenomenom oi coi
sions of cash to a band
that is, according to
Townshend's recent in-
terviews, absolutely,
positively. without a
doubt, unquestionably,
probablv making its
last tour of the United
States, maybe.
Now 1 know what
you're thinking: Mick
Jagger wasn't going to
be singing
"Satisfaction" when he
was 40, and David
Bowie has said "Nevet
again" more times than
B'nai B'nth. And 1
know how revocable
rock breakups are:
Wouldn't surprise me a
bit to find a press
release announcing the
Cream Blind I aith reu-
nion tour in tomor-
iow mail.
1 tie W ho have a long
history ot breakups �
Roger Dal trey was first
tired in 1965, and so far
as I have been able to
determine in a year ol
researching the history
of the group tor a book
I'm writing, they have
spin on at least a bian-
nual basis ever since.
Still. Pete iownshend
is one of the most
honorable guys 1 know,
and if he says this is
their last go 'round,
why it is. Unless he
changes his mind, or
was misquoted, or
forgot, or gets
threatened by John
1- n t w is11 e, or
something.
At least, with his ex-
tra million dollars, the
Who won't have to
play together again
because they're broke.
And 1 think this is ter-
ribly important.
Because when you get
right down to it, there's
something a little
disconcerting about
rock bands performing
in front of banners
advertising Musk oil or
cassettes. And it the
sponsor turned out to
be from a company like
Nestles, which likes to
help third world babies
starve while feeding
American kids candv
bars, or a cigarette
company, when the
Who have a 16ad singer
who is a strident anti-
smoker and are pro-
bablv the only band
who ever did a song at-
tacking the habit, the
results could be
downright embarrass-
ing (unless they work
the logo into their laser
display, and pass it off
as art).
It's also interesting
to contemplate just
who might be an ap-
propriate sponsor for
this particular band.
How about Everlast,
the boxing glove
manufacturer? Remy
Martin � they could
really drink to that. A
hearing aid manufac-
turer might be nice, or
a company specializing
in telephoto lenses, for
those who don't get
good seats. Or maybe
the group should recy-
cle Tommy and sell
themselves as an opera,
letting Texaco pick
them up as it has the
Metropolitan Opera
telecasts for decades. It
is hard to imagine how
else we can introduce
dignity into the spon-
sorship of those bands
who need it least, but
not even Odorono can
disguise naked greed.
Continued From Page 8
but then, according to
ABC, "her own life
and goals take over,
and she becomes impa-
tient with his rigid, old-
fashioned ways
Family Ties makes
the same points by pit-
ting two parents who
are liberals from the
'60s generation against
their three conservative
children. The father is
uneasy in his role. He
reacts emotionally to
problems and confides
his insecurities to his
son, Alex. In a twist on
the old Father Knows
Best routine, it is Alex
who initiates a heart-
to-heart talk after his
father has embarrassed
him.
"1 know there are
other fathers who are
more in control, more
reserved, more adult
the lather says, "but
none who love their
sons more than I love
you Alex, the
paragon of reason and
forgiveness, then
delivers the sort of
homily once reserved
for Robert Young, urg-
ing his lather to
understand that they
are two different peo-
ple. "Do you think this
will happen again?"
Alex asks. "We're
both getting older his
father replies. "One of
us is bound to grow up
sooner or later
Such blurring of the
traditional lines bet-
ween adults and
children is quite
deliberate. Paul Junger
Witt, one of the writers
of ABC's new tamilv
comedy series It Takes
Two, says, "There is
an enormous disservice
to children who are im-
pressionable to see a
father who has all the
answers When peo-
ple had a steady diet of
Father Knows llest and
Leave It to Heaver,
Witt says, "I wonder
how many people came
away from those shows
thinking their parents
had failed them. The
Cleavers (on Reaver)
always managed to
connect
The father in his
show, Witt says, is
"bright, sophisticated
and worldly, yet very
often he won't have a
satisfactory answer He
can be wrong. He can
be a source of the pro-
blem. The duality ot
father and friend can
become contusing and
painful. We want to
plav with that
Along with a new
measure of authority,
television's children are
now enmeshed in every
conceivable adult pro-
blem � from sex,
alcohol and drugs to
concerns about the en-
vironment and nuclear
war. Films made for
television have been
especially graphic, with
portrayals of teen
prostitution Off the
Minnesota Strip), child
pornography it alien
Angel) and drug abuse
( Angel Dusted) among
the most popular in
cent vears This sea
vAill bring several mi
including C hildren
the "Mght. ab
teenage prostitutes.
-BC and �here art
thildren? n BS,
about b ici
sales ot children I
adoption.
Children on e �
series also have tl
,hare ot adult �
complications. NBC
Fame this tall will tn
the subject ot I
suicide in one c
lew it an.
subjects were
aginable 15 oi I
ago, when the i
prime-time chile
were the Neb i '
and Beavei I -
r
CLEAR VUE OPTICIANS COUPON
1
S
(This coupon must
accompany order
12
Off Complete
Eye Glasses With Expires
This Coupon
Lowest TV Rental
Prices In Town!
TELE.RENTTV
1 Phone: 758-9102
2905 East 10th Street in Greenville
Day Students
Vote
Lyn
Jackson
SGA Day
Representative
i
25 OFF
for ECU students on
prescription glasses.
Bring m ad & student ID
30
DISCOUNT ON
B&LRAYBAN
SUNGLASSES
(WITH G '5 LENSES
fcfl
C-LLUSPOB-NE-t
Ei si" JS �- EDOCOl.
VUE
OF voR CHOICE
ptTcians SS
V.
315 PARK VIEW COMMONS
ACROSS FROM DOCTORS PARK
75:
OPEN SAW V
MONOAi tfiu FRIDAY
f
Pizza i nn
Greenville's Best Pizzas Are
Now Being Delivered!
Most delivery pizzas lack in
true quality and have 'hidden'
deliver) costs in the price �
I has changed all that!
We sell our delivery
pizzas at Menu Prices!
No Surcharge. We also
gie FREE Drinks with
our large ?nd giant
pizzas. TRY IS TODAY! 1
i DELTA
9IOMA
PHI
PRFSEFsTT
FREE DELIVERY � ECU DORMS cV HOSPITAL
FOR TAKE OUT CALL: 757-1701
TUtS. SEPT 26
SOO-Z-OO ADM.1.00
:b-cJ266
Greenville Blvd
f
I�pbzf475
fc �� 150.52
yJ 25.54
-Tb TfcK MOOSE � FAMOUS PIZZA -MARaTUoM
� SUB STATiofJ IT � RECORD BAR -RiOCS GufTAR SUCP
-JErfSEY BEEfc4VltUE-Pu)E Moon CAFE -SUBWAY
W�
Eating House
All you can eat �
Spaghetti & Meatsauce
7 days a week
SunWed 11 a.m11 p.m.
Thurs.Sat. 11 a.m2 a.m.
SKPT.27th-OCT.4th
507 E. 14th Street
.cocccococcoccco&oocoococccocooooocoeocg
OOSOOOCCK
y
Monday, Tuesday,
and Wednesday
Ocean Perch Nuggets
$1.99
Crab Cakes
� ������� i 9 I mMM
Hamburger Steak
$2.99
Beef Tips$2.99
French Fries or Baked Potato, Tossed Salad
may be substituted for Slaw35t extra
The Student Athletic Board is currently involved in a membership drive
(Sept 20 Oct. 1) Someone will be contacting your dorm, sorority or
fraternity soon with more information. If you should miss this, then there
is a meeting of the entire SAB scheduled for Sept. 29 at 7:00 in room 244 of
Mendenhall Student Center. For more information call Pam Holt, Ass't.
Athletic Director, 757 6417.
Become a part of the total athletic picture. Join the SAB and be an ECU
Athletic supporter!
Take Out
steaks
Monday 96S
4Vi ox. Sirloin A
Tuesday $985
5 ox. Beef Tips A
Wednesday nbb
8 ox. Chopped Steak �
Thursday $"349
7Vi ox. Sirloin �
Friday $A65
8 ox. Rib Eye �
Saturday A5
6 ox. NT Strip H
Sunday $999
5 ox. Beef Tips A
plus
30 Item Salad Bar
315 SUntonburg Road 7 58 "4600
!iix
Hn j
E
I
rree
P
-
p .
W 1
.
T!
e I
.
.iirnl
game:
I
Ed
the N
the u
beer,
nee
been
j
demal
teleij
ba I
lengt
athlel
troubl
plaq
v. her.l
that'
t
J

1





Hid
1 alien
ibUSC

,
"x. 3k. ac �
i �- ����� i
THfc fcASTC AROl INIAN
Sports
St I'l t MHl R 28, 19
Pag� 1 1
Six Points In Two Games 9
Pirate Defense Stops Chippewas
By CINDY PLEAS ANTS
sporls ttfiloi
ECU football coach Ed Emory
said he wanted to show Central
Michigan a little southern hospitali-
tv but the Pirates were less than
hospitable toward the Chippewas
Saturday night.
The Pirates proved why their of-
fensive and defensive teams are na-
tionally ranked, using both convinc-
ingly to romp the Chippewas, 24-6.
ECU's eighth division! ranked
defense contained the feisty Chip-
pewas all night, making Novo Bo-
urne's 25-and 27-yard field goals
the onlv points scored by CMU.
Once again displaying the effec-
tiveness of their new aerial attack,
1 Cl "s sixteenth-ranked offense
'allied up 357 total yards, rushed for
197 and passed for a 160-yard total.
"This is a great win for us
Emory said following the game.
"This is the first time since I've been
here that we've been 2-1 going into
our third game
The head coach said the win did
not come as easily as the scoreboard
indicated and added that he has the
highest regards for the Chippewa
team "You will not find a better-
coached team than Central
Michigan Emory said. "They did
not make the win an easy one for
us
ECU lineback Ron Reid and
defensive tackle Barry Smith would
also agree. Smith was escorted out
of the game with a bruised knee
while Reid, who finished second in
total tackles with 14, suffered a knee
sprain.
Leading 10-3 at halftime, the
Pirates came out of the locker room
more determined than ever in the
third quarter.
Holding the Chippewas to the
31-yard line, Bojovic's 47-yard tield
foal attempt was no good. A few ex-
changes later, a Kevin Ingram pass
was intercepted in the endone by
CMU's Jim Bowman. But a few in-
complete passes by Chippewa Bob
DeMarco put CMU in a fourth and
eight situation. CMU punter Doug
Roberts then kicked out of bounds
at the Chippewa's 22-yard line for a
10-yard punt. Taking advantage of
the field position, Ingram cut
throught the middle to score a TD.
A Jeff Heath kick upped the
Pirates' lead to 17-3 with 3:58 left in
the third quarter.
Just into the fourth quarter, a
DeMarco pass bounced off of
Calvin Adams and into the hands of
Ron Reid. But the Pirates were
unable to gain yardage and Jeff
Boleh kicked a 37-yard punt, plac-
ing CMU on the 39-yard line. After
five first downs and in a fourth and
goal situation, Bojovic's field goal
gave the Chippewas three points.
Now 17-6, the Pirates weren't quite
finished yet.
With four vards to go for a first
down, strong safety Clint Harris in-
tercepted DeMarco's pass at the
23-yard line and returned for a
77-yard touchdown. "1 think that
put the icing on the cake said
Emory about Harris's interception.
"He's a quick, outstanding safety
and I'm glad he had a good game
Harris, however, wasn't keeping
track of the amount of yards he ran.
"Was it that far? I really wasn't
paying attention. I just ran he
said with a chuckle.
According to Harris, getting in on
the big plays against Central
Michigan enabled him to have his
best performance of the season so
far.
Along with Harris's play, Emory
was pleased with the entire defensive
team. "I thank God for our
defense he said. "We bent some
but we didn't break. We were very
aggressive
In the first half, the Chippewas
were unable to stop the throwing
arm of Greg Stewart and the
quickness of ECU's freshman stan-
dout Tony Baker, Ernest Byner and
Carlton Nelson. Baker rushed for
38 yards in the first two quarters
and Nelson picked up 26 yards in
pass receiving.
Stewart completed six of nine at-
tempts for a total of 99 yards pass-
ing to move into fifth place in career
passing completions with 77 and in-
to sixth place in career passing yar-
dage with 966 vards during the first
half.
The Chippewas scored the first
points of the game when Bojovic
kicked a 27-yard field goal. Five
miniutes later, Stewart threw a
seven-yard pass to Byner for a TD.
Heath's kick put the Pirates ahead,
7-3.
In the second quarter, a Stewart
pass was intercepted bv CMU's
Mike Keneally at the 48-vard line,
who then returned 22-yards. The
Chippewas wound up with a fourth
down with two yards to go. Faking a
22-yard field goal attempt, CMU's
Paul Fate dished off to Jim Burnor
but there was no gain on the play.
When asked it he had read CMU's
intentions, Emory said he told the
defensive line to be ready for a take
play.
In the final minutes ot the tirst
half, P.J. Jordan intercepted a
DeMarco pass at the 37-yard line
and returned for an eight-yard gain,
giving ECU possession on CMC's
29-yard line. Only two yards short
of a fourth down. Heath kicked a
21-yard field goal to boost the
Pirates' lead, 10-3.
Ingram, who quarterbacked dur-
ing most ot the second half, was
named winner of the R.W. Moore
"King of the Gridiron Award In-
gram rushed tor a gain of 65 yards,
scored one touchdown and com-
pleted three of eight passing at-
tempts "He's (Ingram) got feet
quicker than anvbodv I've ever
coached Emorv said.
Stewart called the signals during
the first half, but Emorv said that
switching to Ingram in the third
quarter was just part ot the Pirates'
offensive strategy. "On offense,
they were going for the perimeter,
so we thought it would be better to
put Ingram in
Emorv said the defense siuit the
Chippewa's offense down well, but
he was disappointed that the Pirates
were not smoother on offense. "W e
had too manv penalties and a few
interceptions he said. "We uist
need to iron some ol that stuff
out In all, the Puates had seven
penalties for a 97-vard loss.
Kevin Banks led ECU's defense
with a total of 15 tackles. Reid
followed close behind with 13 and
all-America candidate Jodv Schul
placed third with 11.
ECU's next opponent will be
Missouri, which will be the tirst time
the Pirates have ever plaved a team
Pfeolo H.
in the Big Eight conference. I h
Bucs will leave on 1 ridav. (ci 2 tor
Colombia. Mo and will pla.
2:30 p.m on Saturdav
� ��
i entral Mu hiin
-
I
Mi fttftn
II'ii
Intlt. M)u�t S�
Ku.htnt
�-
"�-
PasHagvM -
:�
Rrcn� miM-
� S. �j. .
- s.�
CMU Coach Injured
Free safety Clint Harris (above right) returns game-breaking interception,
(above) lowers the boom on CMC quarterback Bob Demarco.
All-America candidate Jody Schulz
Pfcolo By (,K PATTF.RSON
Players Have Right To Strike
"It's a union thing but I'm not
going to say I'm against it That's
a hat ECU's former defensive tackle
Tootie Robbins had to say about the
present strike being held by the NFL
Players Association(NFLPA).
Robbins, who began his profes-
sional career with the St. Louis Car-
dinals this year, was starting for the
pro team when his rookie season
was cut short. "I sure wish I could
be playing next Sunday against the
Washington Redskins he said
disappointingly.
But Robbins isn't the only disap-
pointed NFL player. The strike,
now in its second week, has left hun-
dreds of athletes with nothing better
to do than play a game of tag foot-
ball in a desolate stadium on a Sun-
day afternoon.
The NFLPA, which has been in
existence for 25 years, held its first
strike in 1974 when they struck
training camps and exhibition
games. But the players aren't setting
up picket lines this time.
Ed Garvey, executive director of
the NFLPA, and eight players from
the union executive committee have
been meeting with NFL owners to
negotiate. But the results have only
been negative thus far.
Just what are the players
demands? The players want half of
television revenues and a wage-scale
based on performance and the
length of service in the NFL by a pro
athlete.
Most of the public is having
trouble understanding just how a
player can ask for more money
when he's already earning a salary
that's in the double digit figures.
The answer is simple.Athletics are
a BIG business. For example, in the
next five years television revenues
will gross 3.3 billion dollars. Ticket
sales will bring in another billion
dollars and concession stands will
add 200 million dollars to the five-
year total profit.
And while others compare the
players' strike to that of the protests
of teachers, coal miners and factory
workers, the two occupations aren't
even comparable. They are alike in
the fact that every worker should
have the right to bargain, but the in-
dustries are totally different.
Cindy Pleasants
& A Look Inside
To put it simply, the players want
a slice of the pie just like we all do.
Their slice just happens to involve a
lot more money than the average
working individual could ever earn.
Does that mean they shouldn't
make demands and settle for what
they have, even if it's not a fair
percentage of the profit being
made? I don't think so.
As an American, they have that
right. Sure, their salaries are
outrageous but the players should
get what they're due.
Like it or not, professional
atb'c'ics has become a flourishing
industry. And the NFL is becoming
more prosperous with each year.
That's why Robbins thinks pro
football players should get more
money. "Right now, we're the
lowest paid-lower than basketball
and baseball players Robbins
said. "Many people don't know
that
According to the players' union,
the management knew of the players
gripes well before the strike but
thought they were bluffing. That's
when the players forced the owners
to show their hand.
Gene Upshaw, president of the
NFLPA and a 16-year veteran of the
Los Angeles Raiders, is quite bla-
tant when expressing his feelings
toward the owners in this week's
Sports Illustrated. "They want us to
think we're animals he said.
"They want to tell us what time to
get to bed, what to eat, what to
wear. What we're going to show
them now is not just a matter of
economics; it's a matter of dignity
From a player's viewpoint, Up-
shaw summed it all up in his next
statement: "We're human beings.
We want to be heard. Without the
players, there is nothing. We say to
management, you can't own me,
but together we can function
The bottom line is that the
athletes, as well as any hard-
working American, should get a fair
cut. It's just a shame that our piece
of the pie only amounts to about
one-sixteenth of an athletes' slice.
Former ECU linebacker Danny
Kepley made his debut on the NBC
network this past Sunday. Kepley
plays for the Edmonton Eskimos
and is considered as the "greatest
linebacker in Canada
B KEN BOLTON
4sMlanl sports I dilnr
Central Michigan head football
coach Herb Deromedi had a rough
time in more ways than one Satur-
day night.
Not only did his Chippewas suffer
a 24-6 loss at the hands ot the
Pirates, but Deromedi was injured
while standing on the sidelines. Mid-
way through the first quarter,
Deromedi was run into by a group
of players at the tail end of a play.
He suffered a torn ligament in his
right knee and was operated on Sun-
day afternoon at Central Michigan
Community Hospital. School of-
ficials say that he will not miss any
practices due to the injury.
Even though he suffered the in-
jury in the first quarter, Deromedi
remained on the sideline to guide the
Chippewas against the stingy
Pirates.
In the game, which marked the
first time that a Central Michigan
team had ever played an opponent
from North Carolina, the Chip-
pewas were continually turned back
by the tough Pirate defense.
Dereomedi, who is in his fifth
year as head coach, has some im-
pressive accomplishments. Since
taking over as head coach in 198,
he has led the Chippewas to back-
to-back Mid-American Conference
championships in 199 and 1980.
Along the wav, Deromedi
directed CMU to 14 consecutive vic-
tories, a 10-0-1 undefeated season in
1979 and a school record 23 con-
secutive games without a loss bv
midseason 1980. Both his offensive
and defensive units have been rank-
ed nationally throughout his career.
Coming into the ECU game.
CMU was 1-1 after defeating In-
diana State 35-10 in the opener and
losing to MAC ioc Bowling Green
34-30 the weekend before last. In
the Bowling Green game, CMU was
intercepted with 52 seconds left in
the game with a first and 10 at the
11-vard line.
Against the Pirates. Central
Michigan was able to drive inside
ECU territory, but were never able
to get inside the end zone.
CMU, which brought a
32.5-point scoring average into the
game, was only able to manage two
Novo Bojovic field goals � a
27-yarder in the first quarter and
one from 25 yards out in the fourth
quarter.
As Deromedi stated after the
game, the Pirate defense was the key
to the game. "Thev
strong, physical defen um
said Deromedi. "But wher .
fall behind, we kept coming back
Early in the second quarter.en-
tral Michigan had marched to
ECU four-yard line and attempted a
take field goal. Holder Pat Bonk
flipped the ball forward to fullback
Jim Vurnor, but the plav was stop-
ped by the Pirates for no gain. Ac-
cording to Deromedi. the crowd
noise affected his team's ability
execute the play.
As Deromedi limped around
CMU dressing room after the gam
he looked back on the game and
continually made references to
ECU's team speed. "Thev have
great speed with their big and small
people, not just the skill positions
he said. "They have so much speed.
1 think their backfield has forgo
the Olympics to play football
No one could blame Deromedi it
he is in no hurry to return to Green
ville. especially after all the bad luck
he has had. But he regards the ECT
football program with high esteem.
"This is one of the best football
teams Central Michigan has ever
played he said. "People in
Michigan just don't realize how
good East Carolina is
ECU punt-return lean prepares to put pressure on Chippewa punter
,DO��IUUMs

r
f
A





12
THb FAST CAROLINIAN
M �'lr MHI-R28. 1MH2
Special Teams Play Key Role For Wake
As Deacons Snap Two-Game Losing Skid
(UPI) � Wake
Forest coach Al Groh
said Monday his special
teams proved their im-
portance by coming up
with key plays in the
Deacons' 31-22 win
over Appalachian
State.
The Deacons broke
open a 17 14 game in
the fourth period when
Lynn Conner blocked a
punt and teammate
Reggie McCummings
scooped up the ball and
ran tor a touchdown.
The win snapped a two-
game Wake Forest los-
ing streak.
Special teams
players like John
Carper and Reggie Mc-
Cummings had a
tremendous impact tor
our winning the
game Groh said.
But Groh said his
team can't count on
many mistakes by
Virginia Tech, its next
opponent. Groh said
the Gobblers "won't
do anything to beat
themselves and the
tailback will get the ball
30 times.
"1 think Cyrus
Lawrence has a little of
everything he's not a
jet but he is fast; he is
not a monster but he is
strong Groh said.
Duke coach Red
Wilson, meanwhile,
said he didn't expect to
score 51 points against
Braves Rely On Heavy Bats
As Season Enters Final Week
ATLANTA (UPI)�
That the Atlanta
Braves were only one
game off the lead in the
National League West
when they headed to
California where they
were to play their last
seven regular-season
games has to be ap-
plauded no matter
where they wind up.
After all, we're talk-
ing about a team that
appears to have the
most questionable pit-
ching staff seen with a
major league pennant
contender ' a staff with
an earned run average
hovering around the
4.00 mark and with on-
ly 12 complete games
after 155 starts.
Braves manager Joe
Torre makes no bones
about it:
"We're going to
hae to outslug people
this last week said
Torre. "Our bullpen
has been our pitching
staff and we need our
bats. We've given up a
lot of runs. But we'e
scored a lot of runs too
and one more week of
that is what I want
The Braves play all
the other top teams in
their division during
their West Coast swing
" two games at San
Francisco (with whom
they were tied for se-
cond) two at division-
leading Los Angeles
and three at fourth-
place San Diego.
In previous visits to
those three cities, the
Braves had a combined
record of 9-11 and they
know that wouldn't be
good enough to earn
them their first division
title since 1969.
San Diego Manager
Dick Williams thinks
the Dodgers, who were
104 games back at the
end of July but one
game ahead of the
Braves and Giants go-
ing into the final week,
will repeat as division
champions.
"I'd like to see the
Braves or the Giants
win the division, but 1
think the Dodgers
will said Williams
after his Padres won in
Atlanta Sunday. "The
Braves don't have the
personnel or the ex-
perience the Dodgers
have. Being on the road
the entire last week, 1
can't see them winning
it
The Giants, W out
at the end of July but
only one back after
sweeping a three-game
series against the
Dodgers or the
weekend, think they're
headed for the division
crown.
We're in the
driver's seat said
Giants second baseman
Joe Morgan who had
plenty of pennant-
winning experience
when he was with Cin-
cinnati. "We've beaten
the Braves seven
straight and the
Dodgers five straight.
Now both have to come
to our place and I like
that. Everything is in
our hands
Despite the pitching
problems and the add-
ed burden of having to
play out the season
without power-hitting
third baseman Bob
Horner, who injured
his left elbow on Sept.
18, Torre says it would
be a mistake to count
the Braves out.
"We've been
through everything that
can happen but we've
done a good job of put-
ting things out of our
mind and bouncing
back said Torre.
"We'll do it again
The only Braves
starter who has won
with any consistency is
43-year-old
knuckleballer Phil
Niekro. Niekro, the
starter in Monday
night's game at San
Francisco, was 15-4
and was holding a 2-1
lead when Torre lifted
him for a pinch hitter ii
the sixth inning of a
game against Houston
the Braves went on to
lose.
But Niekro will tell
you he hasn't been real-
ly effective the past
couple of months.
"I'm getting more
wins than 1 really
deserve because of
some great help from
the bullpen and from
our batters said
Niekro. "I haven't
been lasting as long as 1
should and I haven't
been getting strikeouts
like I should
Only two other
Braves pitchers went in-
to-the final week with
double-digit win
numbers ' Bob Walk
who was 11-9 and Rick
RESEARCH PAPERS
- ; �- . � q'ales h.js- 1 00 I
Current 306 paqf reaaarch estalog 11 ?7(
ptpara - I e fe1 (I1 Su&factl
Knw-nrrh Aasiatanrr M127 lain. A.�-
�206 LCX Angews C 90C21- 21j
4'7 8??
Camp who was 11-11.
The Braves don't like
to talk about it, but
last-place Cincinnati is
the only National
League West team with
a worst won-lost record
than the Braves since
July 30 when they ap-
peared to be running
away with the division
when they built a nine-
game lead.
The Braves were 24
games over .500, 61-37,
back then, but only 13
over, 84-71, when they
headed West for the
last roundup. That
means they played only
.500 baseball over the
140 games following
their record start-of-
the-season 1 3 game
winning streak and
only .404 baseball
(23-34) since that July
30 high mark.
"Inconsistency lias
plagued us all season
said Torre before leav-
ing for the coast. "We
keep swinging trom
highs to lows and back
again. If we're going to
have another winning
streak, the time is
now
Virginia and still was
not pleased with the
performance of the
Blue Devil defense in
the 51-17 win.
"We gave up too
many yards and too
many points Wilson
said. "In order to be a
good football team we
must learn to be strong
both offensively and
defensively
Wilson said he ex-
pects Navy to show up
in Durham Saturday
with a "well-disciplined
team and a team that
will stress fundamen-
tals
The Blue Devil
trouncing of Virginia
was good new for the
Blue Devils, but it mav
end up being bad news
for the Cavaliers' next
opponent ' North
Carolina State.
W o 11 p a c k c oa c h
Monte Kit tin. whose
team suffered a 23-6
loss to Maryland last
week, said Monday his
players would have to
work hard on preparing
tor the Virginia game.
"The worst time to
plav a defense is when
they've just given up 51
points Kiffin said.
"When that happens,
usually the defense
changes and you don't
know what to prepare
for
Kiffin said Duke's
offense, especially the
passing of Ben Bennett,
should be credited with
the runaway win. But
he said the Cavalier
defense probably won't
make the same
mistakes twice.
"After a game like
that, they won't be beat
on the long pass
again Kiffin said.
North Carolina State
quarterback Tol Avery
and tailback Joe Mcln-
tosh are expected to
miss practice at least
early in the week, and
Kiffin said Mclntosh
the Wolf pack's leading
rusher is "a little ques-
tionable" for the
Virginia game.
"Whether he starts
on Saturday will de-
pend on how many and
which days he practices
this week and if he's
1(X) percent Kiffin
said.
DAY REPRESENTATIVE
BOB CATHEY
ID NO. 816792 752-3022
My name is Bob Cathey, and I would like to
share with you my qualifications tor being a Day
Representative tor the SGA I am a native North
Carolinian that has received an education at Lees
McRae Jr. College, the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill, and East Carolina Univer
sity. At these institutions, I have studied science,
business, industrial technology, and am currently
a senior honor student at ECU
With this diversified education I have made con
tact with a wide variety of students. Through these
contacts, I have gamed an understanding of
students' needs. I believe that a large number of
ECU studntsarenot clearly being represented by
the SGA As SGA Day Representative, I intend to
help fill this deficiency of the student body through
communication with students.
WE SEW
LEATHER COATS
SAAD'S
SHOE REPAIR
113 Grande Ave.
758-1228
G! r (Ucj. rt C- n
T htlif-TS, Sleeping Bags
�tackpacks, Camping Equip
ien� Steel Toed Shoes,
D'Shes and Over 700 Difterent
New and Used Items Cowboy
Boots S3 95
ARMY-NAVY
STORE ,w,��r
ABORTIONS
1 74 week terminations
App'ts. Made 7 Days
CALLTOLL FREE
1 800 321 0575
TRIM YOUR FIGURE
Not H KIM
I OOk IN
lO) � -ounUi in j At-L-ki
Programs for Men & Women
�Medical Weiqht Control
Nutritional Counseling
SH'NCARE
Individual Sku Analysis
Deep Pore Cle ing
Face & Body Wciung
Manicures and Pedicures
Complimentary Consultation
Check phone book for
discount coupon
r-1
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i.
��i
No B.S. Jewelrv
RepairCusif-n
Crafting � rair
Prices &
(Guaranteed V ork
- 120 E. 5th si
758-212 7� 10-5
Tuessat.
Bring this ad for 20
off 14K chain repairs.
���-Jl
Room
Wednesday Night
PONY NIGHT
FREE ADMISSION for ECU Students
Happy Hour prices for ponies
all night long � 9 until closing
?ja
vKS
j , -
!�,
Quarterback dreg Mewart In ction
H lull V4II I IO
WANTED
THE PHANTOM FORECAST �R
in
ie mosT accurate je IHMK Mb
Available IK11 at the
foHc riglocations.
� AccuCopy -Attic� Varsity Barber Shop
� Pantana Bob s Book Barn�Subway
� TreeHouse�Heart s Delight
� Globe Hardware Store� Apple Records
� Bicycle Post�Mr. Gatti s
�Quick Snak� H. L Hodges Bonds
� Pharos�Archie s Steaks
� Sharpe's Formal Wear�The Sandwich Game
�University Book Exchange� Arcade Variety Shop t� G
��
Travel
with
ECU
to the
Big
Apple
Nov. 24-Nov. 28. 1M82
Spend your Thanksgiving holiday in style on Broadway,
at Macy's Parade, shopping. & touring the cit. Space is
limited & time is drawing near. For more info, contacl
Central Tieket Office. Mendenhall Student Center.
ma$$t
75? M
S6C E varr Street
FREE DELIVERY
FROM SUP �.
7 DAYS A WK
Athenian Chicken
Special
$2!
only
also specials every day
THIS WEEKS $5.9? SALE ITEMS (LP & TAPE)!
Bruce Springstein
Dire Straits
Hank Williams Jr.
Greatest Hits
Judist Priest
Crosby, Stills, & Nash
Steve Winwood
Cool ft The Gang
New Shipment of Cut-Outs � just arrived.
CALL 758-1427 for MORE sale information!
Bad Company
The Times
Michael McDonald
Zapp
Aerosmith
Kim Carnes
Nicolette Larson
& More
1002 Evans
Street
758-9584
Open Under
New
Management
CLUB
for Men & Women
RECENTLY REMODELED It's that time again to
get back into shape. Nautilus is located on Evans
Street, within walking distance from campus. Featur-
ing a full line of Nautilus equipment, Olympic free
weights, sauna, whirlpool and locker room.
Call and ask about our pro-rated student rates and
froup rate. CqU and schedule a
free introductory workout.
HOURS OF OPERATION:
MonThurs. � 10 a.m9 p.m. Friday � 10 a.m8 p.m.
Saturday � 10 a.m5 p.m. Sunday � l p.m5 p.m.
BHMMMMBSaB
t






THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 2S, 1982
13
M
J
e
n
J 7
I,
Spikers A t State
B FDWARI)
NICKLAfc
The ECU Lady
Pirates volleyball team
showed signs of
brilliance Friday by
winning four straight
matches, but were
ousted Saturday by
Miami Day South
Community College,
6-15, 15-7, 15-13, 15-8, in
the semi-finals of the
N.C. State Invitational.
The Lady Pirates
were impressive in Fri-
day's pool play,
beating George
Washington 15-13, 15-13;
College of Charleston
15-8, 9-15, 16-14; Miami
Day South 15-13, 11-15.
15-5; and East Ten-
nessee State 15-12. 15-5.
The string of vic-
tories Friday gave ECU
a number-one seed and
a first-round bye in
Saturdays pool. The
1 ad Pirates, however,
were beaten by Miami
Day South, a team they
had trounced the day
before.
Coach I ynn David-
son commented that
the pressure might have
been a factor in the loss
because they were in
such an excellent posi-
tion to advance to a
final game like that.
"Our kids felt so much
pressure because it was
a new experience for
them she said.
There were some ex-
citing matches in Fri-
day's pool, perhaps the
most notable one being
the contest between
ECU and the College of
Charleston. "The
Charleston game
Davidson said, "was
very unique because
. .ter losing the second
game were were behind
13-3 in the third game,
and instead of giving
up, we came back to
win 16-1
Davidson added,
"We were consistent
emotionally. This is a
good sign because we
usually have extreme
highs and lows
Outstanding perfor-
mances Friday were by
Stacey Weitzel, who,
according to Davidson,
"was our offensive
weapon" and Diane
Lloyd, who "played
well all day
The Lady Pirates,
now 8-6, will play next
in the USC Carolina
Classic on Oct. 1 and 2.
IM Events
The Karate Sport Club
has been ranked the top
collegiate team in the
nation for the past
three to four years. The
club competes in the
LSPN teleused "Battle
of Atlanta" each year
and has always done
well. The advisor for
the club is Bill
McDonald, one of the
leading karate experts
in the nation. Practice
i and times for
v ate are Monday
mgh Fridays from
" ; p.m. until 9:30
m. in Memorial
c ivmnasium.
In flag tootball. the
ines Fnforcers will
-urn to defend their
title. In the fraternity
division, the polls pick
Pi Kappa Phi to take
the title.
In the women's divi-
sion, the Heartbreakers
are back to defend their
title as all-campus
champions in the in-
dependent category.
The cotton creamers
should be tough in the
Residence Hall divi-
sion, while the Tri-Sigs
should continue to
dominate the sorority
division.
The intramural
department will hold its
second annual Punt,
Pass and Kick Contest
on Wednesday, Sept.
29. Contestants art
scored on their best at-
tempt in each category
and then all three
scores are totaled to
form their final tally of
total yardage. More
than 70 participants
competed last year.
GET
RESPONSIBILITY
FAST
E OFFER
� Starling salary from S18.000 � 22.SOO with increases to
S28.000 140,000 - in four years
�30 days paid vacation annually
� Fully financed graduate programs
�Superior family health plan
� More responsibility and leadership opportunities
� World travel and adventure
�Prestige and personal growth potential
CURRENTOPPORTUNITIES
�Nuclear Engineering
"Business Management
� Aviation �intelligence
� Nursing �C vil Engineering
�Law �Shiprjoard Operations
COLLEGE GRADUATES
U.S. Citizens less than 35 years ot age
interested in holding challenging
managerial positions.
Send resume to:
NAVY OFFICER PROGRAMS
1001 Navaho Dr.
Raleigh, N.C. 27609
or call 1-800-662-7231
1t RoOWM JKHHfltS
,kso� Hti ?-wi!v S 1 4
ban, ,�.� in bvnt m
TERolSHeALTv
6� Junction H�d
wbw'av �!
-cMMr
ittis, �r. wi �,
n 72 HorttifrnBhi
IjlilTlil'liifiit
USPA Choice Beef Chuck Bent-la
1.5 Liter - Ree White, Piak, 6eM
Taylor
Lake
Country
9
22 Oaeee
Why Pay M.39
79
2 Ply - 4 Roll Peck
Edon Toilet Tissue
99
I49
S109
5 Lb Frezee Critkle Cat Petateef 1 0i. - Dal Heate Freach,Cat
Green Beans
Tatar Boy
24 C�. - Faailly Size c - 42 Oaaee � Deterjeat
99
Tetley Tea Bags
Trend
59f
U 0. � Seaehlae
Krisw Crackers
4100
IS Oi. - Pe Feea" - Ste�
Ken-l Ration
279
Half Otliee - SO Off
Wisk liquid
Mayonnaise t?
Why Pay M 29
Prices �ood at Greenville Food Tot Start cniy
r
i





14 IHE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 28.1982
Nothing Goes Right For Losing Cavaliers
CHAR I- O T
HSVlll E, Va. (UPI)
nuke's 5i-n
dismantling of Virginia
was a case ol
everything tailing into
place for the Blue
Devils and nothing go-
ing right for the
Cavaliers, Virginia
coach George Welsh
said.
"It vas just one ol
those davs when
everything went to
pot said Welsh.
lit falling to 0-3 on
the season and. losing
!or the loth lime in its
last 1" starts, Virginia
yielded 612 yards total
offense and a school
record 392 passing
yards.
Puke, 3-0, registered
its highest point total
evci against an Atlantic
Coast Conference op-
ponent while averaging
Hist under eight yards a
play for 78 snaps. The
Blue Devils had gains
of 10 vards or more 22
tunes.
"Rip Lngle (former
Penn State coach) used
to say. 'You're never as
good as you think you
are when you win, and
you're neer as bad as
you think you are when
you lose said Welsh
at his Monday news
conference "1 hope
we're not as bad as we
looked Saturday
because we looked bad.
" I don't think
anybody on the team
had a good game
against Duke. It was
our poorest perfor-
mance and against the
best team we've played
so far
Duke quarterback
Ben Bennett, who has
passed for 756 yards,
six touchdowns and no
interceptions through
three games, picked
apart Virginia's
defense.
"He was great said
Welsh. "But he had a
lot of help. They have
two good wide outs, a
good tight end and
good protection
While Welsh said
there was "no fun-
damental flaw" in the
Cavaliers' defensive
game plan, he said
"tactically we blitzed
too much and left
(Virginia cornerback
Darryl) Reaves one-on
one too much with
(Duke wide receiver
Chris) Castor
After the game
several Duke players
agreed that Virginia's
inability to generate a
pass rush was a key to
the Blue Devils' offen-
sive success.
"What Virginia
misses is Stuart Ander-
son (1981 All-ACC
defensive end) said
Bennett. "Last year, he
was a thorn in our
side" when Duke beat
the Cavaliers, 29-24.
Said Duke offensive
tackle Tim Bumgarner,
"We knew from wat-
ching films that
Virginia didn't have as
good a pass rush as
Tennessee or South
Carolina (Duke's first
two opponents). They
have some big, strong
guys, but big, strong
guys don't usually
make good pass
rushers. They don't get
off the ball
This Saturday,
Virginia opens a four-
game home stand
against ACC foe N.C.
State.
"If we're going to be
good, it (playing at
home) should help us
said Welsh.
Ingram Finds Opening In Chippewa Defense
m�ftM�����������wH�wra
X XXX X X X X XXX
X X X X X X X XXX
Classifieds
PERSONA
CONGO A'
I, A 1
Wed r
1 A � �
LOSE WEIGHT HONI :
�SS 9 53
ai Aqa and Debra Wiggins are
starimt. a c bib " theatre
group -naov up ol sludonts t'Om
ECU Can you sing' Dance" Ac"
Babv. we re all gonna br stars
Let's pu on a show Call fit 9'7)
MOM HAPPY BIRTHDAY
SORRY THIS ISN T A ZIGGY
CARD. BUT THE STORE WAS
ALL OUT YOU RE THE
GREATEST LOVE MIKE
COUPON
LOST AND
FOUND
lost m FOUR SEASONS
e 'auant Ladv s yellow gold
B .�, watch enqraved on bacW
at sentimental value Reward
. . rsi � ) and ask tor Sherri
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL TyP'S' wants to
type at home Reasonable rates
7SA J�C
PROFESSIONAL Typing service
experience, quality work, IBM
typewriter Call Lanie Shive
?S8 5301 or Gail Joiner 754 1062
TYPING TERM papers, resumes,
thesii etc Call 753 6733
TYPING SERVICES Resumes
theses research papers, etc NEW
IBM type Judith Wuson Phone
756 7651
10YRS typing - reasonable rates
� spelling, punctuation and gram
mar corrections Proofreading
Cindy 9 a.m. 9 p.m 355 J468
WANTED
BASS PLAYER wanted lor Part
lime contemporary Countr Rock
Band Band has numerous book
mgs and has 2 45 s getting a lot ol
air play Serious competent musi
cians only Call 758 8772 alter 5
p m
ROOMMATE
WANTED
TWO ROOMMATES needed
4 bedroom house 7 blocks Irom
campus 575 per month Call Bun
Chadwick 7SJ 4961 309 E '3th St
ROOMMATE WANTED to share
3 bedroom, l bath trailer m Azalea
Gardens 1r pk. lurnished cable
TV, washer dryer, etc 5150 in
eludes everything Call George at
7 58 3566
NEEDED ROOMMATE NEED
ED lor 4 bedroom house on
Biltmore St Halt block Irom cam
pus 583 75 plus utilities Call or
come by 405 Biltmore St 758 78�4
EORSALE
FREE KITTENS NEED A good
home call 758 6402 ask lor Chris
HANDCRAFTED, rustic lur
niture at affordable student
prices For more information call
Kim at 752 5717
FOR RENT l Bedroom apart
ment neat campus available 5145
includes utilities 752 2615
FOR SALE W inch Panasonic
black and wh te TV E�cellent
condition Price negotiable Call
752 1897
25 in. ROSS GRAN Tour bike ex
cellent condition, only tlM.OC Ph
75I-4471.
fl
DELI KITCHEN
rr Home Cooked food
Meat & 2 Veg Bread, I
$30 tree ret
COUPON
s3.00off reg pnceANY GIANT PIZZA
2.00off reg priceANY LARGE PIZZA
at WE SUPPORT
iga
zns, othe' Spec
, envilli Bl d Phone 7s 0825
ruPUNEXPtatS OCTOBER 1 �
EXPERIENCE,
RELIABILITY
& KNOWLEDGE
3 GOOD reasons to reelect
JOE ADMIRE
SGA LEGISLATOR FROM
SLAY DORM � SEPT. 29, 1982
Not all clinics are the same.
ABORTION is a difficult decision that's
made easiei bv the women of the Hem
Center. our
night to supr1
fort, safety, p
are available day and
and understand you. Com-
and a friendly staff . . -
� c entei is all about.
r� pregnant? loiing
saiurda appointment
,r carh prcgBMK) tet
that - what the Flei
Insurance accepted
Ml inclusive lee'
I p in IK weeks
(all 781-5550 day or niht.
I tie Flemingenter makes the difference
5-
ABORTIONSUP TO
. �- WfctK Of-
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM II 14
WEEKS
C � URTHER EXPENSt
S185 00 Priqmncy Test Birth
ntrol and Problem Preqnan
cy Counseling for lurthei inlor
mation call 83? 0535 I Toll Free
Numbc 800 22' 2568 between 9
A M and 5 P V Weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
91? West Morgan St
Raleigh N C
JARVIS MEMORIAL
METHODIST CHURCH
VAN SCHEDULE FOR
SUNDAY SCHOOL AND WORSHIP
STOPS:
i) Mendenhall Student Center Parking Lot
� 8:45 a.m.
2) College Hill Dorms � 9.00a.m.
3) Fleming Hall (Front) � 9:15a.m.
4) Slay Hall �10:15a.m.
(Van with lift for handicapped)
�' ixV ftiiWV " you know where
you re going to?
�� you like the things
that life is showing vou?
H here are you going to?
Do you know?
510 S.
Washington St.
Downtown
Greenville
cof fee &
Breakfast Served 6:30a.m10:30a.m.
Sausage & Ham Biscuits - 50
Lunch Served from 11:00-7:30
Homemade Biscuits & Desserts
Eat In or Take Out
103 Raleigh & Dickinson Ave.
752-5339
H hy eat anywhere else when you can
eat at the Deli Kitchen
J. A. UNIFORMS
SHOP
Bring this ad for
KFo oft
on the purchase of
one of our lah coats!
All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes, shoes,
and hose. Also - used ECU nurses
uniforms. Trade-ins allowed
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
oft Memorial Drive.
Near Hollowell's Drug and old hospital
c0� o�N
Athletic FTOhM
Carolina East Mall
USA
RIBS AND CHICKEN
OPEN24HOURS DRIVE THRU WINDOW
2forl
SAUSAGE BISCUITS
MonFri. 6a.m11 a.m.
Thurs. 26th&Tues. 1st
2 ribs $2.99
fries, slaw, & biscuit
No Take Outs
1011 Charles Street � 752-1373 1 Block from Campus
Kash & Karry
CONVENIENCE STORE
14TH ST & CHARLES ST. GREENVILLE
Next To University TRR-lQClfl
Seafood Market I 3J -WWW
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
GRAND OPENING SPECIALS
-HOT ROASTEO-
PEANUTS
-HOT POPCORN-
HOT COFFEE-
ICE SLUSHES-
-HOT FRENCH FRIES-
HOT ONION RINGS-
WE INVITE ALL
ECU STUDENTS
TO VISIT US
FREE BAG
OF
POPCORN
WITH 10 Gal.
OR MORE
PURCHASE
OF GASOLINE
REGULAR CONE OF
PINE STATE
ICE
CREAM
10c
Famous
HOT
DOGS
EA.
Fixed To Suit You
Call In Oiders
VIDEOGAMES
(ASSORTED FLAVORS) We SELL AMERICAN EXPRESS
BAG ICE JjONEY ORDERS
E(C EVERY QU,CK FJlL GAS - DIESEL - WHITE KEROSENE
JU DAY SERVICE
417 Evans Street Mall � Downtown 757-1608
Opening
Oct. 1 st-2nd
9:00-6:00
tor initial registration
Classes start Mon. Oct. 4th
2b CLASSES WEEKLY
to choose from!
�TMS A�oBIC WORKSHOP totally ded.cated to bringing yoo MM BEST OVERALL Mness class you will ever experience. A FUN
MOM.
TUES
WED.
THURS
FRI
SAT
� STUDENTS-
9 30 10:30
9:30 10 30
9 30 10 30
t 30 10 30
9:30 10:30
10 00-II: 10
12.10-13S0
II:10 II. SO
1J10 13 SO
12:10 13 S-
13 10 13:50
3:15-4:15
1:15-4:15
3:15-4:15
3:15-4:15
3:15-4:1S
5:15 � IS
S IS IS
S 15 4:15
5:15-4:15
5:15 4:15
4 30 7 30
4:307:30
4:30 7:30
4:30 7:30
closed
MONTHLY FEES:
Sit a month tor 3 classes per week
SI3 a month for 3 classes per week
535 a month lor 4 classes per week
530 a month tor unlimited classes
$3 drop in basis
12:00-1:30 TUFF STUFF
We .r,i JIlk njdistance from campus - build your workouts around your class schedule
' FoR YOUR ENJOYMENT and CONVENIENCE:
�r Tr dTss-rm"rv
.Xya'f PRC'rAmTqWH , HURRY - CLASS S.ZES ARE LIM.TED11,
ATTENTION SENIORS
VOTE
1
SENIOR CLASS
PRESIDENT
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 29
I
1





Title
The East Carolinian, September 28, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 28, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.218
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy