The East Carolinian, September 23, 1982






She lEaat Ularnlinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.10
Thursday, September 23, 1982
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
SGA Fills Vacant Post
By BOB MORGAN
suff Unlrr
SGA President Eric Henderson
approved the nomination of senior
Mike Swaim as ECU's attorney
general.
Swaim. a history major, has been
tilling the post as interim attorney
general since the end of August. His
appointment still must be approed
b the SGA Legislature in October.
The nomination was made �to
Henderson bv a judicial selectio
committee Sept. 10.
As attorney general, Swaim will
direct the SGA judicial system. He
will work with the honor board on
violations of the honor code and
with the legislature on constitutional
questions.
Attention was focused on the job
earlier this month when The East
Carolinian ran a story about
Henderson's rejection of two
students nominated by the selection
committee. The article reported that
both candidates were bitter about
their rejection.
Henderson was quoted as saying
he didn't feel either was qualified
for the post as a result of their roles
in the "conflict of my administra-
tion He was referring to the con-
troversy surrounding his election
and the legal trials that followed.
A member of the honor board for
two years, Swaim was Henderson's
campaign manager in the April elec-
tion. He admits that politics are ob-
viously involved in the appointment
but denies that it is a political
payoff. "I'm one of the best
qualified students on this campus
for this position said Swaim, "I
have the experience to back it up
According to Swaim, the office of
attorney general has been
downplayed for too long, and he
wants it to change. He has already
made rulings concerning elections
and the SGA budget. His plans in-
clude a crackdown on book stealing
and cheating at ECU.
At the present, Swaim is looking
for a freshman student who is in-
terested in working as his assistant.
"I want to train someone who can
be qualified to take over this posi-
tion in a few years. It is part of my
goal to keep this office active after
I'm gone said Swaim.
Loneliness Strikes Students
B PATRICK O'NEILL
stiff Writer
"I think there's a difference bet-
ween being lonely and being alone
said George Wiegand, director of
the ECU Counseling Center. "A
person can be alone and be perfectly
content and another person can be
lonely in the middle of a crowd
Wiegand was discussing
loneliness, especially as it applies to
students in the college setting, or
what is sometimes referred to as the
"college blues
The college blues typically afflict
the new students who are away from
home for perhaps the first time in
their lives.
"Many students come here from
small places, small high schools,
where the were king of the roost.
Here they're just one of
thousands said Jon Rogers, area
coordinator for central campus.
"Many people feel that nobody
gives a damn about them adds
Wiegand.
For most students the feelings o
loneliness that accompany them
upon entering college will dissipate
when the initial adjustment period is
past, and some relationships have
been fostered, but for others who
may be shy or lacking social skills,
the battle against loneliness is cons-
tant.
Loneliness is a matter of degree,
for some it may be a short period of
time said Wiegand. "We'll see
others who don't make the adjust-
ment, and they're crushed. They
can't stand it
"This is a commonplace problem
that all of us experience at some
time or another said Wilbert Ball,
one of the five counselors working
at the ECU Counseling Center.
"We're all social beings who need
interaction with other people
Ball notes that often the new
students are without any support
groups to help them build up their
confidence. "They really don't have
the confidence to reach out and
woik on building friendships he
adds.
"The unproductive person is the
unhappy person says Wiegand.
Being productive is different for
each individual. For many students,
of course, performing well in
academics is one measure of pro-
ductivity, for others it may be
athletics or some other outside ac-
tivities.
Wiegand suggests that people try
to discover what they need to feel
worthwhile to themselves. "If
you're not worth something to
yourself, you can't believe
somebody loves you
Another area coordinator, Inez
Fridley of the College Hill area,
feels that entering college is the time
in a person's development when
they are going through a lot of
changes that make them receptive to
loneliness. Rogers adds, "It's just a
time of transition for so manv peo-
ple
Wiegand also believes that some
students probably shouldn't even be
in college, and all students should
ask themselves the question, "Do 1
really want to be here?" He also
says that students often emphasize
all the negative things in their lives,
instead of taking in a wider scope.
Wiegand says students may come
to him and be very upset because
they've failed one test, yet they may
be doing well in all their other
courses. I had a student who said he
couldn't talk to anybody, and he
was sitting here talking to me It's
a misinterpretation of problems
he adds.
Part of a persons self image also
includes the perception they have of
their own physical attractiveness.
Wiegand also thinks this, too. is
often a matter of misinterpretation.
"You are going to be attractive to a
very limited population.
Some individuals believe they
should be liked by everybody
Wiegand said. "It's not that I'm
unattractive, but I'm not attractive
to some people is the outlook peo-
ple should take, Wiegand said.
He believes that physical attrac-
tiveness is usually not the major fac-
tor in a person's decision to start a
relationship. He tells his clients to
just take a look around campus and
notice the couples they see. Many
people who may appear to be very
attractive physically, may be going
out with a person of what seems to
be an average appearance and vice
versa.
People should ask themselves the
question "Where do 1 go to find
people of similar interests?"
Wiegand suggests that going
downtown is often not the answer to
this question. "They don't think of
going to the Methodist Student
Center, or some other club or
group Wiegand adds.
See LONELINESS, Page 5
.38 Special
. 38 Special Comes To Minges
By GREG HIDEOUT
Auteum Ntl Miior
Rock'n'roll will once again come
to Minges Coliseum when .38
Special arrives in Greenville on Oct.
24.
Jerry Dilsaver, chairperson of the
Major Attractions Committee that
signed the band to appear, said the
concert would start at 8 p.m.
.38 Special will be backed-up by
the Spys, a new band. Two of the
Spys members are formerly of
Foreigner. They have iust released
their first album titled Spys.
Members of .38 Special played
together in various combinations
until 1974 when they joined together
under their present name. Since then
they have toured across the nation;
from their home base of Jackson-
ville, Fla. to places like Casper,
Wyo.
.38 Special is made up of drum-
mers, Steve Brookins and Jack
Grondin; lead guitarists, Don
Barnes and Jeff Carlisi; bassist
Larry Junstrom and lead-singer
Donnie van Zant.
The southern rock band comes
shooting into Greenville in the wake
of their latest hit album, Special
Forces. Their back-up band, the
Spys, has also recently released an
album.
Tickets will go on sale at
Mendenhall central ticket office on
Monday, Oct. 4, at 10 a.m. Student
advance tickets will be $7. General
admission tickets, which will also be
available at the Record Bar and Ap-
ple Records, will be $9.
The concert is not a money-
making venture. It is mainly for the
student's benefit, and the idea is to
break even, Dilsaver said.
The Major Attractions Commit-
tee comes under the auspices of Stu-
dent Unions and is comprised of ten
members. They are planning more
concerts, according to Dilsaver.
Mendenhall Snack Bar Has Growing Pains
Photo By STANLEY LEABY
Snack Bar Doubles Use, Lines
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Miff Writer
"Business is great said Rudy
Alexander, director of Mendenhall
Student Center, "and that's the pro-
blem In the last three years,
business has doubled in the student
snack bar and the long lines that
form around lunch time have
become a source of frustration to
many students.
"Sometimes the lines are halfway
across the cafeteria said ECU stu-
dent Mary Ann Miller. "It depends
on the time of day adds art senior
Ray Murray, "at lunch time, it's too
crowded
"We don't have the facility to
take care of this volume of business,
that's the bottom line said James
D. Mayo, manager of the
Mendenhall snack bar. "The facility
is overtaxed Alexander adds.
According to Mayo, the only way
service can be improved is if the
whole snack bar is renovated and
converted to a assembly line-type
cafeteria. "The system that we have
is designed like a fast-food system
adds Mayo.
Freshman accounting student
Todd Harris agrees. "I usually get
my food pretty quickly, not any
longer than a fast-food place.
Betsy Easterly, freshman art ma-
jor, says the snack bar food is good,
but that her orders have been
misplaced many times. She blames
the volume of business as the reason
for the confusion. Easterly also
thinks that the employees of the
snack bar don't really act as
courteously as they should. "Their
objective is to get your food to you
fast, not to be nice she adds.
"The emplovees are nice said
Miller.
Harris agreed. "1 think they're
friendly "The service is slow but
courteous added Lynn Cosada.
"When is was built and designed,
it was set up as a fast-food service
type facility Mayo said. "And
now the business has increased
beyond original capacitv expecta-
tions
Mayo said that the snack bar is
currently doing eight times as much
business as it was in 194. as far as
dollar value goes. He attributes
most oi the increase to the fact that
more students are now buying meal
ticket plans
At present there are also more
students ordering breakfast than
ever before which creates another of
what Mayo calls a "clog-up" at
around 10 am. "We only have one
grill in here Mayo said
Despite the one grill problem,
students are still able to order a wide
choice of breakfast orders which
"come right off the grill as thev
want them Mayo points outI
don't want to prepare a lot of food
ahead of time and leave it in trays
he continued "because the qulitv
would deteriorate. What I'm in-
terested in is improving the quality,
that been mv number one aim
Democrats Return To Party
WASHINGTON (UPI) � Most
Democrats who backed President
Reagan in 1980 apparently are retur-
ning to the fold, a nationwide
survey said Wednesday, giving
Democratic candidates a substantial
lead in the November congressional
elections.
Among all likely voters, the poll
indicated 58 percent would support
Democrats, 38 percent would back
Republicans and four percent said
they were uncertain.
Three-quarters of the Democrats
who say they voted for Reagan told
interviewers they now intended to
vote for Democratic congressional
candidates.
The poll, conducted by The
Washington Post and ABC News,
found that 92 percent of Democrats
questioned said they would vote for
their party's congressional can-
didates, while 90 percent of the
GOP voters were said to be backing
Republican nominees.
It indicated independent voters
are sharply divided but leaning
toward Democrats, 50 percent to 40
percent, with 10 percent still uncer-
tain.
The poll, published by the Post
Wednesday, suggested the two chief
factors dominating voters' opinions
are perceptions of Reagan and the
nation's ailing economy.
The poll showed that 92 percent
of the Democrats would stick with
their party in November, six percent
would vote Republican and two per-
cent was unsure. On the Republican
side, 90 percent would vote for the
GOP, nine percent would vote
Democratic and one percent was un-
sure.
The Post said 1,505 people were
interviewed nationwide from Sept 9
through 13. The poll results were
based on the views of 500 people
who mav be considered almost cer-
tain to vote. The Post said on most
matters, including vote preference,
there is little difference between the
500 and the other 1,005 interviews
Another poll published today by
The New York Times said economic
concerns rather than social issues
appear to dominate voting inten-
tions in the November elections.
Conducted jointly with CBS
News, the Times poll said the
Democratic edge seemed to be big
enough � if it lasts until Nov. 2 �
to end President Reagan's "working
control" o the House. The current
House is composed 241 Democrats
and 192 Republicans and two vacan-
cies.
The poll of 1,305 registered
voters, which was conducted last
week, found 54 percent of those
surveyed backed or leaned toward
Democrats in the congressional elec-
tions and 38 percent sided with
Republicans.
MacDonald Moved To Texas
RALEIGH, N.C. (UPI) �
Federal officials say Dr. Jeffrey
MacDonald is being transferred
from a federal prison in California
to Texas to serve a life sentence for
the 1970 murders of his pregnant
wife and two daughters at Fort
Bragg.
Mike Aun, a federal Bureau of
Prisons spokesman in Washington,
said MacDonald will be moved from
the Terminal Island prison near Los
Angeles to a federal prison near
Austin, Texas.
"As a matter of policy we do not
announce transfers until after they
have been completed, so I can't tell
you anything about it other than it
will be as soon as possible Aun
said.
Aun would not say why Mac-
Donald is being moved from Ter-
minal Island, where he has been
held since the Supreme Court
reinstated his murder convictions on
March 31.
Bernard Segal, MacDonald's
chief defense lawyer, said his client
was "profoundly depressed" during
a visit last week. He said Mac-
Donald has not been assigned any
duties at the prison because of the
impending transfer.
"They are taking him away from
his mother and brother Segal
said, "and putting him somewhere
where people don't care about
him
"He just sits in his cell for 23
hours a day and does nothing. We
are discussing his transfer with
prison officials
A U.S. District Court jury in
Raleigh convicted MacDonald in
1979 for the stabbing and bludgeon-
ing deaths of his 26-year-old wife
and two daughters, ages 2 and 6.
He was sentenced to three life terms.
The slayings occurred Feb. 17,
1970, while MacDonald was serving
with the Army's Green Berets at
Fort Bragg.
The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Ap-
peals reversed the conviction in July
1980 on the grounds the nine-year
delay violated MacDonald's rights
to a speedv trial. He was freed on
$100,000 bond.
But in March, the Supreme Court
overturned the decision and sent the
case back to the appeals court for
consideration of other legal issues
raised during the trial. MacDonald's
bond was also revoked and he was
returned to the Terminal Island
prison.
The 4th Circuit court last month
upheld the conviction, and federal
prosecutors say the decision nearly
closes the case.
MacDonald's lawyers, however,
believe there are other legal avenues
that can be followed.
Seagal, who headed MacDonald's
defense team during the original
trial, said a former federal pro-
secutor, Brian O'Neill of Santa
Monica, Calif has been hired to
assist in the legal battles.
"Together, we will be asking the
Supreme Court to review the deci-
sion of the 4th Circuit Court of Ap-
peals Segal said.
T
i





THfc EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 23, 1982
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
It you or your organnation
would like to have an item printed
in the announcement column.
please type it on an announcement
?orm and send it to The East
Carolinian in care ot the produc
tion manager
Announcement terms are
available a' the East Carolinian
ott.e m 'he Publications Building
Flyers and handwritten copy on
odd sued paper cannot be ac
cepteo
There is no charge tor an
nouncements but space s otten
limited Tneretore we cannot
guarantee that your announce
men! will run as long as you wan'
and suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column tor publicity
The deadline tor announcements
is 3 p m Monday tor the Tuesday
paper and 3pm Wednescavy for
the Thursday paper No an
nouncements received atter these
deadlines will be panted
This space is available to an
campus organ rations and depart
merits
WZMB
join ke V'chell on WZMB
�ne Eiec'r'C Rainbow Rao.o
on II s run Sa'urday nights
� 12 m dr gh1 lo 4 am and Sun
jhts from '2 midnight to 3
n A ou-n specials begin at 2 am
s weeks album specials are me
-�� s Ge' you a YasOu' on
� i. anc 'he new Uriah Weep
Aoominog - on Sundav
t netal will ly so don't ss
FRESHMEN
� you are intelligent en
thus as' C a"0 nteres'ed n ge ng
nv veo in SGA, 'here s a- open
ing r "e A"crnev Genera s 0
tice tor you H vou would like '���'
seve as Assistant Attorney
Genera' please call or s'op by
Room 228 Mendennai, Student
Cefer before October 1 W82 be'
wee" 8 OC a m and 5 00 p m Ai
e'e'eo persons male cr
teale will be cons derec
CAREERS
Whic" career fits you bes"
La'ev Bv Choice Not Chance is
a Iim pa' m rti series ottered a'
s s by ttve University Counse
-g Cee' ' s ottered on and Oc
tobei ' ' a"c October 5 m 305
a jht Annex 757 661' from 3 00
PV 5 0 pV The Strong
. � . � ,� a nter�1 In
,����. a re acmistereo m
�� . Firsi Vee'ing No advance
� �� sti a- ��- s necessary
CADP
impus A - a-c D'ug
. jm .v ar- a eeig on
T "ursda� a' 5 0C P n
" e set " I ' ' -prence room
� i - Ha a- , 'ude n
�tec n lurthei "y respns die
attitudes arc ihe use ol
suPstan es encrLfdg
.� � (trend Fot �-re info ca'i
157 6793 ' '57 664V
ALPHAXI
DELTA
Alpha Xi Delta is proud to an
nounce their eighteen tan pledges
Lisa Bytner Eilien Carresas San
di Casebier Amy Chapman. Susan
Cooper Connie Drake Patricia
Harris. Meg Hasell. Ehssa
Haskeil Kathryn House. Nancy
Jahn. Judy Koch Susan Petty.
Karen Priflgen, Miki Scheer,
Maribeth Williams. Nora
Wnliams. Deiores Worthmgton
We are looking torward to a grea'
year'
ALPHAXI
DELTA
Alpha Xi Delta congratulates its
newes' Initiate Sarah Butler
Mary Louise Butt Laura Ketner
Pan Lanaerith and Jeanme
Woolard We welcome girls as
very special Sisters
FRISBEE
Congratulations to ECU'S Linda
Bur' who is the NC Womens All
Around Frisbee Champion She
won the 'itie at the state cham
P'Onships in Raleigh Sept 11 and
12 Georgia S'ate Championships
are fills weekend in Augusta any
members who want to go. contact
Peter Lauber' Anyone who is In-
terested 'h playing ultimate or
learn,ng tr.sbee Skills Should iom
the club every Tues and Thurs at
the bottom of college hill a' 4 00
FRiSBEE RUSH par'y on Oct 1
Ask any member of the club for
details Thanks to Mike Cotter for
arranging the oemo at the Wnson
School tor the Deaf at which club
members demonstrated and
�augnt tnsbee tun
BASIC NAUi
PADI SCUBA
Why not ,o,n our new class
which begins Tuesdy October 12?
instruction will be held on campus
except for tne open wafer eves
which are necessary requirements
tor certitica'ion Registration ,s
limited For more in!orma' ion can
757 6143
TAOIST CIRCLE
Taoism ttve o'd ye timely and
universal philosophy of China
teaches inner and u'er harmony,
heai'h peace and iOy The Taoist
Circle will meet on Sunday
September 26 a' 00 PV a' tne
K wan!S She"er 'ocated behind
the Elm S'reet Gymnasum
v,Sors are mos' welcome, and
refreshrnents will be served The
location in case ot rarn wii be a'
1113 South Evans Street For tur
ther inforration r.a '� e ther
758 1739 or 758 4255 eve"mgs be
wee" 6 ana 9 PV
PRE PHYSICAL
THERAPY
STUDENTS
Dead'ine for 983 M" sS'Or to
professional phase s October 1$,
982 A'i genera' college a"0
physical therapy creds must be
completed by end ot Spring 1983
Allied Hea1 Profess.ons Adnvs
sions Test must be 'aken in
November iapplv prior 'o October
3) Appl'ca'ion and interview ap
pomtments are to be made by
Sep'errber 24 1982 in departmen
tai office Beik Bu'ldmg, Annex 3.
757 6961 ext 261'
SIGMA TAU
DELTA
The Sigma Tau Delta English
Honor Society will hold its lirst
meeting of the fall semester next
Thursday. Setember 30. from
5 00 7 00 at the New Deli located
on Cotanche Street downtown
Greenville All members are en
couraged to attend Other in
terested persons are cordially in
vited to attend
SEMINAR
The Department of Chemistry
will hold a seminar on "Lab Data
Networks tor Automated In
strumentation it will be given by
Paul Gemperline, Assistant Pro
fessor at ECU The seminar will
be held Friday, September 24 at
3 00 p m m Room 201, Flanagan
Building Refreshments will be
served m the conference room
following the seminar
THANKS FOR
BANNERS!
Did you notice the banners in the
football stadium Saturday night?
Well, it you didn't, you really miss-
ed it Through the efforts of the
Student Athletic Board, seven
campus organizations designed
banner to be judged and displayed
during game Our winner, JarviS
Dorm, receives a free keg of oeer
provided by our local
Anheuser�Bush distributor, Jef
fery s Beer and W.ne We would
like to thank Jarvis Dorm and an
ot the other contributor to Satur
day's contes' and would like to en
courage every group here on cam
pus 'o ge' involved in this SAB pro
ect if your group would like to
dispiay a banner on Saturday
Septemoer 25 please go by Pam
Holt's office m the officer ot
Athletics, 2nd floor M'nges There
are some forms and guidelines
that you need to pick from Pam
before displaying a banner Ail
banners must be hung in the
stadium by 10 00 am Saturday
morning to be ludged The wmner
will be announced a' halt time of
the Central Michigan game
GOD
Do you believe in God7 Were you
'augn' '��' God wants us to have
an abundant enioyable life7
(John 10 10. I Timothy 6 17' God
lays out the principles and a'
t tubes you need to live an en
ryable fu'i life, -n the Bible, which
iS His word II Peter 1 20. 21)
Come check out our fellowships
where we leam 'o nve i fe e"
loyabiy nke God wa"ts us 'c
Thursday Sept 24 and Monday
Sept 28 a' 7 30 PM in Mendenhai'
S'udent Cen'er in Rm 242
INTERVIEWING
SKILLS WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Place
ment Service if! the Bloxton House
is offering these one hour sessions
to aid you m developing better In
terviewmg skills for use in your
10b search You may select a time
from those listed below
September 23 1982 Thursday
3 00 p.m
September 28, 1982 Tuesday
4 00 p m
October 4. 1982 Monday 3 00
p m
A film and discussion ot inter
viewing through the Career Plann
ing and Placement Service will be
shared
BAKE SALE
Phi Alpha Theta and the ECU
History Department are sponsor
ing a bake sale Thursday. Sept 23
from 9 00 am fo 2 00 pm Cakes,
brownies and other goodies will be
sold (Brewsfer A 317)
CORSO
ECUS own student organization
for future professionals in the field
ot social work and correctional
service win be meeting Monday.
Sept 27, at 5 30 pm in Room 101
All maiors and intended maiors
are urged to attend
PSI CHI
Come ano see what creatures go
bump m the ECU forest You can
find out first hand at the Psi Chi
cookout party to be held
September 29 (ramdate Sept 30
frcm 4 30 to 7 pm The froncx will
be held in the oeii between loth
street and B'Oiogy Greenhouse
Reserve your fun and buy a ticke'
at the Psi Chi library for $2 00 or at
the cookout for $2 50 ,pas for
food, soda ana beer You will
never know who you will meet
uniess you come
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
COURSES
Personal Development courses
begin
Sept 23 Retirement Planning
Sep' 25 introduction to Sman
Computer Oct 18 Getting
Organ,zed Oct 21 Real Estate
Finance Commodity Hedging
OC 26 Aerobic Exercise Nov 17
Real Esta'e Appraisal
Sept 29 Mime Sep' 30
ves'ng m the 80 s Oct 5 Baske'
ban Officiating Oc i2 Coping
wh Stress. Philosophy anc
Re'irement For intormaVcr ca'
757 6143
ATTENTION
On Monday September 27 8 9 00
p m m Hendrix theatre Pi Kappa
Phi ano CADP will sponsor well
known Dr Kenneth Mills from
UNC The topic of discussion will
be "Alcohol Prevention Free ad
mission to community and entire
campus
AEROBICS AND DANCE
Noontime masses in Aerobics
(already m progress but
newcomers welcomel tor faiu"?
and staff are held on Monday
Wednesday, and Friday in Room
112, Memorial Gym Noontime
classes m Ballroom dancing istart
October 7) for Faculty ana S'att
will be held on Tuesdays and
Thursdays Both ot these classes
are free and you may call Jo
Saunders 757 6000 for further in
formation
SCIENCE MAJORS
Need some i gnt readinq7 l -�.
A C S S A is takmg orders for the
CRC Handbook ot Chemistry ana
Physics ana the CRC Handbook of
Tables tor Organic Compound
Identification for S25 00 and J20 00
respectively A reference must for
any science maior' Place orders
in the Chemistry office located in
Flanagan between "ie "ours of
10 00 and 12 00 Sept 20 'hrough
Oct 8 Place your orders now'1
Paymen' due when order s piac
ed
PHI BETA LAMBDA
T"e Om.cron C-ap'er of P"
Be'a ambda w "old ,ts nex
meeting Wednesday September
29 at 4 p m in Rawi 339 Member
s"ip 'S open 'o aii persons maior
ing in business a"d business
education
?e
S4
DISNEY WORLD
INTERNSHIPS
'�a ' O s"Py wor d's Mage
c rr C" ,pge n'ensnip Pro
r w oc nterv ewmg on cam
iOcI 5 982c3 30 5 00pm
"p r sd" "g a"d summer n
is S'uoe a work 30 hours
week and earn approximately
op- hour for 0 A-eeks Spec a
- "g se "ars -e'a weekly
des a II be piaceo according
the r ma ors Any .nterested
des should coact the Co op
ce n 33 Raw or can ex' 6979
PHYE MAJORS
An s'udents who plan 'o declare
phys.ca' education as a maior dur
ing change ot mB,or week tor 'he
Fan Semes'er. should report tc
Minges Conseum from 1 00 3 00
p m on Wednesday September 29
tor a mo'or ano physical fitness
s' Sat sfac'ory performance on
� i- s -esT s requi'ed as a prere
gu Site tor official aami'tance to
'ne physical educa'ion maior pro
gram More de'aiied information
concerning the resl s available by
camng 757 6441 or 6442
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
COURSES
BaS'C NAUI or PADI SCUBA
Certification Sep' 14 OC 7
Bas'C Sailing Sep' '6 OC 2
Begi"n,ng Ball'oom and in
termedate Bal'room Sept
17 Nov 19 Texas Country Dance
Sep' 18 Nov 20
Darkroom Photography I Sep'
18 Nov 13 Yoga Sept 29 OC 13
Conversa'ionai German Sept 21
Nov 23 Camera i Sept 21
Oct 19 jazz Exercise Sept 21
OC 21
Guitar Sept 21 Nov 9 Banio
Sept 21 Nov 9 Algebra Review
Sept 22 Oct 10 Clogging I Sept
22 OC 27 Re'irement Planning
Sept 23 OC 14
For more information can
757 6143
ECMUG
Eas' Carolina V crocomputer
Users Group is a new dub termed
as" January ope" to an people in
'he Greeny e area nte'es'ec n
microcompu'ers The club holds
mee'ings e second Tiu'soay ot
each month a' 7 30 pm in
Vende"nan 2J F3r further .nfc
caii R.ck Athey President, a'
7 56 8793
EAST CjUKXJNA UMVEtSin
1907-1912
r1
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Marsh's Surf-NSea, Inc.
Surfboards - Surfwear - Rentals - Repairs
hobie Catamarans
AMF Sailboats & Windsurfer
� Parts & Accessories
�r�y ot tin
Shoes by Portsider, Timberland, OP, Coolshoes, TopSider
Now have Ig. stock of OP Jackets, Sweaters, Pants, Esprit Winter Clothes
10 off any clothing items with coupon
206 E. 5th Street Downtown Greenville
Does not apply to sale items.
CRAFTS
MSC is offering a variety of
crafts workshops for Fall
Semester 1982 ano are available
for enrollment immediately The
workshops are free to all members
ot the Crafts Cen'er Each
memoer may enroll in one ll)
workshop The cost of a Craf's
Center Membership s JIO 00 per
semester which includes the use of
the facilities tool check out. use ot
library materials, and aid of ex
per enced supervisors
ah tacui'v and s'att. their
spouses and depenaents who are
Menpenhali S'uden' Center
members may loin the Crafts
Center Dependents must be eigh
teen years of age or oiaer 'o be
eiegibie lo iom
Crafts Center Memberships are
available during regular
operat ng hours. 3 00 PM u I
10 00 PM Monday tnrougn Fr
day and 12 00 Noon unti 5 00 PM
Saturday Following is a list of
available workshops Floor coom
Weaving Thursdays : Sep'ember
30 October 28) 6 9 PM Pot'ery
Mondays (September 27
November i. 6 9 PM Baske'r,
Wednesdays i September 29
November 31 6 9 PM P-ctogracn.
Thursdays Sep'ember 30 Nov
f 7 10 PM Jewelry Metals Mon
days Novemoer 8 December 6
6 9 PM Darxroom Tecn.ques
Mondays September 27
N eml I 6 30 9 TO PM
CATHOLIC NEWMAN
CENTER
The Ca'noi.c Newmar Ceer
would like " nvit everyone t
n witti us for ceieca' "5
Mass every S�"cai n 'ne Boiogy
Lecture a! sar' ng a 12 30 aa
e.ery Aecesday a' 5 00 at 'he
Catholic Newman Center loca'ed
down a' the bottom ot College Hill
BOWLING
MSC 'S sponsor ng ar ECU S'u
den' s M sxeo Doubles Bowling
ieague The Monan N.g1
League will nave an organ;la
t.onai mee' ng en Noda
September 27 a' 5 00 pm n re
MSC Bowl rg Cee' Tne ' ues
day night league II mee' on
Tuesday Septemper 28 Pa.
begn directly follow ng ea I
organizational meeng Sign up
your team of 2 men anc 2 women
on tne dct'om of tne ficx
Menaenhati Sfude Ce�'ef For
'� nformaii - i 757 66i i
�� 260
BIOLOGY CLUB
Tnere will be a B
mee'mg on Monday Sep'emoe-
a' 7 30 p m An Med" Prcprotes
S'onai Evaiua' on Comei "ee
�eoe's spea- ana a-swe'
Ques'cs Anyone r, '�'� .4-q
professional neai"1 ca'eers are en
couraged " attend Refresttments
will oe served
TKE RUSH
TKE Lil S.s RUSH Sep' 22 and
23. 9 i2 00 f � � t. ali 758 7699 or
758 9802
SPORT CLUBS
Get ready tor a a"as- ,ear
F r�d -u' everytttintj you e�er
ASecc know abc : s
Cu'rey F e "3 Hocney Zx"
nas cs Kara'e Rugby Soccer
Surfing 'es' Nandba
Aa'e' Poio are adve Spcr' C �bs
. MJ and your ff ecs -�
beg - a -e C ub ae'T the
cub riforma" ���( i
SPCRT CL -BS ViS' " � ��
THE F ST MEE' NG ��H -
A BE HELD WEDMi
SEPTEMBER NMEMOD
GVM ROOM "C5 3 a" t X :
Ac'ive spir clubs if
ga- za0ra mee' r�ga � - W
eieC on of oft 'e-s a"2 prepa'a
� � sched . e s -
mee r
ALPHA BETA ALPHA
The Aipna Be'a a ; �
�trar S - - " '
hoia s piedg "si
prspec' e ifo'S Verr
sn o s iOen ' � " '
ma n lacuitt
'nose nterestec
�-
eren � be neto
iepoer 28 a 5 3 ' � �
�"�e brary Science c
'eres'ec c ease
e sepa "
K 11
U S NAVY
INTERVIEWS
rttc . . - . .
menl Service r tne B �
- .
N . . - . '
� �-�'��'
Ilk wit
-
. - . -
A -
- ' ' - "
FELLOWSHIP
. �
- 15 next meet
Tne room ;
MSC a' 5 c
hen ie
be new a
ser�eo a'
SEMINAR
- -
. . - - � -
- - �
- - ��� -

-
Ri
K I
PLANT SALE
FRESHMEN
REGISTER
f- 'Q�r
. �
n TueMMH
� . - � . -
I he r ai �roiiilMin
-
Eas' Ci-1 " a�
. 1
-
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use �he orm a, right or
use a separate sheet of Daper if
you need more lines There are 33
units per line Each letter, punc
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit Capitalize and
hyphenate words properl . Leave
space at end of line if word
doesn't fit No ads will be ac
cepted over the phone We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
Name
Address.
City �'State
No. lines
at
po ne S.
I
T
,�y-
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
75 per hne or Fraction ol a line.
Please prim legibly! Use capital and
lonci ae leiterv
Return lo IHE r nIROUNlAN
office n 3:1)0 Iut-sdav before
ednesda puhlkation.v
I -
- " �
- -
4�.�.�-�
� -
r-
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
e
i
i
i
i
L
Let us help decorate your
dorm or apartment.
Tapscott �esigijs
Wicker mats, all types of brass, pot-pourri by Claire Burke,
large selection of Christmas items. We have personalized
prints for fraternities & sororities. ino rrr
, lUoUrr
222 E. 5th St. Free merchandise
757-3558 gift with coupon
wrapping.
OLO COLLEGE SHOP BLOG.
LIMIT ONE COUPON
PER PURCHASE
P1
So
I

(.1
SUN SEPT. 26
Doors Open 7:30 to 8:15 P.M. for Advance Ticket Holders Only
ADVANCE TICKETS $5.00
TICKETS AT THESE LOCATIONS:
WESTERN PLEASURE. APPLE RECORDS, AND THE CAROLINA OPRY HOUSE
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 758-3943
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
f
:





I hi 1 s I -k 'I Is' XN
SI fll 1UI k

nly
Reagan Policies Detrimental To
Education, John Anderson Says
Hn (.KM. R1DEOI 1
John nderson, the
I980 presidential
peful, iv bus these
days 1 'he nun who
tn thought would
ow a monkey
vrem h into the 1980
on machinery is
w speaking out
the � in net's
ps
" 1 he battle ot the
budget has been fought
explained that mosl oi necessity oi upgrading blems, such as
the increased funding oui human capital, economic recovery,
foi education was a
result ot the 1958 Na
tional Defense Educa
lion Act
In reference to wha
he calls the mixed up
nore so than our rebuilding ol industry
physical capital and the growth ot
. uts in highei educ- crime in the nation's
tional grants like the cities. "Can we hope to
Guaranteed Student tend to these problems,
Loan would weigh or can there be
priorities of the Reagan most heavily on low domestic tranquility
dministrati o n .
ndei son a i ned .
"We ought to be con
cerned, mote than eei
be t oie . about the
t amities, v hen international
ndeison said. peace depends not on
nderson is the law, but on who can
pessimistic about other stack nuclear weapons
I nited States pro the highest
the disad
nders saio in a
speech ai Duke
� on c ii
cuts in
trimental
ess fori u nai e
ol SCK
Reagan took ol
defense
Center Gives Support
B I'MKIIK
ONI II I
� growth in the
� educat'
" explait
? s k y' s i
� �
� � ailing
� the country i It
R


i ; . .us the Real
Crisis Centei has been
operating as a con
fidential counseling
centt at pi o ides
suppoi t lo peop .
trt lav ed kvith a ci isis
Rl i . a non pi
hun services
. aniat ion, local ed
10th Street, is
lat i i ed by the (
retar ol state,
licensed by the C
Department ol Human
Resources at d ac
edited b the Noi
Drug Com
mission.
"he organizai
several
P -
im id
I nts u
w REAI
"People may c
� by teW
by wall
Mary Smith, dirt �i
� RI 1 "Somebody
. .
ntacts at Rl M ai .
ming ft om 1I
idei Mai

a
such as "boy girl rela
tionship pi oblems,
roommate pi oblems, Ol
Iust getting along with
ot hei people pro-
blems
" e have 24-houi
confidential service,
up to-date referral in-
formation, general in-
foi mation and counsel-
Smith states.
Rl AI also provides a
24 houi telephone ser-
: .ailed Mil P
LIN! (758-HELP)
accounts foi
tut tvo thnds ol
the contacts.lt
han,tic- about 400 calls
p month.
Besides Smith and
� husband, the pro-
i � am l oordinatoi. the
Rl 1 siat! is compos
ol volunteers who
� dei. �ne an in-
eight week
� � aining com se. I hree
hese trained
cou actually live
RI 1 House
ate night
respoi ties
�' w e
' e
lo
I scuss concerns and to
It any help a per-
may need Smith
said She adds that
mes all a person
"objective
provide
with some sup-
port, but thai REAI
also provides
knowledgeable people
foi more specific needs.
Smith notes that
drugs, alcohol, family
and general depression
are some ot the more
common problems that
people seek help for.
"Not everyone is in a
crisis situation when
they contact us Smith
said. "They may jusi
be looking for informa-
tion of some kind
On Oct. 5, REAI
will be starting a
volunteer training pro-
gram foi crisis counsel-
ing. Smith invites
anyone who thinks they
would like this tvpe Ol
training to contact hei
foi an mtetv iew .
RI 1 has a board ot
directors thai functions
as policy and procedure
coordinators for the
.enter. At present there
are some openings on
the board Anyone in-
terested is welcome to
apply.
Smith wants I C I
students, especially
freshmen, to know that
REAI is here to help.
"We are here to listen
and to be supportive ol
them (students) and
we'll try to be ot
assistance
R( m XRI1 l
Mi: I iter
Soft Drinks
L
89C
RESEARCH PAPERS
. . - - -
I R( ni rii n
. � � ; .V K' jib I � k
Win lhruHjiwav
Dr. Pepper
Dr. Pepper 2" V
SI.69
Q)
NEWS
WRITERS
NEEDED
Call
757-6366
or come by
the EAST
CAROLINIAN
SPEAK IO
(,KK, RIDEOI I
WASH
HOUSE
Modern Laundramats
Close to Campus
10th St. Across from Krispy Kreme (752-6117)
14th St. 1 Block from the "Hill" (752-9636)
�Large capacity washers
� Lots Dryer
� Color TV's with cable
� Video Games
� FluffFold Service
� 10th St. �Open 24 hrs.
� Attendants
r
Introductory Offer
I FREE WASH wthis coupon I
Limit 1 coupon per visit. �
Coupon expires 929
Little
Sister
Rush
9:00 P.M
MON.&
TUES.
Across from Art Bid. & Garret Dorm
Corner of 5th & Summit
Call 752-2941 for Details
FAMOUS PIZZA
Fast Friendly Delivery
Delivery is I Rl I
758-5982 or 5616
Buy Any Large Pizza
Get 6pack or pitcher
of golden beverage
FREE
HAPPY HOUR � 7 Days a Week
2 P.M. until CLOSING
Pitcher $1.79 Mug35C
Wine 50C
Spicy Italian or Greek
Taco � $1.99
Busch
6Pks.
$2.49 Bud
$2.99
SUN SEPT. 26
Doors Open 7:30 to 8:15 P.M. for Advance Ticket Holders Only
ADVANCE TICKETS $5.00
TICKETS AT THESE LOCATIONS:
WESTERN PLEASURE, APPLE RECORDS. AND THE CAROLINA OPRY HOUSE
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 758-3943
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA






Site East (Earnlitrian
Ser'ini the East Carolina campus community since 1925
W ri Merri l I
ROBl Rl Rl( KS. H .
A I I l RASH II H. i
Si I PHANil GRO .
JONI Gt 1 tIKH . �
Ill 1 DING Mil I I R. Gramri MwMtn
Mike Hughes, ��, f.i,�
, h Cindy Pi fasan rs, s &�
Ernest Conner, v� �
Steve Bachni-r.���w,v�,��r
u JulianaFahrbach, s�(��
��� Miki Davis, ���,�,�.�iAmc�r
?v ir
Opinion
Page 4
Players' Strike
Athletes For The '80s
With scores of other, more
newsworthy, issues making the
headlines lateh - -i.e unrest in the
Middle East, tensions in Poland,
etc. - a sti ike by United States pro-
fessional football players seems ut-
terly ridiculous and obviously trivial
by comparison. Alter all, these
other world issues pose great con-
cern and serious threats to the well-
being o( humanity And foot-
ball's onl a game Right?
Well, n used to be.
Football used to mean Sunday
after Sunday come hell or high
water � o' great rivalries, thrilling
victories, heartbreaking defeats,
poster-board heroes "the stuff
dreams are made of In short,
foe ball was the American dream
incarnate. Il wasn't that long ago.
But now, like practically
everything else in American society,
football, and sports in general, have
become nothing but big-business
ventures, corporate investments,
filled with overpriced athletes,
nauseatingh flamboyant owners
and lackluster coaches.
And the future o "the great
American passtime" is in serious
jeopardv.
Consider the demands the Na-
tional Football League Players'
Union has made: They originally
sought 55 percent o the gross
revenues from the league's 28 teams
� an estimated $3.6 billion over
five years.
Then, lasl Friday, the players
changed then demands and asked
for half ol the clubs' 52.1 billion
television contract, plus a
minimum-wage scale based on
length of service.
Despite their not being able to
reconcile on most o' the points in
question, the players and owners are
agreed, basically, on how much the
new contract should cost � SI.6
billion. That figure speaks for itself
� positively outrageous.
Not that football players are sole-
y responsible for breaking down
the American ideal, not at all.
Baseball players struck during the
summer of 1981 for nearly two
months. No one has forgotten that.
But when several of the striking
pro football players attempt to
justify their actions by comparing
the NI 1 strike to walkouts in other
professions, such as teachers, nurses
and the like, something is wrong
with their conceptions of value to
the system.
Those analogies are simply
beyond reproach. They actually
don't even merit response.
Nonetheless, they'll get one.
What these pro football players
are neglecting to consider is that
educational careers, while far more
demanding of individuals, pay
disgustingly less than sports profes-
sions.
How dare they compare their
strike to that of teachers and
nurses? When a teacher goes on
strike, it isn't because he or she
desires a handsome $10,000 or
$20,000 bonus and a cut off the top;
it's so that he or she can eat, buy
clothes and pay the bills at month's
end.
What's happened to the world of
sports? Where have all the heroes of
yesteryear gone? Have they all been
sucked into "the well of perver-
sion which has become the
American norm? At one time, the
term sports was synonymous with
competition, the thrill of
human drama, the agony of
defeat At one time, every
American boy from eight to 18
wanted to be "just like" Johnny
Unitas or Bart Starr. At one time, it
was a hard-fought race to the finish,
and may the best man win.
But today, sports has taken on a
new look, a new dimension, and, it
seems, a new purpose. Drug usage
among players runs grossly ram-
pant; paychecks have become vir-
tually the sole motivation; and the
game itself (be it football, baseball,
basketball or whatever) has become
almost incidental.
And it isn't all on the professional
level either. Players nowadays learn
the perversions of sport long before
they reach that plateau of competi-
tion. College violations are now vir-
tually routine. Suspensions and
reprimands today draw scarce a se-
cond glance from anyone. And the
slap-on-the-wnst penalties imposed
by governing bodies hardly work to
discourage recurrence.
And even on the very basic levels
of athletic competition, American
youth learn more and more ways to
evade, or "step around the rules
year after year. It's no wonder,
then, that the corruption of sports
in this country has reached its cur-
rent proportions.
The NFL players' strike has
become a reality � and, in that, a
tragedy. A tragedy, not so much for
the fact that a Sunday (and
Monday-night) tradition has been
thwarted but because of what the
very heart of that tradition has
become.
New Bible Hard To 'Digest'
"In the beginning was the Word And
the Word became " misinterpreted. And
the misinterpretation became a money-
making venture. And the money-making
venture became the Reader's Digest
Condensed Bible. (MH)
'And so it came to pass ajter seven
years, in the second year oj the presidency
of Ronald Reagan, that their work was
done. On the Sabbath, the scribes rested,
while the Jruit oj their labor was released
to the multitudes. " (AP)
Well, they've finally done it condens-
ed the Bible. I just can't believe it. 1 mean,
shortening something like War and Peace
or Edna And The Killer Whale is one
thing, but the Bible? Oh my! What is the
world coming to?
It wouldn't be so bad, except for the fact
that the editors just went through and rip-
ped some of the best stuff right out.
"Some of the minor characters they say,
"have been consigned into anonymity
Minor characters? Hah! 1 think they need
to reassess their priorities. Why, they even
threw out the story of Biztha the eunuch!
I'm outraged.
They say they've just excised the three
r's repitition, rhetoric and redundancy.
Whew! Seems to me, they're just asking
for trouble.
Think about it. If someone doesn't draw
the line soon, who's to say what'll happen
next?
I can see it now: Condensed poetry �
"How do I love thee? Let me count the
way (Beth Browning)
Condensed drama � A Guy From
Verona or Return oj the Secaucus Trio.
Condensed television � "The Emmy
Award-winning 43 Minutes" featuring
"A Minute With Andy Rooney
Even condensed pornography � Debbie
Does Selected Parts oj Dallas. And I
wonder what'll happen to "men's enter-
tainment like Playboy magazine? Before
you know it, they'll probably make the
centerfold a four-part serial.
This is madness. Admittedly, 1 haven't
yet had the privilege of reading the new
book, but I can just guess what the
Reader's Digest editors pulled out of the
original. And one thing I am sure of is that
they undoubtedly remained true to the in-
famous Digest tradition of outstanding
literature.
In Genesis, for example, I'll bet God
puts in some overtime, creates the universe
in the world's first four-day work week
and takes the weekend off to go to the
beach. A couple of hundred "begets" get
the red line. And the Great Flood probably
scourges the Earth for, oh maybe a
month or so.
Israel is broken down into four or five
tribes, depending on who you ask. And
Moses leads the Israelites out of Egypt and
into the desert for, say umm about
half a page.
Mike Hughes
Just The Wa It Is
Ks
And in keeping with the Reader's Digest
fine heritage of literary excellence, I'm
quite sure Daniel and Revellahon have
been revised into "Apocryphal An-
thologies or "Armageddon For The
'80s featuring stones of three-headed
monsters and other chilling tales.
Only in America � land ot E.T Cliffs
Notes, the electronic date-around, the
drive-thru clothing outlet � could a con-
densed Bible even be conceived, let alone
published.
Let's face it; we Americans are a lazy
people. Everything has to come so nice and
easy � so short and sweet. 1 don't mind it
so much with some things, like coffee or
bagels, but the Bible0 I iust don't know
And in the New Testament. Jesus pro-
bably maintains only about a half-doen
disciples, which � 1 must admit � would
make keeping track of Judas a bit easier.
And, no doubt, Acts of the Apostles has
been shortened into "Apostolic Routines"
or "Saintlv Scenes
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes is a fifth-year
transjer student from Selma Community
College, where he majored in arc welding
He hopes that one dav, Ronald Reagan
will hire the Reader's Digest editors to con-
dense his speeches.
Army! Navy! Air Force! Marines!
Set Yourself Apart?
By PAT O'NEILL
This past Monday, many ECU students
picked up their free copy of the fall edition
of Sutshell magazine. The magazine, pro-
vided by the ECU Alumni Association,
had a couple of decent articles and lots of
advertising.
Among the advertisers were four
familiar names: Army, Navy, Air Force
and Marines.
All the people pictured in the ads were
dressed in bright, clean uniforms; some
had smiles on their faces, and words like
"exciting" and "challenging" kept cropp-
ing up. All I could think of were words like
"blood, suffering and death the real im-
ages of what happens when the military is
at work.
"AimHighthe Air Force ad read. "It's
a future that demands the vision and com-
mitment of people like you. And it's vital
to our country.
The "vision" I have is that of the multi-
billion-dollar B-l bombers that the Air
Force is now adding to its fleet of nuclear-
equipped jets. I think their "commitment"
is to get as much money as they can to
build even more of these weapons.
"Don't just take a job the Navy ad
read; "take charge They're right! Join-
ing the Navy is not just a job. In fact they
may ask you to get on board one of their
Trident submarines and possibly be in
"charge" of firing one of its 462
independently-targetable nuclear missiles
at some unarmed city.
The Marine Corps boasts of the honor
of being one of them, and their ad read,
"the challenges are unique I'll say they
are. Perhaps if you join the Marines, you'll
get the chance to go down to El Salvador
and "advise" the murderous ruling junta's
troops. No wonder there are so "few" of
them. But, personally, I don't see what
they have to be proud of.
The Army ad says it all in one sentence:
"Be all that you can be Fortunately, I
can think of things I'd rather be than a
soldier in the Army.
Let's face it; the military is trying to tell
us lots of things that just aren't true. In to-
day's nuclear age, the last thing any nation
needs to do is rely on its military. Even the
"smallest" of conflicts could easily
escalate into a nuclear war that could end
our world. It's time that we Americans
became "the few, the proud and the
peaceful.
Massive
By JACK ANDERSON
and JOE SPEAR
WASHINGTON � President Reagan's
economists are desperately looking for
ways to reduce the massive federal deficit.
Without some larEe cuts, say the experts,
there are hard times ahead.
But the economists can't find a painless
way to cut the federal overhead significant-
ly. So, they're talking about a painful solu-
tion: Ihey believe a drastic cut in Social
Security may be necessary.
This kind ot talk has been restricted to
th- backrooms. But we've seen a confiden-
tial report ol the International Monetary
Fund which touches on these discussions.
The IMF is a United Nations institution
which lends money to member nations who
are in dire financial straits. Its reports on
the U.S. economy are highly important
because thev are untainted by domestic
political concerns and are therefore objec-
tive.
The experts at the IMF foresee tight
money and high interest rates down the
road. This is the only way, they say, to
beat inflation.
States their confidential report: "The
staff is of the view that pursuit of the
policies needed to bring down inflation will
mean a relatively sluggish economy for
some time to come
The reduction of high budget deficits,
the report adds, "is undoubtedly the single
most important task Here's what the
document says about slashing Social
Security benefits:
"It was estimated that a fiscal effort of
$20 billion to $40 billion would be
necessary to deal with the immediate pro-
blems of the system It's clear from the
context that the economists were referring
to a cut.
One section of the report describes the
preliminary work being done on the 1984
budget. From this, we can tell you that
another controversial idea is receiving
serious attention. During their discussions
with U.S. government officials, noted the
IMF economists, "mention was made of a
flat-rate income tax
TRAGIC FOREBODINGS: There were
ominous signs of death and danger when I
dined only a few weeks ago with
Lebanon's President-elect Bashir Gemayel
in the very office where he was killed by a
bomb explosion last week. The premises
were embanked by sandbags and sur-
rounded by bodyguards. The safeguards
obviously weren't enough to protect him
from assassination.
Gemayel talked fatalistically of the risks
he facedfrom bitter antagonists who wish-
ed his death. He showed me a picture of his
two-year-old daughter, who had been kill-
ed by a bomb meant for him. For security,
he disclosed, he never rode in the same car
two days in a row.
His hope was to bring peace and order to
his wartorn country. Now, the prospect is
for more vicious fighting and killing.
Even before the tragic assassination, in-
telligence sources warned that Lebanon
faced further strife between the Israelis
and the Arabs. They cited evidence that
several thousand PLO fighters remained in
west Beirut, hidden in underground tun-
nels where weapons had been secreted. In
addition, PLO leaders who had ostensibly
left Beirut under the watchful eye of U.S.
Marines and Italian and French forces re-
established themselves surreptitiously in
the Bekaa Valley, where they still menaced
the peace.
The death of Gemayel seriously derailled
the Reagan administration's strategy to
achieve peace in the Middle East. Reagan
had counted on the Lebanese leader to sup-
port his initiative by refusing to sign a
peace pact with Israel's Menachem Begin
until the Israeli government moderated its
hardline policies.
THRIFTLESS FIRST FAMILY: Philip-
pines President Ferdinand Marcos sent
more than 100 advance men and press
aides ahead several months ago to set
things up for his state visit last week. They
took over an entire floor of the Holiday
Inn across the street from the Philippines
Embassy.
Later, literally hundreds more flunkies
flew in from Manila to dance attendance
on the president and his wife during their
visit.
Mrs. Marcos, a spendthrift on the scale
of Marie Antoinette, arrived in the United
States with some 300 pieces of luggage. She
checked into the Waldorf Astoria in New
York. Her suite cost Philippines taxpavers
$1400 a day.
Extravagance apparently runs in Im-
elda's family. Her brother. Benjamin
Romualdez, was named ambassador to the
United States a few months ago.
Brother Benjamin has even outraged
other officials of the Marcos government
with his freespending habits. He rented an
elegant townhouse on Embassy Row
Almost every night, we're told, he throws
lavish parties. The guests include govern-
ment officials and members of the
Washington press corps.
CONFIDENTIAL FILE: The Soviet
Union, which boasts of being a worker"s
paradise, will run into labor problems m
the next few years. An unpublished CIA
report says the Russian labor force will
grow by only a fraction of its current rate
in the five years to come. The number of
able-bodied males available for the
workforce is diminishing because of
alcoholism and other health problems, the
Washington analysts found.
Copyright. IWJ.
United Fmurr Synthetic. Iiv
t
1
" " " ' ' ' '
Ml
i





I til s K l I IMN
si 111 MB! R 2. 1982
ice.
1
In a
tell
to-
Hon
the
isily
lend
tans
the
lm-
rnin
o the
faged
in-cut
:d an
'W
krows
crn-
the
viet
rVer's
ns in
CIA
will
it rate
er of
the
of
. the
Learn To Write To Read
UPl � John Henry
Martin is an educator
who wants to combine
modern technology
with an old and
honored method of
teaching primary grade
students how to read.
Martin and his wife
Evelyn are the founders
of JHM Corp. of
Stuart. Fla a firm that
belnes children ought
to learn to read by first
being taught to write.
Martin's "Writing to
Read" program has at-
tracted widespread at-
tention. Some
educators are en-
thusiastic about the
plan, but others are
skeptical.
The International
Business Machines
Corp. is conducting a
major test of the pro-
gram inoling 10,000
kindergarten and first-
grade pupils in North
Carolina, Florida, New
York, Minnesota,
Texas and Washington,
DC The results of the
lest, expected in June,
1983, will be evaluated
b an independent
educational testing ser-
vice.
IBM has loaned 300
of its new Personal
Computers to the test
schools, according to
Jeanette Maher, an
IBM spokeswoman in
Boca Raton. Fla. The
computers are linked to
the instructional pro-
grams developed by the
Martins. The package
also includes a system
of printed and audio
materials and teacher
training devices.
But the computer ter-
minal is only a part of
the Martins' ex-
perimental teaching
method, Maher said.
"The children are
first taught phonetics
and they learn from
there. They use the
computer 15-to-20
minutes, then use a
workbook which
teaches them what they
have learned on the
computer. They
develop their motor
skills by actually
wn the words.
Then they go to
another part of the pro-
gram where they put on
earphones and listen to
classic children
stories Maher said.
Martin said the con-
ventional way of
teaching children to
read first, then to write,
is the ' 'curse of
teaching His idea of
"writing to read" led
him back to "the very,
very old approach" of
teaching reading.
That approach,
which died out about
the time of World War
I, was the slate and
chalk method. The in-
structor handed out a
slate and a piece of
chalk to each child. As
the pupil learned how
to form each letter of
the alphabet and put
them together to make
up words, he wrote
them on the slate.
But the slate became
"a symbol of rural
poverty" and was
taken out of the
classroom between
1910 and 1920, said
Martin. After that, the
process of reading
became purely visual.
"But I discovered
that human hands were
entry points into a
child's brain said
Martin. "Children
begin intuitively to
write. If you have a
sound-symbol connec-
tion, the child can put
sounds on paper This
is the basis of Martin's
"Writing to Read"
program.
When reading comes
first, Martin said the
English language, with
all its inconsistencies �
such as "threw" and
"through" or "bear
and "bare" � makes
children feel they are ir-
rational or stupid. Yet
normal 5-year-olds
already possess a
vocabulary of 2,000 to
4,000 words and can
express complex ideas
orally. When they are
taught to write and
read at the same time,
we build on that
knowledge, Martin
said.
The computer acts as
an individual classroom
tutor under Martin's
system. It can serve as a
typewriter, primer,
tape recorder and
television screen. It can
produce color, sound
and even a voice. For
example, the computer
may show the picture
of a cat, say the word,
ask the child to repeat
it, and then spell the
word "cat
"This is the word
cat the computer
says. "Say cat Then
"cat" moves to the top
of the screen, and the
computer says, "This is
the sound C and
follows it up with the
letter C and so forth.
After this, there may be
a rhythmic tune, and
the computer asks the
child to clap hands
while chanting the
words along with the
computer.
"How do you think
man transmitted sacred
literature for millenia,
without writing it
down0" asks Martin.
He believes the answer
was by "rhythmic
chant This is the
basis of the "oral tradi-
tion" by which so
much of the Bible was
handed down.
Pepsi and the Pirates
a winning combination
Loneliness Requires Help
Continued FrontPage 1
"We really stress in-
volvement says
Rogers. He advises his
resident student staff to
keep an eye out for
students who might be
having a difficult time
adjusting to their en-
vironment.
Says Mary Smith,
director of the REAL
Crisis Center, "1 think
there's different levels
of loneliness She also
recognizes that some
forms of loneliness are
temporary, but that
others, which may be
more serious or
chronic, are often ac-
companied by depres-
sion.
Smith adds that peo-
ple who are lonely will
often feel rejected and
tend to isolate
themselves. "That
becomes a more serious
situation.
"It takes a while to
adjust, to get to know
people and become
familiar with a new en-
vironment continues
Smith, "and they need
to know that there is
somebody who they
can communicate
with
Wiegand warns that
there is no quick
answer to the problem
of loneliness, but
reaching out for help is
a good first step. "A
weak person cannot ad-
mit a weakness, it will
fracture them. Admit-
tance is a sign of
strength, getting help
takes guts
Wiegand tells his
clients not to
underestimate the abili-
ty of friends, ministers,
or the REAL Center to
help them with their
struggles against
loneliness.
Fdi tor's ote:
Loneliness is just one
of the emotional pro-
blems that students
may be facing for the
first time. Next week,
we will discuss the
places on campus
where siudents can go
to seek support to help
smooth out the rough
edges of college life.
ARCADE VARIETY
III I 5l A Kradrirclt
BUD $2.79
MILLER
$2.38
Gi Carrutiaqed Fatigues and
T Sh.rts, Sleeping Bags
ackpdcks Campintj Equip
nent S'eei Toed Shoes
D � -� did Over 70C DiHerent
�� a-d jsed I'ems Cowboy
B � 134.95
ARMY-NAVY
STORE GsleEe;ans
SUPER SAVERS
14K Fine
Serpentine
ARCADE VARIETY
:i� r 51k 4 krilltirlf
Cigarettes
$4.69 Carton
52C Pack
4K Dainty
Diamond
Pendant Or Slip
Between Beads
(Chain Not Inckitfad)
Sals
Sy97
14K Faith,
Love &
Hope Charm
$9.97
Sate
7
97
Sal
$8.49
SC79
Prices
Good Thru
Oct. 2nd
14K Cutout
"LOVE"
Heart Charm
$11.97
SQ97
Sale 3
14K Engraved
Puffed Heart
$10.97
Sale
Sg97
14K Fine
Serpentine 18'
V
$11.97
Sale
SQ97
ABORTIONS
' 24 week terminations
App'ts. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1-800-321-0575
14K Scallop
Shell Charm
$7.69
5C29
Sale 0
'14K MediumN
Floating
Heart With
Diamond
$7.97
Sale
14K Small
Hoop Earring
$11.49
14K Large
Italian Horn
$11 79
S559
Sale
SQ49
Sal
SQ89
ARCADE VARIETY
218 I ! h i
k-j :� e
Hot Dogs
2for$l00
WE SEW
LEATHER COATS
SAAD'S
SHOE REPAIR
113 Grande Ave.
758 1228
.4K3mm
Gold Ball
Earrings
$9.49
$797
Sale I
14K Football
Charm
$9.97
$797
Sale I
14K Medium
Italian Horn
$8.79
SC89
Sale D
7mm
Gold Beads
$1.79
Sale
$-169
14K Petite
Heart Stud
Earrings
$9.97
SO 44
Sale O
14K Kissing
Couple Charm
$11.47
14K I Love
You Charm
Sale
S949
$9.97
Sale
SQ44
8
14K
Disc
Polished
Charm
14K Baby Cobra
14K Baby CobraN
TRIM YOUR FIGURE
Ol RBtST
LOOK, INC.
Hi m�
Lose 12 i i founds in 3 Weeks
Programs tor Men & Women
� Medical Weight Control
Nutritional Counseling
SKIN CARE
individual Skin Analysis
Deep Pore Cleansing
Face & Body Waning
Manicures and Pedicures
Complimentary Consultation
Check phone book tor
discount coupon
Sale
$17.49
13
97
Chain 15'
$14.97
Chain 18'
Sale
11
97
Sale
$17.97
13
97
14K Fine
Victoria
Chain 16"
$16.97
s1297
14K Unicorn
With Diamond
Sale
$14.97
11
97
14K Guitar
Charm
$12.97
s�s1049
Sale
14K
Genuine Opal
Stud Earrings
Sale
$18.97
14
97
14K5mm
Gold
Ball Stud
Earrings
$13.97
11
14K
Up To
S-M97,
Medium Hoop
Earrings On Wire
14K Large Maple
Leaf Pendant
49
Sale
Sale
$17.97
13
97
Sale
$16.97
12
97
14K Sand
Dollar Charm
$12.97
s-s1077
14K Leaf On
Wire Earring
Sale
$12.97
10
49
Digital Pen
$494
Lady Elgin
Only
� Lord E,9t. 50 �
OFF
MANY MORE IN STORE DAZZLERS TOO NUMEROUS TO MENTION
GREENVILLE
2818 E. 10th ST.
919�752-1600
9:30 A.M. TILL 6:30 P.M.
J.D. DAWSON CO.
CATALOG SHOWROOMS
JEWELERS - GEMOLOGISTS
BELHAVEN
102 MAIN ST.
919�943-2121
9:00 A.M. TILL 5:00 P.M.

f
t





THt I-AST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 23, 1982
Jews Harassed In Europe
By KEITH BRITTA1N
Slaff rilrr
In the wake of the
Israeli invasion of
Lebanon, a rush of
anti-semitism has
descended upon
Western Europe.
In Paris, gunmen
sprayed a Jewish-
owned restaurant with
machine-gun bullets,
killing six people.
Bramy Resnik, a pro-
fessor of foreign
language describes this
and similiar acts a
"very deplorable and
inhuman Bramy is
head of the Greenville
chapter of Hillel. Hillel
is a group of Israeli and
Jewish students.
"What people do not
realize is that a lot of
the killings in Lebanon
have been perpetuated
bv groups of Moslems,
remnants of PLO ter-
rorists and Christian
groups such as the
Phalange Bramy
said.
Many European and
American Jews feel
that the meda is partly
responsible �br renewed
anti-semLLi�m. Jewish
groups claim that the
media shows Lebanese
and Palestinians dead,
and labels Israel as the
aggressor. They claim
that Israeli citizens kill-
ed by PLO terrorist at-
tacks have been forgot-
ten about.
Recent killings in the
refugee camps of
Chatilla and Sabra
made the United States
decide to send the
Marines back to
Lebanon. Israel
disclaimed any respon-
sibility for the killings,
saying that a local
militia was responsible
for the incident.
Some Israeli citizens,
believe that the Israeli
government might have
been indirectly respon-
sible for the murders.
Saturday 500 people
converged outside the
home of Prime
Minister Menachem
Begin to demonstrate.
Israel and American
Jews believe President
Reagan is behind Israeli
causes. They are con-
cerned with the presi-
dent's condemnation of
Israel.
Resnik stated that he
believed that the
business ties of
Secretary of State
George Shultz prevents
him from dealing fairly
with Israel. He feels
that the situation in the
Middle-East should be
solved by mediation,
not by a policy of Arab
appeasement.
"One has to
remember that Israel is
the only stabilizing in-
fluence in the Middle
East, and America's
closest ally. Most Jews
wish that the Lebanon
invasion could have
been avoided, but the
PLO was a sore, a
cancer, that had to be
removed Resnick
said.
The violence in
Europe against Jews
does have, at least in
part, an American
counterpart
"Americans love to
pull for the underdog.
Arafat, when portrayed
as a baby kissing mar-
tyr by the press, affords
American liberals a ra-
tionale for pulling for
the PLO. The man is a
murderer, not a saint,
why can't the liberals
see this said Jacob
Gewitz, head of the
Board of Deputies for
European Jews.
Jewish businesses are
regularly defaced by
painted swastikas.
EXPERIENCE,
RELIABILITY
& KNOWLEDGE
3 GOOD reasons to reelect
JOE ADMIRE
SGA LEGISLATOR FROM
SLAY DORM � SEPT. 29, 1982
Fresh bread:
Whole Wheat
Raisin


Cheese
Butter
J. A. UNIFORMS
SHOP
Bring this ad for
10�7o off
on the purchase of
one of our lab coats!
All types of uniforms at reasonable I
prices Lab coats, stethoscopes, shoe-
and hose. Also - used ECU nurses
uniforms. 1 rade-ins allowed
Located 17 10 W. 6th St.
oft Memorial Drive.
Near Hollowell's Drug and old hospital
jomp

IIS Dickinson Ave
Downtown Greenville
752 5J51
College Leaders Urge Reagan
Against Using Nuclear Warfare
FAMILY EYE CARE
Bv PATRICK
O'NEILL
Miff Wnlrr
The chancellor of the
University of North
Carolina at Chapel
Hill, Dr. Christopher
C Fordham III, was
among 41 college
leaders from
throughout the nation
who have urged Presi-
dent Reagan to seek
ways to settle interna-
tional disputes without
having to resort to
nuclear war.
The group of
academic leaders stress-
ed in a letter to Reagan
that they are not pro-
posing "innocent or
unbalanced trust of the
Soviet Union but
think new or
strengthened interna-
tional institutions are
needed to prevent a
nuclear holocaust.
"The letter called on
the President to find an
alternative to nuclear
war Fordham told
The Fast Carolinian
during a telephone in-
terview. "It didn't call
for unilateral trust of
the Soviet Union
The current and
retired presidents and
board chairmen of
universities and col-
leges said they appealed
to Reagan because ot
their responsibility as
heads of institutions
that are "custodians of
the knowledge and
wisdom on which
civilizations are bas-
ed
Among those signing
the letter with Fordham
included: the Rev.
Theodore Hesburgh,
president of Notre
Dame and Derek C.
Bok, president of Har-
vard University. For-
dham is believed to be
the only signee from
North Carolina.
"We are concern-
ed with the
catastrophe that major
nuclear war would
represent to the
American people and
to all civilizations the
educators said. "We
believe it is urgently im-
portant to begin now to
seek seriously and
vigorously for alter-
natives which would be
more effective in pro-
tecting and promoting
the interest, welfare
and security of the
American people
Fordham said the let-
ter simply expressed
that the United States
should not put itself in
a position where
nuclear war would be
inevitable. "This does
not seem to be our
direction Fordham
said. "The priority of
the ffort to avoid
nuclear war at all costs
should be our goal
and
CONTACT LENSES
Adult and Pediatric vision care in a
relaxed and personal setting Full con-
tact lens services Quick, accurate
eyeglass service.
DR PETER W HOLLIS
anoMFPAK
eECAA�C�XTEJ,
IPTON ANNEX 228GREENVILLE BL
756-9404
00
Any Prescription
Eyeglasses O
OFF Contact Lens Fitting
M s. &e- Prsn-eT 6' T:meOC '�
Ole' Ds Ounts Do Not App��
ST. JAMES UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
UNIVERSITY STUDENT PICK-UP SCHEDULE
Students who w.sh to attend Sunday morning worsh.p services, but do not have a ride. � a"e"
worshTp service at St James Un,ted Method.st Church by observing the following schedule. The church
van will be used to transport students to and from the church.
10:10
Methodist Student Center
10:12
Garrett Resident Hall
10:15
jarvis Resident Hall
10:17
Fleming Resident Hall
10:20
Cotton Resident Hall
10:25
White Resident Hall
10:27
Umstead Resident Hall
10:30
Tyler Resident Hall
10:40
St. James United Methodist Church
GRAND OPENING
CONTINUED THRU SAT SEPT 25
405 E. 14th ST. GREENVILLE
FREE DELIVERY
ECU DORMS AND HOSPITAL
FOR TAKE OUT
CALL: 757-1701
Eating House
Kash & Karry
CONVENIENCE STORE
14TH ST & CHARLES ST. GREENVILLE
Next To University 7QiQnn
Seafood Market fiJOIWUU
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
GRAND OPENING SPECIALS
WE INVITE ALL ECU
STUDENTS TO VISIT USI
HOT ROASTED-
PEANUTS
-HOT POPCORN-
HOT COFFEE-
ICE SLUSHES-
HOT FRENCH FRIES
-HOT ONION RINGS-
FREE BAG
OF
POPCORN
WITH 10 Gal.
OR MORE PURCHASE
OF GASOLINE
THRIFT 30 WT
VIRGIN
MOTOR OIL
QT
REGULAR CONE OF
PINE STATE
ICE
CREAM
c
(ASSORTED FLAVORS)
2 LITER
PIZZA BUFFET DAILY
2.89
� SEAFOOD
� SUBS
� PIZZA
� ROAST CHICKEN
507 E. 14th Street
Greenville. North Carolina
PHONE 757-1701
BUDWEISER
$229
COKE
TAB. SPRITE
OR MELLO YELLO
V
6 PACK
12 OZ
CANS
EA
DAINTY MAID BUTTER WHEAT
BREAD V2
LB.
LOAF
BUY1
GET1
FREE
PINE STATE
MILK
Famous
GAL
JUG
HOT
DOGS
EA
Fixed To Suit You
Call In Orders
VIDEOGAMES
WE SELL AMERICAN EXPRESS
MONEY ORDERS
10 inch Pizza $1.99
16 inch Pizza $3.99
Sapt JOth Sept nth
ANY ADDITIONAL ITEMS
SMALL ���50
LARGE -$100
BAG ICE 50CeSvY Si1 gas� diesel-WHITE"�"�H
1
I
ver
l
( a, J
I
ami
:e
nedl
ciipj
�sen
the
ll
COM
dan
mei
erm
maq
thai
Hof
Twj
Aa
it,
Coi
fac
t
11 �





1 HI SI (. ROl INIAN
Style
skl'll 1BJ K 23, IV�:
I'age
4 Pedagogic Delight
Book Views Women's Role In Art
B . AKRIK RICKEY
V illagr ntrt
1 he most troublesome part of teaching art history is
ding the appropriate text. One is not enough. The
comprehensive surveys usually exclude women from
consideration, the volumes aimed at rectifying this
omission usually fail to provide an integrated, unified
historical perspective. My students juggle George Heard
Hamilton's European fainting and Sculpture 1880-1940
and Barbara Roses American Art Since 1900 to get a
sense ot modernism, Western style; and although these
the best and most incisive surveys 1 know, they leave
ot of lacunae. Herschel Chipp's Theories of Modern
n, a terrific compendium of artists on art, can fill
some ol the gaps, but he includes only one woman.
Consequently, like most of my colleagues, I keep a
periodical file, doe-eared and eccentric, of essays that
are required reading in modern art. Clipped from jour-
nals, both specialist and plain arcane (Art Bulletin, Art-
forum. Heresies, Temenist Art Journal), the file is a
nuisance to store, and mv information-hungry students
have been known to pilfer articles from it in their
scholarly zeal. The damned thing keeps ballonning;
such is the state of art history that the most important
contributions are essavs too short to be books or pro-
ceedings from conferences where brilliant lectures get
redacted but don't always appear in wider-circulation
irnais So imagine my bibliographic (and pedagogic!)
delight with the publication of Feminism and Art
History, which has no less than eight marvelous
speculative essays that have been yellowing in my file,
plus nine more, many of which began as papers
delivered to the Women's Caucus for Art (part of the
College Art Association, which is to art history what the
MLA is to the literary academy).
Norma Broude and Mary D. Garrard, who edited this
excellent collection, are aware of its profound implica-
tions. Most like-minded enterprises, viz Claire Richter
Sherman's Women As Interpreters of the Visual Arts,
1820-1979, seek only to emend the art historical litany,
proposing the addition of forgotten
foremothers.Feminism and Art History is subtitled
Questioning the Litany and does precisely that: it settles
for nothing less than suggesting that the foundation of
art history rests on shaky ground. It's essays take away
the givens, and, in toto, hold out the possibility of alter-
ing the discipline itself.
The painting commonplace of the "happy madonna"
is examined with suspicion instead of sentiment, as pro-
natalist propaganda to keep women barefoot and preg-
nant. The images of Eve and Mary, our most con-
spicious examples of fallen and risen women, are
studied for the assumptions underlying typical
iconographic interpretations. In her essay "Lost and
See BOOK, Page 8
Titian's enus of I rhino. (1538. oil on canvas, Galleriu dtyli I ffii. Florence.) Another fallen woman?
Next Time, Serve Up
The Red Flannel Hash
Metalworks Exhibition At Gray Gallery This Month
I he above work is currentlv on display as part of the Metalsmith II exhibition at ECU'S Gray
Gallery. This exhibit was organized by the Museum of Art in Charlotte, N.C. and is composed
of works b contemporary southeastern metalsmiths. The exhibit will run until October 15.
Gallerv hours are Monday-Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m and Sunday 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. For further
information about the exhibit contact gallery director Randy Osman at 757-6336 or 757-6665.
BvJUIIEFAHRBACH
si,r hdilur
Lately, 1 have come to realize that each and every
issue of the East Carolinian is waited on with bated
breath by thousands of people hoping that the next
paper will contain wonderful, glorious recipes. VLSI
Recipes!
Well, wait no longer. After tirelessly leafing through
hundreds (well, at least ten) cookbooks from various
churches, sewing circles, and civic leagues, I have come
upon several superlative edible formulas that when
reproduced, result in epicurean delights.
First, for you vinegar fans, that scrumptious old time
favorite, vinegar pie:
VINEGAR PIE
Meli I stick of margarine or butter and cool.
Beat in:
3 eggs
1 '2 cups sugar
2 tablespoons white vinegar
1 teaspoon vanilla
Place in 9-inch unbaked pie shell. Bake 10 minutes j:
300 degrees; then bake 30 minutes at 325 degrees. Serve
when cool.
Next, who but Miss Marcy C. Landon from Lizard
Lick, N.C. would think of the wonderful combination
of corn beef and beets?
RED FLANNEL HASH
1 Mi cups chopped corned beef (or one 12 ox. can)
1 Va cups chopped cooked beets
4 cups chopped cooked potatoes
1 medium onion chopped fine
Cream or beef broth
Chop the ingredients separately in wooden chopping
bowl. Mix together and moisten slightly with cream or
beef broth. Mold into a hot, well-buttered skitlei, and
heat slowly. Loosen from edges, and shake back and
forth frequently to keep from sticking When a nice
brown crust has formed on bottom, turn onto a platter.
as you would an omelet.
Each and every person's dream is not one, not two,
hut, here it is, eight layers of salad:
EIGHT LAYER SALAD
1 st layer - 1 head lettuce, ihredded
2nd layer - 1 cup chopped celery
3rd layer � 1 small onion, chopped
4th layer - 1 box troxen peas, uncooked and un
thawed
5th layer � 2 cups mayonnaise
6th layer - 2 tablespoons sugar, sprinkled over
mayonnaise
7th layer - 4-oz package shredded cheddar cheese
8th layer - 10 to 12 strips of bacon, fried ond cup
up, sprinkled on top
Put in 9x12 inch dish or crystal bowl to show layers and
refrigerate for 24 hours.
NOTE: Can substitute fresh spinach for lettuce layer
(1st). Can substitute sour cream for mayonnaise layer
(5th) and omit sugar (6th).
For a simple meal to fix for your date what would be
more appropriate than:
STUFFED ONIONS
Allow 1 medium onion for each serving. Peel and
remove slice from top. Boil about 30 minutes or until
almost render. Scoop out center to make a shell about
'�2 inch thick. Sprinkle with salt. Stuff as follows:
Bake in shallow baking dish containing a small
amount of water. Bake in 375 degree oven about 30
minutes or until browned
STUFFING
1 pound around beef
Chop onion centers
V3 cup finely chapped celery
1 Vi cups cooked rice
See DESSERT. Page 8
Grace Kelly: Delicate Balance Of Contrasts'
This story is combined Jrom
rts b) Clyde Haberman oj The
York Times and Roger Ebert
oj the Chicago Sun-Times. It recent-
ly appeared in the Sept. 19 edition
Ihe Sews and Observer.
MW YORK � Alfred Hit-
chcock, who directed her in three
films and was certainly in a position
judge, said Grace Kelly had
sexual elegance And it was that
very elegance that probably made
the most lasting impression on
movie audiences of the 1950s.
Whether playing the heiress in To
( atch A Thief or the Quaker
pacifist in High Soon or the
amusedly detached career girl � a
term still in vogue when Rear Win-
dow was made � Grace Kelly ear-
ned herself with straight-back and
clipped-voice sUf-assurance. Yet
just beneath the frosty exterior lay a
ensuahty and warmth that cracked
the formidable reserve.
It was this delicate balance of
contrasts that helped give her legen-
dary status � a remarkable achieve-
ment for an actress whose career
emcompassed only 11 films She
made more of that small portfolio
than actors who lasted in
Hollywood many more decades.
Twice she was nominated for an
Academv Award, and once she won
it, for her 1954 performance in The
Country Girl.
There was a certain irony in the
fact that the Oscar came, not for her
portrayal of yet another detached
beauty, but of a frumpy harridan,
desperate in her unhappy marriage.
By then the range of her talent
was obvious, and Miss Kelly was
constantly in demand for a variety
of screen roles. But just as swiftly as
her film career blossomed, it came
to an abrupt end in 1956, when she
married Prince Rainier of Monaco,
the tiny principality on the French
Riviera. Tuesday, Princess Grace
died at age 52 from injuries sustain-
ed in an automobile accident.
For Princess Grace, a regal
blonde beauty, death brought an
ultimate end to a storybook life that
was more romantic than her movies.
After a start as a model in early
television cigarette commercials, she
won her first Broadway role in 1949,
opposite Raymond Massey in
Strindberg's The Father. She then
began to appear in many New York-
based live te! vision programs,
became a popular model in
magazine ads and won her first
movie role, a bit part in Fourteen
Hours (1951).
Her first starring role came in the
next year, opposite Gary Cooper in
High Moon. The movie's famous ti-
tle song asked, "Do not forsake me,
oh my darling and, as Cooper's
wife, she didn't. The next year, she
won an Oscar nomination as best
supporting actress in John Ford's
Mogambo. Although she played a
woman in a passionate love affair
with Clark Gable, critics said she
was overwhelmed in the movie bv
the strong presence of Ava Gardner.
Still, she became a major box-
office star almost overnight, and in
1954 appeared in five movies. They
included two Hitchcock films (Dial
M for Murder and Rear Window)
and The Country Girl, in which she
played the wife of Bing Crosby. She
followed that with Green Fire and
The Bridges at Toko-Ri, also in
1954.
It was Hitchcock who best
brought out the qualities that are
likely to make Miss Kelly
remembered as a screen actress. The
"master of suspense" had a lifelong
penchant for casting cool blondes in
threatening situations, and, as he
did with Ingrid Bergman (who died
only three weeks ago), he liked to
establish her as a woman enveloped
in icy calm, and then use that
reserve as counterpoint in highly-
charged emotional situations.
Her best film was certainly the
1954 Hitchcock classic Rear Win-
dow, in which she played opposite
James Stewart, who played a voyeur
whose broken leg forces him to stay
in his apartment. Using field glasses
to spy on his neighbors, he witnesses
a murder that endangers both of
them. Rights to Rear Window are
tied up in the Hitchcock estate, and
it has not been exhibited publicly for
many years.
Her next film for Hitchcock was
To Catch a Thief (1955), and it pro-
vided the turning-point in her per-
sonal life. Miss Kelly plaved op-
posite Cary Grant, who was a socie-
ty jewel thief, and Hitchcock con-
trasted her character's cool exterior
with the suppressed passion she felt
for Grant most memorably in a
scene where, at lunch over chicken,
she offered him his choice of a
breast or a thigh.
Hitchcock shot the movie on loca-
tion on the French Riviera, in Can-
nes and Nice. It was during that
Riviera visit that she first met Prince
Rainier, a member of the Grimaldis,
Europe's oldest royal family. He fell
in love with her at the 1955 Cannes
Film Festival and continued his
courtship in American, spending
Christmas that year at the home of
her parents in Philadelphia.
She made only two more feature
films, both in 1956: The Swan, with
Alex Guinness, and High Society,
with Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra
and Louis Armstrong. Both of her
final films drew on heightened
public interest in her private life.
The Swan told the story of a young
woman who married a crown
prince, and High Society was a
musical remake of The Philadelphia
Story, in which she took the role
originally played by Katharine Hep-
burn, on the Hollywood theory that
she was qualified for it by her
Philadelphia society background.
On April 18, 1956, shortly after
she completed High Society, she
See GRACE, Page 9
Sir Alec Guiness and Grace Kelly in 1956 remake of romance The Swam.





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 23, 1982
A Book That You Can Judge By It's Cover
Continued From Page 7
Found Linda
Nochlin quotes a Rose
Macaulay heroine:
"It's a queer thing how
'fallen' in the
masculine means killed
in the war and in the
feminine given over to
a particular kind of
vice The cumulative
effect of these essays is
to turn art history in-
side out. Speculation
after provocation
shakes us into recogniz-
ing such double stan-
dards and double
meanings. Hopping
centuries and con-
tinents � from Natalie
Boymel Kampen's
"Social Status and
Gender in Roman Art"
to Pat Mainardi's
"Quilts: The Great
American Art" �
Feminism and Art
History reveals aspects
of women in front of
and on the canvas,
reintegrating different
levels of the feminine
into the art historical
continuum.
You can judge this
book by its cover:
Artemisia Gentileschi's
Susanna and the Flders
is an apt metaphor for
what's inside. Wat-
ching lecherous male
elders leer at Susanna,
you think the way in
which male painters
have distoreted the
biblical tale of wifely
virtue and made it a
spectacle of
" legitamized
voyeurism" (in the
words of Garrard, who
wrote the essay on Gen-
tileschi and Susanna) is
not unlike the way in
which the male
dominiated discipline
of art history has con-
ditioned us to read art
in a specific � dare I
say distorted? � way.
Garrard chides, "It is
an indomitable testa-
ment to the male ego
that a biblical theme
holding forth the ex-
emplum of female
chastity should have
become in painting a
celebration of sexual
opportunity She then
proceeds to analyze
how Artemisia's Susan-
na (attributed by some
to her father, Orazio)
actively resists her vic-
timization � unlike the
peek-a-boo coyness
found in Rubens's and
Rembrandt's Susanna
temptresses.
"Virility and
Domination in Early
Twentieth Century
Vanguard Painting
by Carol Duncan, fur-
ther explores the
iconography of
malefemale relations,
discussing how certain
male artists depict
women as "powerless,
sexually subjugated be-
ings" in order to im-
plicitly enhance
masculine prowess.
Dissecting the language
as well as the paintings
of these artists, Duncan
makes explicit the
association of penis
and painbrush
(Vlaminck: "1 try to
paint with my heart and
For Dessert, It's Tipsy Pudding
Continued From Page 7
Salt � pepper
Sour cream
Scramble beef and brown slightly. Add onion and celery.
Cook about 5 minutes. Add rice and season to taste. Moisten
with sour cream. Fill onions and place in baking dish.
Tomatoes can be substituted for sour cream ij you prejer.
This could be the answer to cooking with school spirit.
VOILA
PURPLE AND GOLD SALAD
' cup olive oil
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
2 tablespoons lemon juice � divided
1 clove garlic, halved
1 tablespoon chopped parsley
1 teaspoon dry mustard
1 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
2 avocados
6 cups torn lettuce
4 cups purple cabbage
1 cup sliced pimiento � stuffed olives
2 large oranges, peeled and sectioned (or use canned
mandarin oranges)
'�2 red onion, thinly sliced
Combine oil, vinegar, 1 tablespoon lemon juice, garlic,
parsley, mustard, salt and pepper; chill. At serving time, peel
and slice avocados; brush with remaining I tablespoon lemon
juice. Arrange greens, oranges, and onion in a salad bowl.
Top with avocados and olives. Pour on the dressing. At the
table, toss the salad gently. Makes 6 to 8 servings.
Finally, for the weekend. Tipsy Pudding! NOTE: Mrs.
Joseph A. Janney, who knows her sherry, says use the good
stuff, never the cooking junk.
TIPSY PUDDING
1 pockoge lady fingers
Seedless raspberry jam
1 package vanilla pudding
Yi. pint whipping cream
. 1 6 ox. pockoge chocolate chips
Sherry (use a good sherry, NOT cooking sherry)
Splil lady fingers and spread each piece with raspberry jam.
Put in bottom of bowl. Pour sherry over the lady fingers.
Make vanilla pudding (if possible use cooked variety, if not
instant can be used). Cool slightly. Pour vanilla pudding over
lady fingers. Spread evenly. Place in rejngerator while whipp-
ing cream. Flavor whipped cream with a little sugar and
vanilla and whip until peaks are formed. Spread whipped
cream over vanilla pudding. Spread evenly and decorate with
chocolate chips on top. Cherries can be used in place oj chips.
Keep in rejngerator until ready to use. Don't keep too long as
lady fingers will get soggy. Serve in a pretty crystal or glass
bowl.
my loins, not bothering
with style"). In this
essay, as well as
"Delilah by Madlyn
Millner Kahr, the
historians alert us to
the psychic assump-
tions of individual ar-
tists, how the un-
conscious conflicts of
painters and sculptors
are often left unresolv-
ed in their work. Dun-
can and Kahr are as
much exegetes as
historians, decoding
social and sexual mores
as well as aesthetic
meaning.
Alessandra Comini,
in a lively essay on Ger-
man Expressionism
(particularly timely
because of the recent
International Style of
neo-Expressionism and
its odious macho
stridency), writes that
although Edvard
Munch is credited with
being the father of Ex-
pressionism, no one has
ever identified the
mother. Comini pro-
poses Kathe Kollwitz
and Paula Modersohn-
Becker, among other
talented exemplars of
Expressionism, female-
style.
Pat Mainardi, in the
essay that provoked me
to start my file,
celebrates the tradi-
tional women's art of
quilting, trenchantly
describing the double
standard prevalant in
the art world: "Because
HAPPY COOKING!
Not all clinics are the same.
ABORTION is a difficult decision that's
made easier by the women of the Fleming
Center. Counselors are available day and
night to support and understand you. Com-
fort, safety, privacy, and a friendly staff . . .
that's what the Fleming Center is all about.
I iurancf accept Free pregnancy testing
Alfinclusive fees I Saturday appointments
I p to 18 weeks er earl pregnano tests
Call 781-5550 da or night.
The Fleming Center makes the difference.
Brody's for men has an opening
for a part-time salesperson. Must
be able to sell men's clothes.
Experience preferred. Requires weekend
& morning work.
ABORTIONS UP TO
'2th WEEK O
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13-16
WEEKS
c FURTHEREXPENSt
J185 00 Pregnancy Te�t. Birth
Control and Problem Pregnan
cy Counseling For further infor
mation call 832-0535 (Toll Free
nun-1 800 771 2S8) between 9
AM and S P M Weekdays
- . l IGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
�17 West Morgan St
Raieigh. N. C.
Apply at
Brody's for Men
Pitt Plaza
2-5 p.m.
lbtf@d)iyjV
pitt plaza
for men
Lowest TV Rental
Prices In Town!
TELE RENT TV
J Phone: 758-9102
2905 East 10th Street in Greenville
PIRATE SPECIAL
SAT. & SUN. 3 p.m9:30 p.m
6 oz. Rib-Eye
Baked Potato and trip to salad bar
also a complimentary glass of wine �
all for only $6.50
s&i
YEARV1EW
Man, SirVmmuA
PRfsmiM
ENTERPRISES

Barbecue Ribs
and
Chicken to Go
"Don 7 get caught with a
cold dog at the game"
$1.99 Daily Special
plus tea and tax
$3.75 P,US,M large plate
with meat and all the veggies
you can eat
Open 11-8 � 7 days a week
752-0476 512 E. 14th St.
roMTCII$tVKi
Beauty Awareness Course
Personal Development
Health � Nutrition � Exercise
Fashion � Makeup � Wardrobe
Basc Modeling Techniques
raSHios CQD�0iNTio-
BEAUTY AWARENESS COURSE
OBIC 1DK
MARCYBYRO HELEN E RUSSELL
225 York Road 514 Lyndale Drive
Greenville. N.C 278M Ayden. N C 21513
756-4913
Please Send Me
More Information
About The
Beauty Awareness
Course.
Name
Home
JESSIE P BARTON
Associate Director
723 Snow Hill Street
Ayden, N.C. 28513
746-4230
746-3390
Please Send Me
A Registration
Form Fof The
Beauty Awareness
Course.
Photo:
Rudy Robtaaon 1M2
Address
Telephone
Business
Address
Telephone
Zip Code
NOTE: ClaM IcHldum
.Zip Code
At eesswawaa t
Ol T�n (it) SturtMta f� tactt kMi A
Mary Barton - Smith Ayden
Instructor North Carolina
Mat
New York HOLLYWOOO - LOS ANGELES DOROTHY PREBLE
New York " SANTA BARBARA Model - ModeHng Instructor
141 - itse California Personal Development Instructor
1H - Its? Actresa
JOHN ROBERT POWERS SAHTA BARBARA MODELS' OUILO
Model moo . Fashion Show Commentator
MANVA KAHN c.shlon Coordinator � Fashion Writer
Physical Therapist - Writer
(Use Only It Under 16 Years Of Afle)
Student Registration
(Minimum Grade: 1th Qrade)
Jr. Mask
Sr High
Trade Schoet
our female ancestors'
pieced quilts bear a
superficial resemblance
to the work of contem-
porary formalist artist
such as Stella, Noland
and Newman (although
quilts �.e richer in col-
or, design, and content)
modern male curators
and critic are now
capable of 'seeing' the
art in them Mainardi
compares the hindsight
revaluation of quilt art
with the belated white
appreciation of black
jazz. In a brilliant, con-
centrated history of
how high art can-
nibalizes the vigor of
the folk arts (the
African sculptors need-
ed Picasso as little as
the Japanese print-
makers needed the Im-
pressionists), she
describes the connota-
tionally rich history of
quilts and argues that
the decorative and or
functional should be
accorded the same
dignity as painting and
sculpture.
Such audacity is
typical of Feminism
and Art History, an un-
conventionally analytic
book which, when
compared with collec-
tions like M omen as In-
terpreters of the I isual
Arts, makes them read
all the more conven-
tional. The editors of
Women as Interpreters
commissioned essays to
educate us about the
little-known ancestors
of our cultural heritage
who worked variously
as critics, journalists,
connoisseurs,
translators. and
educators. It's hefty
and
w or k woman like;e very
library in American
should own it.
The chapters on 19th
and 20th century
figures are absorbing
� though some read
like college term papers
� because the informa-
tion is so fresh. I never
knew that many
women, denied entry
into the academy and
museum world, chan-
neled their creative
energy into writing tour
guides that explicated
architecture and
monuments � which
led them to more struc-
tured art historical pur-
suits. How women cir-
cumvented social ex-
pectation is the book's
highlight: some
organized salons,
others came to art
through their husbands
or fathers, yet others,
like Georgiana God-
dard King, became
educators. Though Ber-
nard Berenson thought
King was the most ac-
complished art
historian he knew and
wanted to hire her as
his assistant, she
preferred to remain at
Bryn Mawr, as head of
Art History, where she
could teach other
women the tricks ot her
trade. And then there
Lady Dilke. on whose
life Middtemarch is
reportedly based She
was a self-educated
authority on French
painting and center ol a
politico-aesthetic
cyclone that encom-
passed fighting tor
women's suffrage,
analyzing how art was
usd to advance im-
perialist aims, and lob-
bying to have the Royal
Academy con f ei
awards on women I
tists
As chatty so a
history. J omen As In
terpreters is often char
ming. but probablv i
of general inter I
Feminism and An
History is something
else again: eminenttv
readable and compell-
ing for specialists
weli as lay readers,
fills all the lacunae
by Hamilton. R
and Chipp, though
ambitions are much
broader. It's not com
prehensile, and it
doesn't pretend to
unified overview, yet it
touches on ever art
historical epoch and art
historiographica
m e t h o d o 1 o y from
Egyptian statuary and
iconology to Marv 51
interpretation.
FOOT LONG
MEATBALL!
99C
99C SUBWAY FOOT LONG
1 MEATBALL SANDWICH
SANDWICH WHEN
YOU BUY ONE AT
THE REGULAR PRICE!
.SUBUKsftP
Limit one COuPO per CjStO"ier 2"r-
gooo on a! partipatng S;a
�estaurants ar3 not good m comtxrvator
iti an otner o�e' yf ejres
Oder good at these Subway Stores
208 E. 5th St.
America's Famous Foot Long Sandwich
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Soft Shell Crabs
s4.95
Steamed la Spice
$4.99
Dm.
'wot
OYSTER BAR
NOW OPEN
e STEAMED
OYSTERS
$7.75
irfleSeStegL
�3� Oyster Bap ?
11:00 AM
10:00 PM
wsSS
SpecUlteti
C�to: Aavtktefl
ma
Cat!
M
Vv
time

tumi
rep
he'

'

t





"I

Grace Played It With Style
( onlinued From Page 7
married Prince Rainier in the
Cathedral ol St. Nicholas in
Monaco. It was a celebrated media
event
With marriage, Princess Grace
abandoned acting. 1 he effect, as
Mine passed, was to burnish her film
career in public memory. I arl on
m net marriage she received man)
offers ol movie roles, but she kept
tut nine them down.
Periodically, there would be
reports that she was about to resume
her careei. but nothing ever came of
them. "Here I have m obligations
and duties as a princess and
mother she said "One cannot do
everything
Her life as princess ol Monaco
was obviousl enhanced b
privelege but also circumscribed by
dutv She became a supporter of
shanties and cultural events. Much
ol her time was devoted to her three
tdren.
In recent sens. Princess Grace
de occasional forays into show
s. nevei foi verv long and
; read prose or poetry tor
.net it Oi another. (In
�mbei 1980, she did a dramatic
at Duke I niversit) in
She did make one movie, sort of,
eai - ago a delicate
umentarv. about the Kirov Ballet
ool in Leningrad called The
( hildren of Theater Street. The
.ess narrated the film and ap-
peared on screen briefly. But when,
ibly, the question arose
. :her she would plunge full) into
work once again, she smiled at her
jrviewei and said. "Oh, no, not
oi
s,
again.
Miss Kelly was never comfortable
with her popular image as an ice
queen.
"I'm not an extrovert � but I'm
not unfriendly either she told an
interviewer early in her career.
"I'm not the exuberant type, but 1
don't like to read that I'm cold and
distant. 1 don't think I am
The patrician manner, suggesting
English roots, did not accurately
reflect her Philadelphia
background.
Her family in later years would be
compared frequently to the Ken-
nedys � rich, attractive and Irish-
Catholic. The difference, however,
was the Kennedys were from
Boston, a kind of Irish-Catholic
citadel; the Kellys were from
Philadelphia, a city in which few
Irish had become prominent. John
Brendan Kelly, Princess Grace's
father, was one of the first.
Kellv, the son of an immigrant,
worked as a bricklayer. He was also
a local sculls champion. His 1920
entry into the English Diamond
Sculls at the Henly Regctta was
refused, however, because he
"worked with his hands" � a
manual laborer. Supposedly, he im-
mediately sent his sweaty rowing
cap to the King of England as a
souvenir.
The incident made Kelly a
Philadelphia celebrity. He left
bricklaying and became a contrac-
tor, made money, and raised his
family in the comfortable suburb of
Germantown. His wife, Margaret,
was a celebrated beauty, who before
her marriage, worked as a
photographer's model.
In later vears, most stories about
Princess Grace described her as a
shy, withdrawn child, despite her
family's luster. Besides her suc-
cessful father, there were her suc-
cessful uncles: George Kelly, a
pulitzer prize-winning playwright,
and Walter C. Kelly, a famous
vaudevillian.
After retiring from movies to
become Princess of Monaco, she
was courted by Hitchcock for the
lead in his 1964 film Marnie.
After she turned him down, he used
another regal blonde, Tippi Hedren.
Princess Grace continued to stay in
touch with the world of show
business, however, as a member of
the board of 20th Century Fox Film
Corp.
Perhaps her role as princess was
the greatest part she ever played.
r
PRB6NT
TUORS. SST 2?-7-Y30
04 DRAFT TOO-VX)
704CANS vys-riaca
M
"We will sell ,
no wine before L- �
our time
But after five. . .
You can have all
the Paul Masson Chablis &
Our All You Can Eat
Buffet for only
Thursday, Sept. 23
"The Four Seasons
Restaurant &
Lounge
301 Evans St. Mall 752-5476
(Corner of 3rd St. and Evans Mall)
Movie stars feed our imaginations
by playing roles we identify with,
but Princess Grace played a real-lite
role that captured the imagination
more than most movies and she
played it with style and presence.
Her death leaves unanswered the
question of whether she might have
developed into a great actress, had
she chosen to turn down Rainier and
stay in Hollywood. She retired at
26, an age when most actresses are
just beginning to find themselves,
and, with the exception of Hit-
chcock, she had not worked with
directors who found more in her
than her beauty and her manner. In
time, with the right scripts and the
right directors, she might have
become a legendary actress. Instead,
she became a legend.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 23. I9t�2 v
PANAMA JACK 1
H.H.
Presented by the Phi Kappa Tau
Little Sisters.
Thurs Sept. 23
4-8 p.m.
60C cans � 25C draft
No Cover
"Come On Out and Start
Your N eekend Early1
�Western Sizzlin
delivers service
witliasmile
W9 want you to feel
right at home at Vfestern
Sizzlin, and we try to go
that extra mile to please
you. "We'll make sure you
get a great steak at a fair
price with a big smile. So
come into a "Western
Sizzlin soon, order up a
freshly cut USDA Choice
steak with baked potato or
french fries and salad,
then sit back and relax.
We'll serve it up with a side
order of smiles and a gen-
erous helping of service.
Western
C VA i t

Saturday
Night
Football
Special!
"The Four Seasons" i
Restaurant & i
Lounge i
Will extend dinner hours
Saturday Sept. 25, and include
l our all you can eat Buffet
for $5.95
and a variety of sandwiches
5: 00-tilI
Sandwiches include steak n cheese,
4-Seasons burger, ham 'n cheese, turkey it
(all served with potato chips.)
301 Evans St. Mall (Corner of 3rd st A Evans Mall) 752-5476

IFC PRESENTS
THURSDAY
7-9
Loudest Fraternity
& Sorority wins 20 free
nights at the ATTIC
50 Admission
(for all night)
65$ Beverages
DON'T FORGET LADIES' NIGHT AT 9 P.M
FRIDAY
(H.H.)
4-7
with:
AYSTAR
25C Admission
65C Beverages
I TnA
4mm4�
� � �
This weekend at the ATTIC:
SAT. - DAYSTAR
SUN. - COYOTE
f





I HI I s I t K M IM XN
Sports
n
Emory Relieved To Get First Shutout
Bn K� N KOI ION
Uw �� spoft�l .1
"It's great to be talking to you
folks as a winning coav h ' 1 hose
wer, A . � js ol I 'I' head fool
I . iddress
- � luncheon
I , ,r. he was glad I1
iry undei h bell
still hasn't been able to com
opening game at
State I he State game is still
a SOre spo . ie said "Bui I feel
"
. la I'enm ssei State
Sa la Pirates w
iiv aks as they deteated
t Bi ) 0 "Saturday
� -ac saw some things we liked.
saw some things we didn't
I mory "Bui as 1
a oldei in this profession, I ap
a w in more and moi e, no
w we played
In tgainsi I 1 si . the
had great balance on offense
trds rushing and 242
ftei the two games
ar, ECL's 84 total y ai ds lea e
an! ed � �� the country in
� nse
Si a art, w ho
15 r 21 passes foi 209
nly halt the
� n , rj �. ai U m Nelson
f tensive spotlight I i
ame Saturda night
N , . S bined on a
ilai 42-yard touchdown in
uai ter 1 he play vvas lc
i ble .ailed by
he line of sci mmage
namt
-
qfensive line Mas piayea
sive line piay
ince I've been here said Emory
Receiving special mention from
1 mory were centei John 1 loyd and
guard 1 en v I ong, w ho I moi a d
"was nisi awesome on some ol his
blocks
I here were six members ot ihe ol
tensive line who didn'i miss an
assignment which, according to
I moi . inv oh es a ot ex
ecution
Nelson was impressive in the I I
SI fame, especially in tlu firsi hall.
th his foui recepi otalling
H�2 yards and two touchdowns, he
received the K W Moore "Kinj
the Gridiron" scholarship award,
re will be a SI.(XX) cl �
ted to the Pirate c lub in the
name ot the one winnei pei home
contest
1 he tailba � -it ion has been a
sensitive area foi the Pirates all
yeai Jimmy v aid � as run
nine at the numbei one posil
before the seasoi started, has noi
played a single down so fai because
ol a knee injui y
alden ha b i n prav ticing this
week. and should K rea I lor at,
tion Saturday. I ony Bakei wil
mam at the number one tailback
position, followed by Stefon dams
and V alden.
ECl 's ol tensive met has
enabied 'hem to ha in ad a
in time ol possession in both games.
1 � e Pirates ha' I
aps fron cei " � N i �
and I I si games
On defense, the Pirates recorded
first shutout since beating Mai
shall 45-0 in the i season
� : ale in 1978. It
firsi shutoul a i id coa
Emoi "Any time
iuj dan ' t a nowada� - ���
s ich sophisticated offensive
schemes; it's impressive
Ihe Pirates are currently ranked
eighth in the nation in total defense,
and lbth in rushing defense.
Running the ball is not a good bet
againsi I Cl lwo yards pei carry is
the norm on the ground against the
I'iiate's rugged defense. In two
games, E I has yielded just 170
yards on the ground. Neithei N c
State noi Easi rennessee State could
mustei KK) yards i ushing
I mor has been particularity im-
pressed with the pla ol Steve
Hamilton, Jody Schulz and Ronald
Reid shul leads the team in solo
tackles and quarterback sacks, while
Reid leads the team in the number
ot total tackles with 1
( h ol 1 mory's mam concerns so
fai has been injuries at the
linebackei position. P.J. Jordan is
recovering from a shoulder injury
d be ready Saturday. The
an onsidering red-shirting
Mike Grant, but a decision has not
n reached yet.
factoi in ECU's defensive per-
formances has been the height ol the
defensive line. 1 his hinders the op-
posing quarterback from being able
io - ecehers and read the
�nsive secondary t the defen-
sive ends, lody Schulz is 6-4 and
ie is 6-2. At defensive
Steve Hamilton and
1 lal Stephens stand 6-4.
! � . -� kei Moe Bennett wasn't
irers for the Pirates,
i the 5 9, 204-pound senior nailed
two pom's for ECl Saturday
night. Bennett knifed through the
drop 1 I si tailback
Rid ard D lls foi i safety in the
tei a the Buc� ere trying
"Oin entire kickofl game is real
good, and oui punt returning isbet
ter than last year said Emory
Coach Emory is also extremely
pleased with the play ol freshman
place kicker lett Heath and snapper
Whitley Wilkerson.
Ihe punting game has been
somewhat ol a disappointment to
I moi v John YA illiams has a
32.7-yard average aftei getting his
first college punt blocked in the
N.C. State game "John just has to
smooth things out said Emory.
"He has the pol nl i
puntei
Emory
pointed ii
penali I'
the third I
nine times foi (
si . ha:
the thir I
"You try not 1
with stupid m � �
a ignmeni ind
d
�ball game
.In- l h
w a
hew own
Ihe kicking game is also looking
impressive atter the first two games.
Headnach f rt f mtr mres the press
Stewart Taking A im
Pholo by DAVE WHLLIA
( arlton Nelson lurns into defender on erranl pass play.
Pirates Expect Central Michigan
To Be Tough In First Meeting Ever
1 �; ectation " I hat s
� � ii � Pirate should have tor
( rural M higan when they meet
' hippewas tor the first time ever
Sal irday night at Ficklen
i im
( Ml finished 7 4 last season.
tgainsi . ' team as ' )hio
i md Bowlinj Gieen In
M ' '� in conference, the
: ' I third and scored
I astern Michigan
at the beginnii I the season. In
'79 tnd ��� 'Ml won the Mid
�n -hip title.
1 � i very sound football
am 1(1 fo itball coach 1 d
I im it . aid 'I hey d n'r di muc h
fancy rhey lon't change much for
We km iw something
about them � tuseol the people on
taf 1 -v 11 h Michigan
backj iunds (defensive coordinatot
onn Parkei and secondary coach
hm Bengala) I hey know and
� � ; t Central's program
AI ng with a highly reputable
team.Ml also has a first-rate
coach Herb Deromedi, who is in
his fifth yeai at Central Michigan,
has accumulated a 'Ml record
during his stay so tar. As C Ml "s
bead coach, Deromedi has led the
Chippewas to two Mid American
conference titles, including a third-
place finish last yeai
He directed them to 14 con
utive victories, a 1 ()- 1
undefeated season in 1979 and a
school record ol 23 consecutive
wins b mid-season 1980
" I hev're as cood as State except
tor their defensive secondary
Emory said atter watching film ol
�lie C Ml Bowling Green game.
"They had a lot ol tumbles and
mistakes against Bowling Green.
1 hey should have beat them
( indy Pieasants
f&fc I �k llislll.
Deromedi. who joined Ml 's
oa( lung stall m 1967, was named
M oachM I he ear in 1980
I hehippewas have an ex-
perienced team this season with 12
seniors, seven juniors and three
sophomores in the starting line ups
1 ike the Pirates, CM! is now
1-1-0 attei losing to Bowling Green
last weekend. 34-30. While the
Pirates captured theii lust shutout
in tour years, thehippewas gave
up the most points in a home contest
since 1M last Saturday (Ml
drove to the Bowlingireen 11 in the
closing mmute only to be in
tercepted in the endone on a first
down play with 2 seconds remain
ine
Both East Carolina and Central
Michigan have balanced running
and passing attacks with the Chip-
pewas averaging 190.5 yards rushing
and 21C.5 passing yards a contest.
" 1 hey run out ol the "I" and use a
lot ol sprint-out passes Emory
said. "1 hey 're exceptional at the
skill position
l U tailback Tony Baker will be
fighting for yardage against CMC
homore Curtis Adams. Adams
averages 139.5 yards per game. Both
squads also have former quarter-
basks starting at the wide receiver
positions: ECU's Carbon Nelson
andMl "s Stephen Jones.
1 here's no doubt that the Pirates
will be expecting the most from the
Chippewas The fans, however,
should expect to see two teams battl-
ing tor a victory that will put one of
them in the plus win column.
"It's an important game for us
Emory said. "A win would give us
some confidence
K I SPORTS INFORMATION
Foi Greg Stewart, it was isi a
matter ol catching his breath Satur-
day night.
-tter worrying coaches arid
trainers with a spell ol hyperventila-
tion prior to the Pirates' 30-0 win
over las- rennessee State, the
junior calmly began the finest night
ol !i:s ii career.
"Before the game he was
hyperventilating said ach
I : Emory, "and we thought he
might not be able i play He1 -ach
a fierce competitor, but it is hard
tell because he is usually so p
�s soon as the ball was si
played just as ca m as he could be
Despite playing less than halt the
game while sharing time a I unior
Kevin Ingram, the 5-9, 170-pound
Virginian riddled the Buccaneer
defense for 209 yards and a
touchdown. He hit on 15 ol 21
passes with no interceptions.
"Greg played an outstanding
came assured Emory "He had
only one missed, assignment and.
three technical errors to cade
91-percent. He graded well and read
well
Carl Summered, who was in-
ducted into the Pirate Sports Hall ol
Fame Saturdav night, was the last
Pirate quarterback to pass foi 200
yards. He connected on 12 ol 30
passes for 201 yards and two
touchdowns against Furman on Oc-
tober 28, 1972. soon atter. the
Pirates shitted to the wishbone and
passing became a lost art in Green-
ville
I he new Pirate "I" attack and
Stewart have revived the pass tter
two games, the Pirates have rushed
tor 423 yards and passed tor 4P
a shocking degree ol balance even to
the Pirate Stalt.
Stewatt climbed to seventh on the
(.rt u Me�art in .u lion
I c I careei pas
with 71 to nintl . �. ass
ing yardage list with S6"7 ya
despite having only six sta
credit. He sta he fina
games ol 1980 il
back C arlton N suffered a neck
injury He was Nelson's sub
again in 1981 Now V
fa ot He target
Nelson, Stewart's roomma
pulled in foui passes foi 102 ya
and two touchdowns Saturdav
.
- id s
S
:
be a
-
Lady Pirates Lose To Tar Heels
In Tuesday Night Volleyball Action
By KEN BOLTON
The ECU 1 ady Pirate vollevball
team travelled to Chapel Hill lues
dav night to face the University, ot
North Carolina. Even though the
I adv Pirates were defeated lb-14.
8-15, 10-15. 15-9, 11 15. head coach
l ynn Davidson was impressed with
the tenacity of her team.
"When we lost the second and
third games, the kids hung in there
and came back to win the fourth
game said Davidson.
Since this was the first match of
the year tor I'NC, Davidson feels
that the Heels were v � v lucky
have escaped with the victory " 1 he
team was real psyched
Davidson "And they took advan-
tage ot the tact that c arolina was in-
experienced as a team
According to Davidson, the I idy
Pirates had a really good match as
far as serving "1iti Davis did a
good ob serving, she had several
aces
Atter four games, the teams w
tied at two games apiece So it all
came down to the decisive titth
game. "In the titth game, we started
out realK shakev. but later in the
game we wert
Dav .
sill'
f
s eLadyI
ped to -i v Da ds ri
team's efl

id ol
"
I his riday and Sa
1 adv Pirates will
s ate Invitational in K
1 he next home match w
Monday nighi l . �� l v
vades Minges c oliseum a 1 �
r

i





r
IHl I AST CAROI ISIAN
SI PI E MBl R2?. 1:
11
ne
l
Unbeaten Record On Line
Wolfpack
C HARl O I 1 t .
N C tl PI) North
Carolina State is riding
a three-game winning
streak, but Wolfpack
v oach Monte Kittm
knows that won't mean
much Saturday when
his team takes on
Maryland in College
Park. Md
"They're the best
team we've faced so
far said k. i 111 n.
a � ,sc W olfpack has
� oiled over Furman, an
N( Division 1-AA
team, 1 ast Carolina.
and W ake Forest
last week.
Maryland was just a
couple oi points away
from beating est
irginia at Morgan
town (W.Va.) Kit tin
said, refering to the
ime Maryland lost
� 8 hen a two-point
aversion tailed. The
week before, the Terps
gave 5th ranked Perm
State all it could handle
� sing that one
59-31.
" hen you realize
� hat A est irginia went
to Oklahoma and w hip-
ped the Sooners at their
place, you know thai
Maryland has a solid
ball club. They've got a
large senioi class, and
� he 've go; quality
lei e ' two essentials
for a sound tootbal!
team Kiffin said.
second Atlantic
C oasi C nfei ; game
r. this weekend's
ed u le when
feated Duke (2-0)
is host to Vii ginia (0-2)
in a game that could get
the surprising Blue
Dev ils of! to their best
start in 11 years it the
w m
"We ha e to a oid
being overconfident
said Duke coach Red
ilson, w hose team
upset 1 ennessee in the
opener and last week
d e teat e d Soul h
Carolina on the
G amecoc k s' home
field. "How mam
times in the past has a
Duke tootball team had
to be worried about
that. It feels reall good
to go into a came with
confidence
In other games, 10th
tanked North Carolina
(1-1) is host to Arrm
(1-1), Clemson (0-1 1)
will try to regroup
ag a i n si Western
Carolina t 1 - 2 at
"Death Valley Wake
1 oresl (1-2) will tr and
break a three game los-
ing si leak ai home
against Appalachian
State (0-2), and
Georgia lech (1-1) is
on the road against
Memphis State (0-3).
Despite a w inless
rcord, Maryland
dt new coach B I
R(

�ftense. In years pas
i he 1 ei ps have been a
running earn, but
iari ei bac k Boomei
Esiason is leading the
conference in passing
and total offense with
22! .5 vards per came.
1 ast year, Maryland
pounded the Wolfpack
34-9 in what was an off
yeai for the Terps.
North Carolina State
also hasn't defeated
Maryland since 199
when the Wolfpack
won the ACC football
championship.
1 he Cavaliers are in
the same boat as
Maryland, playing bet-
tei than the record in-
dicates. Virginia leads
the league in total of-
fense arid is second in
total defense despite
the lack of success in
the record book.
Duke, meanwhile,
has put together an of-
fensive show of its
own, tanking second
onl to Virginia with
402 sards per game and
against much suffer
competition than the
Cavaliers have faced so
fai
r a i 1 b a c k Kelvin
Bryant, troubled by in-
juries in the lar Heels'
first two games, is not
expected to be dressed
out for this weekend's
game against Army due
tii a sore ankle. But the
I ai Heels have found a
i e p I a c e w m e n 1 i n
sophomore Ethan Hor-
ton who rushed tot 201
aids last week in a ic-
ioi over Vanderbilt.
So tar. Army has lost
to Missouri 23-10, and
defeated 1 a fa y e 11e
26-20 last weekend.
c lemson. reeling
from lasl weekend's
17-17 tie against Boston
College, has dropped
from the UP1 Board of
Coaches poll for the
first time since the
Tigers defeated
Georgia early in the
season last year and
went on to win the na-
tional title.
Coach Danny Ford
says the Tigers must get
their offense going, and
this is a good week to
start. So far, the Tigers
have averaged only 309
yards per game. The
weak bnk has been the
ground game where
Tiger running backs
hae combined for only
a 153-yard average per
game.
Wake Forest faces its
second NCAA Division
1-AA team this season.
They defeated Western
Carolina in the opener
before losing 28-10 to
Auburn, and getting
routed by the Wolfpack
30-0 last week.
Deacon Coach AI
Groh says the team will
stay with its pass-
oriented attack despite
last week's shut out.
"We're a young
team; we're developing
and hae to keep work-
ing with what we are
doing Groh said.
Georgia Tech snap-
ped an 11-game losing
streak with last week's
36-7 victory over The
Citadel. Memphis Stale
has had similar misfor-
tune. Winless this year,
the only game they won
in 1981 came at
Georgia Tech's ex-
pense.
The best Pizza
in Town � Honest r
LUNCH BUFFET Mo�t ttirv Fri 11-2 only 2.89 ,
(y EVENING BUFFET Men and Tiw� S:�tpm only 2-(
SPAGHETTI Wrtjli you un �i Compare at only 2.25�
�i
Ad
IttI
�All new game room am) gam machines
' 'Drive up window tor 'to go' orders
It's the fun
place to eat
o
ilk
BIG SCREEN TV
Enjoy the SOAPS with lunch or
CURRENT MOVIES(PG) Sat 7pm �pm
Open Mon Thurs 1130am II p m
Fn andSat � 11 30a m 12pm
300 E 10th St
1- 7S8 6121 �
SUPPORTING
BASKETBALL � GOLF � BASEBALL � SOFTBALL � TRACK
SW MMING � TFNNIS � SOCCER � VOLLEYBALL � FOOTBALL
The Student Athletic Board is currently involved in a membership drive
(Sept 20 Oct I) Someone will be contacting your dorm, sorority or
fraternity soon with more information If you should miss this, then there
is a meeting of the entire SAB scheduled for Sept 29 at 700 in room 244 of
Mendenhall Student Center For more information call Pam Holt, Ass't.
Athletic Director,757 6417.
Become a part of the total athletic picture Join the SAB and be an ECU
Athletic supporter!
IT'S HOT! IT'S WILD!
IT'S THE CAMPUS
CALENDAR!
I am"n the first m f ora
y 1981 Campus Calendar featuring 11
' L sm est n �' � ee on America
-
�� , � � � . rd e r1 r S10 a
Campus Calendar PO Bin B
J Mavwood Se� lersev (TbO"
Former Pirate Anthony Collins, now leading rusher for the New F.ngland
Patriots
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re
quired to be readily available for
sale m each Kroger Savon except
as specifically noted in this ad It we
do run out of an item we will offer
you your choice of a comparable
item when available reflecting the
same savings or a ramcheck which
will entitle you to purchase the
advertised item at the advertised
price within 30 days
Items and Prices
Effective thru
Sat Sept 25 1982
in Greenville
Copyght t982
Kroge' Sa� o
Quantf, PigHts Reserved
None Sold To Deal's
"�$
n Q
T
Y
kj
NT
i
lUtf
&
i
�v
.gaj
Wl
j
V
V

a
600 Greenville Bivd Greenville
Open 8 a.m. to Midnight
Open Sunday 9am to 9 p m
dT
a
O
7
COLrTiXJ
SERVE
iSAVE
wieners
jr t � Style
y
STROH A p
ABTV
Stron's Beer
12-Oz
Bt�s
LONGHORN STYLE
(Colby Cheese
$A99
�m SAVE
50c
KROGER
Multigrain
Bread
Lb.
ALL VARIETIES
SERVE N SAVE
Wieners
$408
12-Oz. I
Pkg. "
s
DIET
PEPS
OR
Pepsi
16-
U.S. NO. 1
GOLD OR RED
Delicious

2-Ltr
N R
Btls
40c
BAT
W
AlHBOOM TISSUE
Cottonew
99
Whole Mw
Ga 1
jug
THIN & CRISPY
Jeno's Pizza1
11V2-12V2
Oz.
Pkg
ASSORTED FLAVORS
LIGHT & LIVELY
hk'
�ilJwh
SPICY GUD! GERMAN
Potato Salad
C
Lb.







12
THL EASTCAROl INI AN
SEPTI MBl-R 23. 1982
Cavs Post Offense Lead Despite 0-2 Record
GREENSBORO,
N.C. (UP1) � Virginia
may be winless after
two games, but the
Cavaliers can take
heart in the fact they
have the Atlantic Coast
Conference's most po-
tent offense and its
second-stingiest
defense.
The league said
Wednesday, Virginia
has rolled to 405 yards
per game while allow-
ing just 237 yards per
contest. In contrast.
second-place Duke has
compiled 402 yards a
game in total offense,
and defensive leader
North Carolina is per-
mitting 199.5 yards per
contest.
Tar Heel substitute
tailback Ethan Horton
leads the league in
rushing with 120 yards
per game, vsith North
Carolina State's Joe
Mclntosh trailing by a
whisker at 119.7 yards
per contest.
In the total offense
category, Boomer
Esiason of Maryland
has wrested the lead
from Duke's Ben Ben-
nett. Esiason now con-
tributes 221.5 yards per
game to the Terrapins'
attack, while Bennett
plugs in 213.5.
Bennett also is the
league's No. 2 man in
passing efficiency, with
156.5 rating points. Tol
Avery of North
Carolina State is tops
with 161.3.
The ACC's standout
pass receivers are
Russell Davis of
Maryland and Carl
Franks of Duke with
six per game. Wake
Forest's Phil Denfeld
comes next with five
per contest.
Virginia's Malcolm
Pittman is the league's
best in kickoff returns
with an average of 31.7
yards per return. Tom-
my Gregg of Wake
Forest is best in punt
returns at 10.9 yards
per try.
Georgia Tech
placekicker Ron Rice
tops the ACC in scor-
ing and field goal kick-
ing, thanks largely to
the five field goals he
booted last week. He
has scored an average
of 9.5 points per game.
Besides total defense,
North Carolina also
leads four other team
categories: rushing
defense at 97.5 yards a
game, rushing offense
at 230 yards per con-
test, scoring defense at
8.5 points per game and
punt returns at 12 yards
per try.
Duke possesses the
best passing offense at
249 yards a game, with
Maryland next at
246.5, while Georgia
Tech has the ACC's
stingiest pass defense
just 75 yards per game.
North Carolina State
has put the most points
on the scoreboard,
averaging 29.7 per con-
test.
Wake Forest leads in
only one category: net
punting, with an
average of 41.9 per
kick.
Pirate Trio Receive A wards
A crowd of anxious Pirate fans wail for Thursday's East Carolinian to hit the stands.
East Carolina quarterback Greg
Stewart, linebacker Ron Reid, and
tailback Tony Baker have each been
named honorable mention to the
ECAC Division I-A's
"Players -Of-The-Week in their
respective categories for their per-
formances in last weekend's 30-0
victory over East Tennessee State
University.
Stewart, a 5-9, 170-pound Mid-
dlebrook, Va native, threw for 209
yards, the most by any ECU
quarterback since Carl Summerall
tossed for 201 yards against Furman
in 1972, and completed 15 of 21
passes including one for a
touchdown to earn offensive
honorable mention Player-Of-The-
Week.
Reid, a 6-0 223-pound linebacker
won honorable mention defensive
Player-Of-The-Week for his eleven
tackles, including nine solos. Reid,
from Farmville, led the Pirate
defense which held ETSE to a stub-
born 80-yards rushing and just 158
total yards. The ECU defense is
currently ranked eighth in the na-
tion.
Also earning honorable mention
honors for Rookie-Of-The-Week
was freshman tailback Tony Baker
of High Point who rushed for 90
yards on only 13 carries and caught
three passes in the East Tennessee
State win. It was Baker's second
consecutive game of more than 100
yards total offense.
A look at the ECAC Division 1
football statistics show that East
Carolina is on top in scoring (28
points per game), total offense (420
yards per game), and learn rushing
(211.5 yards per game). The Pirates
are second in passing at 208.5 yards
per contest only to Boston College
and quarterback Doug Flutie. The
scoring defense is third allowing
16.5 points per outing.
Individually, Stewart, behind
Flutie, is third in passing efficienc)
with a 135.50 rating and second in
total offense averaging 177.5 yard
per game. Baker is second in
rushing with a "4.5 per-game
average; split end C arlton Nelson is
third in receiving, averaging 3.5
receptions per game and cornerbj.k
Chuck Bishop is listed third among
punt returners at 5.9 vards per
return.
Classifieds
PERSONAL
CONGRATULATIONS to our ex
cettcnl AOPI Ml pledges! Love,
your ��� sisters
"RICHIE C" the brothers may
think they have all the wtt but I
know good thing when I see it
ROOMMATE
WANTED
TWO ROOMMATES needed
bedroom house. 2 blocks from
campus WS per month Call Bun
Chadwtck 7S2-mi 30 E 13th S'
ROOMMATE NEEDED
Lanftton Park 7M 0145
FOR SALE
FREE KITTENS NEED A good
home call 754402 ask for Chris
FOR SALE 1�W KAWASAKI 7S0 2
cyl Exc COnd Only 3300 miles
SIMM Call Darrell at 524 4860
HAND CRAFTED, rustic tur
ARCADK VARIETY
Zlll Sih4 Kradc( ink
"He are having
a drawing
for a
Coke Cooler
niture at affordable student
prices For more information, call
Kim at 752 5717
FOR SALE Maple table. 6 chairs,
couch matching chair, maple cof
fee table, endtables, four 14 inch
VW Porsche rims and tires with
some tread Call 758 7820
FOR RENT I Bedroom apart
ment near campus available SMS
includes utilities 752 2615
FOR SALE Rickenbacker 4001
bass guitar with small practice
amp Immaculate condition very
nice case and new strings S325
firm 758 760 after 3pm
FOR SALE 12 inch Panasonic
black and white TV Excellent
condition Price negotiable Call
752 I8�7
JULIET Why does your light
keep shimng through that window
yonder' Sure I know you ve got a
lot of reading to do but we had a
date Maybe you need to find out
about Cliffs Notes and how they
can help you understand those
tough ht assignments and save
you a bunch of time So turn out
the light Juliet and come with
me to the bookstore for Cliffs
Notes
ROMEO
ROMEO Mow can I concentrate
on my Shakespeare assignment
when you are forever crooning
below my window? Why not do
something useful and bring me my
Cliffs Notes! They'll help me
understand what I read and they'll
give me a great review Th�n I'll
have more time lor you. The
bookstore has the ones I need Will
I see you tomorrow? Love and
kisses
JULIET
JOE STUDENT Some date you
are! I spend the whole night wat
ching you study while everyone
else is out having tun If you had
used Cliffs Notes instead, you
would have more time tor me
They help you understand what
you read and they give a great
review Get Cliffs Notes at the
bookstore Wise up! Don t bother
calling me tonight I'll be at the
submarine races with Brian
JOSEPHINE STUDENT
" SERVICES
TYPING TERM papers, resumes,
thesis etc Call 752 7J3
PROFESSIONAL Typing service
experience, quality work. IBM
typewriter Call Lanie Shive
7SI-SJ01 or Gail Joiner 756 1042
PROFESSIONAL Typist wants to
type at home Reasonable rates.
756 3660
HAVING TROUBLE IN
SPANISH? Tutoring available
Call Oscar (native speaker)
75 9527
TYPING SERVICES Resumes,
theses, research papers, etc NEW
IBM type Judith Wilson Phone
7S6 7651
LOST AND
FOUND
Lost m FOUR SEASONS
restaurant Lady's yellow gold
Bulova watch engraved on back
Great sentimental value Reward
Call 7S8 703 and ask for Sherri
WANTED
BASS PLAYER wanted, for Part
time contemporary Country Rock
Band Band has numerous book
mgs and has 2 45s getting a lot of
air play Serious competent musi
cians only Call 758 8772 after 5
p.m.
WANTED Manager and
photographers to work part time
with ECU groups Must have 35
mm camera and three years ex
penence Earn S5 to S10 per hour
Send resume and recent
photograph to 101 Woodland St
Morganton, NC 286S5
TURN YOUR UNWANTED LP'S
into cash! We buy and sell used
albums must be in good condition
Call for details Apple Records
758 1427
PROFESSIONAL man, 42, new in
area, seeks lady for friendship
outings Dinners, company call
757 0�8v after 5 p m or write Box
2271
WANTED Person to share duplex
in King's Row ire Rent 175 per
month utilities free 757 048� after
5pm or write Box 2291 Green
ville
P
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L.
$1.00 Off
Any Plate � With Coupon
Fri. or Sat. Only - 4:30 p.m9:30 p.m.
Cliff's Seafood House &
Oyster Bar
Washington Highway (N C 33 Ext i Green,Mle Phone 7S2 31 72
ONE COUPON PER PERSON
BULLOCK'S
BARBERSHOP
I
Friday Special
12 doz. Sweetheart Roses
issSliIi
"�Jrs of t olors or
Jefferson Florist
vc- fi f7s
rapped � Yourhoice
or Rainbow Assortment
WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH FOR:
CLASS RINGS WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS
ALLGOLD& SILVER
SILVER COINS
CHINA 8. CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
&RING
Of KCV SA16S CO ,�,
401 S. EVANS ST. OPEN 9:30 5:30MONSAT.
(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH) PHONE 752"3866
"YOUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER.
at
Take Out
Service
31S Stantonburg Road
758-4600
tcokr
.
MON. - 4Vi ox. SIRLOIN265
TUES. - 5oz. BEEF TIPS285
WED. - 8 oz. CHOPPED STEAK 285
THURS. - 7V2 oz. SIRLOIN349
FRI. 8 oz. RIB EYE465
SAT. - 6 oz. NY STRIP465
SUN. - 5 oz. BEEF TIPS2"
plus 30 Item SALAD BAR
COUPON FOR FREE BEV. (notalcohod
Nov. 24-Nov. 28, 1982
Spend your Thanksgiving holiday in style on Broadway.
at Macy's Parade, shopping, & touring the city. Space in
limited & time is drawing near. For more info, contact
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Center.
m&jjjm&
OPEN 24 HOURS DRIVE THRU WINDOW
$1.00 OFF
ALL BUCKETS
Good till kick-off � Sat. 18th
4-9 p.m. Mon Tues & Wed.
No Take Outs
1011 Charles Street � 752-1373 1 Block from Campus
iii in
Thursday
All New
College Night
All Cans
70C All Night
Admission $1.00
Friday
End of the Week Party
3:30-7:30 � Free Adm. for all ECU students
3:30-4:30 � All Ponies 30c
4:30-7:30 �All Cans 65C
Friday 9-11 � All Cans 65C All Ladies'
wHappy Hour Stamp Admitted FREE
All Night
Sunday � Ladies' Nite � Free Admission for Ladies'
&SC Draft while it lasts.
ELLEN'S
HALLMARK
SHOP
Pitt Plaza
Shopping Center
Open MonSat.
10-9
758-4591 417 Cotanche St. (Downtown)
We have everything
you need to entertain
before & after the game
Football game
party napkins
plates
cups, etc.
756-9430

?
. �-
I





Title
The East Carolinian, September 23, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 23, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.217
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy