The East Carolinian, September 21, 1982






�Ut� lEaHt Ulnriilintnn
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.9
Iuesda, September 21, 1982
Creenville, N.C.
12 Pages
( iri-ulaiion 10.IMM)
SGA Registration
Deadline Extended
B BOB MORGAN
siatt V rtler
Ihe deadline for candidate
registration in the Sept. 2 SGA
. ection has been extended from to-
day until 5 p.m. Wednesday, Sept.
�s oi 1 p.m. Monday, 56 students
had filed notice ol their candidacy.
Joyce VA 1111 a m s, elections
airperson, said there has been a
blem in getting people to run tor
fl ce. She cited a common lack ol
?wledge about the legislature as
one reason.
W ilkens ; - that main
candidates were hesitant to make a
dev ision uni I he � ere given more
i � rmai about the respon-
sib ties nvoh ed
SGA president Eric Henderson
ned the election delay as a
. information to the
"The co mcil wanted some
. . ra ' evei yone know just
nportani these elections can
Hei dei son said.
I t parliamentary body is made
2 day representatives, one
esentative iron each dorm with
s than 350 students and two
tatives from dorms with
: than 350 students.
. nning in October, the
iture will meet ever) Monday
its duties will include the
ation ol student tunds,
. ol all executive appoint-
ments to the judiciary and approval
ol constitutions oi organizations
recognized by the SGA.
According to Henderson and
othei student leaders, an issue likely
to be handled by the legislature will
be Mt attempt to revise current rules
for the election ol executive of-
ficers.
Class officers, along with ex-
ecutive officers, comprise the Ex-
ecutive Council. Responsibilities o
the council are to make appoint-
ments to judicial boards and be
responsible foi the employ mem of
SGA employees.
The constitution provides for a
president and vice president foi the
freshmen, sophomore, junioi and
graduate classes and a president,
vice president, and secretary-
treasurer lor the senior class.
The presidents ol each class have
voting priveleges in the legislature.
YA ilkens said thai any students in-
terested in running tor any position
must go b room 228 in Mendenhall
Student Center and register bet ore 5
p.m. Wednesday.
"As ol now said Wilkens, "we
still have no candidates from
Umstead, White. Green and Tyier
and only 2d candidates tor day
representatives. We also still need
candidates tor graduate vice presi-
dent and senior class secretary-
treasurer
Remodeled Darryl's
Bars Wheelchairs
Ptoto By STANLEY LEARY
Equestrian Victory
Ihe Pirates rode Carllon Nelson's two touchdown receptions to
victory Saturday niyht, trampling East Tennessee state 30-0. This
evened the Pirates record to 1-1. For more information see Spurts,
paye 10.
By PATRICK O'NEIl I
Slaff Wnirr
Some of East Carolina's han-
dicapped students were disap-
pointed when they discovered that a
new dining area at Darryl's
Restaurant would not be accessible
to wheelchairs.
Darryl's, located on 10th Street.
is the closest restaurant to Slay Dor-
mitory where most of ECU'S ap-
proximately one doen wheelchair
students reside.
"I felt shafted said Brian
Rangeley, "especially since they
said we would be able to get in
there
Rangeley, an English major,
relies on a wheelchair for mobility.
He claims that a new section, "the
sunroomwhich was added to the
restaurant, has no access ramps tor
wheelchairs. From conversations he
and other students had with Dar-
ryl's employees before the renova-
tion began, they were led to believe
that the new room would be accessi-
ble.
Another room in the restaurant
is, and always has been accessible to
wheelchairs, but since the renova-
tion, use of this room has increased
considerably. Rangeley noted that
before the renovation this was a lit-
tle used area of the restaurant, but
since the renovation it has become a
popular section.
"What would have been the tair
thing to do was to have made the
new room accessible while the
building was still under construe
lion Rangeley said "Theychoose
not to do that, and as a result, the
seating that is accessible is now hard
to get
"I was not aware that the new
sunroom wasn't accessible said
George Burkhardt. vte president in
administration tor the Creative Din-
ing Corporation, which owns and
operates the Darrvl's Restaurant
chain. He did say that there were
still as many tables and as many
ieats available as were available
before the renovation began
"However, a smaller percentage of
the total seating is now handicap ac-
cessible he added.
Burkhardt said that he would
look into the possibility ol making
the sunroom accessible He said he
would see it the problem could be
solved. "I can not promise, but we
will make every effort to determine
Buckhardt mentioned tha the
possibility ol a ramp being installed
to a side door could be considered.
"We will undertake efforts io cor-
rect the situation he concluded
Editor's nore:ln a later phone call
to our office, Burkhardt explained
that the failure to in.?U a ramp
making the tnroom accessible was
actual � done in error "We have
already begun to correct the situa-
tion he explained, adding that a
ramp should be installed in the next
three to tour weeks.
Student Political Action Group Targets Philly Congressman
PHII ADM PH1A. (CPS) A
ab foi a political experiment.
;ightl . ressional district in
rban Philadelphia encompasses
no less than three campuses �
inty Community College.
alley College and
. B e College � boasts
e b aesi student-aged population
� tte, and abuts the University
Pel ana. which is the
t's larj esl employer
� . dei tally. the eighth, will
� he cei i major test of stu-
dent political powet this fall.
The test has a new political
creature � a student political action
committee � trying to unseat an in-
cumbant congressman who voted
f : cuts nt student aid programs.
The incumbant, Rep. .lames
. oyne, discounts being made into a
target bv the National Student
Political Action Committee
(NSPAC), which is also trying to
unseal five other "anti-student"
legislators around the country, and
trying to elect nine "friends
"We can't be worried about every
group that opposes us says Hugh
( offman, Coyne's spokesman.
In comparison to other Coyne
enemies. NSPAC isn't worth worry-
ing about, he says "These guys
aren't in the big leagues. They're
engaged m tomfoolery
But Democrat Peter kostmeyer.
Coyne's opponent, thinks NSPAC
can make a difference in the race,
which in 19N0, was decided by some
4000 votes.
"Very, very heavy use ol student
volunteers says Kostmeyer aide
John Seager, "that's how this elec-
tion will be won
"Students constitute the single
biggest manpower pool for these
campaigns agrees Dr. Oliver
Williams, a political science pro-
fessor specializing in state politics at
Penn. "In a campaign this close, go-
ing to the students could be pretty
smart
Such talk warms the heart of Joe
Sweeney, NSPAC's treasurer, who
helped the U.S. Student Association
(USSA) organize the PAC to give
more muscle to the lobbying efforts
against President Reagan's propos-
ed halving of federal student aid
programs.
At the same time, the Coalition of
Private College and University
Students (referred to as COPUS)
formed a student PAC, declaring
"war" on politicians who supported
the president's budget proposals
and threatening them with defeat
this fall.
"Students traditionally don't
have money, and we can't expect
them to give it says COPE'S Ex-
ecutive Director Miriam Rosenberg.
"What they do have is time, and we
want to utilize that rather than
dollars
The emphasis, she says, will be on
"in-kind" services like staffing
voter registration drives, phone
banks and mailing in the targeted
districts.
NSPAC's Sweenev nevertheless
hopes to raise $30,000 tor expenses,
though as of July the Federal Elec-
tion Commission shows NSPAC's
balance at $1040
By contrast, conservative PACs
are estimated to have some SI45
million to spend for right-wing can-
didates this fall.
Both the National Education
Associaton and the American
Federation of Teachers will concen-
trate on many of NSPAC's target-
ted races. Their budgets are a com-
bined $1.25 million. They scare
Rep. Coyne, for one, a lot more
than NSPAC does.
"Out of three guys in the alley
Coffman asks, "which do you
worry about first � the two gor-
rillas or the skinny kid?"
Sweeney hopes to enhance the
skinny kid's effectiveness by choos-
ing narrow alleys like Penn-
sylvania's eighth district.
"We were looking for districts
where the student population was
greater than the incumbant's margin
of victory in the last election he
explains. "We found approximately
100 districts where students could be
a significant factor
NSPAC windowed them down to
supporting senators Robert Staf-
ford, R-Vt and Paul Sarbanes.
D-Md and representatives
Claudine Schneider, R-R.l , Barney
Frank, D-Ma Peter Peyser,
D-N.Y Robert Edgar. D-Pa and
Paul Simon, R-ll.
NSPAC wants to defeat
represesentames Marcaret Heckler.
R Ma Ben Oilman. R-N V .
Coyne, Cooper Evans. R-la . Bobbi
Fiedler, R-Ca and Frank Wolff,
R-a.
It's also actively working tor
Lynn Cutler, who is challenging
Ivans in Iowa. Ira Lechner,
challenging Wolfl in Virginia, and
Kostmeyer.
COPUS will announce its targes
later this month.
T he American Student
ssociaton, a third student lobbying
group in Washington. D.C will
disburse information to voters on
certain, as-yet unnamed candidates,
savs director Tim Fuckey.
The candidate choices have
already caused some outrage. A
newly-formed coalition of conser
vative student groups called Fhe
Student Coalition for Truth
dismisses NSPAC as a political tool
of "far left" groups "such as
USSA
Rosen Meyei ol Rep. Cooper
Evans1 Washington office says
NSPAC's tendency toward
Democratic candidates discredits
the group. "It comes down to a par-
tisan standoff
See PAC. Page 5
Big Item Purchases Slumping
Photo By STANLEY LEARY
Steppin' Out
1 hese AKA sisters strut their stuff in front of the Student Supply Store. An annual ritual of Ihe AKA
sorority, they flamboyantly show their eohesieness in ecstatic displays across campus.
Protests, Dumping Continues
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Protests continued throughout
the weekend at the new PCB landfill
dump site in rural Warren County.
More than 100 people were ar-
rested Monday bringing to 200 the
total number of people arrested for
attempting to block trucks filled
with PCB-contaminated dirt from
entering the site.
Among those arrested on Monday
was Rev. Joseph Lowery, national
president of the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference.
Lowery led a group of more than
325 demonstrators on a two and one
half mile march to the PCB landfill.
When the first of the two groups of
demonstrators reached a line of
helmeted N.C. state highway
patrolmen, they were told to clear
the way. Lowery responded by say-
ing he wanted to pray. "I'm going
to pray right here the minister
said, kneeling. "I've got a right to
pray
Lowery then began reciting the
Lord's Prayer and was promptly ar-
rested by police. About 50 other
followed his lead and were also
carted off to waiting police vehicles.
The day's confrontation appeared
over after that, but demostrators
then regrouped at a nearby house
and again marched to the dump.
As two empty dump trucks came
out of the landfill, the
demonstrators sat down in the road
about 300 yards away, forcing
highway patrolmen to jog to them.
The second group of demonstrators
was also arrested for refusing to
leave the road.
Local residents with support of
outside civil rights leaders have
formed human blockades to protest
what they call a racist decision to
use the 59.5-percent black county
for the dumping of the
polychlorinated biphenyls, which
was mistakenly dumped along 210
miles of North Carolina highways in
14 counties.
Local resident and organizer of
the Warren County Citizens Con-
cerned about PCB, Ken Ferruchio
said that the human rights issue and
the environmental issue have always
been inseparable.
Ferruchio has begun a hunger
strike in response to the dumping.
"We can't afford to fail right now.
Don't be scared of that jail, added
White who has been arrested before
in the incident.
NEW YORK (UPI) � Con-
sumers who have the discretionary
income to lead the economy out of
recession are holding off buying big
ticket items waiting for prices to
come down further, a leading con-
sumer survey shows.
"A large percentage of the na-
tion's more affluent households are
postponing purchases of big ticket
items, including cars, on speculation
that prices will come down said
Albert E. Sindlinger, who heads a
widely followed consumer research
firm based in Media, Pa.
"This new trend that we call
'reverse hedging' has come out of
nowhere Sindlinger said. "And it
will keep a lid on any hopes for an
economic recovery
Sindlinger's confidence surveys,
which base the replies on actual li-
quidity and job security, break the
population into two segments he
calls stockholders, those who own
some stock, and non-stockholders.
There is wide disparity between
them.
More than 68 percent of the
stockholders are confident about
the economy and their own futures,
compared to less than 20 percent of
the non-stockholder group.
The non-stockholders, roughly
two-thirds of the households in the
country, are hurting badly. They've
absorbed the bulk of unemployment
and there are tremendous teats
among this group that more jobs
will be lost, he said.
Despite government figures on in-
flation, they still feel the infla-
tionary bite, he said. "Prices on
necessities in the consumer price in-
dex � utilities, rent, services and
medical care, for example � still are
going up.
"Taxes haven't abated. Social
Security and state and local taxes,
especially property taxes, have gone
through the roof he said, putting
this group, largely lower-income
and blue-collar workers, "in a real
squeeze
The stockholder group, on the
other hand, comprised of the other
one-third of households, is "a very
distinct group. Not all are wealthy,
but by and large it's an affluent,
sophisticated, educated group, and
generally includes the upper-income
segment of the population he
said.
These consumers have been
relatively unscathed by the bad
economy. "Most are keeping their
lobs, and they're ebullient now
because they've got profits � both
on paper and in actual dollars � in
the stock market rally Sindlinger
said. They also have been keeping
ahead of inflation through interest-
bearing investments.
"They're the only ones that have
money to spend and if there is to be
any consumer-led recovery it's go-
ing to come from this group he
said.
"But they're telling us that, con-
trary to the 70's when they bought
to beat price increases, whether or
not 'hey needed an item, they're
now postponing purchases waiting
for prices to come down
Even the discounts offered by the
automakers are having a backlash
effect.
"The stockholder group, which is
in a position to buy cars, is saying 'if
the automakers have come down
through the discounts, they will
come down further and maybe even
actually cut base prices Sindl-
inger said.
"They're playing a real waiting
f.ame, and it's going to prolong the
slump at the retail level

1





THL EASTCAROl IN1AN
SEPTEMBER 21, 1982
Announcements


A
?
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcement column.
please type it on ar announcement
form ana send it to The East
Carolinian in care Of the produc
tion manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications Building
Flyers and handwritten copy on
odd sized paper cannot be ac
cepted
Tere s nc charge tor a"
n&uncements but space is often
limited Tneretore, we tannot
guarantee that your announce
iueni will run as long as vou �anl
and sugges' fnal v u do n ' rely
solely - ifiiscolurni � i publicity
Tn� deadline lew announcements
is 3 p m VoniJdi lot the Tuesday
paper and 3 p m Aeonesdayy for
the Thursday pape' No an
uncements received after these
deadlines wii be printed
This space is available ' all
campus fcj.i' zal ns .ind depart
men's
CAREERS
Wn en career ' is .
Career By t' ice Not C. ci
a � part - .�- sit . s � it
N C St by ' � yersityv . ISC
ing Centei 'is
�'�.lei 4 i
. � � ii and ' : �5 � K)5
A � ; � A �� rS7 ,Vm- 3 00
p V . � -S ' � � Q
Campbei . � �'erest m
ven tor .�. be Idn ��fered n
�' i l rs' "i � ' ic, Nad .i ce
reg strat s ni essai
BRIDGE
CONGRATULATIONS
Delta Zeta wants to con
gratulate every one of our 23 new
pledges Welcome to our
sisterhood
TKE RUSH
TKE Lil Sis RUSH Sept 22 and
23 9 12 00 For info call 758 7699 or
758 9802
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
COURSES
Personal Development Courses
begin
Sept 21 Conversational Ger
man. Camera I. Jazz. Guitar, Ban
io Sept 22 Algebra Review
Clogging Sep' 23 Retirement
P'anning Sept 25 introduction to
Small Computer Oct 18 Getting
Organized Oct 21 Real Esta'e
Finance Commodity Hedging
Ort 26 Aerobic Exercise Nov 17
Real Estate Appraisal
Sept 29 Mime Sept 30 m
vesting in the 80 s Oct 5 Basket
ban Officiating Oct 12 Coping
wi'h Stress Philosophy and
Retirement For information call
'57 6143
FELLOWSHIP
The King Youth Fellowship will
hold its next meeting on Sept 23
The room number is 247 in the
MSC at 8 pm The topics of discus
sion will include the coming of our
Lora Jesus Christ. Elections will
be held and refreshments will be
served at the conclusion of this
meeting
CHI BETA PHI
Chi Beta Phi National Honor
Fraternity invites you to become a
member of the Alpha Gamma
Chapter at ECU Membership is
open to students in the natural
sciences and mathematics We
look forward to seeing-you at 6 30
m Biology 103on Wednesday. Sept
22. 1982
EPISCOPAL
SERVICE
A student Episcopal service of
Holy Communion will be
celebrated on Tuesday Sept 21 in
the chapel of St Paul's Episcopal
Church. 406 4th street (one block
from Garrett Dorm) The service
will be at 5 30 pm with the
Episcopal Chaplain, the Rev Bill
Hadden celebrating
Bridge live 1 C icert This
Friday nigm at 7 JO in the Jenkins
Art Aud't. rium Bridae a con
lempcry Cnnsfian band from
Gre � iO a 11 be giving a tree
1 ri eri A are wel ome ' come
� n 1 � rhe musk Sp n
sored by Faith Victory � Cam
TAOIST CIRCLE
the 1 id �� ' mei � and
s ,1 ptii losopny � c � ,l
es mner aoc utei ' a- m
' ceac e and
r Ta st
���� nber .6 at j 30 p" at rne
K wants S' 1 '� � ' itefl � �� ' nd
- - Eirr Street rymnas
y is rs ar. rtn st ���� e a"C
� efreshment a � � served
)�"� - . is 1 � .1 a CM �
� � � .)� ai' ei'her
758 ")v 1 "sn �25! � � sjs bet
a � 6 and y PV
INTERVIEWING
SKILLS WORKSHOPS
The Career Piarng anaPlace
� rv � " � 6 �' "H
s 1 �� � ne hour si�ss s
� a c . devel 1 ng beer n
'ervieAiny Skills for use 1n your
10b search You may selec1a 'ime
Hrc " ' � ��'� 1 w.
b. r '� mber 15. 1982 Wed"PSOfly
2 00 p t September 231962
Thursday 3 00 p m
September 28 8:uesday
4 00 C m
Oct bet 4. i"82 v. �-�aa3 00
P m
0 � Im anc 3'Sr-ssn'er
. ng Trirr.ug" the CareetP.anr
g �nd Placemen- Set . e
shared
fCMUG
SEMINAR
During Spring Semester 1983 the
Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Program will otter the inter
disciplinary seminar ASMR 5000.
Hi 'he opc The Flesh in the Mid
die Ages and Renaissance Te
seminar will mee- on Thursdays
from 6 Jt'9 JO pm in Brewster
D 313 and will be directed by Dr
Gregory Ross of the Philosophy
Department The seminar is open
to all students interested in
medieval and Renaissance
Studies For further into, see Dr
Ross 1 Brewster A 333' or Dr
Bassman iForeign Languages ana
L teratures Brewster A 424i it
you are .nterested in the Medieval
ana Renaissance Studies Program
or if you need special permission
to pre register tor 'he semma'
see Dr McMHan program coor
dinatOT Dep' of English Austin
315)
CADP
The Campus Alcohol and Drug
Program will have a meeting on
Thursday Sep' 21 a- 5 00 pm .n
'he second floor conference room
;f Erw" Han Any student in
teres'ec in furthering responsible
attitudes toward tie use t
chemical substances is encourag
ed to attend For more into call
757 6793 or 757 6649
NATIONAL LABOR
RELATIONS BOARD
A representative from NLRB
Wmston Saiem. NC will be on
campus Thursday. September 23
to interview underqradua 'e
��'uden's who expec' 'c gradua'e
tf at least 24 hours r one or a
combination of subiects sue as
Labor Relations, industrial Reia
t i o n s Labor Law Labor
Economics. Political Science.
Economics. Business Aomimstra
tion. Personnel Managemen Ac
coun.mg or ta S'uaen's mus'
r-ave a 3 0 grade point average rr
be"er Dead! ne fc app;y s
Septempe' 17 1982
East Carolina Microcomputer
users Group is a new club tormed
last January open to an people in
� ne Greenv � irea n'eres'ec in
micrr.c jmputerS The UD '
r e'ings t' e sec .no Thursday of
- - � �� a' 7 30 pm in
Ml � del � .T For further 1
& . A they President a'
? v. B793
COMMUNION
A student episcopal service of
Holy Communion will be
celebrated en Tuesday .
September 21 in the chapel of St
Paul s Episcopal Church. 406 �th
Street ; nne block from Garret'
Dorm : The service will be a' 5 30
p m wn fhe Episcopal Chaplain.
the Rev BiH Madden celebrating
m
mm
STUOENT UNION
lV '�t.Jl JHIVOVTV
ITALIAN N1TE
LASAGNA
AND
ISPAGHETTII
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
Plus Garlic Bread CQQ
-li-V-l
s&T
SHONEYS
432 Greenville Blvd.
CRAFTS
MSC is offering a va'iety of
crafts workshops for Fall
Semester, 1982. and are available
tor enrollment immediately The
workshops are tree 10 an members
of the Crafts Center Each
member may enroll m one (I)
workshop The cost of a Cralts
Center Membership is $10 00 per
semester which includes the use ol
the facilities tool check out, use ol
library materials and aid of ex
perienced supervisors
AM faculty and staff, their
spouses and dependents who are
MendenhaU Student Center
members may 10m the Crafts
Center Dependents must be eigh
teen years ot age or older to be
elegibie to 10m
Crafts Center Memberships arc
available during regular
operating hours 3 00 PM until
10 00 PM. Monday through Fri
day, and 12 00 Noon until 5 00 PM
Saturday Following is a dst ot
available workshops Floor Loom
Weaving Thursdays (September
30 October 28) 6 9 PM Pottery
Mondays (September 27
November 1) 6 9 PM Basketry
Wednesdays (September 29
November 31 6 9 PM Photography
Thursdays 1 September 30 Nov
417 10 PM JewelrvMetals Mon
days v November 8 December 61
6 9 PM Darkroom Techniques
Mondays (September 27
November 1 i 6 30 9 30 PW
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
COURSES
Basic NAU! Of PAD' SCUBA
Certification Sep' 14 OC 7
Basic Sailing Sept 16 Oct 2
Beginning Ballroom and In
fermediate Ballroom Sep'
17 Nov 19 Texas Country Dance
Sept 18 Nov 20
Da'kroom Photography I Sep'
18 Nov 13 Yoga Sep 29 Oct 13
Conversational German Sept 2'
Nov 23 Camera 1 Sept 21
OC 19 JaJl Exercise Sept 21
OC 2i
Guitar Sept 21 Nov 9 Bant
Sept 21 Nov 9 Algebra Review
Sept 22 OC 10 Clogging 1 Sept
22 OC 27 Retirement Planning
Sept 23 OC 14
For more information can
757 6143
EAST UXOUMA UHVEISITT
AEROBICS AND DANCE
Noontime classe in Aerobics
(already in progress but
newcomers welcome) tor faculty
and staff are held on Monday
Wednesday and Friday in Room
112 Memorial Gym Noontime
classes m Ballroom dancing (start
October 71 lor Faculty and Stall
will be held on Tuesdays and
Thursdays Both of these classes
are free and you may call Jo
Saunders 757 6000 tor further in
formation
FRESHMEN
REGISTER
Freshman Registers may be
picked up in the Buccaneer office
on Tuesdays and Thursdays from
2 00 p m. till 5 00 p m The Buc
caneer Office is located on the se
cond floor of the Publications
Building.
NEWS RELEASE
The Governor s Advocacy Coun
cm for Persons win Disabilities
and Greenville parent s organiza
� ns w,ii sponger a public hearing
Mondav Sept Oth to discuss pro
Pcsea changes m Public Law
94 142 the Federal regulation
a' ch guarantees appropriate
pubK education tor an handicap
p�ci c hildren
Tie public hearing will oe a'
7 30 P V Monday. September
20-n ai The Tommie W'HiS
Regional Developmen' Cen'er m
Greenville
Proposed Federal changes
would reduce the services present
11 provided to physically and men
�ally nandicappeo s'udents and
reduce the role ot parents in the
evaluation placemen: r 'eview
ot ao .noividuai educationa p j
1 iEp 1 ' �� � � ' dren
The pulp, se t fe Sep'
meepg ,s renew 'he prop sed
( � anges aa advise pare's a"d
� n'eres'ed persons how ' Senc
tit r ;ommen's to the Deoan-e1'
tEa.irf' and their legislators
Hai v q � . the E as-9
TEacCh center aa Michael
Ernes' ' 'ne Eas' Carolina
University Pr Bran I ji ear "g
impai'eo S'uden's wilt conduct
the mtefing This meeting will
preceo reg na mee'mgs '0 be
heWSeptr- rje- 30th
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
COURSES
Basic NAU :r PAD' SCOBA
Certification Sep' 14 OC 7
Basic Sa i.ng Sep- 16 OC 2
Beg.nnmg Baiirccm and In
termed'a'e Bai'r c"n Sec'
17 Nov 19 Texas Ccun Dance
Sep' 18 Nov 20
Darkroom Photography Sep'
18 Nov 13 Yoga Sep" 29 OC 13
Ccnversacnai German Sept 21
. 23 Camera I Sept 21
OC 19 iail Exercise Sept 2'
OC 21
Gui'ar Sep' 21 Nov 9 Ban;G
Sept 21 Nov 9 Algebra Revie
Sept 22 OC 10 Clogging 1 Sep'
22 OC 27 Retirement Planning
Sept 23 OC 14
For more
757 6143
CATHOLIC NEWMAN
CENTER
The Catholic Newman Center
would like to invite everyone to
torn m with us for celebrating
Mass every Sunday m the Biology
Lecture Hal' starting a' 12 30 and
every Wednesday a' 5 00 at the
Catholic Newman Center located
down a� �he bottom of College Hill
ALPHA BETA ALPHA
The Alpha Beta Alpha iABAi
Library Science Fraternity will
hold its pledging ceremony for
perspective members Member
ship is open to all library soene
maiors, faculty members and
those interested in the library or
the library profession The piedg
ing ceremony will be held on
September 28 a'5 3C n room 219 of
the L'brar r Scier: e building it m
terested please t ome -i the library
science departmen' uitce lor
more mforma' W All presen
members are requirec 'o attend
SCIENCE MAJORS
Need some light reading' The
A C S S A is taking orders tor the
CRC Handbook of Chemistry and
Physics and the CRC Handbook of
Tables for Organic Compound
Identification for J25 00 and $20 00
respectively A reference must tor
any science maior! Place orders
in the Chemistry office located m
Flanagan between the hours ot
10 00 and 12 00 Sept 20 through
Oct 8 Place your orders now
Payment due when order ,s plac
ed
AMBASSADORS
Attention ECU ambassadors
Don't forget the important
meeting this Wednesday Sept 22
at S 00 pm m the Menoenhau
Multipurpose Room The member
ship drive was a great success ar3
with your help the telephone cam
paign will be great too We have
alot ot surprises you'll be very
nappy to rear about at this
meeting, so please make plans to
attend
information cail
ACTING CLASS
An acting class for beginners
will be meeting lor ten consecutive
evenmgs starting Sept 21 at Pitt
Community College Registration
lor the class will occur at its initial
session, the tee is $U 00 Stephen
B Finnan, formerly of ECU s
Drama and Speech Department.
will be the instructor In addition
to ECU Mr Fmnan has 'aught
and directed a' Brooklyn c.uege
Michigan State Univ and Piti
Community College He also ns$
professional ac'ng and directing
credits Since the class sije s
limited, those who are interested
are advised 10 can Mr Finnan
(757 3546. between 3 5) or Mr jm
Brown at PCC (7S4 31JO between
� 5)
ATTENTION
On Monday September 27 8 9 00
p m m Hendnx theatre P Kappa
Phi and CADP will sponsor welt
known Dr Kenneth Mills from
UNC The topic ot discussion will
be "Alcohol Prevention Free ad
mission to community and entire
campus
PSI CHI
Come and see what cea'ures go
bump n the ECU tcrest You can
fma cut firs' hand at the Psi Chi
cookout party to be neid
September 29 iremdate Sep' 30'
from 4 30 to 7 pm The frolick Will
be held n the deli be'ween iQfh
street and Biology Greenhouse
Reserve your fun and buy a ticket
at the Psi Chi library lor $2 00 or at
the cookout for $2 50 pays tor
food, soda and oeer) You will
never know who you will meet
unless you come
BAKE SALE
Phi Alpha Thefa and the ECU
History Department are sponsor
�ng a bake sale Thursday Sept 23
from � 00 am to 2 00 pm Cakes
brownies and other good es will be
sold 1 Brewster A 317
CORSO
ECU s own student organnation
for future profess onais in "he t'eid
of socai work and correctional
service will be meeng Monday
Sept 27 at 5 30 pm .n Room 101
All maiors and m'ended maiors
are urged to attend
TOMORROW
There s a mandatory mee g
for all persons "0 ae fled tor
SGA posi'ons in Menoen-a 221 a
7 X pm Wednesday Ml persons
not able to atfena this me' -s
tomorrow mus' senc a 'epresen
tatve
ELECTIONS
The follow ng c:sns are Stll
available m 'he Sec' 29 SO� e M
'�ons ot 'he S&A ieg s Sture ano
ciass Officers T"e are ' .e Ja
represen'a' ves represe'a"
from �Vh!te Greene un-s'eaaanc
yier Graoua'e vce presden-
and sfr c ass sa
'reasurer Tne cteae ne I hie to
candidacy is Aeanesaa. Sec
in R-Km 228 Df Ve"hen-ai S'u
dent Cer'e-
PRCCLUB
The PRC I Jb w ii oic iU
meeting on Tuesday Septebe'
21 at 7 00 m the MSC Multipurpose
Rou" An interested PRc IN
are nv.ted to a'tend
BIOLOGY CLUB
There w 11 be a BiOtegy Club
� eeng HI Monday Sep'emt
at 7 30 p m An nea' Prep'Ces
sionai Evaluation Ccn -
Members w.1. speak arc answr-
ques'iors An�cme r � r v p a
professional health caree-s a-e Hi
courages 'c attend Retresme- s
wi'l be served
BOWLING
� . � '

.eague
Sef ��" � �
VSC Bowi-nc
tan
.
ceg ' '
.
your 'ea"
KM
�- '
I. ' 260
ARTS
ADMINISTRATION
An Arts Asm n s'ra' '�' I
and an, mer�ic ors "s
spec' we nr�4�On ae -� "eo
�ena Ihe I rs ee' - -ear
on yvecnescar Sep' 22 a'5 Xp"
n ysi � Ga e . Jen W �"�
Bu-d "C For more ml
-58 9936 a'te' 5 pn
PHI ETA SIGMA
The Pv E'a S gma Fr
Honor Sociehy arill mee' on Sec '
a' 5 00 pm in Room 212 a'
Menaenhaii Stude' Cfr-
members are urgec 'o at'e 1
'he pia"S ior 'he OCcCe' a . I �
�zar' be scheduled
I
The ha-l aroliman
-
Bper�ec a
.�
Si.bsc- ipon Ra'e UWyea �
The Eas' Ca " -
are loca'ea " O c
Buiid.ng on NM ci
Green, ne N C
POS' '�'
-
Telephone
U.S. NAVY
INTERVIEWS
The Career Piann.g a"d Place
men' Service n 'he Bloxton House
i have representatives Irom e
u S Navy Reciting Ottice "ere
eo'er'�oe 29 oe'wee- 9am
aPd 4pm tc talk wi"i Seniors A
shea .s ava'ace lor 'hose
'es s'e'ec with us '0 sign up tor an
inter, eyy All maiors are
welcome the mus'demand will oe
for tnrse in the Health ana
tecn cai I eias j mus' s.gn up
on or before Sep'ember 28
PHYE MAJORS
Ail studen's who plan to oe'ia'e
physical educa'ion as a maior dur
ng change of rr'aior week tor me
Fan Semes'er should repor' 'c
Mmges Cc.seL from I 00 3 00
0 m on Aed"esday Sep'ember 29
tor a mo'cr and physica' fi'ness
'es' Sa'istacory performance en
this 'es' s 'equred as a prere
a s'e loi ctt-c at aoca"ce to
�r-e physical education maic pro
gram Mee detailed information
concerning the tes' is available by
calling 757 6441 or 6442
CIRCLE K
Circle K is caring it is giving a
oart of yourse't to someone else
I' is an opportunity to commit
yourself to enriching tne lives of
many individuals and a'he same
time enhancing your lite because
ycu iave chosen to care Circle K
is "e larges" co ed collegia'e ser
vice organization in 'he world with
over 700 Cap'ers in North
America alone ECU s chapter
mee's every Tuesday n.gnt at 6 30
in MendenhaU room 221 Come and
be a part cf our group choose to
care'
ATTENTION
On Monday September 27. 8 9 00
p m m Hendrix theatre Pi Kappa
Phi and CADP will sponsor well
known Dr Kenneth Mills from
UNC The topic ot discussion will
be "Alcohol Prevention" Free ad
mission to community and entire
campus
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines There are 33
units per line. Each letter, punc
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end of line if word
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac
cepted over the phone We
reserve the right to reject any ad
All ads must be prepaid. Inclose
75� per line or fraction of a line.
Please print legibU! Use capital and
Iowa vase letters.
Return to THE EAST C AROITMAN
office b 3:00 Tuesda before
Vednesda publications
Name
Address.
CityState.
No. lines
. at 5� pe:
. N
I r
-U-H-H -
-
T-t
-r��
- - "
- ' -
4 J.
'

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11
DISNEY WORLD
INTERNSHIPS
Wait Dsney Ac'd s Mag c
Kingdom Coliege lrtemsnip Pre
gram will be interview ng c rar"
pus OC 15 1982 Irom 3 3C 5 OOP
lor tneir spring ano su"me- in
terns Students nrill work 30 hours
per week and earn approximately
S4 00 per hour tor IG weeks Special
trarjrig sem ra,s ne a weekly
Stude'fs w H d� p.acea according
to tne maiors Any in'erestec
s'udents should contac 'e Cc op
ffiee m 3.3 Rawi or can ex' 6979
PRE PHYSICAL
THERAPY
STUDENTS
Deadline for '983 aom.ssion t0
professional phase is October is.
'982 All general college and
physical therapy creaits mus' be
completed Oy end ot Spring 1983
Allied Health Professions Admis
sions Test must be taken m
November ;appiy prior to October
3! Application ana interview ap
pomtments are tc be made by
Sep'ember 24 1982 n departmen
ta' office iBelk Building Annex 3.
757 6961 ext 261'
SPORT CLUBS
Ge' ready tor a fantastic year
Fine out everything you ever
wan'ed to know about Sport Clubs
Currently Feid Hockey Gym
nas'es. Karate, Rugby. Soccer.
Surfing. Team Handball ara
Wafer Polo are active Sport Clubs
It you ana your friends wish to
begn a new club attend the sport
club informational meeting ALL
SPORT CLUBS MUST ATTEND
THE FIRST MEETING WHICH
WILL BE HELD WEDNESDAY.
SEPTEMBER 22 IN MEMORIAL
GYM ROOM 105 8 AT 4 00 P m
Active sport clubs should rave
organuational meetings for the
election of officers ara prepara
tion of schedules prior to tt�e IRS
meeting
ECU
POLITICAL
CANDIDATES
The upcoming student elections will
be a valuable experience for you in
your college life. Be a winner and
advertise your campaign in The East
Carolinian � a proven winner. To
join the winning team � call
757-6366 and ask for Geep Johnson
� Ad Representative.
-
LU
5
CO
Q
IT'S HOT! IT'S WILD!
IT'S THE CAMPUS
CALENDAR!
There s nothing academic about it' Be
among the first in your school to order the
19�3 Campus Calendar featuring 12 of the
sexiest men you II see on A.mencan cam-
puses this year These gorgeous honeys
vsill hang with you all year long To receive
yours fill out the coupon below, enc lose a
check or money order for $10 and send
to Campus Calendar, P.O. Box B,
May wood, New )ersey 07607. In
6 8 weeks and in time for
the holidays we'll send
you the 1 J" x 1 5" color
planner calendar
We II also tell you how
to enter your honey
in our 1984 National
Campus Calendar
Contest to win a
uxury SV000 Spring
fling Vacation for j
both of you ou mus
be 19 years or older to
rjua'ifv
Bookstore inquiries
welcomed I
Yes' Please send me
Enclosed is my Check or M O for$
f it print
Name
Address
City
P
P
K
T
I
"A
OSS
Wednesday
"Original Ladies' Lockout"
Thursday � Appearing �
The Original Drifters
Happy Hour � 7:30-9:00
Friday
The Best In Dance
Open 8:30
Saturday
Beach Night
with John Moore
Sunday
Lambda Chi Pony Night
For Members & Their Guests Only
River
Bluff Ra
Behind
Putt Pun

Tm





T HI I SI I AKOl IMW
stpn MHt K
Student Health Concerns
Mono Explained
The Student Health Service m-
tially wanted this to be a question
and answer column, but due to
the lack of questions sent in after
the article on herpes, we decided
to continue with an informative
column. When sufficient ques-
tions arise we will continue the
question and answer column.
W e would like to remind all of
you this is for you and if you
tune am questions relating to
health and would like them
answered in this paper, send your
questions to the East Carolinian.
1 his week's topic is Infectious
Mononucleosis, a iral infection,
which generalh affects Kmphatic
tissue. Lmph node enlargement
is typical and may or ma not be
iccompanied by malaise, fever.
sore throat, headache, enlarge-
ment of the spleen and even jaun-
dice (yellow mg ot the white of the
eye and skin).
Other abnormalities ma occur
in infectious mononucleosis but
are less common.
I he diagnosis of infectious
mononucleosis is made b a
positive blood test, along wnh a
physical exam
The cause of the disease is
: to be a Mr us known as
he 1 pstein-Barr irus. Infectious
� mucleosis occurs most com-
. among young adults 15-25
. s � though no age group is
ime "kissing disease" is
ill used as a synonym
ous mononucleosis.
Ban irus may be
aliva of infected per-
sons a . thereby ma he
, by kissing, although
not the only means of
an mission.
Besides kissing, there are other
ol rapid indirect oral con-
5 ich as passing a soft drink
an from one person to
other.
Generally, using good health
its such as covering your
�� a hen coughing or sneez-
not eating or drinking after
hers, and washing your hands
(end to decrease the
usness o infectious
mononucleosis.
Once you have contracted in-
fectious mononucleosis, it may
take up to six weeks for the first
symptoms to develop. The symp-
toms usually last only 2-4 weeks,
but may last for months depen-
ding on the seventy of the infec-
tion and the organ systems in-
volved.
Many people have a mild case
of infectious mononucleosis,
with lymph node enlargement be-
ing the only sign of the disease.
They are generally able to con-
tinue their daily routine with
minimal restrictions.
If you happen to be one of
those with a more complicated il-
lness, ou may be restricted to
bed rest to allow your body to
recover more quickly and also
prevent possible trauma to your
liver and spleen by increased ac-
tivity.
There is no rapid cure for in-
fectious mononucleosis. Symp-
toms tend to be decreased by ade-
quate rest, good nutritious diet
and avoiding strenuous physical
exercise
As stated, most of the symp-
toms will be gone within 2-4
weeks. However, there seems to
be a period of fatigue that
sometimes lingers beyond the
other symptoms. This vanes with
individuals and also with the in-
dividual's state of mind.
Those who tend to be strongly
motivated to return to their work
recover more rapidly than others.
Those with depression and low
self-esteem are likely to recover
more slowly.
What ou should do if you
have infectious mononucleosis.
� I. Get adequate rest.
�2. fcat well (regular, nutritious
meals).
�3. Take Tylenol or aspirin for
fever or aching.
�4. Take other medication only
as prescribed by your health care
provider.
�5. Avoid alcohol and strenuous
physical activity.
�6. Use good health habits to
decrease the possibility of
spreading your illness.
School Prayer Bill Supported
By PATRICK O'NEILL
SI.II u rilrr
The controversy over
prayer in public schools
heated up last weekend
as President Reagan,
citing what he called
U.S. heritage as a na-
tion under God, asked
Congress to enact
legislation which would
allow prayer in public
schools.
Reagan urged
members of Congress
TuES. QEPT. 14
00-2:00
ADMISSION l-&0
�apple ecfos-ewt0'
'� Pose's � uoOGfS � u.B E
� Qook. &h&K � PCP5 I COLA
CACCoLueAiStSCWTES Cv
� CCA COLA
� F emeus F- zzo
2nd ��
PLUS C7WES PRIZK
�0ME EARLY !
ooooocoooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

�"
�s
Located 1 mile past
Hastings Ford on
10th St extension
to pass this "long over-
due" measure and "to
help make us one na-
tion under God again
He made his comments
during his weekly radio
address.
Former North
Carolina Civbil Liber-
ties Union board
member Carroll Web-
ber said he agreed with
the American Civil
Liberties Union's
(ACLU) position that
the phrase "one nation
under God" is un-
constitutional.
A school prayer
amendment has already
been sponsored by
N.C. Senator Jesse
Helms (R) and has the
strong support of con-
servative backers. The
Helms' amendment
would strip the
Supreme Court of
power to rule on the
school prayer issues. So
Chairperson Selected
Emily S. Boyce, a
widely-known advocate
of an expanded role of
libraries and librarians
in today's society, has
been appointed perma-
nent chairperson of the
Department of Library
Science at ECU.
Boyce, who has been
acting chairperson for
the past year, was the
unanimous choice of
the department to suc-
ceed Gene D. Lanier,
according to Angelo A.
Volpe, dean of the col-
lege of arts and
sciences.
Lanier, the previous
and first chairperson of
the department, re-
quested more than a
year ago to be relieved
of administrative duties
to devote his time to
teaching and research,
including his advocacy
of intellectual freedom.
Lanier and Boyce
were original members
of the library science
faculty when the
department was created
in 1966.
Volpe thanked
Lanier "for all he did
in bringing about the
successful evolution of
this department
"This is an exciting
time to be involved in
managing an education
program in librarian-
ship. 1 believe that East
Carolina University can
become a regional
center of excellence in
preparing graduates for
a great ariety of jobs
in the knowledge in-
dustryBoyce said.
ECU's department
currently has 82
graduate majors. Volpe
said the department's
graduate program "is
exceptionally strong
Long active in library
association work,
Boyce has held
numerous positions,
offices and committee
assignments and is a
frequent speaker. She
serves on the executive
board of the N.C.
Library Association
and on the governing
council of the
American Library
Association.
Boyce is a member of
the Bibliotherapy Com-
mittee of the Associa-
tion of Cooperative
and Specialized Library
Agencies, a division of
the ALA. She is a
regional director-elect
for the N.C. Communi-
ty Colleges Learning
Resources Association.
Prior to joining the
ECU library faculty in
1959, she was a
librarian at Tileston
Junior High in Wilm-
ington, and the Wilm-
ington public library.
She joined the ECU
library in the cataloging
and circulation depart-
ments.
Volpe said the ap-
pointment was effective
at the start of the fall
semester.
far a liberal filibuster
has delayed the
measures.
Sen. Gary Hart
(D-Col) delivered the
official Democratic
response to Reagan's
remarks. Hart claimed
that Reagan was hawk
ing school prayer
because his "economic
program has failed,
and apparently he
would rather not talk
about it
The ACLU has
claimed that any type
of school prayer would
likely be unconstitu-
tional, and they have
taken some cases to
court at the state level
to block such legisla-
tion.
The founding
fathers wisely saw thai
the power ot the state
should not promote
any religious group
said Aebber "The
public schools arc an
instrument ol state
power. No praver. ex-
cept one of the most
watered down kind,
could be agreed on bv
all religious groups I
don't want our children
to have a watery
religion
Some proponents �
school prayer have if
gested that a moment
o silence be held in-
stead ot an open
prayer. They claim tha?
in this wav student-
could choose to par
ticipaie or not to par
tisipate They could
also use a praver of
their choice
Opponents ol school
praver slaim thai
students already h i
pi in anwa
The context of
silence is an imp I
factoi w ebbei said H
said tha: what happens
before the prayer, aft
the prayer, an
said b the iea hei �
other students will
fluence the m
"I ither it will be sec
�.� in or it il
��erv pablum
Income Growth Low
WASHINGTON
(UPI) � The personal
income of Americans
grew by only 0.3 per-
cent in August, the
smallest gain since
March, as factory pay
and government
benefits levelled off,
the Commerce Depart-
ment said Monday.
After-tax disposable
income showed even
less improvement, go-
ing up only 0.2 percent
after increases in both
taxes and government
fees, the department
said.
The anemic Au
increases were in sharp
contrast to July-
figure which h a d
shown a full one per-
cent increase in per-
sonal income and a
heaithy 2.1 percent in-
crease in atter-tax
disposable income
because of the July tax
cut.
Personal spending
outpaced increases in
income for August, go-
ing up 0.7 percent, the
department said.
The departme
Bureau of Economic
V ilysis -a per; i i
income increas I
58.6 bil an
nual rate ol S2.
triuion, after adj isi
ment for seasonal
come trend
Factor) pay i
dropped at an anr .
rate o: � Bu
the far largei rtl
h s the - ' - in
government benel
an mere only
5900
from July's
rgc
512.9 b n.
WANTED
THE PHANTOM FORECASTER
(the most accurate coiiege footcall prediction sheet available)
FREE
Available I lLL at the
following locations:
� AccuCopy � Attic
� Pantana Bob's
� TreeHouse
� Globe Hardware Store
� Bicycle Post
� Quick Snak
� Pharo's
� Sharpe's Formal Wear
� University Book Exchange
� Book Barn
� Varsity Barber Shop
� Subway
� Heart's Delight
� Apple Records
SUPPORTING
BASKETBALL �GOLF.BASEBA � 5JHBA � -
SWIMMING � TENNIS � SOCCER � �OL. E v B AL. � c : TBALl
The Student Athletic Board is currently involved m a membership drive
(Sept. 20-Oct. 1) Someoii3 will be contacting your dorm sorority or
fraternity soon with more information If you should miss this then there
is a meeting of the entire SAB scheduled for Sept 29 at 700 in room 244 of
Mendenhai! Student Center. For more information call Pam Holt Ass't
Athletic Director, 757 6417.
Become a part of the total athletic picture. Join the SAB and be an ECU
Athletic supporter!
ATiTIC
'e@&
J Monday, Tuesday,
and Wednesday
Ocean Perch Nuggets
$1.99
Crab Cakes
$1.99
Hamburger Steak
$2.99
Beef Tips$2.99
, French Fries or Baked Potato, Tossed Salad
I may be substituted for Slaw35c extra !
fcoooooooo���Prinnonuuuuoiooooonnon-i
TUESDAY
LAUGHING MATTER
WEDNESDAY
ISLAND
Srud�r r�dwcd (xJmijuon
THURSDAY
DREAMS
IFC Foil Fl H H 7 00
Lodi�t Lit M.t.
FRIDAY
DAYSTAR
�IFC Foil F.tl H H 4:00)
SATURDAY
DAYSTAR
SUNDAY
COYOTE
MON - PIZZA 4 PASTA
iUFFfT - S 9 oil p.no i.
ipooh.n. - S2 79
TUES - PIZZA BUFFET S2 49
Lad Nit. .BRUCE Ft t I
Lodi.i - NoCo�ei - Fre� K.a
Happy Hou' SI 00 spec
WED - 2 IS SALAD BAR
TMURS - SPAG SPEC J2 49
Champoane loi" M M 9 til I
Lod.n - l�tglotttr�� �otk Daaton
NKil 00 spec 2Sdtott
FRI M H � �� �o'i R.cktAcDo-U
SAT - HH 4-7
SUN - LASAGNASPEC 2 99
EAST CAROLINA S
PARTY CENTER
TUESD
�- GOLDFiSH SWALLOWING
weokshay iz DATING GAME
MJ.i NIGHT - 30C� .e.
Free odm. tor ECU students
THURSDAY $1.00 Adm.
COLLEGE NITE - 70 cons
FRIDAY
END OF THE WEEK PARTY
N�. Houri - 3 30 7 30
3 30 4 30 oM pc 30
4 30-7 30olUo"�65
9 00-11 00 ailca 6S
tod admitted tr�� � M M Hoop
SATURDAY
BtST IN DANCE MUSIC
SUNDAY
LADIES' NITL
di. od'nittve' -ec
jt dro� -�w� '� 0�n
105 E FIFTH STREET
When ou get the munchies
after partying downtown
this weekend. ou need
not get in your car.
because . . .
Fn.&Sat.
Open till 3:00 a.m.
&. remember our subs are
a foot and a halt
of food
Across From USE
S11 Cotanchc SI. Ortw vill
7M-B0M tor TAKE OUT
BMW, ft. � BJ0� m I M
HAPPY HOUR DAILY
4p.m 7B.m
VIDEO. "INBALL.
FOOSBALL BILLIARDS
THURS.
HARRY
&
SCRAPPY
W-Rfft
Come try the
newest H.H. in
town � along
wour regular 4-8
H.H. we are now
running a H.H.
12:00 a.m. -1:00a.m.
109 E 5th St
77 1361
DARTS
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Sire last (Earoltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, cm mm
Mike Hughes, wbHUKM t�"
WAVERLY MERR1TT, v�o, �; MMfMwv ClNDY PLLASANTS. s,�,ns t,im�
Robert Rucks, �,�,�,� Mm, Ernest Conner, ,� t�
ALl AFRASHTEH, Cmdu Mamnttf STEVE BACHNER, Kmnmnmtm Edm
Stephanie Groon, (,��,�,�,� ��
Mike Davis, ��u7�m t&Moxr
September 21. 1982
Opinion
Page 4
U.S. & Israel
Senseless Massacre Severing Ties
It is somehow difficult to believe
that two nations so essentially
disparate as the United States and
Israel could have ever carried on
anvthing but sporadic, heated and
west Beirut even claim that
"wounded people (in the refugee
camps) were killed in their hospital
beds
We condemn and deplore, time
unproductive diplomatic relations, and time again, the Nazi murdering
After all, it would seem to follow
that any nation which continually
chooses to propagate the influence
of senseless bloodshed and violent
destruction would run counter to
the policies of a nation such as the
U.S which claims "life, liberty and
the pursuit of happiness" as its fun-
damental tenets.
But nonetheless, U.S.Israeli ties
have been, perhaps, the foremost
oasis this country has had in the
Middle East in recent years, which is
almost sickening to realize when one
considers that country's recent
chain of events.
In this summer's siege of Beirut,
for example, Israeli troops were
responsible for killing 17,825
Lebanese and Palestinians � in-
cluding women, children and
civilian men � and injuring another
30,203. These figures may seem in-
ordinately high, except when one
compares them with the official
Israeli count, which claimed the
death toll was even less than one
thousand.
of six million Jews in the WW II
concentration camps � as well we
should. The world has probably
never known such a decadent,
reproachful crime. But deny it as we
may, that same attempted genocide
is occurring today in the Middle
East.
The "proud" nation of Israel has
rejected, on numerous occasions,
U.S. demands to withdraw its
troops from Lebanon. And the
government in Jerusalem, which
amounts to little more than a
power-hungry insane asylum, says it
"regrets" the horrible incidents at
the refugee camps, yet maintains
that Israeli troops will continue
their "mission-of-peace" occupa-
tion of west Beirut until terrorist
and other anti-Israeli factions are
eliminated.
Admittedly, casting the im-
mediate blame at the feet of Israel is
unjust. As yet, there is no sound
proof as to who's to blame for the
massacre. However, even that coun-
try's own citizens (or, at least, a
Then, practically a month after goodly number of the Israeli people)
cease-fire negotiations had reached believe their own government is at
an apparent settlement, the flame of least partly, if not directly, at fault
madness rekindles. Israeli tanks in the incidents.
surge deeper and deeper into the
heart of west Beirut, directly-
violating diplomatic arrangements
� once again, killing and destroy-
ing everyone and everything in
This past weekend, angry protests
were staged in Jerusalem, once
again voicing the Israeli people's
distrust of their government
They were dispersed by military
sight. Suddenly, the Soviet Embassy police armed with teargas, concus-
is occupied by Israeli troops, sion grenades and clubs
Naturally, they deny that takeover, When will the world learn that
despite the fact that Israeli artillery Israel cannot be trusted? How many
has already seriously damaged the more lives must be wasted in this
entire embassy compound. senseless bloodbath? How much
Israel, of course, claims that any longer will it be before we find
damage to the Soviet compound has ourselves in the midst of another
been unintentional, although the world war? Despite what we may
buildings have been shelled more like to believe, WW 111 is right
than a dozen times since the fighting around the bend, just aching for a
began 14 weeks ago. reason to launch itself. The stage is
And then, apparently so as not to already set.
omit the United States from the Perhaps the only logical mode of
growing Middle East insanity, an action for the United States is to
Israeli officer takes a shot at a U.S.
Marine standing guard atop a
clearly-marked American Embassy
sever its ties with the warmongering
Middle East nation, since it is ob-
vious that Israel has neither any
building in west Beirut. Fortunate- concept nor intention of spreading
ly, the bullet missed its mark; never- the influence of peace in that
theless, days later came the awaited region They have flatly rejected the
denial, which has almost become
standard practice for the Israeli
government, especially in recent
months.
But now, perhaps the most
sickening act to date has occurred:
the massacre of men, women and
children alike in the Palestinian
refugee camps of Chatilla and
Sabra, which occurred on Sept. 17
and 18, only days after the multi-
U.S. peace initiatives, saying they
are contradictory to the Camp
David accords, despite Former
President Carter's firm statement
that the current plan is "completely
compatible with the Camp David
agreements" he helped negotiate
with Israeli Prime Minister
Menachem Begin and the late Egyp-
tian President Anwar Sadat.
It is also obvious that Israel has
national U.N. peace-keeping force manipulated its entire region using
pulled out of Beirut. Bodies, human its bogus alliance with and approval
and animal corpses, strewn together
and buried by bulldozers in the rub-
ble of destruction. And the
characteristic, blood-boiling blame
tossing ensues.
Israel blames the murders on
Phalange gunmen loyal to the
recently-slain president-elect of
Lebanon, Bashir Gemayel. The
PLO accuses the Israelis of the
slaughter, claiming they went
through the camps simply killing
"every man, woman and child in
sight
The disregard these people show aid, aid for the elderly, etc.), it is ex-
toward human life is utterly incom- pected that $3 billion dollars will be
prehensible. Men driven by some allotted to Israel this year to
obvious insanity, killing helpless "protect U.S. interests" in the Mid-
bystanders. Red Cross volunteers in die East.
from the United States. Our own
nation has been far too hesitant in
disapproving of Israeli policy and
actions.
Once the guise of protection from
this Western super-power is formal-
ly and actually withdrawn, Israel
will stand � and rightly so � as a
nation alone.
Consider This
While the Reagan administration
has sharply cut back many domestic
programs this year (i.e financial
50RRYSIRmITS B�N AWNexePASAN ISRAELI SETTLEMENT
Poster Airplanes Bombard Ficklen
The Pirate 'Aerial Attack'
Ah, the sights and sounds of Pirate toot-
ball. Wow, did 1 miss thai over the long
haul since last year. What an audio-visual
experience! The hand marching proud in
their regal uniforms, striking up their
"stirring rendition" of our national an-
them; the heartwarming sound of
cheerleaders screeching in unison; the
heartbreaking whimper of a die-hard tan
who's just dropped a halt-lull bottle ol his
favorite beverage. Boy, I'm sure glad
Pirate football's back.
Just sitting up there in the north stands
of Ficklen Stadium the other night really
brought back the memories. That im-
mense, howling crowd � the likes ol
which can't be found this side o Wilson. 1
love it! Fans who stick right with the team
through thick and thin, fans who just
don't miss a trick.
Take this �uy who sat behind me at the
game. Not really all that big or anything.
In fact, he looked more like Frnie Douglas
than a football fan. But nonetheless, this
guv was on his feet the whole game,
screaming and cheering his team on to vic-
tory. It just so happened that he couldn't
sit down, because someone had spilled a
drink on his seat. But he didn't mind. That
was a small price to pay to watch ECU
football in real life.
"Kill 'em he yelled. "Tear his legs
off! Rip his lungs out Gees, this fella's
really getting into the game, 1 thought to
myself. 1 mean, this guy practically had
tears streaming down his face he was
screaming so loud. Little did 1 know that
someone had just stolen his precious flask
What a fan!
And then there was the girl sitting a cou-
ple of rows up Boy, was she excited. In
fact, she got so involved in the game that
DOONESBURY
she threw up on the people sitting in front
of her. It was right then and there that I
knew Pirate football was back and bet-
ter than ever.
And some people say ECU fans are
apathetic. Hah! 1 think Ed Emory should
be proud to have fans who loe good,
tough grid-iron competition that much.
Like these other guys sitting nearbv.
Talk about your spirit. Everytime we
scored a touchdown, thev not only clapped
and hollered with the rest of the crowd, but
the went that extra mile, grouping
together in their ritual circle and belching
the familiar fraternity cheer. Fll tell ou, if
that didn't get the ol' adrenaline flowing,
nothinc would.
Mike Hughes
Just The Wa It Is
v
And wasn't it great to see the famous
�aerial attack" we've been hearing so
much about? The only trouble was, I
couldn't tell where the attack was coming
from. Who'd have thought those free
posters would make such great paper
airplanes.
At one point, I was watching intently as
the entire East Tennessee team was huddl-
ing around an injured player. He'd been
laying in the same spot for about 10
minutes. His legs didn't even move. We all
thought he was dead or sleeping or
something. The crowd grew restless.
All of a sudden, a few rows back, this
tiny eirl with Pirate stickers plastered all
over her face. vrcan. "What
Damn, what a hit
�- little late on th 1 &a d
mvself. shaking im head, until i rea
she wasn't ret, neat all. Het
boyfriend, who 1 pre-umed ha
upon himselt b
the respite, was in the midd It
in the aisle.
Yes. ECl football in SZ s chai
but 1 can tell alreadv. it's g �nna be gr
Like the new mascot. Actually, Ht s si
the same, but now h.
instead ot a motorcycle. 1 guess 'he
wanted him to bean tic p i r.e.
I personally th i ighi it was - t
although 1 couldn't help but wond
would ha- e happened I ht dec
�'go on the field (The h �rsc � is
Whoa!
And wasn't � great to hav� I ckfc
Stadium's own version of the Ooodve
Blimp hovering overhead, hacking awaj at
the clouds Saturday night? Almost mac.
feel like the Rose Bowl, didn't it? (V
either the Rose Bowl oi Pearl Harbor 1
couldn't decide.)
But the one thing I didn't understand
about the whole deal was wh it flew
just after the national anthem. I mea
you'd think a traffic copter would vant to
hang around at least long enough to ac-
commodate the mas exodus of fans from
the stadium. After all. two minutes into
the second quarter isn't too much to ask
is it?
(Editor's Note: Mike Hughes is a Jon
exchange student from the Ga
Islands whose favorite acting combo is
Tony Don and Jerry Mathers as the
Beaver.)
by Garry Trudeau
zeapytooo
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1HECAR

Campus Forum"
Who's Running And Why?
As a candidate running for office in
the upcoming SGA election, a common
complaint arises as I recruit students to
get out and exercise their right to vote
next week. A major reason for the poor
voter turnout may be that the students
don't know the candidates running.
Understandably, many would rather
leave the decision to the various voting
interest groups than flip a coin and hope
for the best choice. This newspaper
could help the uninformed voter by in-
terviewing candidates running for the
class offices and even those running for
the legislature. Or at least, you could
print a brief background and list issues
concerning the candidates. I feel that
more people would vote and the elected
officers and the SGA legislature would
be more representative.
Linda Bishop
Senior, Political Science
(Editor's Note: On Tuesday, Sept. 28,
The East Carolinian will print a sum-
mary oj the platjorms oj any and all
candidates who wish to make their oj-
Jtcial SGA candidacy known. All those
wishing to run a brief platjorm must
submit a typewritten, one-page max-
imum, sheet, written exactly as it is to
appear. Deadline Jor these platjorms
will be Monday, Sept. 27, at 11 a.m.
This deadline and the above strictures
will be strictly adhered to. Alt candidates
are welcome to take advantage oj this
opportunity, provided their candidacy is
legitimate, i
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing alt points of view Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes oj verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted.

I
-
I
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THt t�i tAKOLIfWAN Ml'HMBl K:i. IV8

deau
28n
South
wrary.
ii letters
r and
umber
Letters
nazes.
Alt let-
"revity,
fcnal at-
Poor Health Prevents Graham Trip
CHARLOTTE,
N.C. (UPI) � Billy
Graham has been in-
vited to preach next
month in East Ger-
many, but the
evangelist has not yet
accepted the invitation
because of health pro-
blems.
WSOC-TV reported
Monday that negotia-
tions were under wav to
have Graham preach in
another Eastern Euro-
pean Communist coun-
try. Sources with
Graham's organization
would not reveal the
name of the second
country.
Graham injured his
back during a fall
about two weeks ago
while rock-climbing in
Spokane, Wash. He
has cancelled all his ap-
pearances until Sept.
27, when he is schedul-
ed to conduct a
religious lectures series
at the University of
North Carolina at
Chapel Hill.
Groundwork for the
East German visit was
laid in May when
Graham visited
Moscow and was in-
vited by a bishop of the
East German Lutheran
Church to visit that
country, WSOC said.
Sources with
Graham's organization
said negotiations have
been conducted
throughout the summer
and the trip is tentative-
ly set for Oct. 15-25.
Most of the negotia-
tions were handled by
Dr. Alexander
Harastzi, an Atlanta
surgeon who is
Graham's East Euro-
pean adviser, WSOC
said.
PAC Supports Aid To Schools
Continued From Page 1
Moreover, "Evans'
support for education
is long-standing
Meyer asserts. "His
'right vote' rating was
as high as some of the
candidates supported
(by NSPAC)
Hugh Coffman of
Covne's office is equal-
ly aggrieved, swearing
Coyne supported stu-
dent aid legislation.
"He (Coyne) was one
of the founding
members of CARE
(Coalition Against
Reductions in Educa-
tion). Their criticism is
unfounded
"CARE is not a
coalition contends
Kostmeyer aide Seager.
CARE is "a political
smokescreen formed to
leave the impression
(coalition members)
were against cutting aid
when in fact the
damage (the vote to cut
aid) was already
done adds Scott
Williams, an aide to
Rep. Peter Peyser,
D-N.Y who led the
House fight against the
Reagan education
budget.
Sweeney regrets the
appearance of NSPAC
favoring Democrats.
"It's not that we are a
partisan organization.
It's just the fact that,
overall. Democrats
have been more
favorable to our posi-
tion on student aid
Helping them won't
be easy. The massive
student vote that pro-
mised to alter elections
never has been mobiliz-
ed successfullv.
The NSPAC for-
mula, moreover,
doesn't take into ac-
count that, though
huge numbers of
students mieht go to
school in 100 closely-
contested districts, very
few of them may be
eligible to vote in those
districts. �
In the eighth district,
for example, the ma-
jority of 18- to 22-year-
olds who attend college
out of the
Seager points
do so
district,
out.
"The younger people
are, the less likely they
are to vote he says.
But he adds, perhaps a
little wishfully, that
"the most fundamental
change in American
politics (the furor of
the '60s and early '70s)
was once brought on by
students. And with
students hanging on by
financial fingertips,
this might be the
margin we need
New Project Started
By PATRICK O'NEILL
siaff Wnlrr
A newly formed
organization in the
Grenville area called
The Hunger Project
will be holding what
they call an "ending
hunger briefing" at the
First Federal Savings
and Loan on Greenville
Boulevard this Satur-
day.
The Hunger Project
is a non-profit,
charitable corporation
which states as its goal
the elimination of star-
vation by the turn of
the century. "The end
of hunger and starva-
tion on our planet by
the year 1997. An idea
whose time has come
is the written goal of
the group.
The all day briefing
by the new local
chapter of the national
organization will be
broken into three parts:
the basic facts about
hunger, the major
assumptions and false
beliefs about why
hunger persists and
what you can do to be
an effective participant
in ending hunger
The workshop is
open to the public and
will be free of charge.
A representative from
the national office of
the Hunger Project will
be directing the pro-
gram. For more infor-
mation call David M.
Baughan at 355-6855.
Lowest TV Rental
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6
THE EASTCAROl INI AN
SI-PI I MBI K 21, IS�S2
Regional Workshop Held
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Starr W nirr
"The United States
says it's preventing
communism but it
doesn't take com
munism to tell people
they're hungry said
ECU Catholic Campus
Minister Sister Helen
Shondell commenting
on the role that she sees
the U.S. as playing in
Central America.
Shondell vvas one of
over a hundred people
who gathered in
Raleigh this weekend
for the Southeastern
United States Regional
Training Workshop
titled "creating a
presence on Central
America
The workshop,
which was the seventh
one to be held in the na-
tion this summer, was
sponsored by the
Carolina Inter faith
Task Force on Central
America (CTTCA) and
the Coalition for a new
foreign and Military
Policy of Washington
DC.
The 13-hour Satur-
day program included a
series of eductioanal
activities such as panel
discussions, films,and
activies. The morning
panel discussion includ-
ed five panelists each
responsible for a
specific topic and how
U.S. Policy related to
each.
Gil Joseph, profesor
of history at UNC
Chapel Hill spoke on
Nicaragua. Knut
Walters, a former dean
of students at the Cen-
tral American Universi-
ty in El Salvador spoke
of the troubles there,
Honduras was led by
Joseph M o r a n,
associate director of
CITCA and Guatemala
was led by Gail Phares,
director of CTTCA.
Another panelist who
gave a U.S. policy over-
view was Ondv Buhl
from the D.C. office of
the coalition.
During the panel
discussion Joseph ac-
cused the U.S. of at-
tempting a
"destabilzation" of the
Nicaraguan govern-
ment. He claimed that
the U.S. was providing
$19 million to finance a
500 man para-military
force to disrupt the na-
tion. He also feJi there
was a possibility of
direct U.S. intervention
in Nicaragua.
Walters said that El
Salvador was in a state
of "military stagna-
tion" and that there
was no chance of a
"quick military victory
(by the government
forces) in El
Salvador.This means a
continued violation of
human rights" because
the government troops
take part in
"systematic" killings.
"The only way to stop
the human rights viola-
tions is to stop the
fighting
Walters supported a
negotiated settlement
to the problems in El
Salvador.
Moran also felt that
the U.S. was attemp-
ting a process of
polarization and
destabilization" in
Honduras. "The U.S.
has had no involvement
in Honduras in 20
years said Moran.
He claims that now
we are "quietly" pro-
viding $40 million in
aid that will be used for
military purposes. He
also said that the U.S.
would possibly use El
Salvador as a staging
irea for our other cen-
tral Ameican military
involvement.
Phares claimed that
the army in Guatemala
was carrying on a "war
of extermination"
against their own peo-
ple with U.S. support.
She claimed that social
reforms were what was
really needed in
Guatemala, but that
heavy U.S. corporate
investment was not
supporting such
reforms.
"Social reform does
not equal communism,
social reform is not a
threat to U.S. security.
In fact social reform is
good for U.S. securi-
ty added Phares.
Shondell said that
the U.S. position in
Central America was
actually going to force
the people into com-
munism The U.S.
role is one of giving
military aid training to
a small oligarchy said
Shondell. "That just
enables the ruling party
to kill their own peo-
ple
Shondell suggested
that people in the U.S.
should get involved and
unite together in an ef-
fort to keep the U.S.
military aid out �
Strike Will Hurt Farmers
RALEIGH, NX.
(UPI) � Utility com-
panies and farmers pro-
bably will not suffer
immediately from a na-
tionwide railroad
engineers strike, utility
officials and an
economics professor
say.
Coal supplies are suf-
ficient for both of the
state's major electric
utilities to survive a
short strike. Mac Har-
ris of Carolina Power &
Light Co. said Monday
his firm has about a
75-day supply of coal,
while Alex Coffin of
Duke Power Co. said
his firm has about the
same backlog.
The nationwide
strike stopped most
freight traffic and all
four passenger trains
that pass through
North Carolina. A
Southern Railway
spokesman estimated
40 percent of
f'Outhern's freight was
being hauled, while a
Seaboard Coast Line
officials could not
estimate how many
trains were stopped by
the strike.
Railroad engineers
walking picket lines
said they were forced
into striking to protect
their right to stage
walkouts.
"Striking is part of
the collective bargain-
ing process and we're
entitled to it said
Jimmy Stevenson, a
40-year veteran
engineer for SCL who
was manning a picket
line during the strike.
Bobby Day, an SCI
engineer for 20 years,
said the strike was forc-
ed on the Brotherhood
of Locomotive
Engineers after 18
months of talks
because management
was adamant about
putting in a no-strike
clause.
"If no strikes were
allowed it would take
collective bargaiing
completely out Day
argued.
Ticket offices were
closed Monday at
Raleigh's Amtrak Sta-
tion because up to
4,000 workers tor the
rail company have been
furloughed, an Amtrak
spokesman said.
Amtrak has four
lines serving North
Carolina: the Silver
Star and Silver Meteor,
traveling between New
York and Florida via
the coastal plain; the
Palmetto, linking New
York and Savannah,
Ga via the same
route; and the Cres-
cent, which crosses
North Carolina's Pied-
mont en route between
New York and New
Orleans.
The state's farmers
will not immediately
feel the effect of the
strike, although corn
farmers and companies
that prepare feed could
be affected if the strike
does not end soon, said
Mark Johnson, an
economics professor at
North Carolina State
University.
"Residents ot North
Carolina are not heavi
Iv dependent in the
short term because
much of the market can
be shipped in trucks
Johnson said in a
televised interview.
"Those who would
be affected most are
corn farmers he said
"Any farmer thinking
of harvesting should
check with their
elevator to see if there's
room for their grain "
Johnson said com-
panies that prepare
feed material also
would be among the
first hurt, because soy-
beans make up much of
their ingredients and
the soybeans usually ar
rive at plants via rail
!
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ALPHA GAMMA
CHAPTER OF
CHI BETA PHI
NATIONAL SCIENCE
FRATERNITY
ANNOUNCES ITS
FALL RUSH
FOR ALL SCIENCE &
MATHEMATICS MAJORS
WHEN: Wed Sept. 22,1982
TIME: 6:30
WHERE: Room 103 in the
Biology Building
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"Columbia Scholastic Press Association's
First Place � Medalist in 1982"
CONTEST SERIES
ART
Entry date � November 5, 1982.
Seven Categories, each offering $50.00 First Prize
$150.00 � Best in Show.
Prose
Deadline � November 1, 1982.
All genres. $125.00, First Prize. $100.00,
Second Prize. $75.00, Third Prize.
Poetry
Deadline � November I, 1982.
$90.00 First Prize, $70.00 Second Prize,
$40.00 Third Prize.
IIprize money provided by the TTK and Budweiser.
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I HI I fcSTCAROI INI AN
Entertainment
SEPTEMBER 21. 1982 Page 1
Waters' Wall
Solidly Built
"What shall we use to fill the emp-
ty Spaces where we used to talk How
shall I fill the final places How shall I
complete the wall
B MICHAEL S.Bl'TZGV
SMI �nur
"So you thought you might
like to go to the show Well do.
Pink Floyd the Watt, which open-
ed Friday at the Plitt Enter-
tainmet Center in Greenville, is
the most powerful film of the
ear. It combines imagery,
music, and animation in a
masterful way that will leave you
pondering this film long after you
leave the theatre.
Beginners and die-hard
Floydics alike will love this film.
It is in essence. Pink Floyd on
film, although you see not a hair
on their heads. They have long
had an attitude that the world
sucks and there's nothing you can
do about it. After seeing the
U all, you'll start to believe it. So-
meone once said that Pink Floyd
was a product of our industrial
society. If so. the Hall is our mir-
ror.
The H till as an album came out
m late 1979. All the lyrics and
eighty-five percent of the music
were written by Roger Waters,
whose leadership of the group
since the departure of acid
casualty Syd Barrett had turned
more into a dictatorship. Only
lead-guitarist David Gilmour
continued to have musical input.
Fed up with this situation,
keyboard player Rick Wright has
left the group, with drummer
Nick Mason reportedly not too
far behind. Both had been with
the group since it's earliest forms
in nineteen sixty-five, seeing their
roles increasingly downplayed
since the Flovd albums of the ear-
ly 1970s.
The album The Hall is pro-
bably the starkest, most gut
wrenching album ever recorded.
John Lennon's Plastic ONO
Band album looks positively op-
timistic by comparison. It went to
number one, and produced a
number one single, "Another
Brick in the Wall, Pt. 2 Then
Pink Floyd took it out on the
road in what is probably the
greatest special effects concert
tour in history. During the show,
workmen constructed a huge
wall, brick by brick, around the
group. At the end, it came
crashing down. After this, due to
the limited tour, the only thing
left to do was make a film.
And that they did. It is the
story of Pink Floyd, a rock 'n'
roll star who is being torn apart
by his life, so he builds a wall of
defense to protect himself. The
story skips back and forth
through Pink's life up till the
night of the fateful concert.
Pink's father is killed at Anzio
Beach, so he grows up under an
overprotective mother. Then he is
sent off to school, a veritable
meatgrinder of children, all
under the sadistic teachers who
"hurt the children in any way"
they can. Brick by brick, Pink
starts to build his wall. When
Pink grows up, he becomes a
rock star, and gets married, but
the film shows very little of this.
The story picks back up with
the breakup of Pink's marriage,
and at this point he becomes
catatonic. (By the way, Pink, as
played by Bob Geldof of the
Boomtown Rats, barely speaks
yet comes across in a powerful
way as a product of the
dehumanizing society in which
we live.) He picks up a groupie
and takes her home, but ends up
attacking her instead, and driving
her out of the room. Pink's wall
is complete; it towers around
See PINK, Page 8
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Newcomers Brighten Season's Films And Hollywood's Future
By VINCENT CANBY
NEW YORK � You might be getting the feeling that
movie actors are out of date. The Muppets can do no
wrong. A flesh-and-blood child named Aileen Quinn,
who plays the title role in Annie, is an also-ran next to
that extraordinary mechanical contraption named E.T.
This Christmas, Jim Henson, the father of the Mup-
pets, will release The Dark Crystal, a live-action film
cast entirely with creatures made not by God but by
man. Humans, however, are not yet ready for the junk
heap.
Take this season, for example. It's actually been quite
a good one, and among its supplementary delights have
been the appearances of a number of new � or com-
paratively new � performers who, on occasion, have
made even some of the rotten movies if not memorable,
then at least tolerable in fits and starts. Clearly there is
no shortage of acting talent here or abroad.
The following performers, listed in alphabetical
order, are some of the people who are on show in cur-
rent movies and who, I trust, will be on show in even
bigger and better films in the future.
� Mel Gibson: Gibson, American-born and
Australian-bred, is a good bet to become the first actor
of his generation from Down Under to make the inter-
national big time. He's been quite visible in the wave of
not-always-great Australian films that recently have
been flooding this country, especially in Gallipoli and
Tim. Not, however, until George Miller's beautifully ex-
ecuted shock-adventure The Road Warrior, has it been
apparent that here is a major league film personality.
Gibson recalls the young Steve McQueen. It has
something to do with his looks, which are more clean-
cut than the character he plays in the Miller film, and
also with the kind of cool, infinitely pragmatic manner
with which he deals with his existential situation. His
Max, the title character in The Road Warrior is the lone-
ly gunman of classic westerns tranferred to the post-
holocaust Australian outback. I can't define "star
quality but whatever it is, Gibson has it.
� Julie Hagerty: As the stewardess in Airplane! Miss
Hagerty was one of the lunatic classic's most charming
conceits, though it was impossible to tell whether she
was simply a beautuiful former model, which she is,
who was being used to perfection, or comedian. Ap-
parently Woody Allen knew the answer. In his A Mid-
summer Sight's Sex Comedy, Miss Hagerty emerges as
one of the brightest comic beauties to appear on the film
scene since the discovery of Paula Prentiss. In the pre-
World-War-1 Allen comedy, Miss Hagerty plays every
men's dream of a registered nurse. She's stunning look-
ing, capable, unshockable, available, sexy and so ex-
perienced that she can instruct the other women in the
film in various erotic maneuvers, including something
called "the Mexican cartwheel
� David Keith: In Taylor Hackford's sleeper-hit, An
Officer and a Gentleman Keith plays the best friend to
Richard Gere's emotionally desperate, opportunistic
hero. It's not a super role, and it's about the only incon-
sistently written role in the film, but Keith comes off as
such a decent guy that he goes a long way to providing
the consistency that is otherwise lacking. Keith's perfor-
mance in An Officer and a Gentleman is so fully realiz-
ed that it wasn't until I checked his previous credits that
I remembered he was the fellow who played the
murderous redneck in The Great Santini. He's not an
actor who need be typecast.
� Willie Nelson: Nelson's is not exactly a new face.
It's been around a long time in all sorts of cir-
cumstances. That experience is defined not only in his
face but in every gesture, every mannerism, each shrug,
each squint, each sudden burst of sagebrush wisdom.
He's" a joy to behold, and he's the principal reason that
Fred Schepisi's Barbarosa is so thoroughly winning even
when you can't be sure just who is doing what to whom
or why.
Nelson and Gary Busey are the not engaging pair of
outlaws to wander the mythical west in several decades.
Until now Nelson has been sort of playing around with
movies, but Barbarosa demonstrates that he could be a
continuing attraction.
� Gordon John Sinclair: As the lovesick teenager.
Gregory, in Bill Forsyth's Gregory's Girl, young
Sinclair exemplifies what is both the style and the con-
tent of this unusual Scottish-made comedy. He is naive
without appearing to be retarded, and blyth to a
transcendentally comic degree. Sinclair's Gregory, who
looks to be about 7 feet tall but not yet ready to shave
every day, is never for a minute fazed by the strange
things that happen to him. I've no idea whether Sinclair
is capable of becoming the screen personality he pro-
mises to be in Gregory's Girl, but this performance is
one of the year's treats.
� Barbara Sukowa: Miss Sukowa plays the title role
in Rainer Werner Fassbinder's Lola, that of a classy
whore with a heart of bourgeois stone. Compare Miss
See NEW STARS, Page 9
Cougar's Catchy Pop
Topping Music Charts
By ANDREW SLATER
RnHtn StoM
BLOOMINGTON, lnd. � John Cougar may be well
acquainted with the mechanics of the music business �
after all, his single "Hurts So Good" is one of the sum-
mer's biggest hits � but as a chauffeur he's got a lot to
learn. On this humid July afternoon, the thirty-year-old
singer greets me at Bloomington's Monroe County Air-
port with a biker friend named Bo and two prodigious
Harley Davidsons.
"Hope you don't mind riding with Bo says Cougar,
rubbing the stubble around an affable but nonetheless
kicked grin. "He's really a safe rider. Hasn't had a
wrett in weeks. Honest Bo revs up the throttle on his
battered lowrider, then callously suggests that I get on
� and keep my hands off his waist. Rumor has it that
Cougar may be wheeling his way into Minges in the near
future, ed.
Arms folded across a sleeveless T-shirt, Cougar seems
to be thoroughly enjoying this scene, particularly my
sudden pallor over cruising helmetless on this man-
mangling machine. Perhaps he's getting even for all
those years the critics pegged him as just a pallid Bruce
Springsteen clone from the Midwest. While the relative
success of such songs as "I Need a Lover "This
Time" and "Ain't Even Done with the Night affirmed
Cougar's upward AOR mobility over the past couple of
years, few were taking note.
But now that his latest LP, American Fool, is loiter-
ing in Billboard's Top Ten, "Hurts So Good" is
Number Three on the singles chart, and a new track,
"Jack and Diane is hit-bound as well, the Indiana-
born-and-bred Cougar is finally garnering the attention
and respect he thinks he deserves. "For a while, it was
like I didn't even exist outside of being this guy who was
copying Bruce Springsteen moans Cougar, once in-
side the safe confines of his quaint suburban home. "1
was influenced by the guy, but I was also influnced by
Bob Dylan, Mitch Ryder and Eric Curdon. It's getting
better now, but someday I've got to meet Bruce Springs-
teen, because I want to tell him all the trouble he's caus-
ed me
Trouble or not, the similarities are inescapable. Like
Springsteen, Cougar is streetwise and tough, and he has
a viselike grip on his blue-collar background. An
assaultive performer with a rough-and-tumble voice, he
writes of women, cars and his own restless youth-lately,
fashioning a longing for teenage freedom and first-love
euphoria into chart-topping rock hits. "Now that I'm
getting older, so much older1 long for those young boy
See COUGAR, Page S
John Cougar: Streetwise and tough, with an arresting! rough-and-tumble voice.
i
!
T





8
IHl EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 21. 1�H2
Cougar Tired Of Comparisons To Springsteen
Continued From Page 7
days he sings in
"Hurts So Good
And in "Jack a. i
Diane it's the same
lament: "Holdin' onto
sixteen as long as you
can
"Growing old tor a
lot of people, myselt in-
cluded, is a scary
thing says Cougar.
"1 think there're a lot
of people out here in
the midlands who feel
that way. A lot of the
guys I grew up with and
still hang out with,
their fucking lives end-
ed when they got to be
nineteen. It was like
this fucking business of
being forty, there's a
lot of responsibility.
The older 1 get, the
more complicated life
becomes, so lots of
times 1 remember those
days when everything
was simple and eas "
Cougar grew up in
Seymour, Ind as
short, stocky John
Mellencamp. B seven-
teen, he was married; at
nineteen, he as a
father, pouring con-
crete foi a living and
then working as a
line m an tor t h e
telephone company. He
kicked around the local
Seymour bar scene, and
in 1975, with aspira-
tions to make it in the
music business, he took
his demo tapes to New
York. Eventuarlly, he
linked up with I ony
DeFries, David Bowie's
manager who got him a
deal with MCA
Records. Cougar's
debut 1 P, Chestnut
Street Incident, was
released in 1976, but
there was one catch.
I was John Mellen-
camp. 1 went up to see
Pink Floyd 9s ' Wall' Filled With
Powerful Images, Visual Effects
Continued From Page 7
turn.
For the remainder ot the film, Pink looks pain-
tullv inward and relives old memories. He also
undergoes something of a startling transforma-
tion, living out his sickest fantasies within his
mmd. To go any further would ruin the film, so 1
won't.
One of the most amazing things within this
film is the animation, designed by Waters and
British cartoonist Gerald Scarfe. It is at once the
most amaing. shocking, and innovative anima-
tion 1 have ever seen. Disney and Bakshi have
dazzled us with their work in film, but never has
movie artwork spoken so powerfully to an au-
dience.
Yet. the images within the film are just as
powerful. There are some amazing scenes in this
film, like the comparison of a World War II bat-
tle with a crowd of fans descending on a rock
concert then clashing with the police, and Pink's
long dead father holding up Pink's dead pet
muskrat. Perhaps most disturbing is the com-
parison between a rock idol and a fascist leader
such as Hitler or Mussolini and the audience that
will do anything they are told. You'll have to do
a lot of thinking for yourself at this film, because
it shows that you may not do as much of it as you
thought.
The enigmatic climax depicting young boys
milling in the wreckage left after the wall is level-
ed by Pink himself is certainly open to many in-
terpretations. The ensuing image, frozen for em-
phasis, ol a boy emptving the petrol from a
Moloto cocktail, is a bit anti-climactic but at
least thought-provoking.
()! course, the other major part of the film is
the music. It seems to be mostlv culled from the
original H all album, but there arc a few new ver-
sions ot some songs, and the addition of two new
songs. "When the I igers Broke free and
"What Shall We Do which curiously enough
was on the album's lync sheet but is nowhere to
be found on vinyl. Every song from the original
album is in tins film in one wav or another, with
only minor edits in two of them. So those ot you
that are familiar with the album have nothing to
fear. Bob Geldof only sings three of the songs,
which is good because the film doesn't end up
like a musical. I hat would have been the death of
this film.
the Hull is coherent, and those that had trou-
ble visualizing the events ol the album will love it
all the more tor, lo and behold, it now makes
sense! Anyone that accuses this film ol being
muddled or contusing is dead wrong.
The basic focal point of tins film is the loss of
innocence. Children are seen as the hope for
society, it thev can withstand the brainwashing
� and tortures ol adults. Witness Pink's loss of
childhood, and the souring of his marriage, and
this is not unique to Pink. I here is probably no
person over twenty that doesn't feel they've lost
their innocence in some wav.
I seriously recommend this film, whether you
are a Pink Floyd fan or not. It raises some very
important issues having to do with our western
industrial society, that should not be ignored or
written off as demented ravings bv a malcontent.
I am not trying to suggest this film is perfect, but
it rolls awa the western dream and. shows the
maggots festering underneath. This is not a film
for little kids. It is violent, has some sex. and is
too intense tor the little ones. But, 1 think this is
an important tilm and should not be dismissed as
a pop opera. Because it it is. we may have some
serious reappraising to do.
D e fries w h e n t h e
record came out, and
there was "Johnny
Cougar' on it. Nobody
ever called me that in
my life. So Tony ex
plained it to me, and 1
bought it like a tucking
idiot. He said, 'Do you
think David Bowie
came up with the name
Ziggy Stardust? Ziggy
Stardust was supposed
to be this cartoon
character from outer
space, and when the
record came out,
everybody believed that
it was really Bowie. So
Johnny Cougar is just
like Ziggy Stardust
Ot course, that's not
the way it came across
� cartoon character
from the Midwest
comes to life. Chestnut
Street Incident suffered
not only its unabashed
"Springsteen i n -
fluence but the ton ol
hype that served to pro-
mote such a trivial
debut. Cougar wa
dropped from MCA
betore he could deliver
a second LP and.
through his attorney,
met Billy Gaff (then
Rod Stewart's
manager), head ol Riva
Records. Under the
aegis of Gaff, he releas
ed his first Riva album
in the U.S John
Cougar. The songs
were tough vet pas
sionate, and Cougar's
penchant tor mining
real-lite stones from
the Midwest seemed
palatable enough to
radio programmers
hungrv tor a gravel
throated ()R heart
throb. 1 Need a
I over" was a radio hit.
and Pat Benatar later
covered it on her debut
1 P.
Cougar's next
album, othin' Mat-
ters and H hat If It Did.
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301 Evans St. Mall In the Minges Building 752 5476
FRATERNITY
Interested in starting your own?
ZETA BETA TAU is forming a
NEW CHAPTER
Here at ECU onTues Sept. 21, a representative of ZBT
will be on campus to meet students & discuss the
formation of a ZBT chapter � 7:00 p.m. in Mendenhall
Student Center � anyone interested is invited.
No Pledging, Become an Active Now
Zeta Beta Tau, founded 1898
produced bv Sieve
Cropper, yielded iwo
singles: " I his 1 ime" a
putt pastry ballad a la
Rod Stewart's
�' tonight's the Night
and "Ain't Even Done
with the Night The
album was a bit more
melodic, with horns
and keyboards, but
Cougar wasn't happy
with it.
"Nothing sounded
the same from track to
track Cougar ex
plains, "the drums
didn't sound the same;
the guitars didn't sound
the same Rattier than
tight with somebodv al
that point in mv life
I was getting divoi
I was getting married, a
thousand things
going on I figured
next time out, I'd do it
myself. I knew enough
about the business bv
then, enough about
how my records should
sound, to jusl do it
Apparently, he was
right. Cougar pruned
his band, the one. to a
toucher guitars-b i
I-drums outfit, i
with Don (iehman
Xmerican
I nl has become
kll COUf
knew h ike a
- a hit i
i .
"music-business
figured out. and h
�i got an .it. .u" �
journalist- �� riasl se
him tor tr id
B in
"Here's
"When Dyla
rybody
v.
-�
can
alu �
V I I
ind I'm a
ne. B
i I -v

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WRITERS NEEDED
For Entertainment &
Style Sections
GOOD PAY
Call 757-6367 Or Come By The
Old South Building, Located
Across From Joyner Library
LOCd'i 0
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ttfEEASl I AKoMNIAN SU'llMBI R2t, I9�2
8
5
5
E VS
New Stars
Continued From Page 7
Sukowa's performance in Iota, with her perfor-
mance in Margarethe von Trotta's Marianne and
Juliane and you'll reahe that a fine, versatile,
new German actress has come onto the world
scene.
� limothv Van Patten: Although he is cur-
rentlv appearing in what must be one of the
trashiest movies of 1982, Mark Lester's Class of
IVS4, a camp exploitation feature about low life
in high school. Van Patten could evolve into one
of the more employable of the new young a- tors
now hanging out in Hollywood. He has a distinc-
tive screen presence, far different from the
homogenized, square-jawed actors who play all
the young male roles in things like Dallas, Falcon
Crest and Dynasty and who, 1 suspect, are all the
same person. In Class of 1984, Van Patten
displays a convincingly psychotic intensity that
sometimes translates to box office.
� Jobeth Williams. There's been so much talk
about Steven Spielberg's magical, one-two wham-
my with the simultaneous release of Poltergeist,
directed by Tobe Hooper, and his own E. T. The
bxtra- Terrestrial that some of the people in those
films have been wrongfully neglected. Chiel
among those is Jobeth Williams who plays the
suburban mother in Poltergeist and whose work
convinces us to accept the supernatural events
e en as we hoot at them. Miss Williams' mother is
a swinging, funny American mom who, when he
chips are down, doesn't hesitate to embark on a
journey to hell to retrieve a lost child. The role is
well-written and exceedingly ell-plaed.
� Debra Winger: Discovered in Irkan
Cowboy and then promptlv lost in Cannery Row.
That was the beginning and end of Miss Winger
until the release of An Officer and a Gentleman in
which this hugely intelligent, husky-voiced beauty
triumphantly resumes her career. Actors don't
write their own lines, but Miss Winger is so selt-
av�.are. appealing and down-to-earth in Officer
at one is tempted to believe she does.
She's on her wav � again � but she's not yet
the kind of star who can carrv a movie by herselt.
ith the right material she'll be at the top in, say,
three ears.
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Prices good at Greenville Food Town Store onto





I Ml I AS CAROLINIAN
Stewert, Nelson Pace Victory
Sports
si pn mhi k ;i is; it.
1
I
Pirates Amass 474 Yards In Rout
B C1ND1 PLEASANTS
sports dllitr
In an ot tensive attack led by
quarterback dreg Stewert, the
Pirates scored tour touchdowns to
overwhelm I ast Tennessee State
I niversitv. 30-0.
With an offensive total of 474
yards and 242 yards passing, the
Pirates completely dominated the
R.meers this past Saturday night
at I cklei Stadium.
w ith split end Carlton Nelson on
the receiving end and Stewert throw-
ing the passes, the duo worked
the first halt to place the
P i es on top, 21-0, at halftime.
Iton caught two touchdown
passes, mcludtng a 42-varder from
Stewert, in the lust quarter. Two
kicks from freshman .left Heath
ui the Pirates ahead. 14-0.
rht second quarter just under-
wa Stewert dished ofl to flanker
S dams, who ran six vards
. �thei 11).
1 he Pirates had an offensive total
ol $04 yards at the half, with
Steweri completing S ot 14 passed
12" yards. Nelson accumulated
102 yards in pass receiving and two
touc ftdow Us.
Defensively, ECU held the Buc-
caneers ;o five first downs and 29
.r ds -ashing, averaging almost one
. a pt: , arrv.
But a! let lumping to such a
ginal lead, the Pirates were
lb e so sustain the same amount
; tensitv the demonstrated in
� it si half.
1 v. I committed nine penalties.
iih occurring in the third
a loss ot 35 vards. With
1:16 0 anj, five punting
. . late �. defensive end Moe
tackled ETSU's Richard
ne for a two-point
sal. . ipp ng the score to 23-0.
In a slow-paced fourth quarter.
1 v I 's dams earned six ards to
, a touchdown in the last four
minutes of the game. Heath's field
goal kick made the score, 30-0.
After alternating quarterbacks
Kevin Ingram and Stewert
throughout the game, number three
QB John Williams came in at the
end of the fourth quarter. Making
his first game debut, Williams car-
ried for 29 yards in four offensive
plays.
ECU's defensive team held East
Tennessee to 158 yards rushing and
78 yards passing.
"It's great to get back in the win
column said head coach Id
Emory. "And it's great to get a
shutout. 1 can't remember the last
one. It's a heck of an achievement
for any team. I congratulate the
defense
Emory was pleased with the of-
fense but was disappointed that the
Pirates didn't score more more than
21 points in the first half with 304
vards on total offense. "1 felt we
should have had 42 points and put it
away "
"30-0 is a great score, but we
wanted to get out in front earlier so
we could put in a lot ot different
players
Emorv said the team was not as
physically as tough against I I SI as
it was in last week's game at N.(
State because ot the difference in
competition. "I think the kids fell
we were belter than them (East ren-
nessee) and you could sec our emo-
tional drop ott he said. "We
were a little flat at times in the se-
cond halt
Emorv, however, had nothing but
praise tor some great individual ef-
forts, including Stewert. "He's still
improving, but his leadership and
confidence is so much better he
said. Stewert completed 15 ot 21
passes tor 209 yards, which now
places him seventh on ECl 's all
time pass completion career list and
ninth on passing vardage career
totals with S67
In last week's game against N.C
State, Emory was disappointed with I
the amount of pass protection
shown,but that was not the case
against ETSU. "Stewert had a great
deal o time to throw the ball he
said, "the offensive line did a good
job
freshman tailback Tony Baker
rushed for 91 yards against East
Tennessee, moving his total up to
150 yards for the season so far.
"He just totally has no regard for
his body Emory said. "Instead of
faking, he jusl bows his neck and
accelerates right into his defender
Nelson was named as the recipient
ot the R.W. Moore "Most Valuable
Player Award" for ECU and Emory
has been delighted with the former
quarterback's transistion to the split
end position "He's adjusted real
well he said. "But I'm not that
surprised. We knew he had a lot of
speed He jusl had a super tirst
halt
I he Pirates take on the Central
Muhigan t'hippewas next Saturday
at 1 icklen Stadium. Ciametime is 7
p.m.
� ��
(
pho'o B. GAB � �
I srolina
� 9
J4 0
Carlton Nelson out jumps KTSl defender for first quarter touchdown.
Chips To Pose Many Problems
I . nut m
i irottna
n n (i n
14 7 2 7


H"a:h Ink
I nit i
idumI SlatlMH
r :
� ,
I'assirn; i

rs h
: i . hi
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S V i
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A crowd of 22,12" people attend-
ed ECU's first home game of the
season against East Tennessee State
University � a number that didn't
surprise head tootball coach Ed
Emory too much.
"That's about realistic he said.
"We cost ourselves about S,(XX bv
losing to N.C. Slate
Emory said a big crowd will be a
must when the Pirates go up against
Central Michigan this coming Satur
day. "Student support means more
to the kids (players) than anything
Lady Pirate Spikers
Enjoy Busy Weekend
The K I 1 adv Pirate volleyball
n aw plentv ot action towards
end ot last week, playing in
seven matches in just three days.
1 asi rhursdav night, the Lady
P � lefeated William and Mary
11-15, IS 15-4, 15-9. Head coach
I Davidson expressed satisfac-
� it wa ttie team is improv-
ing "Wt played better as a team,
nore communication bet-
ween the plavers she said.
"I verybody did their job and that is
aI . we were able to control trie
e so well
avers mentioned by Davidson
as having an outstanding match
. Diane Lloyd, who had an ex-
ceptional game setting the ball, and
lene Hedges, who played very
smart at the net according to David-
ftei the victorv over William
and Mary, the 1 adv Pirates headed
to Washington, D.C. to participate
in the George Washington Invita-
tional ()n I tidav, the teams all took
part m pool play to determine the
seeding tor the actual tournament
which started Saturdav.
In the tirst match, ECU lost to
George Washington 5-15, 15-8,4-15
hut bounced back to defeat Hofstra
University 3-15, l-5, 15-7. By do-
ing so, EC U was the only team to
beat Hofstra, the eventual winner of
the tournament.
"In the first match against
George Washington, we weren'1
mentally readv to plav stated
coach Davidson. "1 think we might
have been scared because we knew
nothing about these teams and the
facilities that we were playing in
were overwhelming. We had some
trouble getting statted and we didn't
plav very well
Before the Hofstra match. David-
son and assistant coach Sue Martin
had a talk with the team about not
having high expectations of
themselves. As Davidson puts it,
"We told them that instead ot play-
ing well and losing, we should be
winning
In the first game ot the match,
Hofstra won 15-3. The normal reac-
tion would be one of devastation.
But, according to Davidson, the
Lady Pirates shook it off because
they were mentally tough.
"Realizing that we could beat the
big team could be the turning point
in our season added Davidson
The serving of Lexanne Keeter,
who had eight aces in the two mat-
ches, was a big difference tor the
Lady Pirates. "Last season. 1 ex-
anne couldn't get the ball over the
net with a 50 per cent accuracy
See LADY, Page 11
Photo by CINDY WATL
A juhilant Slefon Adams celebrates after scoring ECl 's third touchdown.
Golf Squad Battles
First-Game Jitters
B EDWARD NICKLAS
Mall WriK-r
The ECU golf team concluded its
its tirst match of the fall season
Saturdav, finishing tenth among
twelve teams in the Wolf pack In-
vitational. The tournament,
which was held at the MacGregor
Downs Country Club in Raleigh, in-
Photo by GARY PATTERSON
ECU Golf Coach Jerry Lee
eluded such participating teams as
South Carolina, UNC-Chapel Hill
and Guilford College.
ECU was led by John Riddle and
Chris Cbaja who each shot a 230 for
the three-day invitational. Don
Sweeting rounded out the top
scorers with a total of 234. Cbaja
was the recipient of the lowest
round score, having shot a 73 on
Friday.
ECU coach Jerry Lee felt that
ECU's showing could be partly at-
tributed to first-game jitters. Also,
Lee said, the team might have been
expecting too much considering that
they had been pushed for practice
time ir the days preceding the
match.
"We just started practicing the
Monday before the invitational he
said. "So with more practice, we
are looking for a better showing.
We are expecting better results
The team will have that chance
when they take part in the Dunlap
Invitational in Pickens, S.C, on
Oct. 9 and 10.
he said, "And CMC is gonna be
verv, erv tough
THE CHIPPLWAS Under the
direction of head coach Herb
Deromedi, Central Michigan has
not had a losing season since he ar-
rived in 1967. The Chippewas were
4 last vear and piaced third in the
mid-American conference. CMl
averaged 365.7 vards and 20 ;
points per game during the "81
season and their 5-2 detense was na
nonallv ranked.
This vear, the Chippewas are now
1-1-0 after losing to Bowling Green,
34-30 this past weekend CMU beat
Indiana State 35-10 in its opening
game c the season.
Cindy Peasants

A I ook Inside
Although C Ml usually scores a
high number of points. Emory isn't
expecting an offense-oriented game.
"1 don't think it'll be a high scoring
game he said. "We have good
teams defensiveh and 1 think that
will make the difference
Emory said CMl suffers from an
identity problem with 1 C I 's
plavers, coaches and tans.
"A lot o people don't know
about Central Michigan, but I car.
tell vou this he said. "They're ai
aca a I
one
seas t,
IVJl Rlfs -
i imrnv w i ; �

hopefull) be
ne

end Norv

i
ot bruised ribs a
for next
I inebacker P. i
shoulder in
Greg Qu .ha �
PR( IIG MAkE
PERFECT?
makes perfect
"We'll be
assignments .
coachi - i
and
thev follow a
their nun
The
week a
Hamili Han
aff afte ;N
vtai -ame Ron F .
champ v
went to G I x �
S
Harris had he
percentaf . i
team 's iffensive p
is
Carlisle Happy Not To
Relive Last Year's Game
B KEN BOLTOiN
vslslan: p.M� dihi
Although visibiv disappointed.
East Tennessee State head coach
Jack Carlisle was able to retain his
sense ot humor after the 3O-0 loss to
the Pirates.
When asked about 1 as
Carolina's new ot tensive lineup,
Carlisle responded, "I'm glad thev
changed. Thev didn't score as manv
points as they did last year
Carlisle was reterring to the 1981
game between ETSU and ECU in
which the Pirates demolished the
Buccaneers 66-23 ECU leads the
series 4-2-1.
Carlisle, who is in his fifth season
as Buccaneer head coach, has
posted an overall record of 207
wins, 66 losses and 17 ties
In the past four seasons under
Carlisle, ETSU has established 2
school records and the 199 team
posted the best mark of am Last
Tennessee State football team in a
decade with a 7-4 record.
Even though this year's game
wasn't as overwhelming as tne 1981
contest, it was obvious from the
start that the Buccaneers were out-
manned. Coming into the game.
East Tennessee State was 0-2 and
had not scored a touchdown all
year. Their two losses were to Ten-
nessee Tech 14-0. and VMI 21-3.
After the game, Carlisle expressed
disappointment in the plav o the
offensive line. "Our offensive line is
too inexperienced and we have sut
fered too many injuries at that posi-
tion he said. "Because of all of
the shuffling of players that we have
to do, we need more continuitv in
our �'
On offense. I fie B .
onh able to gain a
vards. most of it
outcome
I rSl was I
territory tour time
drive ending a
missed a field
Bucs never got in-
c arolina 40
One of (
was the fa U the B
able to move the I
tinuallv forced to star: tl
with pooi
occasions, punter Bobbv c
was forced to kick fi om
one
1 he Buccaneer's inabilit.
the ball was shown bv the
the final total yardage figures �
to 158. One reason tor this was the
tact that Carlisle had to use his
second stung quarterback R
Achoe. along vuh � Wall
Bowlin. In explanation. v ai
reterred back to his point ah
offensive line
"Bowlin is strict!) a drop K .
passer he stated. "Without
protection, he won be able to do
the tob
Although the Buccanee u
0-3 and have onlv scored one tield
goal in the three games. Carlisle
mains optimistic "It's a learning
process, ou tust have to look al
and go with what you've got he
added
ETSU is at James Madison next
weekend, and the Pirates will return
home to host Central Michigan of
the Mid-American Conference at 7
p m





THF IAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBtR2l, 1982
11
i
Ki
Lady Pirates Compete
In Northern Tournament
i �'iinmit'il Y rum Page 10
aid David-
son. ' 1 his season, she
in sen ing at an 80-per-
cent accurac mark and
is get tine aces
In the next match.
the Pirates defeated
W illiam and Mar
N v 15-9 I his ended
the pool plav Mth ECU
and Hofstra tied for the
top seed But since
Hofstra had won more
mes in their matches.
the) were established as
the number-one seed
and ECU was seeded
number two.
As the tournament
got underway Satur-
day, the Lady Pirates
got off to a bad start.
Against the University
of Maryland, they were
defeated 12-15, 14-16.
This loss put ECU in
the consolation bracket
for the rest of the tour-
nament.
After the Maryland
defeat, the Lady
Pirates outspiked
William and Mary
again 15-13, 15-6 to put
them in the consolation
finals against James
Madison. ECU lost in
the finals 13-15, 5-15
and ended up placing
sixth out of eight
teams.
After the tourna-
ment, Davidson felt
that ECU might have
suffered a letdown
after the big win over
Hofstra. "When we
came out of the pool
play, we weren't ex-
cited about playing
said Davidson. "We
went from one extreme
to the other
ECU's next match is
tonight at 7:00 p.m.
against the University
of North Carolina in
Chapel Hill.
ECU Soccer Team Edged
Out By Ranking Indians
Get fast, impressive results on
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(Sept. 30)
call 757-6366
H KfN BOl ION
. . int � rls t diuw
I s o c c e i
iffered t's firsl
� n Sun-
with a
� e hands
im and

id Mary
ie match
eenth in
a week.
ayed to a
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ox e'
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isi week.
to 1I
RESEARCH PAPERS
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Adp ts Made 7 Days
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BOO J. : 575
i 3MY-NAVY
TOR
Church, the Indian's
experience was the ma-
jor factor in the match.
"We played really well
early in the game he
said. "1 think their
edge in experience hurt
Us
William and Mary
opened the scoring with
two corner kicks mid-
way through the first
half. Then ECU's Bill
Merwin scored on a
penalty kick at the
23-minute mark to cut
the lead to 2-1. The
Pirates added another
goal by Mark Harry
with an asMst by Jay
Bergen. William and
Mar countered with
another score and the
' : si halt ended with the
score 3-2.
Both teams ended up
with ten shots-on-goal
with ECU goalie lony
R ec h n e r recording
eight saves as compared
to the six saves for
William a :d Mary
goalie Jaurgin Kloo.
Despite the loss,
Church was pleased
with the team's effort.
"We played right with
them, but we didn't
have the experience to
get us over the hump
Church stated. "We
played our hearts out,
but we lost to a club
that was just a little bet-
ter in regard to talent
and experience
The road doesn't get
any easier for the Pirate
hooters. This Wednes-
day, ECU is scheduled
to play the N.C. State
W'olfpack, currently
ranked fifteenth in the
nation. So far this
season, no team has
been within six goals of
the Wolf pack. The
match will be played in
Raleigh at 3 p.m.
Wednesday afternoon.
6Se.v' �
f
r &

Ln?
of
nC if ci

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SC89
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SR59
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$11.49
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7mm
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14K Petite
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$9.97
SO 44
Sal O
14K Baby Cobra 14K Baby Cobra
Chain 15'
Chain 18'
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$14.97
11
$17.97
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13
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14K Fine
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12
IHt I ASI C AROI INIAN
SfcPTFMBl R21, 1982
Bulldogs Placed On
One-Year Probation
Classifieds
Photo By DAVE WILLIAMS
Kevin Ingrain cuts back against the flow for good gain aainsi KTSl
A CC Players Chosen
uKl NSBORO,
N.C. (MM)
I inebackers Chris
Ward of llth-ranked
North c ai olina and
nd Hendell oi North
(. arolina State were
named the Atlantic
Coasi C onference's
defensive players-of-
the-week today.
(i e o r g i a T e c h
tailback Robert 1 avette
:mJ Duke spin end
C hris Caster earlier
were named the con-
ference's offensive
players-of-the-week.
1 he selections were
made bv a special com-
mittee oj the Atlantic
i. oasl Sports Writers
Association.
W aird, a 6-foot,
210-pound senior from
( ru nnati, Ohio, had
11 solo tackles and two
assists in North
Carolina's 34-10 win
over Vanderbilt Satur-
day. He also caused
two tumbles and broke
up a pass in the secon-
dary.
Hendel, a 6foot-l,
220-pound junior from
Rochester, N.V made
a team high 13 tackles
in North Carolina
State's 30-0 shutout of
Wake Forest Saturday
and caused two
fumbles.
He called the
Wolfpack's defensive
signals against Wake
Forest's m u 11 i -
formation pass offense,
which held Deacon
quarterback Gary
Schofield to just 151
yards passing.
A 6-foot, 189-pound
sophomore from
C a r t e r s v i 11 e, G a
I avette rushed for 148
yards on 27 carries and
scored two touchdowns
as the Yellow Jackets
snapped an 11-game
losing streak with a
36-7 win over the
Citadel Saturday.
His effort pushed
him oer the 1,000-yard
career mark for his
13-game collegiate
career.
Caster, a 6- foot
170-pound senior from
C a r y, caught
touchdown passes of 36
and 10 yards in Duke's
30-17 win over South
Carolina Saturday. His
season total now stands
at four completions
and three touchdowns.
MISSION, Kan.
(UPI) � Fifth-ranked
Georgia was placed on
one-year's probation
Monday for a one-year
period by the NCAA's
Committee on Infrac-
tions as a result of foot
ball recruiting viola-
tions.
The NCAA said the
probation imposed on
Georgia, which is
retroactive to Sept. 17,
does not include sanc-
tions related to televi-
sion appearances or
post-season bowl
games. They will,
however, penalie the
school through the loss
of three initial granis-
in-aid for incoming
football players during
the 1983-84 academic
year.
The announcement
comes less than a week
after a federal court
ruline in a 1981 suit til-
ed on behalf of the
University of Georgia
Athletic Association
and the University of
Oklahoma Board of
Regents that stripped
the NCAA of its
blanket negotiation
power for the telecasts
of college football
games.
The NCAA has since-
said it will appeal the
ruling, which in effect
struck down the four-
year $280.6 million
agreement with three
television networks.
In addition, Georgia
will prohibit two out-
side representatives of
its interests from par-
ticipating in the recruit-
ment of players during
the period of proba-
tion.
This case was
limited to violations
that occurred in the
recruitment of one pro-
spective student-athlete
by a former assistant
football coach and two
representatives ot the
university's athletic in-
terests said Charles
Alan Wright, chairman
oi the NCAA Commit-
tee on Infractions.
"Some of the viola-
tions in the case were
the subject on
newspaper articles dur-
ing the summer of 1982
when the university an-
nounced that it had
'released' the prospect
from his national letter
ot intent in light of
violations that occurred
during his recruitment.
"In addition to the
one-year probationary
period that was impos-
ed in this case, the com-
mittee determined that
action to reduce the
number of new recruits
who will attend the in-
stitution in the fall of
1983 was approriate to
emphasize the institu-
tion's responsibility to
avoid future viola-
tions Wright said in a
statement.
PERSONAL
CONGRATULATIONS to our ei
ceilent AOPI 'an pledges' Love
your new sisters
ROOMMATE
WANTED
TWO ROOMMATES needed
4 bedroom house. 2 blocks trom
campus 173 per month Call Bun
Chadwick 7S2 4UI 30 E 3th S'
SHARE TRAILER IS WMites
Trailer Park near Pitt Plaia on
ECU gold bus route S40 per month
and one third utilities Kitchen
privileges and your own room
FOR SALE
PRESCHOOL Elementar, educa
tion maiors Need resource
materials Former incut' has
books on linger plays art cteas
science eiperimenti math pro
iects. kid s stutt "j batkteyi
Can Pam at ?s� ���i
FOR SALE 1�C KAWASAKI ?SC :
cyl Emc COnd Only jiOC miles
SiWC Can Darren at in 4S4C
HANO CRAFTED ruS' c 'uf
mture at aftordaoie s'uon
prices For more intormation a
Kim at T53 SU
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL T.c i" n�s to
'ype a' home Reasorbit � �. �
PROFESSIONAL T.p.r'qs-
e�perience guaht, work IBV
'rpewr.ier Can Lan.e S � �
'SI 510! or Gail Joiner ?S :�:
FOR SALE JVC JAS 77 Stereo
Amp �S wattsc StSO or best offer
752 0449
FREE KITTENS NEED A good
home call 7S� 4402 ask for Chris
FOR SALE glasses dishes and
hot plate Call Pam at 7S4 �5�5
TYPING TEBV jiPf-i �
thesis etc Can ?: 4733
TEN YEARS Prolessior.i p -g,
eiperience reasonab t 'as
spelling punctua'io a"Q Q' 4
matical corrections �� -
work proofread Ca N C �a. ta.m
� p m 235 :���
HAVING TROUBLE M
SPANISH' Tutoring i.i 40
Can Osca' nati.e speakf
7S� �527
LOST AND
FOUND
LOS' n FOuR SEA N
't-s'iu'1" Lad. i � - -
Buo.a wa'C- e9ra.�-e wi oar�
Great sen'imra � -� Rent I
sa rWJ a"C as� NH (I
WANTED
BASS PiAVER .Hive �
; on'empo' ir�
Banc Bi
"gs ad ia- . -
Ait p'a� Serious
� a"S WKA Ca 7SM
p m
AAS-fcC i - -
pt ��� Kb work
mtf) ECU grtvf
mm uinera airi �
o � encf Ea" S-
- -
NC 2�4SS
BREAKEAlST
IN THE COUNTRY
1 egg with bacon OR sausage
and grits OR hashbrowns
and biscuit OR toast
With juice OR coffee
v
$&&5
$1.95
�' t:
STEAK HOUSE
TWO GREENVIT.T.F, LOCATIONS
2903 E. TENTH ST.610 W. GREENVILLE BLVD.
OPEN 24 HOURS DRIVE THRU WINDOW
ALL YOU CAN EAT �
CHICKEN $2.99
(dark meat)
This meal includes Chicken,
Fries, Biscuits &
1 Small Tea (no refills)
4-9 p.m. Mon Tues & Wed.
No TakeOuts
1011 Charles Street � 752-1373 1 Block from Campus
SsS&sS
IN rf aN� �'
rr' 'jf�
yeab
ggoKH
Contact Lisa Coleman
at the Buccaneer Office
or call 757-6501
after 1:00 M-F
iN
Art and ideas, ad-
vertising layouts,
attention-getting
headingsall the
elements oi quality
advertising is at
your serviceand
at no extra cost
when you adver-
tise with us! The
Metro advantage
means advertising
to YOUR advantage!
To advertise
in the
PRE-REGISTRATION
ISSUE
(Sept. 30)
call 757-6366
MGzemmp
Angel Flight is an honorary, professional, service
organization of dedicated individuals from leading
colleges across the nation. It is an organization that
works closely with Air Force ROTC, however,
membership in Angel Flight requires no military
obligation. Fun activities are socials, Military Ball,
and being together as a group! There are fun and
rewarding service projects, too, that make you feel
good about yourself. If you're interested in having
fun, Angel Flight is for you!
RUSH DATESTOREMEMBER
Attend 2 out of 3
Tues Sept. 20th, 7:00, Wright Annex, Rm. 201
SUBMARINE PARTY
Wed Sept. 21, 7:00, Wright Annex, Rm. 201
ICE CREAM PARTY
Thurs Sept. 22, 7:00, Elm St. Park COOK OUT
�sssssssssssv
CLUB
for Men & Women
1002 Evans
Street
758-9584
Open Under
New
Management

'
1

I
;

i

I
i
1
RECENTLY REMODELED It's that time again to
get back into shape. Nautilus is located on Evans
Street, within walking distance from campus. Featur-
ing a full line of Nautilus equipment, Olympic free
weights, sauna, whirlpool and locker room.
Call and ask about our pro-rated student rates and
group rate. Cali and schedule a
free introductory workout.
HOURS OF OPERATION:
MonThurs. � 10 a.m. 9 p.m. Friday � 10 a.m. 8 p.m.
Saturday � 10 a.m5 p.m. Sunday � 1 p.m. 5 p.m.
l
i
i

1
L
i
i.
J. A. UNIFORMS
SHOP
Bring this ad for
Wh off
on the purchase of
one of our lab coats!
All types ot uniforms at reasonab;e
prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes shoes
and hose. Also - used ECU nurses
uniforms 1 rade-ins allowed
. 17 10W 6th
Memorial Drive
Near HolloweM's Druq and
Travel
with
ECT
to the
Big
Apple
Nov. 24-Nov. 28. 1982
Spend your Thanksgiving holiday in style on Bi jadwa.
at Macy's Parade, shopping, c: touring the cit . Spat t -
limited & time is drawing near, for more info, contaei
Central Ticket Office. Mendenhall Student Centei
Take Om
St�r k c
Monday $06b
4'2 oi. Sirloin �
Tuesday sosb
5 oi. Beef Tips "
Wednesday $085
8 oi. Chopped Steak
Thursday $049
7 Vi oi. Sirloin O
Friday A5
8 oi. Rib Eye
Saturday A5
6 oi. NY Strip H
Sunday $099
5 oi. Beef Tips a
plus
30 Item Salad Bar
315 Stantonburg Road 758"4600
IB






Title
The East Carolinian, September 21, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 21, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.216
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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