The East Carolinian, September 16, 1982






�hc 4:a0t (llarulumui
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.8
Thursday, September 16, 1982
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation Ki.lHNi
Police Arrest PCB Protestors
AFTON, N.C. (UPI) � Seventy-
six people were arrested Wednesday
in a futile effort to stop the dumping
of the suspected cancer-causing
chemical PCB in a state landfill.
Protestors trying to get to the
landfill were stopped by helmeted
highway patrolmen, holding
nightsticks and forming a barricade.
There was some pushing and
shoving at the landfill entrance but
no iniuncs.
About 60 to 7() highway
patrolmen were on duty throughout
the area about 20 miles south of the
Virginia border as the state began
picking up PCB-contaminated soil
from along 210 miles of state road-
ways. Oil containing the chemical,
found to cause cancer in laboratory
animals, was illegally dumped along
the roadsides four years ago.
Three New York men pleaded
guilty to the dumping and the owner
of a Raleigh company that used
PCBs in the manufacture of elec-
trical equipment was found guilty of
participating in the dumping.
Ten yellow dumptrucks contain-
ing the first scrapings of dirt waited
nearby as the highway patrolmen ar-
rested the demonstrators, who had
owed to form a human blockade to
stop the trucks. Although most of
the demonstrators already were
under arrest by the time the trucks
began rolling to the site, two men
did lay down in front of one truck,
stopping it briefly.
The 76 protestors arrested includ-
ed 12 juveniles, whom officials said
were not charged in the incident.
The rest were accused of impeding
the flow of traffic or trespassing.
Most were released on their own
recognizance, although some refus-
ed and paid bail instead.
Warren County residents, claim-
ing they are the victims of "toxic ag-
gression" by the state, say the land-
fill poses a threat to water supplies
in Warren County, the poorest
county in the state. Blacks maintain
the Alton area was picked for the
landfill because the region is 75 per-
cent black.
At a news conference in Raleigh,
Gov. James B. Hunt Jr. reaffirmed
the state's position that the landfill
is safe and is the only way federal
officials have said the state could
deal with the PCBs.
led by civil rights leader Rev.
I eon White and Ken Ferruccio,
president of a Warren County
citizens' group, about 100 people
marched two miles � as a National
Guard helicopter hovered overhead
� to the entrance of the landfill
area.
But 17 highway patrol troopers
made sure the demonstrators never
got closer than a half-mile to the ac-
tual landfill, shifting to put
themselves in front of the
demonstrators.
White, reading aloud from a red
Bible, marched to the line of
patrolmen and stood chest-to-chest
against Ft. H.B. McKee. White said
he wanted to go to the landfill but
McKee replied the demonstrators
were blocking traffic and would
have to move off the highway.
"When the spirit tells me to move
then I'll move White replied.
"I'm staying here until the spirit
tells me to move
McKee and White, surrounded by
demonstrators and reporters, faced
each other for about five minutes
before McKee again warned the
demonstrators they would have to
move.
"You are violating state law. You
are impeding the normal flow of
traffic on this roadway and I ask
you to cease this unlawful act he
said. "If you do not cease you will
be arrested
White and Ferruccio refused to
move and McKee immediately put
them under arrest, leading them to a
white prison bus about 20 yards
away in the direction of the landfill.
Other protesters attempted to
follow and a shoving match occur-
red.
Highway patrolmen, holding
their nightsticks with both hands
across their chest, forced the crowd
back to the road. Protesters then sat
down and the patrolmen began ar-
resting them.
As the arrests were being made,
protesters chanted "Black and white
together and "there ain't no stop-
ping us now Demonstrators
already on the bus clapped and
shouted as other people were ar-
rested.
White, regional director of the
United Church of Christ's Commis-
sion for Racial Justice, said he plan-
ned to remain in jail to dramatize
the fight against PCBs.
"As long as these trucks are roll-
ing we are going to protest every
day he said.
White, interviewed in the yard of
the Warren County Jail following
his arrest, said he believes the
demonstration made its point even
though the dumping began. He said
opponents will continue their ef-
forts.
Prep Queen Visits Greenville
Lisa Bi rnbach. author of The Official Preppy He - . lev iurea
potential preppies Monday in Hendrix Theatre. For more of the pink and
green details see Style, Page 7.
New Services Offered At Student Health Center
B PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff �nw
The 1 ast Carolina University Stu-
dent Health Center (SHC) has in-
troduced a new "health education"
program as part of its extensive
structural and internal changes for
.982-1983 academic year.
The health education program is
being coordinated by family nurse
practitioner Jolene Jernigan. The
program provides written literature
on health related topics and an
outreach program on contraception.
"The literature display is now
available said Jernigan.
The literature display is located
directly inside the entrance to the
center "There's a wide range of in-
formation out there. The display
has a broad scope she continued.
Pamphlets about many health
related topics are available at no
cost.
The contraception outreach pro-
gram is being coordinated by Jer-
nigan, but she does have access to
assistance when necessary. So far
she has conducted the program for
over 200 students in all 13 of the
female and co-ed dorms. A program
for the mens dorms is also being
planned. "Women need to be
responsible for their bodies (but) 1
think the men shouldn't just force
responsibility on the women
either Jernigan said.
Jernigan noted the high number
of pregnancies among freeshmen as
proof that this program is needed.
"We're trying to cut the emphasis
on abortions and put the emphasis
on contraception where it really
should be she added.
"I think it's important to cut
down on abortion said Jernigan.
"It's a health hazard and an emo-
tional hazard She feels that con-
traception is the "responsible"
choice.
"1 think the word ought to be out
on contiaception Jernigan con-
tinued. "1 have nofhad one person
come in here for abortion counsel-
ing who was happy about it. The
emphasis should be put on preven-
tion
The participation in the con-
traception outreach program was
"not as high as expected said Jer-
nigan. "but we hope throughout the
year more interest will be exhibited
in the programs relating to health
One-on-one contraception counsel-
ing is also available at the center.
Although she sees that "in the
long run" a pregnancy will effect a
woman more dramatically than a
man, Jernigan believes that men
should also act responsibly in their
knowledge and use of birth control.
"They (men) should be aware about
how the other types of contrceptives
work and the side effects of their
use. They (men) should make sure it
(pregnancy) doesn't happen she
continued.
Jernigan also believes that all
students should be knowledgable
about contraception, whether they
are sexually active or not. "They all
have an obligation to help their
friends or roommates if they come
to them with a problem she said.
"It's important to get this informa-
tion (on contraception)
disseminated
Jernigan also plans to take her
contraceptive outreach program in-
to the classroom this semester. She
will be making presentations to
courtship and marriage, family rela-
tions and some health classes.
Among the other changes that
have come to the SHC is the dev lop-
ment of a triage center, which is
designed to screen patients and
direct them to the appropriate
health car provider. Says Jernigan,
this program helps to decrease the
"overall waiting time" of students
who need care.
A full-time pharmacist has been
added to dispense medications at the
SHC as well as instruct students
concerning their medications and
answer any questions they may
have.
Students also have a new
"self-medication center" available
"This is located just outside the
pharmacy and is stocked with over-
the-counter medications said Jer
nigan. "The students may pick-up
(these medications) to treat simple
ailments such as colds, poison ivy,
and simple di irrhea
Two new full-time physicians,
one male and one female, have
recently been hired by the SHC.
both specializing in family practice.
Besides the new health education
program, the SHC also otters four
general areas o service. The first
area is called "Well Care" which in-
cludes physical exams required tor
any university related activity,
venereal disease screening. IB
screening, and allergy vaccine injec-
tions.
"Illness c arc is the second area.
This covers a broad scope from
minor cold- and �pra u kles to
gynecologica more
serious problems wh a even
require h An in-
patient fat '� for self-limiting il-
lnesses .
V nta Health
Services I
ly psv � pan
time psj and
psychial the
med :a n.
"The) ippoint-
ment basis len . d 'These
patients may b referred, refer-
red bv jl si i or an out-
side prol add d
The last pi grar - t "Fertilitj
C octroi" gram v fune-
tions on at �unmet" and
prov idi sting, abor-
tion counst aceptive
information.
Raising Drinking Age Studied
By GORDON IPOCK
Staff Wntrr
Twenty states have raised their
legal drinking age in the last few
years. If North Carolina does the
same Greenville would be par-
ticularly affected.
Although the legislature is not
now in session, state Sen. Vernon
White of Greenville admitted there
has been talk concerning the drink-
ing age and that he would not be
surprised if a bill were introduced in
the next session to raise it.
According to the governor's of-
fice a task force on drunken driving
is making a study that will un-
doubtedly include the drinking age
question, and it should issue a
report within a few weeks. The
governor's office says it has remain-
ed neutral on the subject so as not to
influence the task force.
"The governor did make a state
ment at one time saying that he
thought the idea (raising the drink-
ing age) had some merit as far as
saving lives, but he was not ready to
commit himself on the issue until
much more research had been done
and he was more informed on all
aspects of the issue said the gover-
nor's press secretary.
States are being pressured by the
federal government and private ac-
tion groups to reduce the yearly kill-
ing of 26,000 people by drunken
drivers. President Reagan has
declared the campaign to stop
drunken driving a national priority.
Groups like MADD, Mothers
Against Drunk Driving, and RID,
Remove Intoxicated Drivers, have
formed across the nation to lobby
legislatures and pressure courts to
crack down on drunken drivers.
Sgt. Glen Swanson of the state
highway patrol saiJ there is growing
pressure across North Carolina to
raise th drinking age to 21. "The
push is stronger now than at any
time im mv 2? years with the
patrol he said.
Swanson, who is in charge of
local accident statistics, said Green-
vile has a greater problem than most
areas of the state because of th;e
unusua'ly high percentage of voung
people here. He said college
underclassmen, who are often ex-
periencing their first independence
from home, usually have the most
problems with drinking and driving.
"Also, voung people tend to go
out in groups he said. "Therefore
if they do have a wreck, there's
often a car full and more injuries
See NEW, Page 3
Damn! That Professor's Boring
This cat attends one of the many boring lectures going on everyday on campus. He listens, though, because he
knows someday he'll need this knowledge to achieve his goal � make money.
Governor Defies Court Order
Women Announce Candidacy
WASHINGTON (UPI) -
Alabama Gov. Fob James, turned
away at the Supreme Court, called
on state's teachers and students
Wednesday to defy a federal court
injunction banning prayer in public
schools.
James announced that he will ig-
nore the court order against
Alabama's 1982 voluntary school
prayer law during a news conference
in Washington, where he had hoped
to file a petition for review of the
ruling by the nation's high court.
However, the Supreme Court
clerk's office refused to file James'
legal papers because state lawyers
have not taken the appeal through
the lower courts, as required by
court procedures.
The governor may still have a
chance to get his petition before the
justices. The clerk's office said he
could file a special motion asking
the high court to overlook the pro-
cedural errors and consider his
papers.
James, a Demcorat, did not men-
tion of his troubles at the clerk's of-
fice at his news conference. He con-
tended that school prayer is a state
matter and that the Constitution
does not give federal courts the right
to interfere.
U.S. District Judge W. Brevard
Hand of Mobile, Ala issued a
preliminary injunction last month
prohibiting use of the prayer law un-
til he can consider a case testing its
constitutionality.
or
The Alabama law says teachers
professors in public schools "may
pray, may lead willing students in
prayer, or may lead the willing
students" in a prayer composed by
Fob James III, the governor's
?5-year-old lawyer son.
By PATRICK ONEIL
Staff Writer
Mariem House and Fredrica
(Freddy) Jacobson announced their
candidacy for the N.C. State Senate
and House of Representatives dur-
ing a 30 minute announcement
ceremony on the steps of the Pitt
County Court House on Tuesday at
noon.
Both women are residents of Pitt
County and have had long time in-
volvement in the Democratic Party
and numerous other community ac-
tivities. The two women are spon-
sored by a local campaign organiza-
tion formed after the failure of the
N.C. General Assembly to ratify the
Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) to
the U.S. Constitution this summer.
"I am running for a seat in the
state senate because I believe that
the time has come for more women
to be involved in the legislative pro-
cess. I believe that women can bring
compassion, honesty, practicality,
and a strong sense of justice to
government said House during
her opening statement.
House is running for the ninth
district senate seat which includes
Pitt County, eastern Martin and
southern Beaufort townships.
Jacobson is also in the ninth district,
but in the house this includes Pitt
and Greene counties only.
According to a supporter who
was present at the announcement
ceremony women were "Grossly
misrepresented" by the North
Carolina Senate members who
voted to table ERA. "We're ex-
tremely disappointed, we worked
very hard for long hours trying to
get ERA passed said Fran Par-
rott. an ECU graduate student in
special education.
Parrott hopes that the House-
Jacobson candidacy will draw more
attention to women's issues.
"Women are under-represented in
the legislature she sid. Women
currently account for 12.9 percent of
the general assembly members.
Parrott feels that women's issues
include many elements of social
change. She stressed reducing the
arms race and alternative energy as
issues that she is also concerned
with. "This will show the people of
North Carolina � especially the
legislature � that women do make a
difference concluded Parrott.
"We're serious candidates (and)
we're optomistic said House.
t







THb EASTCAROI IN1AN
SlPll-MBtR 16, 1982
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
it you or your organization
would like to ave an item printed
in the announcement column
please type it on an announcement
�� and seno II to The Eas'
Carol nijn m care Ot the produc
' n manager
A n n q u n c e m e n T forms are
available at 'he East Carolinian
Mice in the Publications Building
Flyers and handwritten copy on
vjeo paper cannot be ac
i epted
There s no charge tor an
icements Do' space � often
Therefore we cannot
ii an'ee 'hat your announce
ent will run as long as Fou want
� suggest that you do not rely
1 this column tor publicity
The deadline foi .� 'looncemen's
s 3 p m vonoa tcr the Tuesday
caper ana 3pm vVeanesaayy tor
so,i paper NO an
ementj rece veo at'er se
�� - a be v 'ea
. � . it ind depart
�e's
NATIONAL LABOR
RELATIONS BOARD
a representative from nlRB
A ist i Salem c be
rsdav September ?3
itei � ndergraduate
�pe ' ' aduate
a a' ��� riours n one ot a
WZMB
The Electric Rambow Radio
Show is on WZMB Saturday from
12 midnight to 4 a m and Sunday
from 12 midnight to 3 a m Album
specials will be played at 2 a m
Th,s weeks Albums will be Led
Zeppelms Zeppehn ill Satur
oay and T he vVhos new album I ts
Hard' on Sunday Jam out on
Saturdays and Sundays with Keith
Mitchell on 'he Jammmgest
vVZMB
SLC
There will be a meeting ot the
Sign Language Club Sunday Sept
19 The meeting will Mart with a
cover dish dinner a' 6 30 in the
Multi purpose room ;n Menaenhall
Studen' Center Anyone interested
is more 'ha" .��� me to attend
New Officers �i m 'he 1982 1983
� � , r ,v a be eie ted
NUTSHELL
�. up
new V.
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lion . � �,
!� les ab v '
iSSUOS ' �-

� � h .�
fecting the
lasn - a vj �
l pv ot me all
�- . nagai ne I i ihi
�nunt'y The Mth edi
�- p ii ke : ai
: � �" � S
example
�, �� . � .ssion is at
market enioy
Se se ' IS .tod

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ab �
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apply s
SCIENCE MAJORS

- � et' � g
�� - nee
popu'd' ti ass � ns such as
Tht II icand I I' and � � �
�ii- ii . � I. ii
: esl v � �. �� '
The E � ' ' �"��K- ai "
a lislributl v. ht in 'he
� �, � v -� suppi. Store
�� idenhall S'uaen' Centet ana
I � � � . � Vusic Building
� - i 30 p m on
Monday epten bet 20 l�82
PUBLIC
ANNOUNCEMENT
Applications are nnw bemg
n- � � � pos '� nc o( Day S'u
BRIDGE
Bridge ' live in Concert This
Fr iday night at 7 30. in the Jenkins
Art Auditorium "Bridge a con
tempory Christian band from
Greensboro will be giving a free
concert All are welcome to come
and iom in on the music Spon
sored by Faith Victory on Cam
pus
PHIKAPPATAU
LITTLE SISTERS
There will be a mandatory
meeting Sunday. September 19 at
v 30
TAOISTCIRCLE
Taoism, the old yet timely and
universal philosophy of China
teaches inner and outer harmony,
health peace and ioy The Taois'
Circle will meet on Sunday,
September 26 at 4 00 PM at the
Kiwanis Shelter" located behind
the Elm Street Gymnasium
Visitors are most welcome, and
refreshments will be served The
location m case of ram will be at
1113 South Evans Street For fur
ther information call either
758 1739 or 7S8 425S evenings be'
ween 6 and 9 PM
CIRCLE K
Circle K is armg It is giving a
part ot yourself to someone else
It is an opportunity to commit
�self to enriching the lives of
many individuals, and at the same
time enhancing your life, because
you have chosen to care Circle K
s the 'a'gest co ed collegiate ser
'� organization in the world with
vei 700 chapters in North
America alone ECU'S chapter
meets every Tuesday nigh' at 6 30
in Mendenhail room 221 Come and
be a par' of our group choose to
�� i Legis
Legisi ii �
Any tv ' '�
: 0 upa is el
rr ii . I
n S'uden'
Class Officers
� lent will a
a aa'es are
j rtii ugh ihe r!
CAREERS
.�.
best '
� i
i - - tooer 5 in 305
-i' !��' �- n
PV Tht Strong
P . v mt : . :?8 Me'
� lent enter and ppu
WORKERS NEEDED
�� ee Jed ' lend p ! i
� � Sepi 29 A
3 rups nterested
Heg please coniaci
�� it '5J Mil � � '�
ECMUG
� � '
LAW SOCIETY
�. . irea terested
. : �. - � � . : �
. � : thi � rtd T "l'Soh , I
it 7:30 pm
� �� ���
- . �� . . Pi . �� �
- j .
SPORT CLUBS
Ge' ready tor a fantastic year
F no out everything you ever
wanted lo know abou' Sport Clubs
Currently Field Hockey Gym
� s karate Rugby Soccer
S rfing Team Handball and
tier Polo are adve Sport Clubs
H . u and our friends wish
begin a new dub attend 'he sport
club informational mee'ing ALL
bPOP' Ct "Bl VUST ATTEND
"�-t FIRST MEETING WHICH
A LL BE HEwD AEDNESDAY
SEPTEMBER 22 N MEMORIAL
-v M ROOM 105BAT400pm
�'� ' ve spor' nubs should rae
. � i itional meetings for the
election of officers aa prepara
it schedules prior to the IRS
meeting
GAY RUSH
A nvite interested men ana
a men 'o this semester's first
� ' the Las' Carolina Gay
Community Our group now mee's
��, first and third Monday ot each
month at 7 00 p m at the Catholic
Newman cen'er 9S3 E 10'h si
A�- will aiscuss goals tor the year
C i1 and give us support
PHOENIX
ORGANIZATION
SYMPOSIUM
A Child at Risk Children of
Incarcerated Mothers" - Anyone
interested in volunteering with
these children is invited to the
symposium Thursday. September
23 at the Bachelor Benedict Club.
707 Wyatt Street Registration is
free and will begin at 1 00 For
more information contact the
Social Work and Corrections
department at 757 6961
ACTING CLASS
An acting class for beginners
will be meeting for fen consecutive
evenings starting Sept 21 at Pill
Community College Registration
for the class will occur at its initial
session, the fee is $15 00 Stephen
B Finnan, formerly of ECU'S
Drama and Speech Department,
will be the instructor In addition
to ECU, Mr Finnan has taught
and directed at Brooklyn College,
Michigan State Univ and Pill
Community College He also has
professional acting and directing
credits Since the class size is
limited, those who are interested
are advised to call Mr Finnan
(757 3546, between 3 5) or Mr Jim
Brown at PCC (756 3130, between
9 5)
CATHOLIC NEWMAN
CENTER
The Catholic Newman Center
would like to invite everyone lo
iom in with us for celebrating
Mass every Sunday in the Biology
Lecture Hall starting jt 12 30 and
every Wednesday at 5 00 at the
Catholic Newman Center located
down a' the bottom ot College jm 111
SIGMATHETATAU
BETA NU
Sigma Theta Tau Beta Nu
chapter will have its firs' business
meeting Thursday, Sep' 16th at
7 00 pm m room 203 of the nursing
building
KAPPA SIGMA
The Bothers and the Littles
Sisters of the Kappa Sigma
Fraternity would like to con
gratulate the following new in
ducted pledges of the Alpha Tau
Pledge Class, Mike Smith, Rick
Kradel, Steve Pendergraph, Jason
Davis, Tim Irwin, John
Charlebois, Jim Kepple. Greg
Wyatt. Mark Meade, John
Hamrick, Paul McArthur, Danny
Wolfe. Greg Taylor. Steve Ed
wards, Mark Hana Scott Smith,
Rickie Jackson, Dwayne
Wiseman, Mike Sanoba Chipper
McDowell, Tony Harris, Dave
Schuler, Trey West, Eddie
Halstrom, Rich Orzol, Tony Mills,
Howard Shreve, Steve Reavis
Keith Parkham, Dave Sadlowski,
Benpe Sherman, S'eve Deal and
Tony Carrea
We would like to also thank Don
nie Parr for organizing a very sue
cesful Fall Rush 33 Alpha Tau's is
a good thing!
!JS
COFFEEHOUSE
AUDITIONS
Sepl. 17 & 18
Room 15 Mendenhail
9:00-11:00
Those interested in performing
please sign up at the Student
Union Office, Mendenhail.
sLl
jppjsr
h
'A
u- J'
Tar Landing Seafood
Restaurant
;Tar Landing Seafood;
Restaurant
�-A
i
Cross G'een Street B dqi
Taki l M a' ' �' c m'1'
Loca'eO one block down on It
Mrport R:ad
jreenv.lle. N:r:h Carolina
SunThurs. � 11-9 p.m.
Fri. & Sat. �11-10
MonThurs. ALL DAY
Sat. � Lunch 11-3
All You Can Eat
TROUT
$3.99
SHRIMP
$4.99
REGULAR DAILY SPECIAL
Flounder & Shrimp Plate
$2.89
TAKE OUTS
AVAILABLE
758-0327
f
SURF CLUB
Meeting Thursday the 16th All
members mus' be there Release
forms must be signed Plans tor up
coming party and contest will be
talked about Dues need to be paid
by Oct � So bring them it you got
them Election of officers next
week Meeting a' Mendenhail
PEACE COMMITTEE
'We ave iT within our power to
begin the world again "
Thomas Paine
The Greenville Peace Commit
tee will be holding a meeting Fri
day at 7 30 P M All interested
persons are invited to a"ena at 610
S Elm St phone 758 4906
Everyone 'S welcome
RESUME
PREPARATION
WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Place
ment Service in the Bloxton House
is offering the following one hour
sessions 'o help you prepare your
own resume September 25 1982
Weonesoa y 3 00pm
September 79, 1982 weonesoa
4 00 p m October 5 1982 Tues
day 3 00 p m
GAMMA BETA PHI
Our second fall semester group
mee'mg will be held on Thursday
Sept 16 m Mendenhali's Room 244
Membership dues n the amount of
WOO will be collected from an
members interested persons are
mvi'ed 'o attend
ATTITUDES
Your attitudes are a maior fac
tor in determining whe'her you
succeed or tail in achieving your
goals, and your attitudes grea'ly
affect how much you enioy life
Man, people know this, but they
do not agree on the best attitudes
and how to get them in our hear
We believe knowing God and his
Word i Bible i and appiyng ii in
your hfe 'S 'he oes' way 'o fine
tune your a'ti'udes lo be your bes'
(Roman 12 2i Come and check us
ou' Thursday Sep' 16th, and
Monday. Sept 20th. a' 7 30 pm in
Rm 242 m Mendenhail S'uden'
Center
BOWLING
MSC is sponsoring an ECU Stu
dent's Misxed Doubles Bowling
League The Monday Night
League will have an organua
tional meeting on
September 27 at 5 00 pm In the
MSC Bowling Center The Tues
day night league will meet on
Tuesday September 28 Play will
begin directly following each
organizational mee'mg Sign up
your team of 2 men and 2 women
on the bottom of the floor of
Mendenhail Student Center For
further information, call 757 6611
ext 260
NEWS RELEASE
The Governor s Advocac Coun
cil tor Persons with Disabilities
and Greenville parent's organna
lions will sponser a public hearing
Monday. Sept 20lh 'o discuss pro
posed changes m Public Law
94 142, me Federal regulation
which guarantees appropriate
public education tor all handicap
ped children
The public hearing will be a'
7 30 P M Monday. September
20th at The Tommie Willis
Regional Development Center in
Greenville
Proposed Federal changes
would reduce the services present
ly provided to physicall and men
tally handicapped students, and
reduce the role ol parents in the
evaluation, placement or review
of an individual educational Plan
(lEP) for 'heir children
The purpose of the Sept 20th
meeting is to review the proposed
changes and advise parents and
interested persons how to send
their comments to the Department
of Education and their legislators
Hal Shigiey of 'he Eastern
TEACCH Center and Michael
Ernes' ot 'he Eas' Carolina
University Program tor Hear.ng
Impaired Students will conduct
the meeting This meeting will
precede regional meetings to be
held September 30'h
STUDENT STORE
The S'uden' Supply S'ore and
Soda Shop Wr.gnt Building, will
be open Saturday. September 18
from 10 a m until 1 p m
INTERVIEWING
SKILLS WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning ana Piare
ment Service in the Bloxton House
is offering these one hour sessions
to aid you m developing better m
terviewing skills for use in your
O0 search You may select a time
from those listed below
September 15 1982 Wednesda
2 00 p m September 23 1982
Thursda 3 00 p m
September 28, 1982 Tijesaa
4:00 p.m
October 4 1982 Monday 3 00
p m
A film ana discussion ot inter
viewing through 'he Career Piann
mg and Placement Service will be
shared
OPTOMETRY
RECRUITMENT
CONFERENCE
There will be an Optometr
Recruitment Conference on
Thursda. September 16. i982 a"
3 00 pm at Menaenhaii S'uae-
Center There will be speakers
from all Contract Op'ne"
Schools All interested persons are
welcome to a'tend
PRCCLUB
The PRC club wilt noia �,
meeting on Tuesda. September
21 at 7 00 m 'he MSC Mul'ipurpose
Room All mteres'ed PRC maiors
are invi'ed 'o attend
SNOW SKI SNOWSHOE
There wil' be a mee' "g tor a'i
persons interested in snowsk "g
on Thursda. at 4 00
in Memorial Gym 108 Crr sas
and spring break 'rips will be
made on Snowsnoe Aes' J rgr a
for PHYE credit or non credit A
slide presentation wii be shown
and information on sk packages
including prices and accomoda
lions will be distributed Space is
limited tor each'r.p Reser.a'
will be accepted a' this mee-
For additional ntorma'ion con
lac' Jo Saunders a' 757 6000
Memorial Gym 205
PERSONAL
DEVELOPME
COURSES
COMMUNION
N T
Bast NAUi 0� PADi SCUBA
Certit,ration Sep' 14 CK'
Base Sailing Sep' 16 OC 2
Beginn.ng Ballroom arc
'ern-ediate Ballroom Sept
17 Nov 19 Texas Couo'r, Dn' I
Sept 18 Nov 20
Darkroom Photograp' � Sep'
18 Nov 13 Yoga Sep 29 Oct 13
Conversational German Sept 21
Nov 23 Camera � Sept 21
OC 19 Ja:7 Exercise Sep' .
Oct 21
Gui'ar Sep' 21 N . � �
Sep' 21 Nov 9 Aigebra Re em
Sep' 22 OC 10 Ciogg I
22 OC 27 Re'iremen' Plant
Sept 23 OC 14
For more infoi
757 6143
Pauis Epscopai ' '
ne I � '
Dor
pm with tne El
me Rev E
DELTA SIGMA PHI
ti-f De'a s g" � �
� � .
198; pted .�
Sean Ois �
.
. . .
David Drive '� �� � � �
BAPTIST STUDENT
UNION
Would rou "� ' � ' �� a goo
time?' Conn �
oe mf S M ���' ' �
nfan needs can oe me' a' the Bac
' si S'uden' un
Physical with home � �
on Tuesda a' S�J pm lot
� "5 Recr��ti( nal will
par i pa 11 or - i� �'
Spiritual with a � "
Jt PAUit
pm Emol ma with a tali
on Liv "g as a Christian
each Tuesoa� a- T Or .
Socai a " � : � A
-ake Can 752 4646 for any rttoi
mat ion! Bob Clyde rr -
ATTENTION
O- v jrwJav Septi 8 9 00
p m r Her :� � � -
Pfi and CADP a
� - a- i �
UNC The tor; I rjiscussion w
be a r Prevent - - ee ac ,
mission 1 mmunity
campus
1 he La arolinian
-

. - ,
SuDscr.pt.on Bi'e i
The East Carol.nun
are totaled �" 'he Oia Scc-
Bu.id.ng on 'ht cj�i
Gree"�e N C
.
Telephone '5" �36� �3�
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(ill


1 1. II '
Ybu can stick
it in your
when
you win.
Register now for a free "Walking Music"
mini stereo cassette player to be
given away. Register at the
Bookstore during
our special record
sale - Sept. 20-24.
Drawing will be held
5:00 p.m. Sept. 24
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
Wright Building
Owned and operated by East Carolina University
i-
� - - � aggM





I HI EAST k�l INIAN
StPU MBfk 16. 1982
Wins
l a s 1 Carolina's
Rebel 82 was awarded
firsi place and medalist
ranking in the 59th Col-
umbia I niversit
Scholastic Press
Association Contest
last week
1 h e literary-art
ne was aw aided
dace in the contest
foi scoring 4 l out ot
a possible 1 iHH points.
1; was i-1 en t he
medalist ranking based
on intangible qualities
e ident to the judges.
Bill Rapp, eduoi ol
the winning magazine,
said "this is an exciting
and proud event foi the
Rebet and ECl 1 he
au aid is a tribute to the
tremendous talent here
on campus
ludges cited the
m a ga z i ne foi its
"outstanding eoncep
uon and execution.
1 he went on to call the
magazine extraordinary
siating that it was the
best the reviewed SO
tai this year in the
literarv -art field.
I he Rebet 82 with
contributions t torn
disciplines which in-
clude biologj.
psychology, computer
science, art and
business, was said to be
"almost in a class by
itself" for which the
judges ottered "only
the highest praise
ECU has done well in
past years but has never
before received the first
place and medalist
ranking in the Colum-
bia contest w h i c h
judges college publica-
tions from all over the
country and is con-
sidered one of the most
prestigous competition
in the nation.
New Age Would Hurt Clubs
ATTIC ATTIC
RCA RECORDING ARTIbl 5
lUjckeC
WFOOLSTAR
FRI.&SAT.
SNOW
( ontinued From Page 1
l od v DiGiuliot,
nanaget ! the New
) idm ' ted that his
ess would sutler it
drinking age were
lised "We ha e
� i ist omei s w ho
older he said,
a , do � eh heav il
. gc ti ade As
estaui ant most ol
ness is food,
ke most places
.� n we also de-
ru sale ol beei
a ne, especially
apps houi
lie Nightclub
V , �. on president.
Kei Brson. said
a : nightclubs
be sei ioush hurt
king age were
� M si nightclubs
. on beer sales
charges tot
tev enue "You'd see a
lot ol clubs turn
pro ate he said
But Hiv son also said
that a change in the law
would cause more pro
blenis than it would
solve. "It would cut
oui 40,000 jobs across
the state he said,
"and Sn million a yeai
in siate taxes would be
lost
Hi v son said that a
bootlegging industry
would quicklv develop
to fill the dr market,
and a lot more kids
would drive to Virginia
to buv beer causing
even more highway, ac
cidents.
' 'Also the law w ould
be extremely, difficult
to enforce Bryson
said. "An A IK office!
admitted to me that
thev wouldn't have the
manpowei to enforce
it
Swanson agreed that
it would be difficult to
enforce a 21 drinking
age "But I feel it
would be similar to the
55 mph speed limit
he said, "Most people
have respect for the law
and voluntarily obey it,
even if they know we
can't always cat c h
them. I think we'd see a
positive outcome if the
law were passed
SUNDAY
WARNER BROlHERb
RECORDING ART ISTS
J. A. UNIFORMS
SHOP
Bring this ad for
10 off
on the purchase of
one of our lab coats!
All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, ethoscopes, shoes
and hose. Also - used ECU nurses
uniforms. 1 rade-ins allowed
Located I 7 10 W. 6th St.
oft Memorial Drive.
Near Holloweil's Drug and old hospital
30ZT
PH. 752-7303
Workers Installing
Pipe Near Trailer
c onstruction lor ad-
ding water and waste
lines to a near-by trailer
is currently underway
neat the biology
building.
1 he trailer is schedul-
ed to be occupied bv
the commupter center
in the near future.
V :ording 1 any
S ivder, I Cl s plant
engineer, the digging
that is being done this
week is for the purpose
ol installing a drainage
line tor a toilet in the
trailer.
The trailer has
previously been used by
the medical school and
also as an extension for
the Allied Health
1 ibrarv.
FAMILY EYE CARE
ana
CONTACT LENSES
A ! ill an ' Pediatric vision care in a
I and personal setting Full ron-
lens strvi es Uin k accurati
i veglass r r it �
DR PETER V HOLLIS
oTOwmuc
eCAA�C�HTCR
756-9404
00
OFF
�� r ip1 '
Eyeg i esOr
Cop- 1 " I � : "
SSggB
YmmtmOm
ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET
For Just3 5.9 5
5:009:00 PM. Momdif Siftrtiy
COUPON�
WITH PURCHASE OF
2 BUFFETS GET
1 PITCHER OF BEER FREE
Buffet Includes: Roast Beef. Chicken.
Seafood, l.osagno, Ham, Salads. Meaibails.
Vegetables. Bread A More! (toffee or Iced Tea Included!
A Iso serv ing our fuIIIu itch menu from 11:30-2:30
our full dinner menu from 5:00-10:00 MonM(. � Closed SMti
301 Evans St. Mall In the Minges Building ,�52 5476
GRAND
OPENINGS
THURS.FRI. SAT. SUN.
405E14THST.
SEPT. 16, 17, 18 & 19
GREENVILLE
Kash & Karry
CONVENIENCE STORE
14TH ST & CHARLES ST. GREENVILLE
WE INVITE ALL ECU
STUDENTS TO VISIT US
Ned To University
Seafood Market
758-1900
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
GRAND OPENING SPECIALS
-HOTROASTED-
PEANUTS
-HOTPOPCORN-
-HOTCOFFEE-
-ICESLUSHES-
-HOT FRENCH FRIES-
-HOT ONION RINGS-
Regular Gasoline
$-109-9
S GAL.
UNLEADED 1.15-9 GAL.
Limit S20
FREE BAG
OF
POPCORN
WITH 10 Gal.
OR MORE PURCHASE
REGULAR CONE OF
ICE
CREAM
10c
(ASSORTED FLAVORS)
2 LITER
BUDWEISER
COKE
TAB, SPRITE
OR MELLO YELLO
F A
�)�
Pizza
Transit.
Authority
tfudvMMil
fwei4-
6 PACK
12 OZ
CANS
EA.
DAINTY MAID BUTTER WHEAT
BREAD 112
BUY1
LOAF GET1
LB
FREE
:mntmmimnirr ��
8 0ZPKG Famous
Mite DORITOS HOT
BUY 1 GET DOGS
EA.
Fixed To Suit You
Call In Orders
1FREE
REG. RETAIL 1.29
VIDEOGAMES
WE SELL AMERICAN EXPRESS
MONEY ORDERS
BAG ICE 50c
EVERY QUICK FILL
DAY
SERVICE
GAS - DIESEL - WHITE KEROSENE
UNLIKE OUR
COMPETITOR
WE USE
ALL FRESH
INGREDIENTS
AH P.T.A. pizzas Include our
special sauce and come toppped
with real Mozzerella cheese!
P.TAsEV EVERYTHING
Loaded with all 10 items lor the
price ol 7.
12" Everything 9.95
16" Everything 14.50
PTAsDX THE DELUXE
5 toppings for the price of 4.
Pepperonl. Mushroom. Sausage.
Onions. Green Pepper
12" Deluxe 7.55
16" Deluxe 11.10
TOPPINGS
Pepperonl. Mushrooms. Canadian
Bacon. Black Olives. Ground
Beef. Onions. Green Peppers.
Sausage. Green Olives. Double
Cheese. Double Thick Crust
16"
$6.70
7 80
8.90
10.00
11.10
12 20
13.30
FREE PIZZA
FREE DELIVERY
ANYWHERE IN OUR
SERVICE AREA
GREENVILLE CITY LIMITS
Free Cokes!
When, you order a 12" pizza. v
get 2 cokes 14 ounces tree,
free cokes AVth any 16" pizza'
v5 Pizza Transit Authority, inc
LUNCHEON SPECIAL n AMto4PM
Buv a la'qe pza get a small ra writi eq I
number o toppings 'fee
EXPIRES 10 1 82
757-1955
FREE DELIVERY
ANYWHERE IN OUR SERVICE ZONE
Pizza Transit Authority inc
12"
Cheese14 55
1 Topping5.30
2 Toppings6.05
3 Toppings6.80
4 Toppings7.55
5 Toppings8.30
6 Toppings9.05
VA 4
SAVE ONE DOLLAR
ON ANY PIZZA. LARGE OR SMALL
EXPIRES 10 1 82
Good onr w9ms xfxr
One staBMN t� poxa
757-1955
DELIVERY
ANYWHEREOUR SERVICE ZONE
A






A
!
(Sift �aat �arolinfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, anm,
Mikl Hughes, MMmaiw
WaVERLY MERRITT, p.reaoro, 4v,�v, ClNDY PLEASANTS, Sports EOr
Robert Rucks, �,w� v,u�a( Ernest Conner, �,��,
JONl GUTHRIE, nr�mSmno. STEVE BaCHNER, EnmmmmEH�
Stephanie Groon, ,���,��, Wa�ajrfr Mike Davis. �,�,�.� m
Septembci 16, I9S2
Opinion
Page 4
Fall Elections
One Vote Makes A Difference
Hopefully, it comes as no surprise
to any of us that 1982 is an election
year. And in so being, this
November will mark yet another
polling day tilled with thousands
upon thousands of excuses for
"Why I didn't vote
"I didn't have the time is a
favorite; or "I forgot or "1 didn't
like anybody on the ballot But
probably the most overused and
misconceived excuse is the old
classic: "What difference would
one vote make, anyway?"
Perhaps, those who annually
subscribe to this latter excuse have a
valid point. Indeed, what difference
could one vote make? Certainly,
there's no possible way that one
vote could change the shape of
destiny. No, that's impossible.
Well, if you're one to think along
those lines, think again, because
history has proven otherwise time
and time again. But don't take my
word for it; take a look yourself at
what just one vote has done to
change the world in the past:
� In 1645, one vote gave Oliver
Cromwell control of England, tak-
ing it temporarily out of the hands
of monarehs.
� Four years later, in 1649, one
vote cost Charles I of England his
head.
� In 1776, delegates from the 13
colonies voted on a language for the
formation of their new country.
English won over German by a
single vote.
� Massachusetts Governor Marcus
Morton took that office in 1839
after winning the gubernatorial elec-
tion by � you guessed it � a single
vote.
� Texas became a state as the result
of a single-vote victory in
Washington in 1845.
� President Andrew Johnson and
the United States were saved the em-
barrassment of impeachment pro-
ceedings in 1868 by one vote.
� Rutherford B. Hayes won the
presidency of the United States in
1876 by one vote.
� In that same year, one vote
changed France from a monarchy to
a republic.
� And in 1923, one vote � one
vote � gave Adolf Hitler leadership
in the German Nazi Party.
Now, think about these �
especially that last one. Imagine the
ramifications a single vote has had
in the past. Imagine what would
have happened if one "aye" had
gone the other way.
Think of it; the Dallas Cowboys
and Houston Oilers would have to
play football in the Jalapeno
League. We'd all spit on one
another whenever we spoke. The
world would be quite different, in-
deed.
Granted, the 1982 congressional
elections are a month and a half
away (Nov. 2). And most of us can't
even plan a week in advance. But
the history of national and interna-
tional elections has shown the im-
portance of citizen participation.
And the earlier we can start making
plans to vote (especially by in-
vestigating the prospective can-
didates) the better. Admittedly, one
vote is almost immeasurable small
compared to the total number of
registered voters in the U.S the
state or even on campus.
And it is unlikely, if not impossi-
ble, that one vote will change the
face of American policy. But when
you consider thaf only about one-
third of the nation's eligible voters
went to the polls in 1980 � a
presidential election year � then
you must admit that something is
wrong, terribly wrong, with the
American people. There certainly
are a lot of "one-votes" out there.
And the apathy of the American
public � what the media generally
like to call 44low voter turnout" �
is not at all alien to the college cam-
pus, either. In fact, statistics show
that it's even worse here. Why, even
in student government elections (in
which most of us pass right by at
least one polling place during the
day), voter turnout is a mere joke.
Fewer than 10 percent of the student
body � a lot fewer � voted in last
year's SGA general elections, a
disgusting reflection of the apathy
of those who are to become
"America's leaders
(Editor's Note: ECU elections for
class offices, as well as those of
representatives, will be held on
Sept. 29.)
Plans Will Uproot Solitude
Building Woes
By MIKK I1AMKR
Every once in a while, we notice that
something we treasure (for instance, a
wooded area or a nostalgic building) is
suddenly gone. It is then that we are forced
to ask ourselves, "What do we consider
beautiful?" and "What do we consider im-
portant?"
Campus
Spectrum
First, consider the case at hand. The
university has to expand � there are only a
finite number of directions in which it can
expand. And so, then, it comes down to
what comes first: a beautiful wooded area
or a parking lot accompanied by a lot of
legal hassles and a possible delay in the
construction of the needed building. Of
what value are wooded areas? Are they
valuable only to those among us who have
grown up in rural settings? Or are they on-
ly valuable to those individuals who like to
take solitary walks and watch the passing
of the seasons? Is there any use in being a
nature-loving individual in today's socie-
ty? Now that James Watt is in charge of
the national forests, are we to begin think-
ing in his manner � that trees are money
in the pocket?
Perhaps it comes down to this: Do the
individuals on this campus value a natural
area more than a new building? Or are new
buildings and lesser walks the most impor-
tant considerations? That a new building is
needed cannot be denied. That money has
already been spent in planning and the site
has been decided cannot be denied. The
question, then, becomes, "Which is the
spot where one can walk on campus and be
quiet and reflective?"
The gazebo behind the biology building
is certainly a secluded spot, but it won't be
when the new building is erected � it will
be too close to that building.
Chancellor Howell has offered the mall
as an example of a natural area. But amid
the frisbees and rock'n'roll, there isn't
much solitude to be had.
Where can one have a quiet area? Or do
we even need one? These are questions
which need to be addressed here and now,
before it's too late � before the influx of
needed buildings prohibits the develop-
ment of any kind of natural area.
The East Carolinian urges its readers to
respond, to suggest or to berate this whole
idea, but let us, as a community, use this
forum to voice our ideas.
no
"On the other hand, if we steal from the poor
and give to the rich, we can reduce inflation
while stimulating investment
T
Campus Forum
New Building Unnecessary
ECU does not need a new classroom
building. Brewster is not utilized to
capacity, even in the daytime. It's
ludicrous to see comment after comment
directed towards saving some trees,
when the real issue isn't addressed at all.
The real issue is building usage (or, in
fact, non-usage) and ECU's instructors'
unwillingness to teach nights and Satur-
days.
In the late afternoon and early even-
ing, Brewster is practically deserted. It is
inefficient to lay out money for a new
building, when what is in existence is not
fully utilized (or, indeed, nearlv fully
utilized).
If ECU had a real night program for
undergrads, enrollment would increase
and the perceived need for a new
building would evaporate with the mor-
ning mist.
Many colleges and universities have
added Saturday to their schedules,
thereby getting more building usage and
increasing enrollment.
The phony excuse for not having more
night classes (and, for that matter,
Saturday classes) is that the students
wouldn't enroll in them. In fact, it is the
teachers who are the impediment.
ECU does not need a new classroom
building. It needs more use of what it
has and a real night program (note:
languages are never taught at night on
campus).
William B. Veytruba
Senior, Psvcholoev
Our Error
I ast Friday, Sept. 10, well betore the
5 p.m. deadline on Monday, the
Women's Soccer Club submitted two
separate announcements to be printed in
the following Tuesday's paper. Neither
announcement was printed.
You say you can't guarantee that an-
nouncements will be printed and that
clubs and organizations should not de-
pend on The East Carolinian for publici-
ty. It seems we can't even depend on The
East Carolinian for intelligent reporting.
If space is a problem, careful editing of
the announcements would have shown
that our organizational meeting to be
held Sept. 15 well preceded meetings to
be held on Sept. 21, 29 and even as far
off as Oct. 15.
Thank's for your continued service to
the East Carolina campus community
Vicki Marder
Home Economics
(Editor's Note: Thank you tor bring-
ing this error to our attention W f-
sincerely regret any inconvenience it has
caused you or your club. Please unders-
tand, however, that more than 65 an-
nouncements were brought m before
Tuesday's paper. They just won 7 alt tit.
Sonetheless. be assured that those at
fault have been dulv tloaned i
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes tetters
expressing all points of view. Mail -
drop them by our ojjice tn the Old Sou
Building, across from Joyner Library
For purposes of verification, all ler
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone numbt �
and signature of the authorts). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pc.
double-spaced or neatly printed. .41.
ters are subject to editing for brevity.
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted.
Is Pac Man On Da Mob's 'Hit List?'
BvJA
" an
�MM��
ON
WASHINGTON � Is nothing sacred?
Now we've learned that the Mob may be
moving in on Pac Man.
The justice department suspects that the
crime syndicate may be counterfeiting
those video-game quarter-eaters.
Federal agents recently raided two
video-game distributors in New Jersey.
They seized $200,000 worth of bogus
machines. Among the 60 confiscated
games were Pac Man, Miss Pac Man,
Frogger and Kongorilla.
According to an affidavit, a salesman
for one of the companies told an FBI
undercover agent he had a big shipment of
"hot" video games for sale. He said they
had come from the Philippines through
Kennedy Airport in New York.
The FBI found that two large cartons
had, in fact, arrived for the company from
the Philippines. They contained circuit
boards, which are the heart of the video-
game machines.
There is no evidence to link the two New
Jersey companies to the Mob. But agents
of the Organized Crime Division believe
the Mob is implicated in the counterfeit
racket. They know that wherever there's a
fast illegal buck to be made, it's not long
before the syndicate tries to take over.
How do you tell a counterfeit machine?
Sometimes they have no copyright notice
or trademark stamped on the cabinet or
the video screen. But occasionally these
identifying marks are simply forged. In
other words, it's not always easy to tell.
Meanwhile, the legitimate manufac-
turers � the companies that hold the
copyrights � are up in arms. That's easy
to understand. They lose money every time
somebody sells a bogus machine or circuit
board.
SEPTEMBER SWAN SONG: Congress
will be in a pell-mell rush to push through
legislation in the next few weeks before
heading home to seek re-election. The hec-
tic wind-up gives industry and special-
interest lobbyists their best shot to push
through bills filled with goodies and
loopholes.
Two of the pro-Big Business measures
which may slip through this year involve
the giant auto and pharmaceutical in-
dustries.
Lobbyists for the carmakers are waging
a major fight to relax regulations controll-
ing auto emissions and to delay stronger
safety-belt standards.
Rep. John Dingell, D-Mich is in the
forefront of the clean-air fight and has the
sympathy of administration officials. But
the president's aides are reluctant to
become too vocal on an issue that could
stir up anti-Reagan votes in the coming
elections.
The drug companies are pushing for
more time to market new products before
they have to share their exclusive patent
rights with competitors. An organization
known as the National Alliance of Senior
Citizens is supporting the proposal, but the
name is a misnomer. It's a one-man opera-
tion representing conservative views. On
the other hand, the more representative
National Council of Senior Citizens firmly
opposes the legislation.
SOVIET NETWORK: The town fathers
of Glen Cove, N.Y have been in the news
lately. They banned Soviet Embassy per-
sonnel from the town's beaches because
they heard that the Russians had made a
spy's nest out of their diplomatic com-
pound in Glen Cove.
The town officials' suspicions were well-
grounded, according to secret U.S. govern-
ment files. Of the 2,000 diplomats in this
country from Soviet-bloc countries, more
than one-fourth � 544, by actual count �
are known or suspected agents for
Moscow's spy network.
The Russians, Czechoslovakians, Roma-
nians and East Germans are the most ac-
tive. A top-secret intelligence report says
that the Romanians are assigned the task
of buttering up members of Congress to
glean secrets. The Czechs are given the
drab task of pouring over lengthy technical
manuals available in the United States
The tough spy work is reserved for the
Russian KGB agents and their East Ger-
man colleagues.
WHAT'S NEXT?: Economic experts
predict that the miseries of the auto in-
dustry will become worse in the years
ahead. They foresee that foreign manufac
turers will move ahead faster and continue
to pre-empt the field. The experts an
ticipate that by the end of the 1980s, an
American-made auto will cost $1,500 more
than one manufactured abroad.
. opvnghi. 198
I nucv) Keaiurr Svndicate Iik
ptcHgEsm
IFRIADotY
TO D0UBU-ftt?KiK3
INfTfcNTcf THE-
VCTiM'S HCU5L-
V VK
4Mfe
v- r

!
I
I





THE EAST CAROI INI AN
SEPTEMBER 16. 1982
rern-
this
ore
for
ma-
tt ac-
says
task
5S to
the
inical
lates.
the
Kier-
erts
m-
rcars
ifac-
inue
an-
. an
nore
Meeting Held On Hunger
'This fall we want 10
highlight the issue of
domestic hunger said
Candice Fair, staffper-
son with a national
Christian citizens lobby
organization Bread for
the World (BFW).
Fair was in Green-
Mile on Tuesday with
the Rev Kent Outlaw,
BFW's North Carolina
state coordinator. Fair
and Outlaw stopped in
Greenville to meet with
members of the ECU
Hunger Coalition as
part of their N.C.
field t n p which will
culminate with a
statewide conference in
Raleigh this weekend.
The spoke before a
group 20 students.
For the evening
presentation BFW
covers their series of
lobbing techniques us-
ed in their efforts to in-
fluence Congress to
take positive action on
bills and resolutions
which will benefit
hungrv people.
�lthough BFW nor-
mall) focuses most of
their attention on the
hunger problems of
developing countries.
Fair noted that strong
action was presently
needed to counter
Reagan administration
efforts to make addi-
tional cuts in preventive
nutrition programs
such as Food Stamps,
the school lunch pro-
gram. Women Infants
and Children (WTC),
and Aid for Families
With Dependent
Children (AFDC).
"The churches and
Congress are realizing
that people are suffer-
ing and the need is in-
creasing for action
said Fair, "and churchs
alone can't keep up
with the need
In response to this
problem BFW has
lauched an "offering of
letters campaign" titled
"Preventing Hunger at
Home
"Preventing Hunger
at Hone" is actually a
drafted resolution
which will be introduc-
ed in the US Senate and
House of Represen-
tatives. BFW members
will be asked to send
letters to their represen-
tatives asking them to
co-sponsor the resolu-
tion as well as giving
their support to the
measure. "A resolution
is a statement of in-
tent said Fair.
Fair notes that the
resolution will respond
to three issues affecting
the ability of food pro-
grams to effectively
protect people in the
U.S. from hunger.
The three issues of
the resolution are the
discontinuation of the
budget cuts for preven-
tive food programs,
pointing out the rela-
tionship between
unemployment and in-
flation, and calling on
the federal government
to be responsible for
the successful applica-
tion of all nutrition
programs.
Typically the offer-
ing of letters is con-
ducted around the
Thanksgiving season by
church congregations,
letters are prewritten
and then placed in the
collection basket as an
offering. But any group
or individual can con-
duct a letter writing
campaign at any time.
BFW puts out a mon-
thly newsletter that in-
forms members of cur-
rent bills that need
hunger lobbying
response.
Membership in BFW
has increased 31 per-
cent in one year.
Outlaw told the group.
North Carolina cur-
rently has 801
members. National
membership in BFW
has grown by 13 per-
cent. "1 sense a grow-
ing awareness of the
hunger issue said
Outlaw. "Can you im-
agine what kind of
clout we'd have if we
got 800 letters to our
legislators?"
Outlaw mentioned
that his local BFW
group got their con-
gressman to come to
their meetings. "He
stays for the whole
meeting and asks ques-
tions BFW has local
groups in Asheville,
Charlotte, Davidson,
Raleigh, Durham,
Chapel Hill, Winston
Salem, Bueys Creek
and Hickory.
Both Fair and
Outlaw see education
as BFW's first goal.
"Action" is our second
goal, said Fair. After
people become inform-
ed, which Fair says in-
cludes understanding
the relationship bet-
ween public policy and1
hunger, then she wants
them to "participate in
an effort with others
Understanding the
workings of Congress is
an integral part of a
BhW members work.
"Eighty-five to 90 per-
cent of the decisions in
Congress are made in
committees said Fair.
To BFW this means
lobbying for bills long
before they reach the
floor for a vote.
On the international
level Fair said that
hunger is often a threat
to security. "Poverty
has led to unrest in
many cases she said.
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Sat Sept. 18�11 a.m4 p.m.
at
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Offer valid one day only at:
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Sunday
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11:00 AM-
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Saturday
11:00 AM-
10:00 PM 35,
OYSTER BAR
NOW OPEN
STEAMED
OYSTERS
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PECK V
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Cater: Anything
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FAMOUS PIZZA
Fast, Friendly Delivery
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758-5982 or 5616
Buy Any Large Pizza
Get 6pack or pitcher
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HAPPY HOUR � 7 Days a Week
2 P.M. until CLOSING
Pitcher $1.79 Mug 35C
Wine 50C
Spicy Italian or Greek
Taco � $1.99
6 Pks. � $2.99
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each ot these advertised items is re
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sale m each Kroger Sav on, except
as specifically noted in this ad It we
do run out of an item we will offer
you your choice of a comparable
item when available reflecting the
same savings or a ramcheck which
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advertised item at the advertised
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Items and Prices
Effective thru
Sat Sept 18. 1982
in Greenville
Copvqht 1982
K'oge' Sav on
QuaMy Rights �eseve)
None Sold To Dealers
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Open 8 a.m. to Midnight
Open Sunday 9 a.m. to 9 p m
r�
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25v-Oz.$4
Bags I
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20-CT CAPS. OR
24-CT TABLETS
Ea.
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PLUSOEPOS
PAPER
Hi-On
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2Jumbo T
Rolls �
SPOTLIGHT
Bean Coffee
$4 79
Mb
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1ST OF THE SEASON
$f Tokay Grapes
79
Lb.
wAfnts
IN OIL OR WATER
CHUNK LIGHT
Starkist Tuna
46V-0zam5
Cans a
KROGER
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6-Ct
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1
KROGER
" MWk
,al. �
IN OUR DELI
SLICED AS YOU LIKE IT
Extra Lean
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2
SAVE
50
f
I

i
f





IHt I s CAROl IM
si I'll MH1 k lh. I9KJ
Gays To Speak On Lifestyle
The Last Carolina
Gay Community
(ECGC) has announced
plans to continue their
"speakers bureau"
during the 1982 1983
academic year.
Members oi the
group volunteer to take
speaking assignments
on the topic ot
homosexuality, foi
presentations to ECl
classes and othei in-
terested groups.
' 1 h e s (i o a k e i s
bureau is t lie best
i sibi 111 thai we
have said 1 t. I com
munity aits manage
meni student Michelle
Bennett. "People don't
see us in any othei way
all they look at is out
gay lifestyles Bennett
has been actie ith the
bureau tor ovei a yeai
and she has spoken to
classes on five occas
sions
1 he . (iv hopes
that b speaking to
people "openly and
honestly' about
homosexualii . i hey
will be able to dispel
some ot the myths and
stereotypical ideals
often associated with
gay people
" 1 he reason I do the
talks is because it I can
make one person really
understand thai I'm a
human being, then I've
performed a good set
ice said Mark urn
bach, one ol E 'G( 's
tou ndmg members.
Zumbach claims thai
mam people often pre
judge a gas person on
the basis ol iheir sexual
preference withoul
regards to all the othei
qualities thai con
tribute to that persons
make-up.
Zumbach belives that
the talks also encourage
people to think about
homosexuality and
reduces then pre
indices. " I he talks can
enlighten them a bit
he adds.
"Most people don't
hae any direct real ex-
pei i e n ces wit h
homosexuals. 1 he talks
give them some direct
experience said Ben-
nett.
1 he E til also pro
vides support to other
gay students on campus
through the club's hi
monthly programs and
through the speakers
bureau "I he talks
help other gay people
on the audience) to
know thai they're noi
alone said Zumbach.
In i he past the
speakers bureau has
primarily spoken to
sociology and
psychology classes, but
othei classes or groups
are welcome to request
a speaker.
The bureau asks that
anyone who would like
to request a speaker do
so two weeks in ad
vance of the speaking
engagement They can
be reached through per
sonal contact with an
ICCiC member or b
calling the Catholic
Newman Center at
752-4216.
'The biggest tear
people have is the
unknown said Zum-
bach. " I hey don't
know or understand
homosexuality. I want
to remove that tear
when I speak
R( ADE Klf n
2181 t h A
Milk
. 2(,al. J10
) 1?3S?1
ABORTIONS
1 24 week ter mina'ioflS
App ts MadeDays
CALL TOLL FREE
1 800 321 0575
Friday special:
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(beautifully wrapped)
druh a bunch tor vour tooibatt date.
Jefferson Florist
0 W eM I HI
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752 Mvs
Couktry Cooking
Barbecue Ribs
and
Chicken to Go
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i old dog at the game '
$1.99 Dailj Special
plus lea and lax
$3.75p,�,ia, large plate
with meat and all the veggies
you can eat
Open 11-8 7 days a week
752-0476 512 E 14th St.
Open before and after the game
with box lunches to go.
SHOE
ROOM
402 s Evans Street
( in the Downtown Mall
: 1268
All Brand Name Shoes
Buy I Pair of Shoes
at regular price & gel a
second pair for i price
M V Shipment oi Handbags
now in stock-10 �� OFF
In iiu bargain section:
3 I MRS of ladies' shoes,
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SHOES FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY
Thursday Sat Oct 23 25
Hours: 1000 5:30 Mon Sat
MasterCharge Visa
Layaway Plan Available
Pepsi and the Pirates
a winning combination
CREDIT
MANAGER
NEEDED
The East Carolinian is now
taking applications for
the position of
Credit Manager -
(
Salary � $150.00 per month
Apply at East Carolinian
Office
(Located in old South Building)
OPENS IN SEPTEMBER AT SPECIALLY
SELECTED THEATRES.
Check newspapers for theatres.





V S I k I I I !
I I' I I ' 1 Hi h
Quick- Witted Birnbach
Sartorially Impeccable
she explaine � ; � k at n
action. ne slide pictured i pre bach's lecture j
i lothed in the tradh i .� Kh ik . het talk as not i
button down shirt. To ind a ' "
leathei ia kei He wa
Sia) Phot" B( SlftNlf IFAHr
. detail, in the life of today's ultra-prep delving into Iheir mx lives "
B (.KH.um I KHIHII I
rhe sell proclaimed monarch ol
pr pdom idledresumably in )a.
dy's plane) into Greenville on Mon
tiav to lecture II s budding prop course the new pun!
pies "ii the Mimes ot pink and Another ,lid ' i potenl
n I isa Birnbach, author ol The investment bankei h � I R
Official Preppy Handbook, told a bach's ability to ad-lih I hi l
crowd in Hendrix rheatn that the peared out of to
I important thing to a prep is .nit. said ii a
getting di unk Bn nbach gor deta
Birnbach, decked out in official in the life of today' p. She,
preppy pink lod and wrap-around to the amaemeni
skirt, gave a funny and insightful delved into ih �� ��
look into the world of a preppv Het average prep,
humor, although sometimes hard to everybody knows that thi
understand, seemed to please both such thing as prep sex In ta
preps and non preps put it. the term "prep -o"
Hei show was in realm a multi tradiction Hei lescri f Mi
media event with -hdes being use Prer rymg I
to explain certain asp ol hei local Muttys wa � ' -
- In fact, some ol the funniei due mainly
moment ol her
show came when shin ac
Old And New On Display In 'Ragtime'
die;
time think
how t .
k how sad
�� � � ii �
H
ejimtely i
' W .1 .
t w I
most av ov
(.
1 heir
ol it shown here,
va- iusi as interesting as this film.
; i tall about
i led Floradora,
i w as a beautiful
a oman named Evelyn
Stanford White, the most
ful of New York architects at
me, was enchanted with her In
a i I velvet sw-
. ely n would ride
and proceed to
. . mging from
ng I eds
s hite
U old
I
SI fel in love withhim.
. a. in-
11 I na not
-
Im

V1 �a
M �
�dei
w ho

an
remembei. this
90 B vail it gets bettei
I fell in love with Harry
aw , a Pennsylvania
e He took 1 elyn and her
tnd also showered
pon her. But one night during
a thunderstorm, whip in hand, he
1; went to court, but
Mthii � i they were dating
spite attention trom
: w � ��; . elyn married
ibout her roll in
the hay with White, and Thaw
ild get very excited by the story.
He especially liked the stones about
the swing, and as Evelyn told him he
would ring his hands and shout,
'� I he beast' 1 he tilths beast
I her -�:� lune 25, 1906, Harry K.
I haw si ' Stanford White and kill-
ed h m at a concert. It went to court.
and the whole scandal broke. It was
the talk ol New York tor months.
1 haw's rationalization was that he
killed White for sleeping with his perversions and
wife when she was but 16. He was ties
declared not guilty by reason ol in- Kagame boas- some impressivce
sanity. Evelyn starred in some silent acting talent 1 already mentioned
I
Ami
i
ated
Mary'?
i �
cholson in Goin South Ii
ly, it was N
her. She i e all tl
iv tha � gal '
w a �
. :

from V

Sleenburgen: "I'm noi too good in he inn I'm just as true as I can be.
tilms and
Thaw got
died, during
arrested a
died di
he
� ties
lot foi his
rinu the foi
( agney, but some ot the best act
nes from relative unknow
Howard 1 Rolhns. as Coalho
Walker, gies what is probably
ing
ns.
use
the
u u ess, but tor two yea
a waiti md b
was i ent
fot doin' South, tl
w anted
However, iw her,
her. and decided ght

, Timi 1
Tinu he 1 with M
McDowe
him She won a � ' v ��
hei next film. Xtelvin ami
Howard as supporting at tress
Since then sin. has be ei Rag ��
and played i opposite V dy
1 Midsummer Sight's Sexon
Sht u dei �
about her success, but maybe
sad. too
"To suddenly have a dream ac-
tually happen - there's a little e
that goes with it, because y
to take everybody �� i and
yne. eff �
them arc fruitless
Is Mary the i I gn
he is? "I k sht says
" I'm a mess likt ne else
know Cone M ith (he M
always related ro Sea
Melanie
�n final thoughts' "I'm noi
good to be 11 ue. I'm just .is true as 1
can be
'�
Earlier Thar
Same Evening
Lisa B " 1 in a
vork w
sal �� ' a I
Monda . night. She w
- i
B Of
ficial Preppy Handbook .
wordsthe foremost aui
v to 1
?w
"Prep is hen stay a
course, ts beei �
� nmdim
school, Boston I atin she sa
f,repp. now. is a b
Birnbach explained that manul
ers ol prep mei
ing then biggest ; ei s'
cash inj
Her book was pu
. � . �.
v 8 ie I nivei I �
Sort! Dakota at (irand ��� k-
'AU definition o? preppy
bach explained, "is someb d
See SGI I Ml KN. Page 9
The Pope & I
Will '60 Minutes' Call Again?
ditor'
i
So,I,
Publishes
rrnn 1
, , erview, reprinted from
Dftonesbury, is (he only extensive inter
H Trudeau Permission to use the
inted ' by Vf; Trudeau and
i njunt fion with the an
eave oj absent �� trom the
nebur (set Sept 14 edition oj this
evera veai �. the editors
pet uadi i artoomst G H
� ,� �: � m e thoughts about
. v- . xhi arating eek before
Trudeau was believed to have
, , �, h( we et 'till not blossom
�� following interne was
under (he false understanding it
� , : , ! rem h film magazine
� � final transi ript was, certain oj
� � tut fot i lanjh atton or ad
�. ason, his ren 5 hae been
d
11
i
you've had, why have
pi i tuuitie's
� . hesi man's yeai
aj, in Pet haps because it re
� an I'd like It you're serious
i publk image, unlike building a
� something you can do in the privacy
i living room It's not just that tame is cor
.nsuming You're always bus trying
your latest version o! yourseli (For
� on, iv
Trudeau, sa is anonymity. He once hid in his bathroom
for three hours to avoid a reporter trom the Baltimore
Sun i
Q Aren't we all?
1 Yes, but it's nice not to have to shave beforehand.
Listen, some years ago I did a talk show in Boston 1
was 22, and I'd been doing the strip foi about six mon
ths. Atter a brief introduction, the hostess turned to me
and asked what it was like to he rich, famous and eligi
ble. 1 hadn't the faintest idea what she was talking
about. Atter staring at her in dumb panii foi about five
seconds, I finally iust rolled my eyes I he hostess look
ed very pleased and cut to a commercial I nevei did
another television show (Not entirely true He did ap
pear on To Tell the Truth, where only one oj the tout
panelists chose him over the two impostors Trudeau
walked away with 56" and a pair of fade cujjlinks i
Q You must have been tempted, though. I read
somewhere that you and Pope John Paul are the only
two people ever to have tinned down an interview with
611 finutes.
4: Well, 1 don't think too much should be made ol
that. With the Pope, there was a scheduling conflict.
I hey tried to book him on Easter, which is pretty ai
rogant if sou think about it In my ease. I missed the
message on m answering service l nless you've been
detrauding widows out ol their life savings, f0 Minutes
doesn't call twice. (Trudeau's answering sen n e, I IP oj
New Haven, played a continuing role in the cartoonist's
isolation from the outside world at least it did until a
See TRUDEA1 . Page X
c 1976 b OB Trudeau
lhe Donnesbun bunch: Waiting breatblissis for another call trom Mike. Harrv. or Morley
I





fHE EAST CAROLINIAN
SfcPll MM R 16. 1982
Trudeau Blew Pulitzer Cash On Bills
C ontinued From Page 7
crate of orginal strips belonging to
Trudeau was removed Jrom its of-
fice only to be recovered in a police
raid on the Sunshine Girls Escort
Service in Hamden, Conn. Sun-
shine's unlucky social director was
subsequently convicted oj Jirst-
degree larceny, partly on the
strength of Trudeau s ability to
recognize his own work in court.)
O. That sounds a shade in-
genuous, but let's go on. . . You
are reported to go to some lengths
when you are preparing a sequence
in the strip. How much research do
you really do?
A As little as I can possibly get
away with. It is for this quality
above all others, 1 think, that I am
so admired by undergraduates; I
know just enough to create the im-
pression 1 know a lot. And, of
course, being a cartoonist helps. It it
vseren't for the hopelessly low ex-
pectations vMth which people turn to
my section of the newspaper, I'm
sure I would have been exposed
years ago.
O: You know, it you're going to
continue being self-effacing, we
might as well forget the whole thing.
Frankly, it's not very interesting.
Don't you feel good about yourself?
4: Of course I feel good about
myself. You don't think I've got
reason to? What's the Pulitzer
Prize, chopped liver? (When
Trudeau, m 1975, became the Jirst
comic-strip artist to win the Pulitzer
Prize for Editorial Cartooning, the
Editorial Cartoonists' Society pro
posed a resolution condemning the
Pulitzer committee. Trudeau, once
assured the award was irrevocable,
supported the resolution.)
Q. Okay, okay. Tell us about the
prize.
A. What's to tell. . . .It's the
classiest award in America. No din-
ner, no acceptance speeches, no TV
show. They just call you up and say,
"Good going, the check is in the
mail Everybody in my
neighborhood was very proud of
me. My grocer asked me what I was
going to do with the two hundred
thousand dollars. I think he thought
I won the Pulitzer on a quiz show.
(The award was actually in the
amount oj $2,000. Trudeau blew
most oj it on household bills and
some unnecessary minor surgery.)
Q: Speaking of easy money, why
haven't you gotten into product
licensing? The annual gross of the
Peanuts empire is said to exceed the
GNP of your average emerging na-
tion.
A: Well, Sparky Schultz simply
takes the position that the spin-offs
make people happy. I have no pro-
blem with that position, but with the
exception of the books, I prefer to
keep my characters on the reserva-
tion. Perhaps it's because there's no
logical connection between my
characters and a lunch box . . .
unless, of course, you find the logic
of the profit motive irresistible.
Q: May we assume you'd loan
your characters out for charity?
(ihe inteniewer's facetiousness was
unwarranted. Trudeau had in fact
once used several oj his characters
to promote a Connecticut Red Cross
blood drive.)
4: You're missing the point. It's a
matter of artistic pride. I think the
case against merchandising was best
made by the nine-year-old boy who
once wrote to inquire why I wasn't
selling any Poonsebury
"by-products
Q. You seem to be preoccupied
with the idea of purity in your work.
A: Somebody has to be. If you
have a good editor, as I had for 10
years in Jim Andrews, you come to
realize that the inner life of a comic
strip is a very fragile ecosystem.
(Andrews realized Trudeau's limita-
tions. He once described the car-
toonist as "a thoughtJul, creative,
and highly concerned young man
who is out to make a fast buck. ").
has its own rules, its own time
frames, its own internal logic. That
logic may be completely askew, but
if you tinker with it, the chances are
pretty good the whole thing will col-
lapse.
Q: Could you elaborate?
A: Yes, but I'd rather not. I only
put in that last bit for people who
might be working on dissertations.
Q: That's very thoughtful, but . .
A: Look, E.B. White once com-
pared the analysis of humor to
dissecting a frog; that is, it can be
done, but the frog tends to die in the
process.
Q. Where do you see satire going
in the decade ahead?
A: You're asking me to predict a
trend? You must be mad. 1 only do
postmortems.
Q. All right, where has satire
been? What about Saturday Sight
Live!
A: A magnificent missed oppor-
tunity. The reason why SNL
ultimately doesn't matter is that the
show never developed a point of
view. Originally, the program pro-
duced some pretty good guerrilla
theater, but with its success, it
quickly evolved into a smug exercise
in slash-and-burn humor � anarchy
for its own sake. Nothing of value
was ever left standing. This was a
major failing, I think, because great
satire has always had some sort of
moral underpinnings � just ask
Richard Pryor or Lily Tomlin.
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Lis. 7586121 L9i
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Q: Or Garry Trudeau?
A: Yes, but don't look for convic-
tion. I'm like Don Corleone. I've
got a business to run.
Q: That's how you justify cuffing
people for a living?
A: Absolutely. It's my job. I'm a
form of social control. I make no
apologies.
Q: Perhaps you should. One of
the things that troubles some people
about Doonesbury is that it's hard
to know when you're reporting and
when you're making things up. For
instance, did Jerry Brown really
solicit a political contribution from
Sidney Korshak, the alleged
organized-crime figure, as you
charged in one series?
A: Yes, actually Brown doesn't
deny this. (When asked by NBC
reporter Brian Ross, who originally
broke (he story, why he had
solicited a contribution Jrom a man
chronically under Jederal investiga-
tion, Brown replied, "Even Jane
Eonda was once investigated by (he
FBI Later, he described other
charges made in the strip as "Jalse
and libelous, " but declined to press
the issue on the novel grounds that
"the First Amendment allows libel
by the press. ") But most California
papers killed the strips on the
grounds that I had trampled the
rights of a man the FBI had called
one of the most influential mobsters
in the country. Whimsically enough,
the only two papers outside of
Brown's home state to share this
concern were located in � you
guessed it � Reno and I.as Vegas.
O: Do vou know Brown personal-
ly?
A: Nope. I once met Linda,
which, of course, I recognize as not
being the same thing.
Q: Some of Brown's admirers
charge you've been uncommonly
tough on him. (Tom Havden,
among other disinterested
observers, wrote that Trudeau's
view oj Brown was "bigoted)
Perhaps if you got to know him,
you'd feel differently about him.
4: Fxactly. Which is as good an
excuse as any to pass. One of the
reasons why public figures get to be
public figures in the first place is
that they are not without charm. In-
sisting, as a Geroge Will does, that
one must get in close to make those
lovely, nuanced judgement calls is
utter nonsense. I'm not interested in
private assurances or endearments,
the insider's "access I'm in-
terested in what the outsider sees �
the public face the politician
chooses to be judged on. Nothing
could be fairer. He's setting the
agenda; I'm merely reacting.
Q: You're all heart.
A. Actually, I'm all bov It you
think this business is tun. vou're
right. . . .
IPrI&kw
Tickets Co
On Sale
Season tickets h
gone on sale tor the
ECU Plavhousc season
ot musicals, Jran
and dance concerts
be presented in the
newly-renovated
McGinnis Theatre
AceordiUK
Playhouse General
Manager Scott Park'
the 1982-83 season, rhe
firsl full season ol
shows to be produced
in the John D Messick
Theatre Arts C enter,
�"is gome t be a season
ot tremendous anc
tv
" e'll be producing
everything from comic
operetta to contem
porary drain a
modern dance, using
some ot the m
sophisticated theatre
equipment available,1'
he said
S ited I open the
sea-on Oct. 28 $0 i
No i and ; is I he
Mikado, to he prodtu
See 'MIKADO, P�� '
t
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Cliff's Seafood House &
Oyster Bar
W�ih.ngton Highway (N C 33 E�tGreenville- Phone 753 3172
OXE COUPON PER PERSON
USED BOOKS &
MAGAZINE SALE
Sheppard Memorial Library
Saturday, September 18,1982
9:00 A.M200 P.M.
Main Library Lawn
530 Evans St Greenville
MWJtWP
Angel Flight is an honorary, professional, service
organization of dedicated individuals from leading
colleges across the nation It is an organization that
works closely with Air Force ROTC, however
membership in Angel Flight requires no military
obligation. Fun activities are socials Military 6-
and being together as a group! There are fun anc
rewarding service projects, too, that make you feel
good about yourself. If you're interested in having
fun, Angel Flight is for you!
RUSH DATES TO REMEMBER
Attend 2 out of 3
Tues Sept. 20th, 7:00, Wright Annex, Rm. 201
SUBMARINE PARTY
Wed Sept. 21, 7:00, Wright Annex, "Rm 201
ICE CREAM PARTY
Thurs Sept. 22, 7:00, Elm St. Park COOK OUT
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Karate Instructions
Free
For ECU Students Only
Male & Female Classes
Information & Registration � Thurs. 16th
Memorial Gym � Dance Room
Head Instructor � Bill McDonald
6th Degree Black Belt
Will be present to answer all questions.
a
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OPEN24HOURS DRIVE THRU WINDOW
$1.00 OFF
ALL BUCKETS
Good till kick-off � Sat. 18th
4-9 p.m. Mon Tues & Wed.
No Take Outs
1011 Charles Street � 752-1373 1 Block from Campus
ST. JAMES
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
UNIVERSITY STUDENT
PICK-UP SCHEDULE
Students who wish to attend Sunday morning worship ser
vices, but do not hae a ride, may attend the worship ser
vice at St. James United Methodist Church by observing
the following schedule. The church van will be used to
transport students to and from the church.
10:10
Methodist Student Center
10:12
Garrett Resident Hall
10:15
Jarvis Resident Hall
10:17
Fleming Resident Hall
10:20
Cotton Resident Hall
10:25
White Resident Hall
10:27
Umstead Resident Hall
10:30
Tyler Resident Hall
10:40
St. James United
Methodist Church


� � r





'Mikado' A Salute To Southern Preps Neater
ECTC Of Early 1900s
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 16. 1982
( oniinued Krom Page 8
ed in conjunction with
the ECU School of
Music One of the most
be 1 o v e d m usical
frivolities in the hnglish
language and written
bs the legendary team
of Cnibert and Sullivan.
The Mikado is the
lyrical and comic tale
ol Fantastic happenings
in a mythical Japanese
illage of Titipu.
The fikado is
scheduled intentionally
tor ECU's "5th an-
niversary year, as a
salute to successful
Mikado productions at
ast Carolina Teachers
Training School in 1913
and I915. This will bo
i h e fourth Fast
Carolina production of
this perenially popular
favorite; it was also
presented b the Ed
summer Theatre in
967
The Shadow H(
illows as the mext
ain stage production
on Dec. 2-6. This
highly-acclaimed and
werful drama ac-
complished the rare
teat of winning both
the Pulitzer Prize and
the Tony Award. It is
set in a California cot-
tage, where three peo-
ple Use in a controver-
sial experimental health
center presided over bv
an omniscient inter-
viewer.
Modern dance, ballet
and jazz dance will be
performed bv students
in ECU's
professionally-oriented
dance programs in an
EC Dance Theatre
program Jan. 27-29.
The Playhouse will
present the North
Carolina premiere pro-
duction of Robert ln-
gham's Luster Feb.
17-22. This riveting
drama recounts the
famed battle ot Little
Big Horn - what really
happened on that
fateful day and who
was to blame for the
bloody massacre the
nation will never
forget.
Rounding out the
Playhouse season will
be Our Town, to be
presented April 14-19.
One of the most
cherished and popular
plays in the history of
the American stage,
Our Town is Thorton
Wilder's Pulitzer Prize-
winning chronicle of
the way life was lived in
a typical fictitious little
New Hampshire town
in the early years of this
century.
"With all the
sophisticatd new equip-
ment now installed in
the theatre, we're going
to produce some
technically complex
shows that were never
possible for us to do
before said General
Manager Parker.
All five productions
will be directed, design-
ed and choreographed
by the professional
theatre members of
ECU's drama faculty.
Season tickets may
be purchased in the
Messick Theatre Arts
Center each weekday
from 10 a.m. until 4
p.m or ordered
through the mail. Mail
orders should be ad-
dressed to ECU
Playhouse, Messick
Theatre Arts Center
Continued From Page 7
believes that animals belong on
clothing and not in nature
Most preppies assume that prep is
the same across the nation, and
everbody conforms to the same
standards. Not so says Birnbach.
"Southern preps are much more
into pink and green, are much
neater than preps elsewhere. The
men tend to starch their shirts or
have them starched for them.
"In the Northeast, it's much slop-
pier; it's much more layered; it's
much more casual; it's older clothes
with holes and things Birnbach
explained.
California preppies, she said,
were in a class by themselves. Their
prep is much shieker and more a
part of a costume.
"In Texas Birnbach said, "it's
all Ralph Lauren
Being a preppy used to mean go-
ing to expensive boarding schools
and the most prestigous Ivy League
colleges. It used to mean money.
Now, says Birnbach, prep is all
it's
has
very
gone
classes. She thinks
radical" that prep
southern.
Preppy also cuts across political
lines. Birnbach said prominent
preps include Teddy Kennedy as
well as William Buckley Jr. She
says, breaking into a preppy form of
French, "It's very 'egalite "
"I recently saw a sanitation
worker wearing a jumpsuit and
Topsiders, and it was really a
fabulous look she said.
Preps can expect more upper-
crust reading material from Birn-
bach. She is currently working on a
book titled Etiquette For the Pref-
fered Lifestyle, and writing a
screenplay which she describes as
"deep and yet very shallow
Birnbach also plans to write a
book about her experiences while
lecturing.
As she got up off the table, and
got ready to go on stage, she shared
one final secret, "Are there
alligators on my undergarments?
Let me say this, no unnatural fiber
has ever touched my body
Godfather's

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Seven Categories, each offering $50.00 First Prize
$150.00 � Best in Show.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
sf PTEMBER 16. 192
Page 10

Emory: Best Team Did Not Win
After having time to evaluate last
Saturday night's game against N.C.
State, head football coach Ed
Emory believes N.C. State's Monte
Kiffin should be congratulated.
"1 do want to say that Monte Kif-
fin ought to be congratulated
because he won a game that he
shouldn't have won. He beat a team
that was better than N.C. State and
I really believe that. Anytime you do
that, it's a great coaching job
Emory said at the Greenville
Athletic Club on Tuesday.
After studying game film, Emory
not only saw mistakes by the players
but also by the officials.
Emory, however, does not blame
the officials for the loss. "Penalties
hurt us, but the officials did not cost
us the ballgame he said. "We cost
ourselves the ballgame by making
mistakes
But although the head coach said
the ACC officials didn't beat the
Pirates, he phrased it as being an
"odd-officiated" game.
For example, ECU's Jeff Heath
appeared to have kicked a good
field goal but the officials didn't
think so. "A lot of people have ask-
ed me what was wrong with thte
third field goal Jeff Heath tried
Emory said. "The only thing I can
tell you people is that it must have
been too high. I thought it was good
and all our people on the field
thought it was good
During tiie second half of the
game, officials called a time-out
because o the noise of the crowd �
something Emory has never seen
done before. "I've never seen of-
ficials call time-out to quiet the
home crowd he said, which occur-
red when State was on ECU's one-
yard line.
The most puzzling call came when
the Pirates switched from the
1-formation into the shotgun. An
official fell down and called a time-
out, thus eliminating any element of
surprise. "Maybe we surprised him
(the official) so much going to the
shotgun, I don't know Emory
said. "But that gave State time to
make two substitutions, so we went
back to the l-formation on a fourth
and one
Because of so many questionable
calls, Emory said he thinks ECU
should have been able to bring along
a few officials. "We should have a
split crew when we play at N.C.
State or any university he said.
"We should have that courtesy and
our kids should have that oppor-
tunity. I promise you if N.C. State
goesanywhere else to play they play
with a split crew
Despite the officiating, Emory
said he was really pleased with the
offensive team. "N.C. State has
one of the best coached teams in the
country he said. "Monte Kiffin
and his coach are outstanding
defensive coaches. They make you
come the hard way. Anytime you
get 366 yards and 21 first downs,
you've done a good job
The Pirates tried to make a com-
eback in the fourth quarter but end-
ed up just seven points short. "The
reason our kids didn't give up when
they were 14 points down with three
minutes to go is because they have
so much invested Emory said.
"The more you have invested in a
program, the more you're going to
fight for it
Revenge To Be Big
Factor On Saturday
The Pirates will face East Ten-
nessee State this Saturday night at
Ficklen Stadium, and there's no
doubt that East Tennessee's main
motive will be revenge.
In last year's homecoming game,
the Pirates ran up its highest point
total since 1959, beating the Buc-
caneers, 66-23. Nine different
Pirates scored and a defensive team
led by Jody Schulz, Mike Grant and
Clint Harris held East Tennessee to
125 yards rushing.
During an interview with East
Tennessee's head coach Jack Carli-
sle this summer, he said the Bucs
would like to win, of course, or at
least not get embarrassed again as in
last year's game.
"One thing's for sure Carlisle
said. "We'll try not to get beaten as
badly this year
The Buccaneers now have a 0-2-0
record so far this season after losing
to Tennessee Tech, 14-0, and VMI,
21-3.
In the Tennessee Tech game, East
Tennessee's new quarterback Walt
Bowlin set a record for most passes
attempted in a single game and tied
for second for most passes com-
pleted. Bowlin, a 6-2, 199-pound
sophomore, completed 23 of 42
passes for 207 yards. Paul Rose, a
5-11, 176-pound wide receiver,
caught nine passes for 120 yards to
break the Bucs' previous record.
Carlisle said the primary reason
the Bucs lost the game was because
they were unable to mount any
ground offense.
Now in his fifth season at East
Tennessee, Carlisle has had winning
seasons in two of the last three
years. He reported having a good
recuiting year, including the addi-
tion of some blue chip prospects.
Carlisle's staff recruited all over the
United States, signing players from
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
Respect Does Not Come
Easily For ECU Coach
Tennessee, Virginia, Pennsylvania,
Georgia, Florida. Ohio and
Mississippi.
Emory is also aware of Carlisle's
recruiting success. "They've got
some good talent he said. "We
recruited a lot of the same players
they did
With only five seniors on the
team, East Tennessee will have a
very young team. 31 lettermen and
14 starters have returned this
season.
As for what his strategy will be in
the upcoming game, Carlisle said
he'll have to look at the tapes of
ECU's game against N.C. State
before he'll know. "We do know
ECU is going to have a new offen-
sive formation so we'll just have to
wait and see
Carlisle praised the Pirates
highly. "East Carolina is complete-
ly out of our class he said. "Heck,
most of our players have never been
to Greenville but they know what
kind of team ECU has got
Carlisle said his team will lack ex-
perience against a high level of com-
petition � something ECU has
established. Tougher schedules, a
different division and scholarships
are three areas Carlisle cited for the
contrast in ECU and ETSU.
"Some 15 years ago we were
about the same he said, "but
things have changed. A school like
ours may come along and beat ECU
once every couple of years, but
that's about it
Despite last year's game, Emory
won't be taking the Saturday's game
lightly. "It would have been easier
for us to play next week if we had
won (against State) he said, "but
I'm sure they'll come in here with
lots of pride after licking their
wounds
While speaking at the Greenville
Athletic Club this pat Tuesday,
ECU football coach Ed Emory said
he knew exactly how Rodney
Dangerfield feels about not getting
any respect.
"1 didn't get any from Monte or
the N.C. State team he said.
"After the ballgame the press comes
and get you. Instead of getting me
in the dressing room. I had to go
back through all the East Carolina
fans to the edge of the field
"So I turned by back to the field
and was standing there and John
Castlebury (WITN-TV.
Washington) was going to interview
me. He had me all the way under
the goalpost. 1 just moved my right
foot back and I stepped on the
field
"Then a guy in a red jacket said,
'Hey buddy, get your foot off the
field He was just doing his job.
They've got a lot of pride in their
field. Of course, it made by water
get a little hot
But then Emory got into more
trouble � with his mother. "She's
73 years old and, bless her heart, I
love her to death. But. here she
comes and 1 didn't know what she
wanted. She comes up and says,
"Edward I'm on TV now,
�Where's my tickets? I didn't get my
tickets
"I said, 'Mother. I mailed them
to you She said, 'Well. I didn't get
them
"I didn't get much respect
Emory said, "so it's been a tough,
tough time since Saturday night
ptw'c �' DAVE HLUAMS
ECU head coach Ed Emory, above left, makes an important point in the
N.C. Male game; Beloved Pirate. ahoe. oerpoers Wolfpack Mascot.
Sports Hall To Induct Four
PMtl �y OAHY PATTERSON
The ECU soccer team is scheduled to play
William & Mary this weekend.
GREENVILLE, NC � Four new
members will be inducted into the
East Carolina University's Sports
Hall o Fame at halftime of the first
home football game, Sept. 18 at
7:00 PM.
Those to be inducted include the
school's first AIl-American in foot-
ball, Lou Hallow; The Southern
Conference basketball co-Player of
the Year in 1970-71, Jim Gregory;
the Southern Conference Athlete of
the Year in 1973, Carl Summerell;
and East Carolina's most successful
wrestling coach, John Welborn.
Louis John Hallow was named a
Little A11 - Amer ican by the
Associated Press at the conclusion
of his senior year in 1955. It marked
a first for then East Carolina Col-
lege, having had only honorable All-
Americas before.
The Goldsboro native came to
East Carolina in 1953 as a
sophomore, having transferred
from Wake Forest. Playing both
ways, center and linebacker. Hallow
was named all-North State Con-
ference each of his three seasons
with the Pirates. He was also tabbed
all-state by the Greensboro Daily
News in 1954 and 1955.
The Pirates captured two North
State Conference titles, 1953, and
1954, during Hallow's era. His play
earned him the Lanche Blocking
Trophy in 1954 and 1955; the
Defensive Award in 1953, 1954,
1955; and the team's Most Valuable
Player award in 1955.
The 1955 ECU media guide noted
that Hallow was the "reputed best
linebacker in the state The Los
Angeles Rams thought highly also,
drafting Hallow, where he played
the exhibition season in 1955, but
was drafted before the regular
season began. In 1958, Hallow
returned to the Rams, played seven
games, was traded to Washington,
but never completed contract
negotiations and retired from pro
ball.
Hallow played service ball with
the Marine Corps, being named to
the all-service team and the outstan-
ding lineman in the Marine Corps in
1956.
Today, East Carolina University
athletes know the Greenville resi-
dent well for his avid support of
Pirate teams, as well as, for the con-
tribution of a major weight room
facility three years ago.
A decade after Hallow, James
Martin Gregory came to East
Carolina University from small
Elbert. WV, only to become one of
the Pirates' greatest basketball
players ever.
After htJ senior year, Gregory
was named the co-player of the year
in the Southern Conference, the on-
ly time an ECU basketball player
won that honor. He also made first
team all-Southern Conference and
was named the Team's Most
Valuable Player in 1970-71.
The current Charlotte resident is
still tied for the school record tor
highest career rebounding average
with 11.1 rebounds per game. But
scoring may have been his forte,
currently ranked fifth on the Pirate
all-time scoring list with 1,193
career points.
Honors came Gregory's way each
of his four years with the Pirates,
being named Most Valuable Player
on the freshman team in 196-68
with 25.2 points and 15.3 rebounds
per game; Most Valuable Player
again as a sophomore in 1968-69;
and all-Southern Conference
honorable mention as a junior in
1969-70.
Just as Gregory was finishing his
ECU career, Virginia Beach native
Carl Leigh Summerell was just
beginning an illustrious career in
football and baseball for the
Pirates.
Twice named honorable mention
all-America in football, Summerell
quarterbacked two Southern Con-
ference championship, was Player
of the Year, and also the Southern
Conference Athlete of the Year in
1973-74, the only time an ECU
athlete won the latter honor.
In December 1973, Summerell
was tabbed the starting quarterback
for the gray team in the annual
Blue-Gray Clasic. This marked the
first time ever an ECU player has
been selected for this post-season
all-star game.
Summerell was also honored by
his home state of Virginia with the
MacArthur Award, given to the
Virginia athlete who excels at an
out-of-state university. The
Greensboro Daily News named
Summerell all-state twice in North
Carolina.
Most Valuable honors were given
Summerell for his freshman year
play in 1970, and again in 1972 and
1973 with the varsity. The record
books of ECU reflect why these
honors were given.
The current Virginia Beach resi-
dent still holds the school mark for
most career completions with 198;
most career yards passing. 2.859;
longest scoring pass play, 83-yards
to Tim Dameron vs VMI in 192; se-
cond in career net yards. 3,644; se-
cond in season net yards. POO in
192; and second and third in
season passing vards, 1275 in 192
and 1222 in 1973.
In addition to football. Sum-
merell was all-Southern Conference
in baseball with the team's leading
hitting average of .336.
Statistics told a story for Sum-
merell. but statistics for John
Walter Welborn as wrestling coach
for East Carolina Lnivrsity are
simply astounding.
For ten years. 196 . the Boone
native coached East Carolina
wrestlers to a combined 94-14-3
record � an 8percent winning
mark.
Welborn took over a struggling
program at ECU after a brief stay at
his alma mater, Appalachian State.
as assistant coach. Within four
years Welborn's teams became the
dominate power in the Southern
Conference and of all colleges in
North Carolina.
With Southern Conference titles
in 1971-1976, East Carolina was,
and still is, the only school to cap-
ture five consecutive conference
championships. In the other five
years Welborn coached his club to
four second-place Finishes and one Saturday
third-place finish. The league gave
out coach oi the ear honors
from 1973-76, and Wdborn
tured all three.
During his ten-year tenure. Pii
teams lost but one match to in-state
competition, and never did I
Carolina lose to rival North
Carolina on the mats under
Welborn.
Welborn. now a-iar athletic
director for Eat Carolina, coached
44 individual champions and the
lv all-America ever for ECl wrestl-
ing. Bill Hi placed fifth in the
NC A in 1974 to win the all-
America honors
While coaching wrestling.
Welborn also hurded the goit pro-
gram at East Carolina from
1968-73, coaching two conference
championship teams, three second
place teams and one third-place
team.
The four 1982 inductees join
members of the Sports Hall of Fame
that have been inducted since the in-
ception of the Hall in 194.
Dr. John M. Howell. Chancellor
of East Carolina University, will
honor the new inductees vith a din-
ner at his home Friday night wit!
former members of the Hal;
Fame invited to attend. Induction
ceremonies will follow at halftime
of the opening game against East
Tennessee State University on
Bs P
Parti
word
East
I n t :
E)
:
-
ECl
- - -
i
v sd
I n ftm �
Pirate player goes after loose ball in last year's action with East
Tennessee State
d
t
f





! Mi I sl
c kl isus SI I'll MB1-R 16 �2
11
M Starts Aerobics Class
H PATRICK O'NEII
pro-
Dr.
this
will
Participation is a key
word tor the staff ot
last Carolina's
Intramural-
Recreational Services
Pi ogram last yeai
65 2 peicent ot the men
and 2 s 1 pet cent ot the
women enrolled at
C participated in
structured Intramural
activities Another "
women were involved
in last years aerobic
fitness and exec i se
classes Hundreds ot
othei students took
ir! in the numerous
unsti uctured free-play
acttv ities.
ccording to
i r director
a ne Edwards
vea r s activities
have even greater pat
pat ion. "We have
done surveys, ques-
� onaires; and gotten
feedback from in-
i mural represen-
ta ves, resident halls,
fraternities � and
i es Edwards
said.
Ihev have conducted
these studies to better
nine the wants
d needs o the stu-
dent bodv. "We fee! as
gh we could have
pat - pation of
a omen in o u t ac-
lies added Ed-
ai ds
1 he addition oi
terobk I itness and ex-
� �: ass e s has
itica.ll increased
the participation ol
, men ! his year, the
. will be offe
� fteen different
many are in
idem dorms.
�� e'i ' to
vvuh these
i d I dwai :
��� ierobics)
Program" has offered
a scries of activities tor
students. "We are very
proud ol this program
because it offered a
series of activities tor
students who are often
neglected in recrea-
tional opportunities
said Mie.
Disabled students
have been able to par-
ticipate in various ac-
tivities such as
horseback riding,
canoe tups, bowling,
and aquatic events.
"You know it has to
be a prettv good pro-
gram when a young
man (Rick) Creech),
who has to drive a
wheelchair with his
head, can swim laps
arond a pool said
Rick Burke, an ECU
graduate student who
aKo uses a wheelchair
foi mobility.
Burke praised the
work of Edwards say-
ing "he (Edwards) goes
out of his way" to meet
the needs ot disabled
students. "1 wish more
students handicapped
and non handicapped -
got involved in it
(intramurals), because
they have a lot to ot-
ter continued Burke.
Other programs have
been provided tor blind
students as well as hear-
ing impaired students.
Most of these han-
dicapped activities are
conducted by
volunteers. According
to Ed w a r ds, more
volunteers are needed.
Anyone interested may
contact the Intramural
office at 757-6562.
Edwards credits
much of the success of
his program to the
�'student advisory
council which makes
recommendations and
suggestions to his staff.
"The council is com-
posed of a represen-
tative from each of the
participating organiza-
tional divisions said
Edwards.
The representatives
come together for mon
thly meetings "or as
often as necessary
Each representative has
a mailbox in Memorial
Gym which keeps them
up to date on all in-
tramural events, pro-
grams and activities.
"They are an advisory
committee to us from a
standpoint said Ed-
wards. "Their input is
for our benefit
Edwards also
welcomes input from
all other students. The
program even provides
a hot-line telephone
number call
ed"Intra Action" for
any information con-
cerning an aspect ot
the Intramural-
Reereational Program.
(757-6562)
"What we're trying
to do is to offer a wide
varietv ot services that
will appeal to the in-
terests of everybody
concluded Edwards.

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211 W. 9th St. � Greenville, N.C. 27834
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Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
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i





12
1 HI HAST t ARCH IN I AN
SEPTMB1 R 16. m
Heath "Kicks Off" Season Well
Classifieds
GREENVILLE, NC
-East Carolina Univer-
sity has been very for-
tunate in recruiting out
of Virginia's Tidewater
area. The list of starters
and reserves includes:
flanker Carlton "The
Snake" Nelson, split
end Ricky Nichols, free
safety Clint Harris,
right guard Tom
Carnes, right tackle
Mac Powers and
freshman kicker ex-
traordinaire Jeff
Heath.
Jeff Heath, who
kicked a Virginia high
school record 58-yard
field goal, won all-
state, all-Tidewater and
all-Beach district,
opened as kicker with
the Pirates against NC
State last Saturday
night and had an
outstanding perfor-
mance.
Out of Heath's six
kickoffs, three were not
returned and one was a
successful on-side kick.
He also put the first six
of the Pirates' 26 points
on the scoreboard.
Heath remembers the
opening kickoff well.
"The kickoff was
vorse on my nerves
than the first field goal.
We had come out at
five o'clock before the
game, and my
adrenaline was flowing
from then until the
kickoff.
"After the first
kickoff, it wasn't too
bad at all; 1 could block
out the noise. The big-
gest crowd 1 had eer
played in front of
before was 12.(XX). and
there were 55,(XX) there.
It's a big difference
Kicking coach
Charles Elmquist feels
that Heath did an ex-
cellent kicking job.
"Jeff performed ad-
mirably Elmquisl
said. "We were pleased
with the length of his
kickoffs and his first
two field goals.
"Jeff Heath, bar in-
jury, has as much
potential as any kicker
I've worked with in the
past. The biggest thing
to do this year is to get
him through the first
games; the rest will be
easier. It will be tough
on him this weekend
with the Pirates' home
opener
One of the most ex-
citing moments in
ECU'S game against
NC State took place at
the end of the fourth
quarter when the
Prirates successfully
recovered an onside
kick.
"That style of kick is
called the Barn-Bam
explains Heath. "We
got it from a team who
did it against us a cou-
ple of years ago
"1 did recover, but
there was a lot of con-
fusion and a big pile.
Even though I didn't
get touched, nobody
could tell it was me
with the ball
Heath explains the
changes he has gone
Ficklen Stadium now has two student gates, located on either side
of the North Stands (illustrated above, across from the press box).
The additional gate was built last year hut was not used. The gate is
labeled number six and is located just left of the scoreboard. It is
intended to enable students to enter the stadium at a quicker pace.
The new gate will be open for Saturdays game against East Ten-
nessee State.
ARCADE VARIETY
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�Prestige and personal growth potential
CUB BENT OPPORTUNITIES
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COLLEGE GRADUATES
U.S. Citizens less than 35 years of age
interested in holding challenging
managerial positions.
Send resume to:
NAVY OFFICER PROGRAMS
1001 Navaho Dr.
Raleigh. N.C. 27609
or call 1-800-662-7231
Travel
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ECU
to the
Big
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Nov. 24-Nov. 28,1982
Spend your Thanksgiving holiday in style on Broadway,
at Macy's Parade, shopping, & touring the city. Space is
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through in his kicking
game since coming to
ECU.
"I was told not to try
to change my method
states Heath who kicks
soccer style. "In high
school, I kicked trom
the middle of the field,
and now I kick from
the left hash mark. I'm
working on speed and
getting better with what
comes naturally to
me
Former ECU coach
Jack Boone describes
Heath's possiblities
with the Pirates.
"Jeff has got a lot of
potential and will cer-
tainly help the ECU
football team. He is a
real good worker, easy
to coach and will im-
prove all along'
Volleyball Team
Suffers Setback
The , ECU Lady
Pirates opened the
volleyball season with a
loss to N.C. State Tues-
day night in Minges
Coliseum. The match
was won by the Lady
Wolfpack in three
straight games, 15-5,
15-7, 15-3.
According to head
coach Lynn Davidson,
there was a positive side
to the loss. "I saw a lot
of good things she
said. "Our passing was
good; our serving was
good and the fun-
damentals were there
As Davidson puts it,
some of the problems
were caused by the fact
that this was the first
match of the year. "It
was too early for us to
play a team of State's
caliber stated Daid-
son. "We just weren't
ready
Davidson mentioned
the play of Sandy Gi-
deons and Johanna Fry
as highlights for the
ECU cause. "Sandv
came off the bench and
did a great job on the
back row she said.
"Johanna had several
serving aces. She's go-
ing to be one of the
keystones for our
team
PERSONAL
DOUG COBB �� GA) call "t
4S4P Clwmnlry Mary T 7SJ M35
MEE HEE Congratulations you
did it m more �ay ttian one
You done V) good' You got tn�
wings you deserve Your heart is
airborne' PEE WEE
DID WE HAVE tun in RaleigK or
who?Let s go to the Holiday Inn
Did we go to the Holiday mn'Some
cars do have power brakes Pew
D D did it' Have you ever been
le�� at TELLER ll before'Well we
can bench 120 pounds too' Pleas
dance with me no no no you
know she s no good Had a helluva
time m Raleigh let s do it agam
or who THE GOOD EGGS
GREG H Happy B-day and I love
you Your Carolina Girl
ROOMMATE
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TWO ROOMMATES needed
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PRESCHOOL Elementary educa
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TEN YEARS Protessiona' ping
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spelling punctuation and 9' "
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work prootread Can C "Or � 4 rr
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restaurant Ladv s �eiiow gc�c
Bulova watch engraved or bai �
Great sent,mental value Rewa'C
Call 7S 7903 and ask c S
WANTED
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Band Band has numerous book
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air piav Ser ous cempe'en- �
cans only CaM S� sTO ��
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per.ence Earn M to S C BSJ nour
Send resume a"d reef'
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RIDES
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HURRY! SWEEPSTAKES CLOSES SEPTEMBER 24 1982
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Oct 2. 1982. Not
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or discount
tt
I
I
I
I
I
-I
r





Title
The East Carolinian, September 16, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 16, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.215
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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