The East Carolinian, September 14, 1982






(Hire
(Earnltntatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.7
Tuesday, September 14, 1982
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Group Studies Rules
B HOK MORI,
Sluft V f llrr
�v i result of recurring controver-
sy n the election ol SuA president,
changes in the election rules ire pro
bable tiis fall.
In April, the election between
1 iderson and David Cook
ie election rules in the
spotlight.
rhe controversy focused not only
on the individuals involved, but on
the ru es The rules were accused ol
being inconsistent, illogical and con-
tradictory.
On May 27, the SGA 1 xecutive
C ouncil appointed a special study
n � tee ol three students to ex-
it possible revisions in the cur-
rent rules governing the election of
icecutive officers. Each candidate is
represented on the committee along
with a member of the honor council.
Henderson says he does not know
�ahat the committee will conclude.
ii he does have his ownidea about
a change in the appeals process after
an election.
"l! would be better f only the
ectiori immittee was ible to file
in i tei an electionbecause it
� mid take out the personal conflict
between the people involved said
B-52s Moving
Henderson.
He believes this would prevent a
candidate from making false allega-
tions against another without
substantial proof.
A question brought up during the
controversy was the legality of a rule
which prevents the filing of any
charges more than 48 hours after the
election.
Hank Little, Cook's represen-
tative on the committee, wants to do
away with this limit. He wants to
gie the elections committee more
time and power to investigatge
alledged wrongdoing.
In the spring, charges against
Henderson filed after the deadline
were never brought against the
president. Little belives these
charges were substantial enough to
have prevented Henderson from
taking office.
Little also makes it known that he
is against doing away with the cur-
rent $200 limit on campaign expen-
ditures, something he believes
Henderson supports.
The SGA Legislature, which will
be elected in September and convene
in October, will have the final say
on any rule changes.
The chances of anv such action
being approved this fall will depend
largely on the make-up of the
legislature.
Former speaker of the legislature,
Gary Williams, says that it is im-
possible to predict whether any
changes will be made at this point,
without concrete proposals.
However, Williams added, "If they
are necessary and explained well, I
would see no problem in changes
passing the legislature
One year ago the legislature faced
a similar situation following another
controversial election. Small revi-
sions were made but there were not
any significant changes.
"We only did some patchwork to
tighten up existing loopholes" said
Williams, "without tackling the
more comprehensive problem which
is what the recent election has
shown is needed
Dr. Elmer Meyer Jr vice
chancellor for student life, agrees
that something needs to be done
because of unclear sections in the
rules that are difficult to interpret.
"One of the big problems we've en-
countered is that some rules are con-
tradictory, leaving considerable
conflicting interpreta-
Photo 8v DAVE WILLIAMS
Little Fans Have Big Hopes
This pirate-backer dreams of a not to be victory. ECU lost its opener in a hardfought battle to N.C. State
33-26. For further details see Sports, page ten.
Elections Chairperson Selected
room
tions.
for
Base Still 'Category One9
By PVIRK K O Nr II 1
Mill H ril i
olina
at Seymoui
Basein
lovalol
B-52s
housedin
the aiea,
Des
?8 iles 1 om (ireen
ville, will continue to be a primary
enemy target and will retain its
"category one" status, said Air
1 orce general Bennie i . Davis.
"Category one" indicates that
Seymour I n would be one ol
the primary targe in a nucleai at-
tack. The ranking policy is deter-
mi led as part ol a three-category
targeting policy by the Federal
Em. v Man ig ment Ad-
ministration.
Davis, the commander ol the
I S Strategic Air Command, told
the group gathered for the ceremony
that nuclear weapons would not
have "a mission" after the B-52's
were remov ed.
When questioned by reporters he
averted directly answering the ques-
tion ol whether nuclear weapons
would actually be remaining at
Seymour Johnson.
According to a public affairs of-
ficer for the base. 1st Lt. Robert
1 yles, Seymour Johnson will have a
SAC detachment at the base.
During a telephone interview
1 vies told the East Carolinian that
he "could neither confirm or deny
that there are nuclear weapons on
the base He cited Air Force and
Defense Department policy as the
reasons for his answer. Lyies added
that this policy applied to "all" Air
force bases not only Seymour
Johnson.
During Ground Zero Week events
on ECU's campus last spring, par-
ticipants noted that Greenville
would be a "host" city to receive
Goldsboro residents in the event of
a nuclear attack.
Actual damage to Greenville from
a nuclear attack would depend on
wind conditions and accuracy were
the conclusions of some of the par-
ticipants in April educational event
that was held nationwide.
Seymour Johnson, which has
4000 military personal has had one
known B-52 accident involving a
live nuclear weapon. In 1962 a B-52
crashed in nearby Dudley, NC and
some of the remains of a live nuclear
weapon were never recovered.
Last year Gov. Joames B. Hunt
finally was able to get Washington
to confirm that a nuclear weapon
was involved in the B-52 incident.
Despite the pullout of the B-52's,
Seymour Johnson will actually be
gaining 150 more personel and 24
jets as new squadrons of F-4E Phan-
tom Jets take the B-52's place.
By DARRYL BROWN
Staff Writer
The Student Government
Association's Executive Council last
week selected Joy Wilkins as the
elections chairperson for the 1982
fall elections of the SGA legislature.
Wilkins will set up and oversee
the operation of the entire election,
which is set for September 29.
The election will include races for
day representatives (off-campus
students), dorm representatives, and
class officers to the legislature.
Wilkins sees one of her primary
duties as increasing voter turnout at
the student elections. She hopes im-
proved publicity and more available
information on the candidates will
help the student body realize the im-
portance of the student legislature.
East Carolina has traditionally
had low voter participation in stu-
dent elections. In last year's elec-
tion, only 89 of 13,000 students cast
ballots.
Several positions for dorm
representatives went unfilled due to
low interest in the positions
available, and many ran without
competition because ot a lack of
candidates.
The SGA legislature, assuming
there are no delays in the election
results, will meet for the first time
this year on October 4
It will be responsible foi all ap-
propriations oi student activity
funds, last year over 1100,000, and
has other dutes, such as the official
recognition of campus group-
Representatives are dec . i for
one year.
Wilkins encourages students who
would like to work for the elections
committee to contact her at the SGA
office in Mendenhall. In the past.
service organizations, ROTC and
the ECU ambassadors have aUo
helped run the ballot boxes.
Full-time students are eligible to
serve on the legislature and may file
for candidacy from September 14
through the 28th at the SGA office,
located in 22S. Mendenhall.
Ballot boxes will be located at
many areas around campus on elec-
tion Jay, including a dorm lobl
in front of the student store, and at
the Croatan.
Clash Of'79 Still Controversial
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Stiff Wrilcr
"November 3, 1979, Greensboro.
Demonstrators protesting against
the Ku Klu Klan clashed with
klansmen and nazis. Five of the
demonstrators including three white
males, one black female, and one
hispanic male were shot and killed.
Six klansmen and nazies were later
College Costs Rise
By GREG R1DEOUT
uislam Sf� Kdlior
ECU students will spend an
average of 3.6 percent more money
to go to school this year. According
to figures from the financial aid of-
fice, an average in-state student will
spend $3438.
These figures are below the 13
percent increase nationally. The
College Board Scholarship Service
predicts that a student at a four-year
public campus will spend an average
of $4338.
The survey, which polled 3300
colleges across the nation, said the
average private school student will
spend $7475, an increase of 11 per-
cent over 81-82.
The national increase, according
to the college board, was do mainly
to soaring tuiton rates. Nationally
tuition isup an average of 20 per-
cent at public colleges and 13 per-
cent at private schools. ECU's tui-
tion stayed the same.
Julian Vainwright, ECU's
business manager, said ECU's in-
crease was due to a rise in dorm
rent. ECU dorm rent rose 15 percent
over last year, sevent percent more
than the national average.
The college board said the cost of
transportation, supplies and per-
sonal expenses will rise seven per-
cent. Vainwright commented that
there has been a gradual increase in
these areas at ECU.
Vainwright said the price of an
education in UNC system is
reasonable. He said it compares
favorably with prices in other states.
Officials at other schools,
though, argue that students are
lucky that increases aren't higher.
Kathleen Brouder, director of the
college board study, said it's
remarkable that colleges have been
as successful as they have at con-
taining costs.
tried on state charges of murder and
rioting. An all white jury acquitted
all of the defendants
The above quote is taken from the
official "Congressional Record" ot
the United States House ol
Representatives dated February 19.
1981. The title of this particular
report was "Violence Against
Minorities on the Increase
Selected Incidents of Criminal
Violence Against Minority Group
Citizens, 1979-1981
Despite the fact that this incident
took place almost three years ago,
the controversy surrounding the
events of Nov. 3rd are still alive.
The investigation into the deaths
of the five demonstrators is still
shadowed with questions of doubt
regarding the Justice Departments
handling of the case.
Last week a North Carolina civil
rights group requested that the
federal appeals court appoint a
special prosecutor to investigate the
1979 clash.
The group, calling itself the
Greensboro Civil Rights Litigation
Fund, is representing the families of
the five people who were killed as
well as 10 others who were wounded
in the shooting spree. The five killed
were all members of the Communist
Workers Party.
According to the group's lawyer,
Daniel P. Sheehan, there is evidence
that a person involved in the inci-
dent was an undercover FBI agent
while two others were employed by
the Treasury Department's Bureau
of Alcohol. Tobacco, and Firearms.
Sheehan plans to present this
evidence, along with other cir-
cumstantial evidence he has obtain-
ed when a special prosecutor is
choosen.
Presently the case has been
reopened by a federal grand jury.
Another organization. The
Greensboro Justice Fund is also
calling publically for a special pro-
secutor to be assigned to the case.
The Greensboro Justice Fund is
also filing a civil rights suit that
member Jean Wagner claims is be-
ing blocked by the government.
"They're trying to keep it from go-
ing into the courts said Wagner, a
former chairman of the group.
"The current grand jury in-
vestigation will probably follow the
pattern of continuing to cover-up
the role of those government
agents said Wagner. She, like
Sheehan. believes that the original
trial didn't uncover all the facts in
the case.
"In spite of a five-month trial of
klansmen and nazis, the federal
agent who was involved in the
organizing and the arming of the
caravan has never been charged
or indicted
Wagner also claims that the
Greensboro police paid an FBI in-
formant to help recruit klansmen to
come to Greensboro on the day of
the clash.
Bernard Burkovich and Edward
See CONTROVERSY, Page 3
Group Plans Blockade Of PCB Shipment
Heirs Angels Visit Campus
Well not exactly. This is just the average, everday scene at the
motorcycle parking area near the science complex. ECU's easy-riders
arrive on campus bv a highly economical mode of travel.
By PATRICK O'NEILIL,
Staff Writer
A group of Warren County
citizens led by civil rights leader
Rev. Leon White, are planning to
form a "human blockade" on
Wednesday morning to block the
first shipment of PCB contaminated
landfill at an (EPA) approved dump
site in the county.
White says the blockade is a
"united effort" of county citizens
who are committed to going to jail if
they have to to keep the PCB out.
White is the director of the United
Church of Christ Commission for
Racial Justice. "I think it was a
racist decision he said. "They are
choosing this area because they
thought they'd get away with it
"It was a racially motivated deci-
sion said community leader Ken
Ferruccio. "Fifty-four percent of
the residents of Warren County are
minorities Ferruccio added that
75 percent of the Shocco Township,
the actual community where the
dump site is located, is comprised of
minorities.
"They thought nobody would
resist said White, "but we have
broad based support from the com-
munity Ferruccio adds that the
Warren County site is the "only
hazardous waste land fill approved
by the EPA in North Carolina
PCB is a chemical that has been
linked with cancer and genetic
damage. Ferruccio claims that the
soil in the area of the site "can't
hold" the PCB. He claims that ex-
perts have warned that ground
water contamination will occur if
the area is used for dumping. "EPA
landfills have been devastating to
other areas which had ill equipped
soil he stated. Ferruccio also
claims that there are other areas
with more suitable "soil properties"
to handle the wastes.
The group is committed to
"blocking the trucks � we intend to
stop them said Ferruccio. "We're
also committed to confrontation
(and) we want to be non-violent
The State Transportation Depart-
ment is scheduled to begin picking
up the PCB contaminated dirt and
taking it to the landfill Wednesday
morning.

i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 14, 1982
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcement column,
please type it on an announcement
form and send it to The East
Carolinian in care of the produc
tion manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications Building
Flyers and handwritten copy on
odd sized paper cannot be ac
ieptea
There is no charge for ar
nouncements, but space is often
limited Therefore we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you want
and suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column for publicity
The deadline tor announcements
is 5 p m Monday for the Tuesday
paper and 5pm Wednesdayy for
the Thursday paper No an
nouncements received after these
deadlines will be printed
This space is available to an
campus organizations and depart
ments
ATTENTION
Attention investigators of the
mind ano dealers in personalities
September IS Wednesday, at 7 30
p m you are invited to attend Psi
Chi's first organizational meeting
in Room 12V, Speight Being pre
sent you will become better in
formed and help shape Psi Chi's
future events plus let Psi Chi of
ticers know what you want Come
and be a part of the business and
fun Remember you are needed to
fulfill the wants expected from Psi
Chi
DEPARTMENTOF
ENERGY
The US Depaent of Energy is
accepting applications tor Spring
semester Students selected will
re assigned to PETC (Pittsburgh
Enercy Technology Center1 Pitt
sborgh PA or M E T C
iAlorgantown Energy Technology
Center) Morgantown VW Re
quirements Have at least a
s Dhomore standing 2 5 GPA or
Vr and be a US citizen Salary
�jnge between J800 $1000 per
month Travel reimbursement to
30 from site Students will work
a1 least six months Students ma
ioring m Accounting, Chemistry,
Computer Science. Geology.
Allied Health, and Physics are
urged to apply Application
deadline Oct 4 1982 For more m
t rmation contact the Co op office,
.113 Rawi or i all 757 6979
TUTORS WANTED
The Center for Student Oppor
l ties is accep' ng applications
� � tutoring portions in allied
� ealth and nursing courses Ap
plication forms may be obtained
from Room 302 Beik Building,
Room 152 Nursing Building, or
- m 1508 Brody Building
ary is based on qualifications
sic assignments Call 757 2500 it
. re nformation is desired
PHYE MAJORS
! ludents who plan to declare
f .s.cai education as a maior our
ange of maior week tor the
Fail Semester should report to
V aes Coliseum from 1 00 3 00
.eonesaa. September 29
� � a ?tor ano physical fitness
test Sat.stactory performance on
tn.s tesi is required as a prere
quiSite tor official admittance to
the physical education maior pro
'grarn More detailed information
i :ernmg the test'S available b
'ca. "Q '57 6441 or 6442
COUPON
LAW SOCIETY
Law Society will hold an
organizational meeting on Thurs
day, Sept 16 at 7 MpminRm 212,
Mendenhall For further info, call
Diane Jones at 756 6556
ACTING CLASS
An acting class for beginners
will be meeting for ten consecutive
evenings starting Sept 21 at Pitt
Community College Registration
tor the class will occur at its initial
session, the tee is SIS 00 Stephen
B Finnan, formerly of ECU'S
Drama and Speech Department,
will be the instructor In addition
to ECU Mr Fmnan has taught
and directed at Brooklyn College,
Michigan State Univ. and Pitt
Community College He also has
professional acting and directing
credits Since the class size is
limited those who are interested
are advised to call Mr Finnan
(757 3546 between 3 5) or Mr. Jim
Brown at PCC (756 3130, between
9 5)
APPLICATIONS
Applications are now being ac
cepted tor the positions of Day
Student Legislators, Dorm Stu
dent Legislators and Class Of
ficers Please come by 228
Mendenhall Student Center and
apply
HOUSING
If you are seeking of campus
housing or want a roommate to
share expenses, come to 211
Whichard Building or telephone
757 6881 for more information We
have an up to date list of apan
ments to rent or share and houses
and mobile homes to renl or share
CO-OP
The Co op office is now accep
tmg applications for a spring
semester co op student as a claims
representative trainee for the
S cial Security Administration
Requirements Must be a lunior,
have a 2 5 GPA or higher, and co
op two work terms Students ma
ionng m Social Welfare, Social
Science Sociology English,
Psychology Management Public
Administration, Business Ad
ministration, and Business Educa
tion are urged to apply Salary
first work term $11 490 second
work term $12 854 Interested
students should contact 313 Rawl
or call 757 6979
EPA CO OP JOBS
The Environmental Protection
Agency located m Research
Triangle Park. NC is accepting ap
plications tor student trainees m
Biology and Chemistry tor spring
semester Students must be
Biology or Chemistry maiors,
have a 2 2 GPA or better and be
able to work two alternating
terms Salary Approximately
$5 50 per hour Contact the Co op
off ice m 3i 3 Rawl Building to apply
CIRCLE K
Circle K is caring It is giving a
part ot yourself to someone else
It is an opportunity to commit
yourself to enriching the lives of
many individuals, and at the same
time enhancing your lite because
you nave chosen t0 care Circle K
is the largest co ed collegiate ser
vice organization in the world with
over 700 chapters in North
America alone ECU'S chapter
meets every Thursday night at
6 30 m Mendenhall room 221 Come
and be a part of our group choose
to care!
CADP
The Campus Alcohol and Drug
Program will have a meeting on
Tuesday, Sept 14 at 5:00 p.m. in
the second floor conference room
of Erwin Hail Any student in
terested in furthering responsible
sttituted toward the use of
chemical substances is encourag
ed to attend. For more informa
tion call 757 6793 or 757 4649
FRESHMEN
Freshman registers have arriw
ed. Pick up in the Buccaneer office
(across from Joyner library) at
the following times: MWF
1 30 5:00. TTH 2 00 5 00
SPORT CLUBS
Get ready for a fantastic year.
Find out everything you ever
wanted to know about Sport Clubs.
Currently Field Hockey, Gym
nasties. Karate, Rugby. Soccer,
Surfing, Team Handball and
Water Polo are active Sport Clubs.
If you and your friends wish to
begin a new club attend the sport
club informational meeting. ALL
SPORT CLUBS MUST ATTEND
THE FIRST MEETING WHICH
WILL BE HELD WEDNESDAY,
SEPTEMBER 22, IN MEMORIAL
GYM. ROOM 105 B AT 4:00 p.m.
Active sport clubs should have
organizational meetings tor the
election of officers and prepare
tion of schedules prior to the IRS
meeting.
COUNSELING
Studies got you down? A two
part mmi series offered at No Cost
by the University Counseling
Center Topics are How to Sue
ceed in College and Still Have Fun'
on Monday, September 13, 1982
and 'How to Avoid Test Anxiety'
on Tuesday, September 14, 1W2
Both sessions will be conducted
from 3 PM 4 PM at 305 Wright An
nex (757 6661) No advance
registration is necessary
CAREERS
Which career fits you best?
Career By Choice Not Chance' is
a two part mini series offered at
No Cost by the University Counsel
ing Center. It is offered on
September 20 and October 4 or
September 21 and October 5 in 305
Wright Annex (757 6661) from 3.00
PM 5:00 PM The Strong
Campbell Vocational interest in
ventory will be administered in
the First Meeting No advance
registration is necessary
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
SCHOLARSHIPS
Applications ac being received
for the North Carolina Sheriffs'
Association Criminal Justice
Scholarship. Applicants must be
full time students enrolled as ma
jors in the Department of Social
Work � Corectional Services who
meet the financial need and
academic criteria established by
the Sheriffs' Association.
Preference will be given to:
1) Sons or daughters of any
law enforcement officer killed in
the line of duty
2) Sons or daughters of any
Sheriff or Deputy who is deceased,
retired, or currently active in law
enforcement
3) North Carolina residents.
Awards will be made without
regard to race, creed, religion,
color, national origin, age or sex
Applications are available in the
Department of Social Work � Cor
rectional Services, Room 314,
Carol Belk Building (Allied Health
' Social Professions) and must be
submitted by September 15, 1982 to
the Department Chair.
ATTENTION
On Monday September 27. 8 9:00
p.m. in Hendrix theatre Pi Kappa
Phi and CADP will sponsor well
known Dr. Kenneth Mills from
UNC. The topic of discussion will
be "Alcohol Prevention Free ad
mission to community and entire
campus
DISNEY WORLD
INTERNSHIPS
Walt Disney World's Magic
Kingdom College internship Pro
gram will be interviewing on cam
pus Oct 15. 1982 from 3 30 5 00pm
tor their spring and summer in
terns. Students will work 30 hours
per week, and earn approximately
$4 00 per hour for 10 weeks. Special
training seminars held weekly
Students will be placed according
to their majors. Any interested
students should contact the Co op
office in 313 Rawl or call ext 6979
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines. There are 33
units per line. Each letter, punc-
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
nyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end of line if word
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac
cepted over the phone. We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
75 per line or fraction of a line.
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lower case letters.
Return 10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
office b 3:00 Tuesday before
Wednesday publications.
Name
Address
CityState.
No. lines
.ZiP.
Phone.
at 75c per line .
,No. insertions.
$
.enclosed
1iT 11
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ATTENTION
The 1982 REBEL is here If you
missed it int hte spring, you can
pick it up in Mendenhall or the
Library beginning Sept 1 Also,
artistrs and illustrators whose
work was printed in the REBEL
may pick it up in the REBEL of
fice, in the Pulbications Building,
on MWF from 9.00 11 30 Copies of
last year's written submissions
may be dug up too.
The REBEL need an Associate
Editor to learn and work toward
next year's Editorship The mam
requirement is dedication, anyone
in any major can apply Drop by
the office and speak to Rick Gor
don, the Editor, during his office
hours MWF 9 00 11 30.
This last announcement goes out
to ECU'S talented creative
writers The REBEL'S prose and
poetry contests will be starting
soon, so start working on those
poems, stories, plays, interviews.
etc
BAPTIST STUDENT
UNION
Would you like to have a good
time?! Come iom us and let Christ
become an active part of your life
Many needs can be met at the Bap
tist Student Union including
Physical with home cooked meals
on Tuesday at 5 30 pm for only
$1 75, Recreational with ongoing
participation in intramural.
Spiritual with a time tor worship
at PAUSE on Thursday at 7 00
pm Emotional with a talk session
on Living as a Christian Toda
each Tuesday at 7 00 pm, and
Social with all the friends you will
make Call 752 4646 tor any mfor
mation! Bob Clyde minister
PHI SIGMA PI
Phi Sigma Pi National honor
fraternity will hold its monthly
business meeting on Wednesday.
September 15 at 5 00 pm m Austin
132 All brothers are urged to at
tend
SNOW SKI SNOWSHOE
There will be a meeting for an
persons interested in snowsknng
on Thursday, September 15 at 4 00
in Memorial Gym 108 Christmas
and spring break trips will be
made on Snowshoe, West Virginia
tor PHYE credit or non credit A
slide presentation will be shown
and information on sk packages
including prices and accomoda
tions will be distributed Space is
limited for each trip Reservations
will be accepted at this meeting
For additional information con
tact Jo Saunoers at 757 6O0C
Memorial Gym 205
PRE PHYSICAL
THERAPY
STUDENTS
Deadline tor i983 admission to
professional phase is October i5
1982 ah general college arc
physical therapy credos mus� be
completed by end of Spring 1983
Allied Health Professions Aom s
sions Test must be �aer
November (appir prior 'o Octooer
3) Application and interv.e ap
pontmen's a't to be made by
Septemoer 24 i�82 in depar'men
tai office iBeik Building Annex 3.
7 57 6961 ext 26i
COOPERATIVE
EDUCATION
Han C'V- ar Perso-ne. N�
t.ow Oe A represents' .r h
Nw NCP Office win be on car- .
October 8 ano II M in�mi�
'erested ao Qua
u"Oergraduate sfuoen's jobs 'r
aa able tnroughou' 'he US'
'ne following maiOfS Accoo" .
Computer Science F nance
dustria 'fgi va-as�
men Political 5( �
Pscr-ciog� a"d Sc
Dead' ne tc apply is Octobe
1982
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DELI KITCHEN
Home Cooked r id
II.� K:tl (. arolinian � in l
Puus ii i i i , 1 n'surt. and
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t'm s 's � I E as' Cai ulnta

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r





I Jf
I HI I sl K )l IM N
Mill MM K 14, 1982
1
Filibuster Snags Debate
V SHINGTON
11 PD Senate
Republican leader
Howard Bakei was
simistic Monda
having enough
to slop a liberal
�tei. but promised
go the las! mile" to
� action on anti-
on legislation.
Hake pointing out
���' -een Republican
senators still had not
' mthe I aboi
dav said 1
doubt" there would be
enough - votes Monda
afternoon to carr) his
second attempt to in-
voke cloture.
1 he tirst attempt last
week uas defeated
41-47 despite personal
appeals b President
Reagan to crack the
filibustet.
Bakei said he would
schedule a thud vote
tot this Wednesda it
Ins second el fort tailed
Monda
Controversy Hot
Over City Clash
"M commitment is
to a full and thorough
d e bate he told
reporters in his pre-
session briefing. I hat
means we'll go the last
mile to give the legisla-
tion every opportunity
he explained.
Bakei said, however,
he will have to "take
another look" at the
situation if the thud
cloture attempt tails.
saying "we've got to
pass a debt limit bill
I egislation to raise
the temporary ceiling
on the national debt
must be passed to pro-
vide the government
with money in the new
tiseal yeai beginning
Oct. 1.
A Senate source said
Bakei intends to get ac-
tion on the debt limit
b the end ol the week,
suggesting that it he
c a n n o t b r e a k I h e
filibuster by then, he
may have to lay the
anti-abortion legisla-
tion aside.
1 he abortion bill
sponsored by Sen. Jesse
Helms, R-N.C. a
key goal of the New
Right social conser-
vatives � is in the form
ot a rider to the debt
limn measure.
Helms' amendment
would permanently ban
federal funding ol
abortions � which
piimanly would affect
weltare recipients
and federal insurance-
coverage tor the opera-
tions, and would en-
courage a quick review
of the 1973 Supreme
Court decision legaliz-
ing abortion.
When Helms moved
to introduce his amend-
m en t last m o nth,
liberals, led bv Sen.
Bob Packwood,
R () ie began a
filibuster against it.
v ontinued from Page 1
he two key
v case ac-
v arious
Butko ich is
�1 Mcohol,
i ms
aded
i klan
i - - a as
cd as
V . Dawson nor
were evei
ied to testify
oi iginal
Dawsoi as a
in the lead
klan nai
N
rhe GJl ay they
ns, the
. ate
� � w h i c h
i phi 11
VVa� .

tin some
t .
newspapers have been
"told" to limit the
co ei age ol the case bv
the govei nment.
1 he second concei n
! Ci.H is tO PUSh
through then civil
'its suit so ihe tacts
can be brought out in
en court continued
agner.
1 he GJI wants a
special piosecutoi
assigned to the case
because they don't trust
the Justice Department
to bring out the lasts.
��It's the same Justice
Depai i ment who's
agents were involved in
the massacre said
agnei "It's an enor-
mous eov ei up.
"1 think given the
tacts ' - only i
con, lusion I hai ' I t
eo er nment t ound
klansmen and na
ho were willing
ooi the laboi lead
( w P membei - �
A . � ' I II
Local and
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BEST LEGGS CONTEST
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PONY NIGHT - 30C ponies
Free adm. tor ECU students
THURSDAY $1.00 Adm.
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No Hours 3 JO ' 10
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6791
0

t





Site lEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, cju jrrmu
Mike Hughes, hmpi�"
WAVERLY MERRITT, rwmiii nf Atmmmg ClNDY PLEASANTS, SpmmB
Robert Rucks, �� mmm Ernest Conner. ,� �,
PHI! LIP MANESS. Crtdu Vtonaxrr STEVE BACHNER. CMtmbmunt td.lor
Stephanie Groon. cm(M. muw Mike Davis, mmmnmv
W&LP0K�4tig
September 14, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Drinking Age
New Laws Saving Lives
It is possible that the issue of rais-
ing the state's legal drinking age has
already passed its prime. After all,
the local news media haven't even
touched the topic for months.
Nevertheless, the possibility of
North Carolina's drinking age being
upped to 21 is still quite apparent.
Last Feb. 16, The East Carolinian
printed an editorial against raising
the state's legal drinking age. In that
editorial, several points were
brought up arguing the
senselessness of such an action.
Economic setbacks and difficulties
(if not impossibilities) in enforce-
ment, the writer said, would over-
ride any benefits such a law could
produce. Raising North
Carolina's legal drinking age would
be a sham he wrote. "Those who
wish to drink will continue to do
so
Since the initial editorial ap-
peared, however, that writer has
been enlightened by some surprising
� yet by no means startling � in-
formation: the results of a study
conducted by Dr. Alex C.
Wagenaar of the University of
Michigan.
In 1978, the state of Michigan
raised its legal drinking age from 18
to 21. Despite widespread com-
plaints (almost exclusively from
members of that age group), the
state proceeded to record 20 percent
fewer alcohol-related auto accidents
in just one year. In other words, ap-
proximately 1,100 fewer Michigan
drivers aged 18 to 20 were injured or
killed in 1979 than the year before in
auto accidents involving the abuse
of alcohol.
The same basic results held true in
Maine as well, where the drinking
age was increased from 18 to 20 in
1977.
According to Wagenaar's study,
29 states lowered their drinking ages
during the early 1970s in keeping
with the trend of that era. During
that time, however, the number of
alcohol-related accidents rose con-
siderably � up 20 percent in many
Campus Forum
of those states.
But since that time, 18 states have
reversed previous decisions and
have raised the drinking age back to
20 or 21. Maryland and Coimec-
ticut, the two latest states to join
this latter trend, passed such laws
just this past summer.
In North Carolina, Gov. Jim
Hunt appointed a task force
(stemming from his Crime Commis-
sion) last year to study the benefits
of raising the state's legal age to 21.
At the same time, several nation-
wide student organizations had
formed, studying the adverse effects
of similar proposals.
But despite' a recommendation
from the Crime Commission to
raise the drinking age, state
legislators did not adopt any new
legislation on the issue. Instead, the
legislature opted to postpone acting
on any such proposal until a later
date. In fact, Hunt admitted, earlier
this year, that the issue probably
won't even be seriously considered
in Raleigh until the 1983 term of the
N.C. legislature.
Many of those opposed to legisla-
tion calling for the age increase �
especially college students � are
concerned that they will lose a
privilege they already enjoy.
Needless to say, this is a legitimate
concern. However, altrvbtrfcrr
policies vary from state to-state,
most new laws allow for those
already of the legal age (i.e 18 to
20) to maintain that privilege. In
other words, a new law wouldn't
take away a privilege they already
have.
Granted, any new law of this
magnitude must first require proper
implimentation and steady enforce-
ment, which has been lacking in the
state in the past. (Statistics have
shown North Carolina's conviction
rate for drunk-driving arrests is a
mere 50 percent.) But a new law
might make North Carolina's roads
and highways just that much
safer for us all.
HES VERY DEPRESSED,
GET HIS MINI) OFF HIS
TROUBLES
SPORTS OR 4
SOIYlETWNq J

YOU HEAR
THE NFL
ISGQING
STRIKE? S
ECU's Proud Heritage Lives On
Alumni Never Forgotten
"Whatever can go wrong will
Such were the inspiring, mind-boggling
words of the infamous "Murphy Now,
for all we know, "Murphy" is some fast-
talking used car salesman from Ayden who
wears light-blue leisure suits and smokes
tiparillos. Hardly what one might call a
modern day philosopher. But can you
remember how many times that ominous
phrase has actually come back to haunt
you? It's frightening, isn't it? Almost as
frightening as the prospect that Howard
Cosell's daughter is now commentating for
NBC!
The fact is, there are scores of "laws"
that somehow seem to elude the college
curriculum year after year. Yet many are
more directly relevant to everyday life than
93.47 percent of what we're taught in
classrooms. And, strangely enough, many
of these unwritten laws were actually for-
mulated by ECU alumni. Take the follow-
ing, for example:
� O'Reilly's law � "Cleanliness is next
to impossible Nathan O'Reilly of
Dung Heap, N.C, a '71 graduate of the
now-defunct school of waste management,
was a' four-year tenant of Jones dorm.
There, he shared his room with a
500-pound roommate, Moby Taylor, who
was allergic to soap, deodorant and sham-
poo. Nate is still in Greenville, working as
chief cook at several local restaurants.
� Lieherman's Law � "Everybody lies;
but it doesn't matter, since nobody
listens Eric Lieberman was president of
the SGA on campus in 1958. He graduated
that year, moving on to bigger and better
things. In 1981, he applied for the
chancellorship at the University of West
Virginia and hasn't been heard from since.
� Denniston's Law � "Virtue is its own
punishment Alma P. Denniston, a 1943
graduate in home economics, is ECU's un-
challenged record holder for endurance
studying (four years). It has been said that
she never once saw Fifth Street and that
she slept wearing a chastity belt. Alma,
now 60, lives alone in Prudence, Maine,
with her eight neutered dogs, four spayed
cats and a gelding turtle.
� Muir's Law � "When we try to pick
out anything by itself, we find it hitched to
everything else in the universe Gladys
Muir, the former Ethel Muir from Bethel,
never went to East Carolina, but is now in
charge of operations for the ECU Business
Office.
� Clyme's law � "The secret to success
is sincerity. Once you can fake that, you've
got it made Oddly, Ronnie Glymes of
Ankle Deep, N.C , a 1965 business
graduate, was never president of the SGA,
although he once said he was Ronnie
aspired to a career as a campus counselor
but has found plenty of happiness in
Raleigh, where he works as the state press
secretarv for Senator Jesse Helms.
Mike Hughes
Just The Wav It Is
� Creen's law � "Anything is possible if
you don't know what you're talking
about Myron Green, a phys. ed. major
from Home Town. N.C, graduated in
either 1976 or '77, and after a year or so,
enrolled in the "Great Writers School of
Topeka. Kansas, under the direction of
Professor Jake Hemmingway. Since then,
Myron has published two best-selling
books stemming from his days as an ECU
trainer: The Moo oj the Wild and Back-
Breaker Morant.
� Conway's Law � "In any organiza-
tion, there will always be one person who
knows what is going on This person
must be fired Raefield G. Conway Jr. of
Stone's Throw, N.C, earned a bac-
calaureate degree in management in 1980
and took on a job at the ECU bookstore.
Today, he pumps gas at Ned's Exxon in
Ahoskie.
� Lynch's I aw � "When the going get-
tough everyone leaves Beatrice Lynch
of Promiscu City, N.C. a two-vear
veteran of the ECU cheerleading squad
(80-81), is a veritable ECU success storv
After leaving the Pirates in 1981, Beatrice
took to the road and won a cheerleading
spot with the New Orleans Saints, where
she now performs before "even larger,
more enthusiastic crowds
� Stewart's law � "It's easier to gel
forgiveness than permission Orville
"Stu" Stewart oi Hormone, N.C, attend-
ed East Carolina from 1968 to 69 but never
graduated. He was convicted in August
1969 of assaulting a central campus co-ed
and is currently serving time in the Podunk
Countv Jail in Belcher City. He says he
plans to return to Greenville in the spring,
"whether or not my parole comes
through
� Oliver's Law � "No matter where you
go there you are Immanue! Kent
Oliver, a philosophy major from Knee
Deep, N.C. was famous for this and other
profound savings. After graduating in
1978, Oliver travelled to Washington.
DC, where he hoped to "hit the big-
time At present, he is President
Reagan's chief speech writer. He's still
hoping. And finally.
� Hanlon's Law � "Never attribute to
malice that which is adequately explained
by stupidity Agnes Hanlon, of Buck
Pass, N.C, graduated last year with a
degree in adolescent psychology. While ir
Greenville, Agnes' favorite passtime was
watching reruns of The Dave Odom Show.
She is already finding much success in local
government.
Yes, the East Carolina University sue
cess story lives on, even todav, in alumn;
just like these. Alumni, who � belive it or
not � were one day just like us. Let's just
hope we can preserve this fine heritage as
well as thev have.
New Building Would Destroy f Charm' Of Campus Refuge
East Carolina University planners
should reconsider their decision to build
a proposed classroom building in the
beautiful wooded area behind Graham
building, Rawl building and Rawl an-
nex. Although little space for such a
large building is available, ad-
ministrators should carefully consider
other sites � including the area behind
Joyner Library and Mendenhall Student
Center � before destroying the charm
of one of the school's most pleasant
refuges from asphalt, concrete and
brick.
Aesthetic and practical factors
underscore the folly of the proposed
site. A university should provide
students with an environment that
stimulates contemplation and creativity.
The wooded area in question softens the
impact of surrounding buildings and in-
spires persons who care to enjoy it.
One such person was Louis L. Miller,
a landscape architect from New York
City who helped plan the campus in
1908. Miller recognized the importance
of preserving the arboretum area and
other wooded tracts when in 1922, the
school's trustees asked his firm to assist
with an ambitious program of expan-
sion.
Miller told the trustees that he "would
consider it a crime against posterity if in
enlarging your school you encroached
on these premises to the extent of their
destruction Miller urged the trustees
to keep the wooded areas "inviolate for
the joy and pleasure of the students dur-
ing their recreation hours
Even persons who care nothing for
beauty should recognize the practical ad-
vantages of a building site behind Joyner
Library and Mendenhall Student
Center. Traffic congestion probably
would be less troublesome than in the
area around the site currently under con-
sideration. If the classroom building
were built behind the library and student
center � an area already well-endowed
with asphalt parking lots � students'
use of these fine facilities probably
would increase.
Campus officials ought to ponder the
needs of the students and go back to the
drawing board.
Maurice C York
Library Services
1 am writing to protest the current site
for the new classroom building. Certain-
ly there is an alternative to destroying
the last refuge for nature on this cam-
pus. I have seen many early photographs
of our school when the campus abound-
ed with natural spots of beauty (even in-
cluding a lake). Through the years,
aesthetic considerations have given way
to the need for more space for buildings.
There is so little natural beauty left on
our campus. Can we afford to destroy
it?
Our motto during this 75th anniver-
sary period is "ECU: A Past to Build
Upon, A Promise to Fulfill The Sallie
Davis Joyner Arboretum was set aside to
honor our past (as Miss Joyner was one
of East Carolina's original teachers),
and we must fulfill our promise to
preserve this area.
My suggestion for a site would be in
the area behind Joyner Library and
Mendenhall Student Center. Certainly
we could sacrifice one of the blacktop
areas. We need to look into the use of
parking decks instead of wasting much-
needed space with single-level parking
areas.
We must act now to preserve the ar-
boretum while there is still time to
choose another site for the new
classroom building.
Martha Elmore
Library Services
Draft Registration
Both camps in the draft registration
controversy consistently miss or ignore
the basic root issue: Does a government
have any legitimate right to use coercion
against its citizens? To determine this,
we have to look at the basic ethical prin-
ciples that were the foundation of
America, for without a foundation, all
arguments are merely baseless houses of
cards, ponderous mansions which can-
not stand.
The embodiment of the American
ideal rests in the passage "We hold these
truths to be self-evident, that all men are
created equal, that they are endowed
with certain inalienable rights, that
among these are life, liberty and the pur-
suit of happiness I pause here
because this is the founding principle of
the American truth, the atom of the
American creation. But there is more �
the logical extension of this self-evident
truth, to secure these rights, govern-
ments are instituted among men that
whenever any form oj government
becomes destructive of these ends, it is
the right oj the people to alter or abolish
it These extractions are from the
Declaration of Independence, a docu-
ment designed not only to protect the
American people from the tyranny of
foreign governments but also to insure
our safety as individuals from the tyran-
ny of our own government!
We come now to the matter in ques-
tion: TOTegister or not to register? If
you understand and believe in the prin-
ciples that founded America, then you
must also understand that forced draft
registration is clearly not defending
America but is, in fact, destroying it. No
matter what any ethical-contortionist
politician may say, the plain truth is that
a. free country cannot be defended by an
army of slaves. And an army of slaves is
exactly what you will have if you allow a
press gang of Selective Service
bureaucrats to roam the streets on a
search-and-destroy mission. They search
for their willing children, the ignorant
dogmatists whose grasp of ethics is on
the same level as that of a child who gets
burned by a candle and then lives his life
in cold and darkness because he doesn't
dare to think beyond a level of animal
reflex, of brute hatred and fear. They
destroy the men of conscience, the men
who see through the patriotic sounding
phrases, the empty arguments, the bla-
tant hypocrisies and the gutteral threats
� the men who dare to look the beast of
totalitarianism in the face.
Those who see the issue of draft
registration as being merely a conflict
between the pacifists and the war-
mongers fail to see the real enemy. The
real enemy exists in the ever-more in-
trusive tentacles of more government
coercion, more abridgement of an
American individual's right to life, liber-
ty and the pursuit of his chosen hap-
piness. The dry rot of internal subjuga-
tion is surely much more dangerous than
the threat of external invasion.
The American ideals of individual
freedom � of life, liberty and the pur-
suit of happiness � will always be worth
defending but only by truly free men;
only by men who fight, not by the lash
of the whip, but rather because they
know the justice of their cause. Any
government which seeks to compromise
any individual's right to freedom cannot
and must not be defended by
Americans. For then, we will have sur-
rendered to the forces of tyranny
without firing a shot.
Jeffry Scott Jones
Sophomore, English
1






THt EXSTt XROl INI
SEPTEMBER 14. lt$2
I
ou
lent
met
fher
in
ton.
i -
to
ned
I a
ic in
U as
(
:al
isuc-
Imni
it or
Ijust
e as
Exxon Offers Gas Rebate
B BARBARA J.
TYNDALL
Mali VVruer
Paying cash these
days might seem 10 be
more conseratie to
Hime gas customers
than using a credit
card.
The Exvon Comparu
Corporation has
recently introduced
customers vsith a "pay
with cash, get tour-
cents a gallon back"
program.
John Reidy, public
affairs adisor of Exx-
on in Memphis, Term
said in a telephone in-
terview, "The cam-
paign began around
r eburary 1. We wanted
to attract more cash
pa ine customers to the
stations
"A dealer (or station
owner) ha to pay a sur-
charge of three percent
for each credit card
purchase Reidy said.
"Now the dealer has
the election of reducing
the pump price for peo-
ple paying cash instead
of credit. Usual rebates
are four-cents a gallon
but may vary depen-
ding on the station
dealer
Several people of Ex-
xon Stations contacted
by telephone are
already offering the
rebate to cash paying
customers.
"Some of our credit
card users have chang-
ed over to cash said
Mars Robinson of
Briley's Exxon on
Memorial Drive.
"Although we have a
six-cent difference in
price anyway, our
credit card customers
are not paying anymore
than the cash cutomers
in price
Curley McLawhorn
of Curley's Exxon also
located on Memorial
Drive said the rebate to
cash customers "lends
a lot of confusion to
the whole thing. I really
have to watch my 'p's
and q's
However, Exxon sta-
tions are not the only
ones in town using the
'rebate' procedure.
"We started about
two months ago
commented Donnie
Bratton of Bill's
Amoco Service on
Greenville Boulevard.
"We have a credit card
pump and a cash
pump. We've noticed a
reduction in credit card
users since offering the
rebate.
Blount Petroleum
Corporation (Texaco)
started offering the
same type of program
several months ago.
The Greenville Texaco
stations are the only
stations currently under
this trial program.
Some of the Exxon
stations offer the rebate
only at the self service
pumps while others of-
fer it at self-service and
full-service pumps. A
few Exxon stations
have even stopped ac-
cepting credit cards.
Reidy seems to think
Exxon's program will
cause an increase in
competition among
privately owned sta-
tions and the Exxon
stations.
"This has gone na-
tionwide Reidy said,
"and a number of
other gas corporations
have started offering
the same kind of deal
The program was on-
ly recently introduced
to nationwide stations.
take a tip from
Western Sizzlin
biric
with onions and bell
peppers and served
with your choice of
potato So come on in
and follow up on
some good advice at
Western Sizzlin
OJ
C NO. 3
SERXOIJJ
TIPS
with pvpparv
onion
bked potato
or franch frta
uiu toast
V
Located 1 milepast
Hastings Ford on
10th St. extension
Tuesday, Wednesday
& Thursday
POPCORN
SHRIMP
$295
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad may be substituted
for Slaw35t extra
AOVEBTISED ITEM POLICY
Each 0' these advertised items is re-
aj.reo to D 'eadi'y available 'or
saie n es Kroger Sav on e�ceot
as spec c� noted in this ad it we
30 'un out o' a item e arid otter
vOij your choice o" a comparable
Qrr h�n available reflecting the
same savngs or a ramchec hich
e-t tie you to purchase the
adve't'sed tem at the advertised
pr ce wilhin 3C days
DEDICATION
MAKES THE DIFFERENCE
CONCERN
MAKES THE DIFFERENCE
EXPERIENCE
MAKES THE DIFFERENCE
ABILITY
MAKES THE DIFFERENCE
COVERAGE
MAKES THE DIFFERENCE
KNOW-HOW
MAKES THE DIFFERENCE
�lje lEafit
Carolinian
MAKES THE DIFFERENCE
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
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East Carolina University, Greenville, N. C. 27834
(or bring subscription form by office)
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j
-
r
T





THL EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 14, 1982
Parlor Acquires New Flavor
By PATRICK O'NEILL
M�ff Wnln
"How can you not
smile with an ice cream
in your hand said
Jody Fine, an employee
with what many con-
sider the most romantic
ice cream parlor in
town. Heart's Delight.
Fine, an ECU in-
terior design student
has been with Heart's
Delight since it's incep-
tion in 1980.
Recent rumors,
which are still cir-
culating in Greenville
and around campus,
v e r e spread that
Heart's Delight had
closed down. But in ac-
tuality Greenville's
favorite love nest was
only going through a
change in ownership.
Randy Scherr, the
creator of Heart's
Delight has moved on
to Raleigh to spread his
heart of ice cream and
Will Martin of Green-
ille has taken over. "1
want to convey the
same thoughts that
Randy had � it's a
special place said
Martin.
Martin purchased
Heart's Delight from
Scherr because he
didn't want it to close
down when Scherr
made his move. "I
patronied the shop
before 1 owned it
said Martin. "For me it
was an oasis
For some other peo-
ple in Greenville
Heart's Delight isn't
just an ice cream parlor
either. Some even go
there seeking refuge
from their day to day
problems. "It's a place
to get away, it makes
me feel better, said
ECU music student
Susan Baker as she was
eating an ice cream
Sunday. "It's an uplif-
ting spirit, all of it, it's
happiness adds
Baker.
Anyone who's been
to Heart's Delight will
understand why Martin
calls it a
"heartwarming place
Every wall, every
counter, even the ceil-
ing is adorned with
various shapes, sizes,
and variations of
hearts.
Althnough con-
siderably smaller than
Scherr's collection,
Martin has indeed kept
the heartfilled spirit of
the shop alive. "Most
of the hearts have been
given to us by Green-
villians said Martin.
For selected hearts
Martin even offers a
"possible trade off" of
ice cream to his
customers. "It's a
wonderful decor for an
ice cream parlor adds
Fine.
Many of their hearts
came in during Heart's
Delight biggest day �
Valentine's day of
course � when any
customer offering a
heart was given a free
scoop of ice cream.
Scherr claimed it was
the biggest Valentines
day party in the world.
Martin says the tradi-
tion will continue.
"I want people to
know that Heart's
Delight is a place where
they can come and feel
loved said Martin,
who claims his pur-
chase of the shop was a
spiritually guided deci-
sion.
Martin is a Christian
and a member of
Greenville's largest
church, Jarvis
Memorial United
Methodist.
Heart's Delight
customers include
many ECU students
and the families of
ECU employees. "We
have the best customers
in the world, said Fine.
"The people are
wonderful
Fine also touts
Heart's Delight as an
alternative to the party-
ing scene of downtown
Greenville. "People
can come here instead
of going downtown to
have a beer
Customers can
choose from an almost
unlimited combination
of ice cream
"delights 24 flavors
of ice cream and 26
toppings, quips Martin,
borrowing an expres-
sion from Grifton's
Shad Festival, "My
message is 'eat mo' ice
cream.
Bread Visits City
Extra Courses Given
ByPATRKKO'NEILI.
Staff Vt nlrr
The Southeastern
regional staff person
for the national Chris-
tian citizens lobbying
organization, Bread
for the World (BFW)
will be in Greenville to-
day for a community
meeting.
Candice Fair will be
visiting North Carolina
this week to give state
members an update on
the activities of the
organizaton which
works principly on
issues related to
alleviating hunger,
both domestically and
international.
Fair will be isiting
Greenville with state
BFW chairman Kent
Outlaw. Both are here
at the invitation of
anti-hunger activists
from Washington and
Greenville.
BFW uses an usual
lobbying technique
which involves a
number of different
types of ciiien action
including letter
writing, telegrams, and
phone calls to members
ot Congress on kev
legislaton that BFW is
endorsing.
The meeting, which
is open to the public,
will be held at 7:30 this
evening at the Catholic
Newman Center on
10th Street
��Thev (BFW) are
very effective as a lob-
bving organization
said Catholic campus
minister Sister Helen
Shondel! who will be
hosting the gathering
at the center for the
Greenville EC!
Hunger Coalition.
Shondell added tha;
BFW often introduces
sponsors, and lobbies
tor legislation that
their own st a f 1
members have written
Charlotte Hosts Gays
B PATRICK O'NEIL I
The organizers of the
1982 "Miss Gay
America" pageant have
found a new home in
Charlotte. NC.
The national female
impersonation contest
has been plagued by
demonstrations in the
past.
Organizer Michael
Bonner said that
members of the Ku
Klux Klan as well as
anti-gay church groups
showed up to picket
last years affair which
was held in Dallas,
Texas.
Bonner said
Charlotte was chosen
as this year's sight
because of "the
tremendous amount of
interest that has been
shown bv people in
Charlotte
"We want people to
come and see if they
like this kind of art
form, but not to heckle
the contestants said
Bonner. The four-hour
event is set for Sept. 25
at Charlotte's Ovens
Auditorium.
By GREG RIDEOUT
ui�iaai New Mttor
Where can you learn
how to sail, dance, take
pictures and play the
banjo? Give up. Right
here at ECU through
the department of con-
tinuing education.
These courses and
many more are offered
through the depart-
ment's personal
development program.
They are non-credit
and are open to
students, faculty, staff
and the general public.
If you are interested
in dance you can take
beginning ballroom
dancing, intermediate
ballroom dancing,
country western danc-
ing or clogging.
If the beach is your
place then basic sailing
or scuba diving is the
course to take.
There are also classes
in philosophy,
photography, yoga,
German, exercise,
math, mime, com-
puters, investing, real
estate, speed reading
and officiating.
Classes range from
one session to 10 ses-
sions. Starting dates
range from scuba div-
ing on Sept. 14 to a real
estate appraisal
seminar on Nov. 17.
Prices are from $3
for a philosophy course
on retirement to $70 for
the scuba course. The
average price is $30.
A person can register
by going to the division
of continuing educa-
tion, room 203, Erwin
Hall between 8 a.m.
and 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
Registration by phone
or mail is also accep-
table.
Students who are in-
terested can get more
information at the
center or pick up a
brochure at
Mendenhall or call
757-6143.
RESEARCH PAPERS
- � .p . - JfSCteS �srv W me
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TELE.RENTTV
one: 758-9102
2905 East 10th Street in Greenville
Tuesday, Sept. 14 � 8:30-2:00
Adm. $1.00 Bar special all night.
Prizes:
1st �$150 cash
2nd � $75 cash
3rd � $35 cash
Plus a year s tree
pass to the Elbo
Plus a year's free
pass to the Elbo
Plus a year's tree
pass lo the Elbo
Other Prizes from
the followin" Sponsors:
Entries may sign up
at the Elbo or
call 758-4591 weekday
from 10-2
COME
EARLY
PTA Wishing Well
The Cheese House Archie's Steaks
The Treehouse Rest. The Peking Clipper
SEND A BALLOON!
SEND A SMILE!
Choose from an assortment of
latex �nd mylar balloons (Pat-
Man. Snoopy to Smarfette!)
Or mail a balloon la a box!
We'll snip anywhere in
USA � S10.W
Jefferson
Florist, Inc.
West 5th St. Ext.
Near Hospital
752-6195
4
rBlKG CliPPtft
Hair Salon Unisex
With a large number of
ECU students (male & female) as
our customers, we are looking forward
to catering to your every hair care
need. College students of today
demand certain styles that the
PEKING CLIPPER is accustomed to
doing. We stay open Tues. & Thurs.
nights till 9:30 p.m.
Call for appointment at 758-1505
Located 12 mile from ECU at 1005 A Hamilton St
OPEN 24 HOURS DRIVE THRU WINDOW
ALL YOU CAN EAT �
CHICKEN $2.99
(dark meat)
This meal includes Chicken,
Fries, Biscuits &
1 Small Tea (no refills)
4-9 p.m. Mon Tues & Wed.
No Take Outs
1011 Charles Street � 752-1373 1 Block from Campus
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FOSDICK'S
1890 Seafood
231 IS. Evans Street
756-2011
Nightly Specials
Monday - Tuesday - Wednesday
XG&&W0
Angel Flight is an honorary, professional, service
organization of dedicated individuals from leading
colleges across the nation. It is an organization that
works closely with Air Force ROTC, however,
membership in Angel Flight requires no military
obligation. Fun activities are socials, Military Ball,
and being together as a group! There are fun and
rewarding service projects, too, that make you feel
good about yourself. If you're interested in having
fun, Angel Flight is for you I
RUSH DATES TO REMEMBER
Attend 2 out of 3
Tues Sept. 20th, 7:00, Wright Annex, Rm. 201
SUBMARINE PARTY
Wed Sept. 21,7:00, Wright Annex, Rm. 201
ICE CREAM PARTY
Thurs Sept. 22,7:00, Elm St. Park COOK-OUT
Your choice of: Shrimp
Oysters
Flounder
Thursday
Boiled Shrimp, baked potato,
trip to our saladbar
$595
Small Trout Dinner
$2�s
k95 plus
I tax
Friday
Fried Clams
$25
Saturday
Deviled Crab
$295
Coupon
$100
l00 off any meal
Not good toward specials.
Open for Lunch
Sunday Friday
11:00 a.m2:30 p.m.
Open for Dinner
Monday-Sunday
4:30 p.m 9:00 p m







the
DO
TH� t ASTt AROl INIAN
Entertainment
SEPTEMBER 14. 1982 Page 7
Effects Epic
'Blade Runner'
Back For Bow
By JOHN WEYLER
Slaff ntrr
"Sam Spade in the 21st century. "
"It was slow-moving but worth ti,
because there was always someting
to look at. "
' 'I: was very depressing
The above comments are capsule
critiques overheard at a recent Buc-
caneer Theatre showing of one o
this past summer's biggest box-
office disappointments and, at the
same time, best films, Blade Run-
ner. These carelessly-considered and
delivered comments are printed here
because they sum up some of the
most vital aspects of Blade Runner,
one of the most complex, creative,
and challenging movies made in re-
cent years.
"Sam Spade in the 21st century
Blade Runner has all the trappings
of the traditional detective story.
The protagonist is a rugged lawman
living in the underbelly of a big city,
determinedly stalking clues and en-
counterng killers, misfits and
mysterious women. But Blade Run-
ner is set in the future, so fantasy
film fixture Harrison lord is the
detective, rather than riumphrev
Bogart. And instead of tracking
down the Maltese Falcon, Ford is
chasing replicants, renegade flesh-
and-blood robots. These creatures
look, act and bleed just like human
beings, so whenever he blows one
away, which is his job, he is sicken-
ed by it.
" was slow-moving but worth it
because there was always something
to look at Despite the several
quite blood-curdling battles Ford
gets involved in. Blade Runner is
not a Raiderse thrill-a-minute
spectacular. Instead, it is a mostly
low-key and slow-paced film, which
is tine, because that gives the viewer
a chance to grasp the incredible
complexity of the setting. Every
frame is filled to bursting with a
thousand-and-one details about the
world of the future. From the
crowded, decayed streets packed
with street people, punks, and
policemen, to the hi-tech towers of
the pnveleged few, the Blade Run-
ner landscape looks alive and real,
down to the clouds of pollution that
hang over everything.
"It was vcrv depressing The
see 'BLADE Page 9
Harrison I ord stalks a renegade "rephcant" in this scene from Ridley Scott's futuristic earth epic. Blade Runner
Ayden 's Big Day: Two Collards In Every Pot
B MARK KEMP
Miff Wnlrr
Sow every year in the late of summer when the grow-
ing season ends We have a collard festival and
everyone attends There'll be dancing in the streets
while everybody boasts Who's collards arc the biggest
and who can eat the most . . .
From "The Collard Green Song"
Bv Much Bow en, copyright 1982
In this era of scientific technology, video game
madness, and economic unrest, we sometimes tail to
recognize the significance ot the progress of smalltown
folklore. Perhaps it is partly due to our unwillingness to
slow down from our day-to-day impetuous money-
making mentality. Whatever the case may be, it is
refreshing to know the the clean air of community
alliance still exists in those tiny neglected areas once
know as "Hometown, U.S.A
It was 5 p.m. this past Saturday when 1 arrived in
Ayden. The small community road leading into town
was framed bv a row of huge oak trees some of which
gently swayed in the dusty, slightly humid, afternoon
breeze. I had to park my car two blocks back from the
lown square, beside a dingy little fish market which
reeked terribly. The stale stench of raw seafood mingled
:n the late afternoon sun with the festive cotton candy
atmosphere. It would be an afternoon of reminiscence
of childhood innocence.
Above a newspaper stand situated in trout ot the little
market, which held a hundred or so little booklets con-
taining the calender of events scheduled foi the
weekend, was a sign which read, "Welcome to the
Ayden Collard Festival 1 grabbed one ot the little
booklets, stuck it in my back pocket and scuttled on
down the road toward the rackets sounds ol carnival
names and rides, squalling babies, capmatcd children
and chattering adults.
After turning the corner onto the main diag. 1 noticed
that in those small square area ol soil cut into the
sidewalks where most towns beautify the side ol their
streets with bright geraniums or dainty pansies, Ayden
grew collard plants.
"Don't you think you're carrying this thing too far
1 asked a local townsperson concerning their idea ol
decoration.
"We're proud of our collard greens he said, in
defense of the sacred plant. He kicked a rock, creating a
small cloud of dust around our ankles. He looked down
toward one of the smaller, less healthy plants, avoiding
direct eve contact with me, "Bet they ain't many places
in the world grows collard right in the middle of the
town
Old men sat on a brick wall in front of the familiar
small town general stores and markets. Teenagers
gathered in huddles variously situated primarily around
the main stage. The stage itself, built from rough pieces
of light yellow lumber, served as a central focus for the
event. Having already missed the great collard eating
cdntest, I figured that this area had ev ideally been the
site foi it. A Mnall group of young men hurriedly moved
an average sized sound system around on the stage. Ap-
parently, there was going to be music and dance coming
up soon.
The Collard Festival is an event which occurs annual-
ly in Ayden. The townspeople pride themselves on hav-
ing the biggest and the tastiest collard greens in the
world. The festival itself takes place over the course of
three days: usually Friday evening, all day Saturday,
and Sunday afternoon. Saturday afternoon marks the
climax of the festival's events by staging a collard con-
test. The townspeople enter their collard greens in the
contest and the judges decide whose collards are the big-
gest and whose are the best. Afterwards, a group of con-
testants eat as many collards as they can over a period of
thirty minutes. Whoever consumes the most collards,
becomes the year's champion.
Tina, a teenager who grew up in Ayden. expressed her
ideas about the eatin' contest. "I don't like to watch the
contest cause it gets kind of gross. When you get into
the eatin' part it kind of gets � awful
Most of the local townspeople have come to the
festival since its inception eight years ago. Their ideas
about everything from the food to the music to just
plain ol fun often vary. The old time sound of country
music gives a certain atmosphere of tradition to the
event. In addition to the music, there are street dances.
"I think the collid fesvil's jus' faan an old man
erowled, sitting on the wall next to the Ayden Frozen
Foods store. The shuffle of playing cards beckoned him
as he spoke to me. Only the laughter of children, as they
plav their innocent carnival games, eased the sultry pain
until 1 left him free to go back to his business. "Yeah
. 1 kaanuh like 'o watch dah people dance, too � have a
gutaam, ya know
"I like da eatin another chimed in.
"Well, I ain't to good on dah eatin" heeyuh on dah
outside. I rather do most o'mah eatin' at home
See COLLARD. Page 9
Take Five, G.B.
Doonesbury Artist Gets Break
Tired 'Doonesbury' artist G.B. (Garry) Trudeau.
FROM STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS
FAIRWAY, Kansas � G.B. (Garry) Trudeau.
creator of the Pulitzer Prize-winning comic strip
Doonesbury, will take an extended leave of absence
beginning Jan. 2, 1983. John P. McMeel, president of
Universal Press Syndicate, announced today.
"1 need a breather explained Trudeau, 34, in a
telephone conversation from his home in New York Ci-
ty "Investigative cartooning is a young man's game.
Since the industry frowns on vacations, I'll be claiming
a medical leave Trudeau has been producing
Doonesbury for 14 years, 12 of them for daily syndica-
tion.
The specific length of Trudeau's leave was not an-
nounced, but the artist indicated he will resume the
feature by the fall of 1984. "This is simply a lull in the
action. It is not, repeat not, a mid-life crisis
Trudeau said he viewed the time off not only as a
reprieve from the pressure of writing a daily topical
comic strip, but also as an opportunity to reappraise the
characters and review the development of the strip.
"There are a few problems that need to be ironed out.
For almost 15 years, the main characters have been trap-
ped in a time warp, and so find themselves carrying the
colors and scars of two separate generations. It was un-
fair to stretch their formative years to embrace both
Vietnam and preppy Trudeau said.
"My characters are understandably confused and out
of sorts. It's time to give them some $20-haircuts,
graduate them and move them out into the larger world
of grown-up concerns. The trip from draft beer and
mixers to cocaine and herpes is a long one, and it's time
they got a start on it
Trudeau said he would continue his policy of not giv-
ing interviews and would make no further statements
regarding the leave of absence from Doonesbury. All
further questions should be directed to McMeel,
Trudeau said.
McMeel said a press conference would be held at
12:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 9 at his UPS' offices at 4400
Johnson Dr Fairway, Ks. to amplify the Trudeau deci-
sion.
Doonesbury, which currently runs in nearly 700
papers, began with 28 subscribers on Oct. 26. 1970, and
quickly established its reputation for iconoclasm and in-
novation. The only comic strip ever to receive the
Pulitzer Prize, it deftly weaved a cast of engaging,
popular characters against the social and political fabric
of contemporary America. The remarkable success of
the strip brought Trudeau unparalleled attention and
notorietv and a legion of admirers who fervently follow-
ed Michael J. Doonesbury. Joanie Caucus, B.D. and
Uncle Duke through the '70s and early '80s.
No other comic strip has received the attention or has
been pulled from so many new sw papers as Doonesbury.
and Trudeau has had newspaper readers and editors
both praising and damning his work.
Among the most controversial highlights of the comic
strip's history:
� One of the characters gleefully advising that John
Mitchell, Richard Nixdn's attorney general, was
"guilty, guilty, guilty" before the Senate had even
begun its Watergate investigation.
� The introduction of a male homosexual character.
� A scene showing two characters, Joanie and Rick
Red fern, lying in bed. They were not married until five
years later.
� A strip containing a mail-in coupon, in which it
was implied that House Speaker Tip O'Neill was involv-
ed in the Korean scandal. Ten mail bags of coupons ar-
rived at the speaker's office before the post office was
alerted to stop delivery.
� A two-week sequence that suggested California
Gov. Jerry Brown had solicited and received a campaign
contribution from an organized crime figure.
� A week of strips satirizing Sen. John Warner so
enraging Virginia Republican leaders that the GOP
Caucus of the Virginia General Assembly passed a mo-
tion of censure condemning Trudeau.
� A week-long tour of Ronald Reagan's brain, on
the eve of the 1980 election.
Trudeau also plans to use his sabbatical for study and
writing. In the past, he has been a contributor of articles
to such pulications as Harpers, Rolling Stone and The
Mew Republic, and he wrote a daily syndicated column
for 80 newspapers during the 1980 Democratic and
Republican National Conventions.
4SHMNHMffl
t





8 rHE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 14, 1982
Townshend Now Sees Life
With One Set Chinese Eyes
Who onpwriler Kiiilarisl Townshend is free at last. He now devotes his lyrics lo life's meatier conundrums.
By PATRICK ERCOLANO
H�liim.Tr l�iiSan
NEW YORK � Nothing disturbs certain rock
fans more than watching (and hearing) their
heroes grow old. The high energy of rebellious
youth gives away to the mellowed-out restraint of
middle age, and the chagrined followers bellow,
"How dare those guys play like they're 35 not
20?"
How dare they? Well, because they aren't kids
anymore. And if they have any honesty and value
as artists, they will make music that chronicles
their current passage in life. It's a topic worth
considering as the baby-faced stars of two
decades ago slide into their 40s.
Pete Townshend, the guitarist-composer of the
Who and one of rock's monumental figures,
displayed probably more energy onstage and in
the studio than any performer of the 1960s and
early '70s, with the exception of the Who's drum-
mer and ace hotel-wrecker, the late Keith Moon.
Now Townshend is 37, and his writing of late for
the Who and for his own solo albums has become
increasingly laid-back and introspective.
His most recent LP, All the Best Cowboys
Have Chinese Eyes, continues that trend. It suc-
ceeds as solid, enjoyable music and also as a
declaration of Townshend's state of mind after a
recent bout with male menopause.
The album glows with his triumph over two
years of confusion, alcoholism, drug addiction
and separation from his wife and two daughters.
(The cover photo glows too, showing Townshend
looking the best he has in years.)
His binge took him from the rock hangouts of
London to the lazy beaches of Southern Califor-
nia and then to London's high-society clubs. He
kept trying on new images, as he writes in
"Uniforms a song from the new 11 track
record. What resulted was disgust at the trendies
(including Townshend) who conformed to
whatever happened to be fashionable: "1 am
frightened, you are frightened. Should we get our
trousers tightened?"
He also attacks meaningless lifestyles in
"Exquisitely Bored" ("in California"),
"Communication "Stardom in Action" and
"Somebody Saved Me In the latter.
Townshend himself is that "somebody. H
sings of waking up "clean" from his anguished
two years, while "my friend" the termer
boozing, confused, thr.ll-mad Townshend
"stone dead . h
His saving grace is love. He realizesthat with
his family and the basic goodness ins.de hirmeh
he has all he needs. He sings in "Slit Skirts, ine
album's shimmering finale, that one doni
"have to be drunk to try a new dance n
aren't we thinking up romance0 W h can I we
drink it up, true heart romance0
So forget the image-seeking described
"Uniforms In "Stop Hurting People.
writes, "Love conquers poses Loe mao
stances. Love crushes angles into black '
loved ones he had let down - especially his wife
� he sings, "May 1 be matched with ou again 1
know the match is bad, but God help me
Without your match there is no flame '
Old Who fanatics will no doubt decrs the lack
of explosive energy in the music. The powe
chords and the frenetic drums are at a
minimum here. Townshend is more concerned.
as he was on his last solo album, with
rangements that are "tasteful" (his
choosing to let loose only during sections of
few songs.
Giving first-class support to his ocah. guitar
and synthesizers are drummers Mark Brz� �
and Simon Phillips and bassist Ton B
Virginia Astley, Peter Hope-Eans. Jo
Linscott and Chris Stainton add instrumental
help on a few cuts.
As for the album's strange title. Townshend
explained in a magazine interview that "All
Best Cowboys Have Chinese Ees" means I
you can't hide who you are � in other words,
personality of even the most macho cowboy
be discerned in his eyes.
This new LP indicates that Townshend
through hiding who he really is. "Can't prel
that growing older never hurts he -
Granted, it hurts, but he has decided to overcome
it and become that rarity of rarities, a rock n
cian who ages gracefully.
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led
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CoHard Festival
Carries History
Into The Present
Continued From Page 7
As 1 walked through the conglomeration of
carnival rides and cotton candy stands, I noticed
a hint of historical reality. A railroad track divid-
ed the main stage, the old men, and the endless,
yet short row of stores, from the rides, the games,
and the children. The railroad distinguished old
from new, the old section of town from the new
section, and the young from the aged.
Ayden contains history, and the Collard
Festival attempts to carry the history into our
technological present. Even the ominous screech
of southern racism is almost buried during this
festive time of metamorphosis in nature. "It's a
wonderful community activity someone
assured me. "a time for good clean fun There's
hope in the innocence of Ayden's Collard
Festival, a hope that cries for understanding.
As 1 strolled on back toward my car, a small
whirlwind of dust gathered a few feet ahead of
me. 1 noticed a group of people congretating on
the top floor of the town hall. Standing at a win-
dow overlooking the main stage, they waited.
And as 1 walked slowly away, playful words of
hometown pride garnished the air in song, as
former Aydenite, Mitch Bowen, sang:
"Now judging time is growing near as the folks
all gather round One judge hollers, 'Looky
here, this head weighs seven pounds The
mayor does the honers, 'First prize to Mrs.
Brown Cause next to Harvey's Junkyard
that's the biggest mess in town . . .
'Collard Greens, Collard Greens, the purtiest
plant my hometown's ever seen So, if you're
into black-eyed peas and you like butter-
beans Then come on down to Ayden Town and
eat some Collard Greens. . .
"I don't mean spinach . .
'Blade Runner
Continued From Page 7
world of Blade Runner is millions of light years
away from the sanitized Star Trek future, full of
bright, high hopes for the human race. Blade
Runner's cityscape is grim, gritty and often
disgusting, akin to the people who inhabit it.
There are no nice folks in this film: Ford's
disturbed detective is really no better or worse
than superior-grade replicant Roy, played b
Rutger Hauer with all the Nordic nastiness he
displayed in this summer's TV biography of Nazi
leader Albert Speer.
A few rays of light do manage to penetrate the
polluted gloom, however, Ford falls in love with
a beautiful replicant, well-played by Sean Young,
a being he is instructed to destroy. Likewise,
Hauer's character's man-made humanity sur-
faces in a crucial scene with Ford. Blade Runner
ponders the perplexing riddles of life, death and
what it means to be human, and ends on an affir
mative note.
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SEPTEMBER 14, 1982
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
st til MHt k 14. ivk;
Pesky Pirates Suffer Narrow Loss
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Sport I- dilor
"We won the statistics battle but
lost the war That's how head
football coach Ed Emory described
Saturday night's heartbreaking loss
against N.C. State.
If any team has ever exemplified
raw determination and the desire to
win at its highest level, the Pirates
did in its season opener at Carter
Stadium in Raleigh.
Despite such admirable
characteristics, however, the Bucs
came up short � barely short, that
is.
After four quarters of interceptions,
receptions and first downs. State
edged out rivaling ECU, 33-26.
Emory, who was bitterly disap-
pointed by the loss, believed
wholeheartedly that the Pirates
would come out on top.
"We came into this game believ-
ing we would win and win by two
touchdowns he said after the
game. "1 bleed inside for East
Carolina, for Ed Emory and for
these young men. We just came up
short when we thought we could do
it
The Pirates hopes were finally
dashed in the last few minutes of the
fourth quarter. After an on-sides
kick. Heath recoered the ball for
ECU, but Greg Stewart's pass was
then intercepted by State's Perry
Williams.
The side effects of an opening
game proved to be ECU's main
stumbling block. Poor judgments,
mental errors and mistakes on play
assignments were three reasons why
Emorv felt the Bucs faltered behind.
But these problems can easily be rec-
tified. "If we correct our mistakes-
misjudgments by our quarterbacks,
poor blocking at the corners and
mental errors by the secondary he
said, "we could have been
devastating
But looking at the statistics, the
good surely outweighs the bad.
ECU held State to just 90 yards
rushing, compared to ECU's 191.
The defensive team was also respon-
sible for five quarterback sacks.
Offensively, the Pirates com-
pleted nine passes (one more than
State), rushed for 233 yards and had
21 first downs. N.C. State, on the
other hand, rushed for only 133
yards and had 17 first downs.
Besides the mishaps of a first-game
showing, the Pirates had a touch of
a color that has not been isible in a
good while. And it wasn't the new
uniforms either.
The Pirates "I" formation led the
team to a total o 366 yards in the
opening game and brought forth a
new style of play that was exciting to
watch.
The Bucs came out ready to pla.
with defensive end Jody Schulz
sacking State's Tol Aery during the
first two minutes of play.
Unfortunately, the Woltpack
slowly began to control the game.
After State's Eric Williams blocked
John Williams' punt, the Wolf pack
gained possession o the ball on the
49-yard line.
That's when runningback Joe
Mclntosh made his move(s). A very
connected a 12-yard pass to Mcln-
tosh and with two 15-yard penalties
against ECU, the Woltpack wound
up on the 10-yard line.
One penalty was tor roughing the
passer and the other tor for defen-
sive clipping, faking advantage ol
the situation, Mclntosh ran up the
middle to score the first TD of the
game.
After three first downs and ten
plays, the Pirates moved the ball
down the field to the 54-yard line in
4:10. ECU freshman kicker Jet!
Heath, apparently unnerved by the
55,200 people seated around him,
kicked a 37-yard field goal to put
the Pirates on the board.
The ball once again in State's
possession and in the hands of
Mclntosh, ECU's Steve Hamilton
caused the runningback to fumble.
After strong safety Smokey Norris
recovered the ball, the Pirates
regained control at the 24-yard line.
Ereshman Tony Baker ran for
seven yards and quarterback Greg
Stewart gained five more to position
ECU kicker Heath on the the
13-yard line. Heath went on to kick
a 22-yarder, putting the Bucs only
one behind of State, 7-6, at the end
of the first quarter.
Almost halfway into the second
quarter, the Pirates were within in-
ches of getting a first down. After
measuring up. State regained
possession. A 17-yard pass from
A very to Foster gave the Wolf pack
a first down.
Following an interference penalty
against ECU, State moved from the
29 to the 16-yard line. After five
consecutive carries, Mclntosh ran
for 16 yards, landing State on
ECU's three-yard line. With 7:58
remaining, A very ran down the mid-
dle and dove in the endzone to
score. A kick by Rick Cofer put the
Wolfpack ahead, 14-6.
The persistent Pirates retaliated,
driving all the way to the 23-yard
line. Heath then missed a 40-yard
field uoal that was just wide to the
left.
But the Bucs weren't finished just
yet. After Stewart's 52-yard bomb
to Norwood Vann and a face mask
penalty against State, the Pirates
were positioned on the 10-yard line.
Stewart then completed a three-vard
pass to Ricky Nichols, making the
score now 14-12 in State's favor.
The Pirates went for two extra
points, but Stewart fumbled with
1:22 left in the second half.
Only a few minutes into the third
quarter, Avery completed three
passes in a row for 40 yards, in-
cluding an 18-yard pass to Rickv
Wall in the endzone. Cofer's kick
was good, making the score, 21-12
In an eight-minute span, the
Pirates drove 84 yards. Ingram,
now facing a third down and 11
vards left to go. rail foi 1 3 vards to
score the next I I) n incomplete
pass in the two point plav left the
sorc at 18-21.
Aftei a couple ol punting s
changes and a field goal kick
Rukv c ofer, State gained a slight l
larger lead, 1 24.
I rom the -� Mine. A then
threw : 54 nc arn-
left back Rukv Wall 5
point attempt �a no
. w.ts sacked bv Rot R
With Stewa back in the ga
the Woltpack
set PIKXI1 S Pag 11
Head Coach Kd Fmorv and linebacker coach B�b Candors talk with an
unidentified El I plaver during saturdav night's game against V(
state.
Avery Leads Wolfpack Win
Phi.i R, !� u ilium.
Pirate QB Kevin Ingram gets sacked by Wolfpack opponents.
B KEN BOLTON
wtoiini xporis 1 dilor
After the scoreboard lights had
been turned off and the 55,200 fans
had left the stadium, N.C. State
head coach Monte Kiffin looked as
if he had just been through a battle.
And what a battle it was. The
Wolfpack had to pull out all the
stops in order to beat a determined
ECU team 33-26. Quarterback Tol
Avery and tailback Joe Mclntosh
were the leaders for the State of-
fense as the Wolfpack amassed 272
total yards.
Avery threw a pair of touchdown
passes to former Raleigh Broughton
High School star Ricky Wall, as well
as a 42-yard bomb to Ken Jenkins
that set up a field goal. Avery also
scored on a key fourth-down play at
the ECU one-yard line in the second
quarter.
Mclntosh was the game's leading
rusher with 118 vards and he scored
the game's first touchdown. After
averaging"TTve'waffd ohe-TiaTF vards
per carrv last week in the opener
against Furman. Mclntosh had to
work much harder against the
Pirates as he was only able to
average three and one-half vards
each time he carried the ball.
The ECl defense made the
greatest impression on Kiffin, as he
stated in his post-game press con-
ference. "1 hope we don't plav
anyone this year with a tougher
defense than East Carolina said
Kiffin. They hit you, and it seems
like all of a sudden there's ten guvs
all over you
The game, which was lull o big
plays and sudden turnarounds, was
played in front of the second larges:
crowd ever at Carter in lev
Stadium. There were main plavs
that resulted in bie eains as well as a
blocked punt b v- . . tnd a suc-
sessjul oxides kick b ECl
E l held the yarda
in the first 103 55 in rush
and S4-44 in passing. Bv the end I
the game, the Pirate- impiled
366 total va:d- compared to State's
22 total yards EC I �,is abk
sustain lengthy drives as shown bv
their advantage time posses
sion - 34:12 to 25:48
The Pirates I Is I .
trying to contain Mclntosh, the
ACC's leading rushei and Rook
Of I he Nca: .as- season. 1 though
lie gained 118 vards. it took hire
caines to get it. Kiffin showed his
appreciation after the game. "Joe
took some hard hi out tl .
tonight he said. It he ain't sore,
he ain't human
Kiffin pointed out that the
Wolfpack passing game d ot
their running game at this point,
Aver and WaJI, w
i
veai
;
1 O:
ta id � V . w .
reat c itc
hen con a I (
i � t t
Kiffin was .nip-essed
" I hev 're a much nan
the last two ears 1 t nor
offensive threat and s ol sp
on defense 1
ffens
balance
Next week i e V - .�
VCC schedule h
enu he v ak t oi esi
Deacons and s will ji
their ho
nessee sIa Ie
Pirates To Take The Positive Approach
A crowd of 55,200 fans gathered
at Carter Stadium last Saturday
night to witness the meeting of two
rivals � N.C. State and ECU.
In a torrid game that left the
Wolfpack just one touchdown
ahead, the Pirates certainly have
nothing to be ashamed of. None of
us can imagine the disappointment
the ter.m and coaches must have felt
after countless hours of preparation
seemed somewhat worthless.
But ECU's opening game was
hardly worthless. The Pirates prov-
ed to thousands just how well they
can move the ball and their ability to
run the new I-formation. Yes,
mistakes were made. But mistakes
can be alleviated.
And that's exactly what Emory
intends to do. "We gave up too
many big plays on defense and it
killed us he said Offensively,
we played well enough to win. Giv-
ing up five big plays and the blocked
punt killed us. Add three intercep-
tions that we threw and we just gave
them too much for us to expect to
win
The head coach said the loss to N.
C. State is just a "temporary set-
back" and is looking ahead.
"We're going to take the positive
things out of the game and go for-
ward he said. "We're not going
to dwell on N.C. State and we hope
our fans won't. We're just going to
get better and better
After Saturday night's game,
there should be no doubt in
anyone's mind that the Pirates are
going to be one heckuva team and a
darn good one too.
EVERYWHERE BIT THE
SCOREBOARD "We kept the ball
for 20 more plays than N.C. State
and kept the football for nearly nine
more minutes on offense Emory
said. "We beat them just about
every place but on the scoreboard
OFFENSIVE SHUFFLE! ECU
quarterbacks Greg Stewart and
Kevin Ingram alternated the posi-
tion in Saturday night's game, keep-
ing State bewildered and off-
balanced. When asked if the Pirates
would continue such a strategy,
Emory said, "Stewart is still our
number one quarterback he said.
"If Ingram will come on as far as
assignments and execution, we will
have excellent standing at that posi-
tion
drilled two out of three field goals
and put four kickoffs into the end-
zone.
PLAYERS OF THE WEEK The
football coaching staff has chosen
offensive guard Tom Carnes and
defensive tackle Steve Hamilton as
"Players of the Week" for their
performances in the N.C. State
game. According to Emory, Carnes
played his finest game ever since be-
ing at East Carolina. Carnes. a 6-5,
264-pound senior, wound up with
366 yards in total offense.
Hamilton forced State's Mclntosh
to fumble in the season opener and
was also responsible for a quarter-
back sack.
21 IN DEFENSE Holding the
Wolfpack to only 90 yards offen-
sively, the Pirate defense is ranked
21 in the NCAA in rushing defense.
In Division 1. the team is ranked 33,
ha nit: yielded 272 va: ds
SAT! RDAY'S GAM 1 he
Pirates will go up against 1 as; len-
nessee State I mversity this Satur-
day night at 7 p.m. 1 he Pirates beat
the Buccaneers last year, 66-23, in
the homecoming game. "1 think
lasi yeai s ef-
fect on
: oi v sa d "Bui :
beat themsc .
� 'vc got some qua es I
know because we
tew ol them to pla � ' is I don't
expect anyth ke la
pen
Veteran Ready For 'New' Season
Cindy Pleasants
mt A Look Inside
SHOTGUN? The Wolfpack
defense got an unexpected surprise
from the Pirates last week, along
with thousands of fans. ECU fell
back on the shotgun formation dur-
ing the third quarter of Saturday's
game. In a fourth and one situa-
tion, the Pirates came up only in-
ches short of obtaining a first down
while using the old reliable set-up.
FRESHMEN EXCELL ECU
tailback Tony Baker, a freshman
from High Point, ran for 59 yards
and touchdown while making his
debut against N.C. State. Jeff
Heath, a Virginia Beach native,
By KEN BOLTON
Auisltnl spore. Editor
With newly-acquired Charlie
Harrison taking over as head
basketball coach, the 1982 ECU
men's basketball team is looking
forward to improving last year's
record.
And through the efforts of
players like Mike Fox, this year's
squad should be very competitive.
Fox, a 1980 graduate of Raleigh's
Sanderson High School, is in the
midst of an extensive preseason con-
ditioning program along with the
rest of the team.
Earlier this year, Fox discussed
some of last year's team problems
with a reporter from The News and
Observer, an interview he was not
pleased with. "Caulton Tudor (N &
O reporter) stretched a lot of facts
and printed some things the way
that I didn't mean them Fox said.
As Fox puts it, last year's team
had some problems, but they were
problems that every team has. "Our
situation last year wasn't that bad
he said. "We just didn't do well
towards the end of the year
After completing a successful
high school career at Sanderson,
Fox accepted ECU's scholarship of-
fer over other area schools Accor-
ding to Fox, his main reason for
selecting ECU was because of the
opportunity to get a degree from the
ECU School of Business.
As a junior with a double major
in business administration and com-
puter science, Fox was impressed
with the ECU business department.
"1 wanted to go into business, and I
felt that the accredited business
school here would offer more than
some of the smaller schools Fox
stated. "Also, this would be my on-
ly chance to play basketball for a
Division-1 school
While growing up in Raleigh, Fox
was involved in swimming as wciI as
basketball. "I had been into
organized swimming since 1 u.h
nine years old Fox said "In the
tenth grade. 1 realized that I was go
Mike Fox
ing to have to give up either swimm-
ing oi basketball, so l d to
take up basketball full I
v uh the official first da ol prac
tice scheduled tot Octobei 15. the
players are now participating in a
conditioning program along with
strength coach Mike Gentry. This
conditioning program includes run
ning ever) Monday and Thursday
and lifting weights every Tuesday,
Wednesdav and Friday. In ail.
there's something going on from
tour to six even dav
With an extremely tough 1982
schedule, the Pirates will have to put
in a lot of hard hours in prepara-
tion vervthing is looking good so
tar. Everybodv is getting along well
and we're all looking forward to the
first game
The first game ot the sCason is
scheduled tor November 27, when
the Pirates will take on the Duke
Blue Devils at Durham.
I
I

?
f





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 14. 1982
11
e!
Freshman Pirate
Adapting to Crowd
ECU SPORTS INFORMATION
It's pretty rare these days for a
freshman to start at tailback for a
Division-1 college football team
But Tony Baker did just that Satur-
day night.
The 5-10, 164-pound freshman
from High Point was impressive in
his debut game as he rushed tor 59
ards on 15 carries. He also scored
on a 3-yard touchdown sith 2:45
left in the game that cut the margin
to seven points. Adding his two
kickoff returns which netted 46
yards. Baker led the team in all-
purpose rushing with 105 yards.
"Baker really played well runn-
ing back coach Spencer Prescott
states. "I think he's a real tough
kid. He doesn't make many
mistakes. He's got a lot of
character, and he sure doesn't pla
like a freshman
Baker, an all-state, all-conference
high school star, earned starting
rights after Jimmy Walden, the ex-
pected starter, suffered a severe
knee sprain. Baker was worried
about being accepted by the fans,
coaches and his teammates before
the game last Saturday night.
"1 know I have to prove myself
Baker says. "I'll have a little bit of
pressure to hold onto the ball.
Maybe they feel 1 can't take it, but I
can. The hardest thing to adapt to
will be the crowd
Baker, who gained over 1600
ards as a high school senior, is
iooked upon by Prescott as a player
with a big future in football. "He
has great speed says Prescott.
"He gets through the hole faster
than anybody else
His speed is highly sufficient; his
biggest problem is his weight.
"Although he's not very big
Prescott notes, "he goes after
everything hard. Tony Dorsett
weighed 165 pounds as a freshman
starting at Pitt, so you can't use
weight as a criteria for ability
fcCU's Greg Stewart In An Aerial Attack
Pholu B� l��c Wllluim
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Pirates Come Close
Continued From Page 10
sacking the quarterback before in-
tercepting a pass intended for
Carlton Nelson.
In a fourth down situation on the
24 yard line, Cofer kicked a 41-ard
field goai. upping State's lead,
33-18.
With less that three minutes re-
maining, Stewart began his aenel at-
tack by throwing a 4S-ard pass to
Nelson. Baker, who finished uith 59
yards, ran two yards to score ECU's
last touchdown. Stewart's pass to
Nelson gave the Pirates two extra
points, leaung the Pirates only
seven points behind the Wolfpack.
ixs:�f.t:n� St sialr
: o
t as! 1 artthna
Punting
( umKrv 1 OSI
Penalties
14 80
6 42 5
-l
1 70
666 � - 26
7 77 12-33
coring
s s Mclmosh, ll run (Cofei kick)
E It. Heath 7
It It. Haiti 22
M s Acts. I 'up. (Cofet kick)
It Nichols, pass Horn Stewart irun tailed)
t s Wall, 18 pass from Avcry (Cofer kick)
It Ingram. P run tpass tailed)
vt s FC Cofer 35
Si s U h nj, 'rim f' pA tailed)
St s lii ofei 4!
I t Hake T un (Nelson pass trom Ste�ar.)
'
Individual statistics
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i
t





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 14, 1982
The referee's raised hands
indicate a six-pointer, but the
question is for which team? A
jumbled mass of heads and
legs congregate in the end zone
but forget the most important
thing, the ball. Fortunately,
that score was for the Bucs,
although, in the end, they still
fell short of the Wolfpack,
33-26.
Soccer Team
Wins, 6-3
Phmn B l.m Pillrnon
1M Program Offers Variety
B PATRICK O'NEIL
�Muff Wriiir
In 1975 Dr. Wayne
Edwards was hired by
East Carolina Division
of Student Life as
ECU'S first full time
director of Intramural-
Recreational Serices.
1 oda as Edwards
begins his eight years at
ECU, the program ap-
pears to be nothing less
than a rousing success.
Edwards and his
associate director Ms.
Nancy Mie now hae a
staff of three other
assistant directors as
well as tour graduate
assistants directors.
Together these 9 peo-
ple, along with another
estimated 200 student
personel hired to assist
the statt, provide ECU
students, faculty, and
statt with over fifty ac-
tivities to choose from.
You name it, the have
it - bowling and bad-
minton to armwrestling
and tobacco spitting.
"It's almost impossible
for a student to not
find something they
like here said Ed-
wards.
Besides her im-
mediate responsibilities
as associate director to
Edwards, Mize also
coordinates the in-
tramural sports pro-
gram. That includes
mens. womens, and co-
recreational programs.
She also coordinates
publicity and supervises
the graduate assistants.
Each of the three
assistant directors also
hae specific program
responsibilities. Pat
Cox handles the infor-
mal recreation, out-
door recreation, equip-
ment check out, and
reservations for time
limited activities.
Some of the informal
recreational activities
include swimming, free
pla at memorial gym,
and use of the weight
rooms. Equipment ren-
tal is available for
students, faculty, and
staff. Among the items
available for rental on a
daily, weekend, or
weekly basis include
tents, backpacks,
canoes, paddles, life-
jackets, car carriers,
stoves, cook sets, and
sleeping bags.
Bob Fox, another
assistant director is
responsible for ECU's
sport club programs as
well as supervising all
student personel.
Presently East Carolina
has nine recognized
sport club activities.
They include held
hockey, frisbee, gym-
nastics, martial arts,
rugby, womens soccer,
surfing, team handball,
and water polo.
1 ast year the in-
tramural program hired
a record 205 students
for various jobs in-
cluding sports of-
ficiating, ahtletic train-
ing, receptionists, jour-
nalists, editors, artists
photographers, and
isntructors. Fox
oversees the recruiting,
hiring, training, and
paying of all student
employees.
I ast year student
employees with the in-
tramural division
received over SI00,000
in salaries for their
work. "We're vrv
pleased that a large
percentage of our
budget goes back to
students over 25 per-
cent of our total budget
is in thestudent wage
catagory said Ed-
wards.
Ms. Jamie Moul is
the third assistant
director. Moul is coor-
dinator of the spots
medicine program.
ECU's sports medicine
program is one of only
three such programs in
the nation.
According to Ed-
wards the Sports
Medicine program pro-
vides "immediate first
aid care at many in-
tramural activities
The program also of-
fers sports injury
rehabilitation help, use
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of the sports medicine
room which provides
preventive taping,
whirlpool baths, heat
packs and other first
aid. "We have two cer-
tified athletic trainers
to admnister this pro-
gram said Edwards.
Moul is on of them and
graduate assistant
Denis Neveux is the
other. Marsha Miller,
Dan Went, and Vickie
Brownell are the other
graduate assistants.
ECU's intramural
program also has a
wide range oj activities
for handicapped
students. Look in
Thursdays edition Jor
Part II oj the in-
tramural story.
Avenging last year's
surprising 4-0 loss, the
ECU Soccer Team
outscored Christopher
Newport College Sun-
day in their first game
of the 1982 season to
capture a 6-3 victory.
In the first half,
Pirate Bill Merwin
kicked a successful
penalty kick, and Mark
Hardy also scored, giv-
ing ECU a 2-1 halftime
lead.
The Pirates increased
their total early in the
second half, when
Brian Winchell scored.
Mike Swann followed
with a goal assisted by
Dennis Elwell.
Danny Whellen and
David Skiffington add-
ed the Pirates two final
goals.
Christopher
Newport's man-of-the-
hour was Vick Kawan-
trenz, whose hat trick
accounted for the
team's only scoring.
"One of the reasons
we won was because we
knew the team Head
Coach Bobbie Church
said. "We had more
patience; and there was
the revenge motive
Church said that go-
ing into last year's
game against Newport,
the Pirates were quite
confident of victory,
which made their upset
loss that much more
difficult to swallow.
Church added that
he was very pleased
v th the team's play,
including the perfor-
mances of his
freshmen, who saw
plenty of action.
There were,
however, defensive
lapses, the coach said,
although he plans to
work on those this
week.
On Friday, the
Pirates host Pfeiffer
College, Church's alma
mater. Game time is set
for 5 p.m.
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 14, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 14, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.214
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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