The East Carolinian, September 9, 1982






5tou
(Earaltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.6
1 hursday, September 9, 1982
Greenville, NX.
14 Pages
Circulation 10.(MM)
Area Behind Rawl To Be
Destroyed By New Building
B MIKEHAMER
"�l�ff Unler
One of the few remaining wooded
areas on campus will be gone uhen
construction begins on the new arts
and sciences building.
The building, which will be the
largest on campus w hen completed.
is set to be located in the area behind
the Graham building. Raul building
and Raul annex
According to Chancellor Howell,
interviewed on Inday. the decision
to construct this building was made
in the spring of 1982. A request tor
the mone to construct the building
will be submitted to the next state
legislative session. "It the economy
is good then out chances are good
sa:d Howell.
The new building will be con-
structed because ol overcrowding in
some o: the departments in the �
lege ot Arts nd Sciences.
Charles Kaanaugh. preside ol
the Greenville Area Preservai i
Association has registered
� easure � er the location ot tru
new building.
Contacted a: his home las! week,
Kavanaugh sa.d. "There oueht to
be a place on campus where people
can be peaceful and can relax
Kavanaugh deplored the fact that
one of the last natural environmen-
tal areas on campus would be lost.
According to Angelo Volpe, dean
of the College ol Arts and Sciences,
the new building will be a little
larger than Brewster Building. It
will be three stories high. The
English, foreign languages and
literature, school of business, and
business education departments will
be moved to the new building
Volpe said that the architect was
very conscious ot the trees there and
will tr to preserve the wooded
nature of the area. "The Gazebo
will not be touched Volpe said on
Friday.
1 he parking lot toi the new
building will have two more parking
spaces than the existing parking lot
(by the steam plant) has currently.
Volpe said thai the building will,
however, be accessible to existing
pat kini ts on campus.
Vince Bellis, .in instructor in the
biology deprtment, said last week
that the campus would be losing its
largest willow tree, possibh its only
elm tree, and one of the largest oaks
on the campus - all of which provide
shade for that area.
Christine Helms of Greenville
said that when she came to ECU in
1940 the wooded area in question
was part of the Sally Davis Joyner
Arboretum. The arboretum extend-
ed over to where Rawl and Rawl an-
nex are now located. "This area was
to be left untouched she said,
"but at the time the college had 1400
students. No one had any idea of the
growth that was coming
According to Howell there had
been some discussion about locating
the new building in the area of the
parking lot behind the library, but
the university would have needed to
buy some lots there, and some dif-
ficulty was anticipated in purchas-
ing these lots.
Rudy Alexander, director of
Mendenhall Student Center, had ex-
pressed a desire in the early planning
stages that some classrooms be built
closer to Mendenhall so that the stu-
dent union would get maximum
usage.
Concern was also expressed that
the location of the proposed
Photo By SCOTT 148SC
No More Trees
This area behind the Rawl Annex and Graham building Hill soon be gone if a proposed new liberal arts
building is constructed. The area has long been one of the more beautiful spots on campus.
building would increase the amount
of traffic on the eastern side ot cam-
pus. Volpe stated that since the
departments going into the new
building are already located on the
eastern part of campus, no signifi-
cant increase in traffic is anticipated
there.
According to Bellis the crux ot the
matter is in how steps can be taken
to preserve the valuable things on
campus. Bellis mentioned that other
universities ;n the state system, � .
as UNC Wilmington and I C
Asheille. have arboretums. and he
feels that ECU should have one
also. "It behooves us to be proud of
the phvsial aspect of the campus
he said last week "What are our
priorities, and how do we take s'eps
to preserve the valuable stufl
Black Representation Lacking On City Council
B MIkr HAMER
staff � rim
though the 1980 census reveal-
ed that there are 23,386 whites in
Greenville and 10,799 blacks, there
are current! no blacks on the
Greem ille Cit) c ouncil.
Greenville, like n am cities in the
state, hoids "at large" elections
whereby the six candidates receiving
the most votes are elected 1 the six
seats nd in the fall
I 'Vs' � � �. tions, there were no
acli ?cted t he cit. council.
In a ake 't ;n:s election, a
Mav ir's I lection Study Committee
was appointed to investigate alter-
ttive methods ol electing city of-
:ials, s that black citizens would
b represented m city government.
The committee's mandate read as
follows: "We need to consider alter-
native methods of electing city of-
4 :ials in order to ensure the
representation ol minorities within
the citv and to be sure that, in the
event ol annexation, the voting mix-
is maintained to keep the
tice Department out of the issue.
rhe related issue of staggered terms
is another matter for consideration,
rhe committee has the task to in-
vestigate alternative methods and
deve op proposals tor elections pro-
cedures with the above in mind
The committee met several times
between December and June, 19X2.
I he committee also met with
Tinsley Yarbrough and I om Eamon
ol the political science department
to revieweadvantages and disadvan-
tages ol district election plans, at-
large election plans, and staggered
terms for electing council members.
Contacted in his office last week.
Eamon commented thai it Green-
ville had a �ard oi a district system,
the city would be assured ol having
a black representative. He added
that under the present at-large
system, Greenville has had as many
as two black representatives at one
time.
1 he committee gave its report to
the Greenville Citv Council in late
July. It concluded that the city of
Greenville needs to consider a dif-
ferent process ol electing its city
council members.
In the words ot the committee,
"This conclusion is based upon the
need to involve all citizens in the
decision-making process of
municipal government. The intent
ol this statement is not to imply that
the current system excludes select
groups of citizens from the decision-
making process, but to assert that
more people geographically will be
involved in the 'decision-making'
process if a district at-large system
is implemented
The committee's report stated
that it felt it imperative that there be
black representation on the council.
The report added that some types of
election methods that include
district representation assure this
and would "provide a voice for the
black population of Greenville
Contacted late last week, Mayor
Percy Cox said, "I intend to do
something to get some black
representation on the council He
added that, "I find having no black
representation on city council to be
a handcicap
Cox mentioned that he is per-
sonally in favor of a district system
with four districts having one
elected member from each district
and two members elected at large.
Wednesday, Cox and council
member Janice Buck traveled to
Columbia, Mo to study the ward
system being used by that communi-
ty. Cox explained that Columbia is
similar in size to Greenville, and was
in a similar political and economic
position to Greenville 20 years ago.
At that time the town set down a
plan for 20 years.
"Greenville ought to be working
toward a similar plan Cox said.
Cox added that he hopes to return
with a working plan.
Donovan Phillips, who served as
chairman of the election study com-
mittee doubts that the at-large
system will assure black representa-
tion. He personallv favors four
precinct representatives and two
seats at-large. "1 doubt that am
system would work it the eled rate
doesn't get out and vote Phillips
said. "The problem he added, "is
how to get tolks out to vote, i Ile
government has to be responsive to
the people andlnvolve people in the
government � it needs to capture
folks' imagination. People don't
care enough
Buck, mayor pro-tern, said in an
interview that she leans towa I
ding another council memb
having all the elections at-large
"On council issues she
"the mayor would possibly end up
noting on more issues to break a
tie
Buck expressed uncertainty regar-
ding the issue of ha ing longei t
'or ciiv council members. S :
say, however, that she felt I
pointments to the various city
boards and commissions
change every two vears.
"Board work is hard work she
iaid, "and you need to get new
blood in all the boards nd commis-
sions every 'wo years
I rank uler, re- i � I . � . rm in ol
ECU's Department ol counselor
Educai i, served on the .ommittee
as vice-chairman He mentioned
tha: �� I S Department ol Justice
king a look at any changes
h the city coui ghi pw
feet.
'Dump Jesse' Campaign Starts
B PATRICK O'NEILL
siall W nltr
The North Carolina arm of the
national organization known as the
"Federation for Progress" is taking
on a "Dump Jesse" campaign to
promote its other work in North
Carolina.
The group is referring to North
Carolina's senior senator. Jesse
Helms, who they portray on promo-
tional tee-shirts sitting in a garbage
can with the lid coming down on his
head. The words "Dump Jesse are
emblazed below it.
"A central steering committee of
the Federaton for Progress wanted a
way to really get our name out
said Ted Johnson, a coordinator ol
the federation's Chapel Hill
chapter. "It was an ideal way to do
it, too
According to Johnson. Helms
was the "ideal enemy" for a group
which cites "jobs, peace, and
equality" as its major goals. "He's
(Helms) someone working against
the interest of the people
The federation is headquartered
in New York .but has, what they
call, "organizing committees' 40
cities in 23 states. These coiii uees
usually work on multi-issue piojects
c� " ' by grass-roots groups
Protestors To March On D. C.
ani a v 11 VIS IS.
"The thesis behind the federation
is that in the 80's the attacks ih- are
coming trom the right are so ex-
treme that it's time fo- people on the
left to come together and work
togethr says Johnson of the FFP's
concerns.
FFP hopes to get up to 50,000
signatures on the dump Jesse peti-
tions and "build up a fairly strong
movement against him
Another FFP member, Doug
Berger. who set up a table in the
Smithfield post office to collect
signatures on the dump Jesse peti-
tions vas very suprised that so many
people were willing to sign the pei-
tion. "They were also glad to see
that there were so many others op-
posed to him (Helms) reported
Johnson.
By PATRICK O'NEILL
stiff Writer
According to a North Carolina
organization calling itself "the
Emergency Committee on
Lebanon" somewhere between 40
and 80 thousand people are ex-
pected to march on Washington this
Saturday to oppose what they refer
to as "the U.SIsraeli invasion of
Lebanon
"We're hoping to get over 300
people out of North Carolina to
go said Nasser Badwan. "We're
going to demonstrate against the
Israeli invasion of Lebanon and for
the establishment of a Palestinian
state he adds.
Five demands are being made by
the national sponsors of the march,
who call themselves the "November
29 Coalition" after the U.N. chose
Nov. 29 as "International Day of
Solidarity with the Palestinian Peo-
ple
These demands include:
"Immediate unconditional
withdrawal of Israel from Lebanon,
fund jobs and human needs not
U.S. arms to Israel, no U.S. troops
in Lebanon, no puppet Israeli
government in Lebanon, and sell
determination for the Palestinian
people
The coalition lists twelve major
cities on the East coast and mid-west
as having organizers who plan to br-
ing demonstrators to the march.
Among the list of endorsers are
labor unions (many who list an
AFL-CIO affiliation), church
groups, some politicians, as well as
numerous peace, human rights, and
social action organizations or their
members.
On The Inside
' .� '��
George Wallace Faces Runoff
-
" ��
r
. �
j
Photo By SCOTT LARSON
Look Mom, No Hands
Frisbees are flying on the mall this week as students take advantage of the
warm weather. This connoisseur practices a difficult under-the-leg
maneuver. Looks like a "perfect 10
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
Former Alabama governor
George C. Wallace has been forced
into a Sept. 28 primary runoff for
the state's Democratic nomination.
He will be running against Lt.
Gov. George McMillan, a self styled
"new South progressive" who had
the endorsement of the Alabama
Democratic Conference, the state's
major black political group.
Wallace is best known for his pro-
segregationist stance during the civil
rights era. Despite Wallace's former
cries of "segregation now, segrega-
tion tomorrow, segregation
forever he was still able to run
surprisingly well in some of
Alabama's predominently black
counties.
Wallace, 63, is seeking an un-
precedented fourth term as gover-
nor.
Two decades ago, Wallace gained
national attention when he per-
sonally blocked a schoolhouse door
in protest of a court order, but this
year he was able to win black votes
with claims that he no longer
believes his former segregationist
stances.
With 75 percent of the precincts
counted, Wallace had 41.2 percent
of the primary vote, while McMillan
gained 30.3 percent. House speaker
Joe McCorquodale was third with
25.7 percent. Wallace even carried
two predominently black counties
outright.
"I think this is the best vote I've
ever received in any race I've run in
a primary Wallace told cheering
supporters. "I've never won an easy
race in my life
"Alabamans want to break the
shackles of negitive politics
responded McMillan. Wallace's per-
sonal comment of never having had
an easy race in his life may have
been a reference to his 1972
presidential campaign when he was
felled by an attempted assassin's
bullet. He has been confined to a
wheelchair ever since.
It is generally accepted in
Alabama that the winner of the
Democratic runoff will also be an
easy winner in the November
general election.
VA
ii
Landslide recording artists.
The Brains, from Atlanta (but
not to be confused with the pen-
nant contenders in the NL West),
will appear at the Carolina East
Mall Record Bar on Sept. 11. For
the complete "cut see Style.
page 8.
(Graphic Design Bv BETH STEIMCL)
Inside Index
Announcements 2
Opinion 4
Campus Forum 4
Style 8
Sports 11
f
i
V H





THE LAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBERS 1982
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
it you or your organuation
wowM like to have an item printed
:te announcement column,
please type it on an announcement
form and send it to The East
Carolinian in care of the produc
tien rnar.ager
Ariouicerne forms are
avd'lable at the East Carolinian
iff k m tne Publications Building
Flyers and handwr.rteo copy on
� M s zee pjpet cannot be ac
cepfed
There s no charge tor an
nocncements but space is often
limited Therefore we cannot
o- ntee that your announce
cent will run as long as you want
a'v suggest that you oc not rely
so'�lv on this column tor publicity
"e dead' ne for announcements
is S p.m Monoav tor he Tuesday
oaper and 5pm Aednesdavv for
�� Tjrsda paper No an
nooncements received after these
deadlines will be printed
This spae s available to all
. iDos organiiaWora and depart
. , its
OUTDOOR
RECREATION
Registration ano �nforma'ion on
� .��?�. -i'outdvX' recreation op
portunities a-e available "hrough
- Outdoor Recreation
Cc'er n 113 Memorial Gvm
Recently s-ecjied even's in
Horseback Riding
September v 16 23 30 Call
757 691! or s'op bv the center (113
�� - i a' Gym) fcr (ur'her if or
trtai
COUNSELING
down? a two
- .i-i ser es orec! at No Cos'
ers 'v Counseling
' p . arP Mow to Sue
y , ind Still iflvi? Fufl
September 13, 1982
v 1 Mr to Avoid Tes Anxiety
� Tuesday September 14 1982
r tfi sess ons will be conducted
tPlV ' PM a'i05 Wright An
ex "5' 61'v Nc advance
� �� 'is necessat v
P
CADP
The Campos Alcohol and Drug
Program will have a meeting on
Tuesday Sept 14 at00 p m in
the second floor conference room
of Erwin Hall Any student in
terested in furthering responsible
stfituted toward the use of
chemical substances is encourag
ed to attend For more intorma
tion call 757 4793 or 757 4649
FRESHMEN
Freshman registers nave arriv
ed Pick up m the Buccaneer office
(across from Joyner library) at
the following times MWF
1 305 00 TTH 2 00 5 00
FRISBEE
While the football team is
sweating it out on the field, the
ECU Frisbee Club will be treestyl
ing with the wind We are travel
mg to Raleigh for the 1982 NC FLy
mg Disc Championships this
weekend and hope those at State
for the football game will come
support our fast growing, fun and
son loving Frisbee Club! I
SKY DIVING
A different kind of high For
lore information call 75a 9011
SCIENCE MAJORS
Take a look � j close those
books r-orget those formulas,
come and join us! The American
Chemical Society student Aftihate
will meet September 13 at 7 00
p m in 'he conference room of
Flanagan Refreshments will be
served Hope to see you there
PEP RALLY
jom 'he ECU Varsity
Cheerleaders and 'he Marching
Pirates on Sept 14 from 1 30 9 30
at Spor'sworld or an exciting pep
rally Prizes to be given away
ECU s'udents admi'ted tor only
25' with ID Come on out and skate
tor only a quarter
CAREERS
Whicri areer ' tj you bes"
� ireei B. vce No- Chance' is
a hj�o car- mini ser e offeree at
� e Un versits Counsel
Centei l s trtered or
September 10 aJ October 4 or
sej tember 7.1 and ociber s r 305
ht Annex "57 4441 from 3 00
PS' "he Strong
cation I 'erest In
� ce administered m
Meet ng No arvance
� � � � -a' n is t. essar
COOP
negative tcxa'ior is a pro
.��' helps s'uoent ga.n
� ��rer,ence related to
� �� oais through after
-�- re per os X ;aoemic $tu)dy
oe t Is ' "campus
� � - ' - c Office
-���� - 3:3 Raw' currently has
per "JS tcr r.p'ing 83 In
'i ���� 'uden's should stop by
fa to e' more �nformation to
mplete �-? necessary forms
- to sign up 'o: 'nterviews
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
Welcome back APO' Alpha Ph.
Omega will have their first
meeting or 'hursday September
9 at 6 00 p.m in the Erwin
buidmg It is espec ally important
for officers to atterd See you
fhe'e
KARATE
VMM Marrow will take the 3rd
degree black belt test Thursday at
7 30 In the Dance Room ot
Memorial Gym She is an ECU
alumnus and past president of
ECU Karate Club it she passes
me test, she'll be the highest rank
ing woman in this style and one ot
the top people in Goju Shoain Call
Bit) McDonald tor further Infor
ma tion
BEST OF
BOTH BREEDS
FREE! A loveable and loyal
part German Shepard and part
Doberman Pinscher Easily train
ed and would make a good frisbee
dog Call 754 1148 or 754 4873 after
8.00 p.m Will be put to sleep Fri-
day
RESUME
PREPARATION
WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Place
ment Service in the Bloxton House
is ottering the following one hour
sessions to help you prepare your
owr, resume September 14, 1982
Tuesday 2 00 p m . September
22. 1982 Wednesday 3:00 p.m
September 29, 1982 Wednesday
4 00 p m October 5, 1982 Tues
day 3 00 p m
Those seniors or graduate
students finishing this year and
planning to register with us are
urged to attend You may come to
the Bloxtgon House at any ot the
above 'imes
PHI BETA LAMBDA
The Omicron Chapter of Phi
Be'a Lambda will hold its first
meeting on Wednesday,
September 15 at 4 p.m. in Rawl
339 All business education and
business maiors interested in
becoming members are urged to
a'fena
INTERVIEWING
SKILLS WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Place
ment Service in the Bloxton House
is otterng these one hour sessions
to aid you m developing better In
terviewmg skills tor use in your
iob search You may select a time
from those listed below
September 15, 1982 Wednesday
September 23. 1982
00 p m
28. 1982 Tuesday
SPORT CLUBS
Get ready for a fantastic year
Find out everything you ever
wantfi o know about Sport Clubs
Currently Field Hockey Gym
nasties Karate Rugby Soccer
Surfing, Team Handball and
yvater Pole are adve Spor Clubs
1 f you a"ct your friends wis 'c
begin 3 new club attend the spor'
club informational meeting ALL
SPORT CLUBS MUST ATTEND
THE FIRST MEETING WHICH
WILi. BE HELD WEDNESDAY
SEPTEMBER 22, IN MEMORIAL
GYM ROOM 105 B AT 4 00 p.m
Active spor' clubs should have
organizational meetings 'or the
election of OrHcevs and prepara
tion of Schedules prior to the IRS
meeting
k?tdB II�tat if
NCSL
We would like to thank all the
new members tor joining the
NCSL and Invite them, along with
previous members and any addi
ttonel interested persons to attend
our Tuesday night, September 14,
meeting in Room 212 of
Mendenhall at 7 p m.
NATIONAL
INSTITUTES OF
HEALTH
A representative from NIH.
Bethesda, MD will be on campus
October 4 and 5 to interview
students who would like to work in
a clinical setting as Normal
Volunteers. Students will be paid
daily stipends. All interested
students must attend a general
meeting at 7 30 p m. on Monday,
October 4 before having inter
views. Students majoring in Allied
Health and related fields are en
couraged to apply For more infor
rnation contact Rawl 313 or call
757 4979
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
The ECU Accounting Society
will hold Its first meeting Monday,
September 13 at 4 00 p m in Rawl
130 New officers will be elected
JEWISH STUDENTS
There will be a general Hillel
meeting to discuss arrangements
for the programs It will be held
Monday the 13 at 5 30 In Room 246
at Mendenhall M there are any
questions call Dr Resnicks a'
757 4045 or Howard Lipman at
752 9237
2 00 p m
Thursday 3
September
4 00 p m
October 4 1982 Monday 3 00
p m
A film and discussion ot inter
viewing through the Career Plann
ing and Placement Service will be
shared
TUTORS WANTED
The Center tor Student Oppor
tunlties is accepting applications
for tutoring positions in allied
health and nursing courses Ap
plication forms may be obtained
from Room 302, Belk Building,
Room 152, Nursing Building, or
Room 1508, Brody Building
Salary is based on qualifications
and assignments Call 757 2500 if
more information is desired
ATTENTION
The 1982 REBEL is here If you
missed it Int hte spring, you can
pick it up m Mendenhall or the
Library beginning Sept I Also,
artistrs and illustrators whose
work was printed in the REBEL
may pick it up in the REBEL of
tice, in the Puibications Building,
on MWF from 9 00 11 30 Copies of
last year's written submissions
may be dug up too
The REBEL need an Associate
Editor to learn and work toward
next year's Editorship The mam
requirement is dedication, anyone
m any maior can apply Drop by
the office and speak to Rick Gor
don, the Editor, during rus office
hours MWF 9 00 11 30
This last announcement goes out
to ECU'S talented creative
writers The REBEL s prose and
poetry contests will be starting
soon, so start working on those
poems, stories, plays interviews,
etc
TIBETAN BUDDHIST
GROUP
All interested persons are in
vited to ioin the group for discus
sion of Buddha Dharma and prac
tice of meditation The group
meets Wednesdays at 5 PM at 1113
Evans Street Call 7S8 4255 even
ings or 757 4894 days for intorma
'ion
COOPERATIVE
EDUCATION
Navy Civilian Personnel Na
tionwide A representative from
the NCP Office will be on campus
October 8 and 11 to interview in
terested and qualified
undergraduate students Jobs are
available throughout the U S for
the following n.aiors Accountng,
Computer Science, Finance. In
dustrial Technology. Manage
rnt. Political Science,
Psychology, and Sociology
Deadline to apply is October 5,
1982
UST CAtOUNA UMrVOOTY
1907-1912
NATIONAL LABOR
RELATIONS BOARD
A representative from NLRB.
Winston Salem. NC will be on
campus Thursday. September 23
to interview undergraduate
students who expect to graduate
with at least 24 semester hours m
one or a combination of subiects
soch as Labor Relations, In
dustrial Relations. Labor Law.
Labor Economics, Political
Science. Economics. Business Ao
ministration. Personnel Manage
ment. Accounting or Law
Students must have a 3 0 grade
point average or better Deadline
to apply is September 17 1982 For
more information contact 313
Rawl or call 757 6979
KYF
The King Youth Fellowship s
betginmrvg their second year of
reorganization Thursday. Sept 9
in Room 248 at 8 p.m in MSC
Come join our study ot the Bible
and how it relates to your life
Elections will be held
INCREASED
LEARNING EFFICIEN
CY
A program for Increasing Lear
ning Efficiency will be ottered by
the Counseling Center this Fall
Dr George Weigand will teach the
class on Monday and Wednesday
at 1 00 PM beginning September
13 and Dr Phyllis McAllister will
teach the class on Tuesday and
Thursday at 1 00 PM beginning
September 14 Both groups will
mmet m 305 Wright Annex The
classes are available to an
students Attendance is voluntary
No formal registration is re
quired.
ATTENTION
Attention investigators of the
mind and dealers in personalities
September 15. Wednesday, at 7 30
p m you are invited to attend Psi
Chi's first organizational meeting
in Room 129, Speight Being pre
sent you will become better m
formed and help shape Psi Chi s
future events plus let Psi Chi ot
ficers know what you want Come
and be a part of the business ana
tun Remember you are needed to
fulfill the wants expected from Psi
Chi
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
SCHOLARSHIPS
Applications ae being received
for the North Carolina Sheriffs'
Association Criminal Justice
Scholarship Applicants must oe
lull time students enrolled as ma
lurs in the Department of Social
Work � Corectional Services who
meet the financial need and
academic criteria established by
the Sheriffs' Association
Preference will be given to
1) Sons or daughters of any
law enforcement officer killed in
tne line of duty
2) Sons or daughters of any
Sheriff or Deputy who is deceased
retired, or currently active in law
enforcement
3) North Carolina residents
Awards will be made without
regard to race, creed, religion
color, national origin, age or sex
Applications are available in the
Department of Social Work � Cor
rectional Services, Room 314,
Carol Belk Building (Allied Health
Social Professions) and must be
submitted by September 15. 1982 to
the Department Chair
CATHOLIC NEWMAN
CENTER
This Monday. September 13 will
be the second meeting of the East
Carolina Sharing Group we win
be meeting the second and forth
Mondays of every month Leader
ship of the meetings will rotate
Kathleen Colbert is the leader ot
discussion for the Stptemoer 13
meeting The group is basically a
sharing session, and group sup
port, a ime for prayer and discus
sion Everyone is mvited to come
The Catholic Newman Center
would like to invite everyone to
ioin m with us for celebra'i"g
Mass every Sunday in the Biology
Lecture Hall starting at '2 3C i- I
every Wednesday at 5 00 at the
Catholic Newman Center located
down at the bottom of College Hill
March of Dimes
I BIRTH DEFECTS FOUNDATION I
ATTENTION
On Vor.day September 27 8 9 00
p m m Hendrix theatre Pi kappa
Phi and CADP wiU sponsor wen
known Dr Kenne Mills from
UNC The topic of discussion will
be "Alcohol Prevention" Free ad
mission to community and entire
campus
PHILOSOPHY CLUB
There will be a genera:
organizational meeting ot the
Philosophy Cub Thursday
September 9 at 4 00 p m .� BO
313 We Will be planning � p
fall semester ah win are in
terested m philosophical "jP" s
please attend this meeting
PHYE MAJORS
All students '�� pia' ' ttei '
physical education as a maior dur
ing change of maior week lot " �
Fan Semester, shooJd report to
famges Coliseum from 1 00 3 00
p m on Wednesday ,f-DtemDer 29
for a motor and physical ti'ness
'es' Satisfactory perforrnar� �
this tes' is required as a pi
quisite tor otfical adnrnt'arw t- I
the physical education maior .
gram More detailed rrl
concerning 'he tes' is available Oi
calling 757 4441 or 644
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
COURSES
Basic NAUi or PADl SCUBA
Certf, cation Sep' U-Oct
Basic Sailing Sept 14 Oci 2
Beginno BaMi �Bd
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Sep' 16 Nov 20
Darnroom Photograc �
'8 Nov 13 Yoga Sept ;�
,ersa' on �� � 21
No. 23 Camera '
� jazz Eiprc'rf Sepl .
Od 2'
Guitar Sec' 21 Nov !
Sept 21 Nov 9 Algebra R- e�
Sept 22 Oct 10 Clogging 1 Sept
22 OC 27 Re' remt ' - -
Sept 23 Oci 14
For mori nformat
757 4143
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It you are seeking ot campuv
nous.ng or want a roommate '
share expenses come to, 21
Whichard Building or teiepheme
757 6881 tor m ' � o' M A
nave an up to date list of apart
ments to rent of sr.are and houses
and mobile homes to reni or snare
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Ml I ASI C AKOl INIAN
si PT1 MBER9, 1V82
IOE
Drug Researched
B l)RRI BKOWN
Miff Wruri
1 he ECl School of
Medicine has been
selected b a German
phai maceutical com
a to conduct a study
on a new drug used in
: h e treatment o t
angina, severe chest
pain caused b pooi
blood flow to the heart
1 v I . along v iih
I niversity of Calitor
ma at 1 os ngeles,
were the onl two sites
selected to do research
on Dilazep, a medica-
tion already in use
abroad, though its
method of effectiveness
is unknown.
Degussa Chemicals
of West Germany has
provided a $70,000
grant to fund the ECU
study, which is under
the direction of Dr.
Jamal Mustafa, a noted
specialist in car-
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Mustafa's laboratory
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with the drug in the
past.
Though it has been
used on patients both in
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Dilaep has not been
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study, slated to begin
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to find out exactly how
and why the drug
works, as well as other
possible uses.
The study is expected
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medical journals in ad-
dition to being sent to
the German company.
Mustafa hopes the drug
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ly for angina but also
for hypertension, heart
attacks, and sickle cell
anemia.
Garwood Files Fraud Suit
J AK S O N 11 1 1 .
s (I PI) 1 ormet
Marine Pfc Robert
Garw ood, com icted ol
collaborating with the
enemy in Vietnam, til
ed a law suit v ednes
da claiming a fori
at tomes fradulenth
obtained his signature
so he could collect tees
in the case
The stui uas filed in
Onslow c ounty civil
court against attorney
Dermot Foley of New
" ork. w ho handled the
case during the pre-trial
stages but dropped out
prior to the court
martial. The suit claims
Foley, who it said is
seeking $130,000 in
fees, persuaded Gar-
w o o d to sign
documents although
Garwood was mentally
ill.
Garwood, an In-
diana native, was cap-
tured b the North
Vietnamese Sept 28,
165 and released
March 22, 1979.
Prosecutors claimed
he joined forces with
the enemy. Garwood
tied he was mental-
ly ill and was not
responsible for his ac-
tions.
He was convited in
1981 of collaborating
with the enemy and
assaulting another
American prisoner. A
desertion charge was
dismissed.
A jury of five Marine
officers gave Garwood
a dishonorable
discharge, reduced his
rank and ordered him
to forfeit all pay and
allowances from the
date of conviction.
In his suit, Garwood
claims Foley agreed to
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9I " West Morqan St
Raieiqh N C
represent him for no
fee. The suit claims
Foley later convinced
Garwood to pay $100
an hour despite the
original agreement for
free services.
The suit wants all
fees dropped against
Garwood and all
documents signed by
Garwood declared null,
void and without ef-
fect.
Garwood, who now
lives in Charlottesville,
Va is awaiting a ruling
on $147,000 in back
pay he claims the
Marine Corps owes
him.
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Check for details of upcoming values and dis-
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SUre lEast (Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
FlEI DiNCMll 1 ER.owfwMtrwww
Mike Hughes, w,
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I'lll! I II' MNl SS. , � Itawn
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Cindy Pi i asanis. sportsem
Ernesi Conner, vn�Etf��r
S I 1 VI BACHNER, nienainmrni tditor
Mlkl DAVIS, ���� turn 1anoxer
Vnuiuhci ��. IW2
Opinion
Page 4
Financial Aid
For The '80s
Cflcfe 5am Is Pulling Out
Am oik- who's 11 icd to pick up a
Unionl I in oi i rani at ihc finan-
cial aid ollice this semester pro-
babl ikvMi'l need lo be reminded
thai t serioiiN problem exists. In
short, and practically speaking,
there just isn't an money. And it
doesn't take a math genius to
deduce Ihc lad thai empty, banks
don't pay tuition bills.
Bui nisi ho is to blame?
Spokesmen loi the federal govern-
ment contend that the Reagan ad-
ministration will actually be expen-
ding even reatei amounts ol mone
u assist American south.
Bui, as most of us know, the
main problem this year is that Presi-
dent Reagan has already diminished
so many valuable programs with the
federal budget realignment. Some
financial aid programs have been
totally disbanded, while others con-
tinue lo exist as mere skeletons ol
what they should be.
:ust Carolina has not vet received
an federal funding for last year,
which has forced the financial aid
office lo administer emergency tui-
tion deferment and loans simply to
enable recipients to attend school
tins year.
And what makes matters worse is
thai Reagan has now vetoed a bill
allowing lot those funds to be used
loi sludenl loans. It seems the bill
called lvr loo much money to be in-
vested in education and too little in
defense Fortunately, it is likely that
Congress vvill override the presi-
dent's veto, since the bill has
already won approval easliy in both
houses.
Hut as the cost of education
skyrockets, and the availability of
funding grows scarce, students ol
the 1980s will soon have to lace the
grim reality thai Uncles Sam and
Ron arc steadily whittling their way
out of higher education. And the
transition will leave many students
searching Iranticallv for ways to
slav in school. Some will survive;
some others will be forced to drop
out. And some potentially great
minds will never make it to their
first class. Unfortunately, many
capable minds will never know the
challenge of higher education. They
will never live the "college ex-
perience The truth is, the future
of I In- American college student is
endangered.
However, laying the entire blame
on the U.S. government � the
Reagan administration, in par-
ticular is unjust. Although they
do control the ultimate purse str-
ings, at least some of the fault lies
on l he shoulders of students,
students who have, in the past,
misused federally supported pro-
grams. I heir abuse is not only ir-
revocably unfair; it's illegal.
Take student loans (NDS1 and
(iSI programs), for example.
Although student default may not
have reached "epidemic propor-
tions as some officials have claim-
ed, the misuse of these funds is not
as rare an occurrence as one might
tend to believe. With the interest
rates on these loans comparatively
low, many "bargain-conscious"
students have made handsome four-
year investments, collecting an undo
allowance on Uncle Sam's tab. Pret-
ty sly, huh? Sure, it's sly, but unfor-
SECtfETA'RV -DOUCWAN, HAVE THE
ALLE6ATIOrNS UMK1M6 YOU TO CR-
6Atx)l2LED CRIME IMfWRED VOU-R
EFFICIENCY AS A MEMBER OF
THE 'REASfMO CfVBltO&T?
You MEAN 16 ME ArOD OA
TKESiDErviT STILL. �M?ATlCO
RESPITE TA -T 'BASTIDS
VOHAT KEEPS TRVIN6TO
6EJ ME OP?
innately, then sly bargain ends up
forcing some other, more deserving,
students out of school.
O! course, abuse of student
financial aid monies is but a minor
reason for the current federal
education budget problems. And
perhaps, there is some validity to
arguing that our government has its
priorities somewhat askew � i.e
rising defense spending v. financial
aid cuts but if the recipients of
federal ait! continually misuse those
funds, then the principle behind
monetary assistance is lost, and the
incentive to continue those pro-
grams dwindles.
1 herefore, students must accept
the fact that they are, at least in
pan, responsible for the demise of
financial aid programs in the U.S.
On the other hand, the federal
government cuts in student
assistance constitute an act of un-
disputed hypocrisy. Where has the
government gone in the past for
research and innovation? To col-
leges and universities. Where have
the major advances in technology
(medical, engineering, military,
etc.) become realities? In coleges
and universities. Where have a ma-
jority o the nation's leaders been
cultivated? Certainly not in multi-
million-dollar warplanes.
It is, indeed, unfortunate that our
government cannot see the impen-
ding harm of cutting financial aid
programs. Without federal
assistance, many institutions
around the nation will suffer exten-
sive drops in student enrollment,
despite the contentions of some that
the 1983 cuts are minimal. No mat-
ter what the "experts" say, campus
populations will decline.
But it is equally unfortunate that
certain young entrepreneurs feel
they have the right to deprive others
of much-needed assistance. This in-
creasing misuse of student loans has
cost American taxpayers a pretty
penny, not to mention the damper
those abuscrs have put on the
educational goals of others. The
dilemma, which is in itself, a
microcosm of American economics,
is truly a tragedy.
And like a tragedy, there are
those who must suffer, those whose
worthiness will be determined on
the basis of money rather than of
mind. But eventually, the tragedy
winds its way back to the source.
The government will inevitably suf-
fer, as thousands of willing, apt
minds are turned away from the na-
tion's colleges and universities.
Perhaps the dilemma illustrates
that it is time our government
reassessed its priorities. Granted,
others are also at fault, but because
our leaders in Washington have
chosen to balance their precious
budget at the expense of higher
education (and other worthy pro-
grams), they must get the brunt of
the blame.
Regardless of who's at fault,
however, the problem of decreasing
financial aid is at hand, and it's not
going to go away. So, those students
fortunate enough to continue
receiving assistance should use the
money with prudence and con-
sideration. After all, you could just
as easily be on the other side of the
educational fence.
Is Jesse Helms A Moralizing Tyrant?
By GREGORY HIDEOUT
In a taint hope of trying to get the
Supreme Court to reassess its position on
abortion. Senator Jesse Helms of North
Carolina introduced his "human life
statute What Helms' bill would do, it
passed, is say that legal life begins at con-
ception.
Abortion should be a choice; an in-
dividual's choice, regardless of whether
there is a majority consensus that says it is
wrong (which in this case there is not).
fundamental tenet of liberal democracy,
expressed by John Stuart Mill, is that when
the public (government) interferes with
purely personal conduct, it does so wrong-
ly.
Why should one person, who has power.
be able to leeallv enforce his behets on
others? legislating morality has become
Senator Helms' pastime. He and his
sidekick. Senator John East, have
relentlessly fought to invade the American
citizen's private life.
Of course. Senator Helms and company
do not want to stop with simply pushing-
off his Puritan beliefs on us; he also wants
us to pray. Our founding fathers expressly
separated church and state. Is Helms so
wise ihat he can change this? A good guess
is that Senator Helms wishes us to pray his
way.
the "moralitv bills" Helms has in-
troduced are ven controversial. It's elec-
tion time, and one-third of the senate is up
for re-election. They can't risk alienating
anyone back home, so the vote has been
postponed.
Helms and Easl do have help. A few con-
servative Democrats and Republicans are
on his side. Thus, he was able to attach h -
human life statute to the National Deb;
Ceiling Bill � a piece ol legislation Con-
gress must pass b Oct 1 to pa the
tion's bills.
Much has been said on both sides
abortion issue. It would not even re ar
issue m a perfect "Mill Societ " But.
he soberly admits that such a po
republic is a Utopian dream.
So, in the wake oi mankind's imperl
tion, we can only hope that the silent ma-
jority will raise its stilled voice to st p
self-avowed moralists from restrict n
freedoms.
last-minute filibustei has delayed
senate's vote until aftei the ! abor Day
recess. 1 efs hope someone's men
Washington (certain!) n two) do
riehi thine.
Librarians Never Have The Itch
The Drama Of TV Ads
(Assistant Editor's note: The Jollowing is a
reprint oj a column previously printed tn
this publication. The Editor is vacationing
in luxurious Bethel this week and forgot to
leave a key to his ojjice.)
Did you ever stop and pay attention � 1
mean really pay attention to the ads on
television? I don't mean those stupid net-
work plugs (although they're definitely
bad enough). What I'm talking about are
those asinine commercials that portray
"real-life" American drama and try to
convince us that we need to buy their
brand of broad-leaf herbicides or their
cold-sore ointment if we want to be suc-
cessful in life.
1 mean, isn't it a bit � just a bit �
farfetched that an ex-pro football star
would be out on the street (microphone in
hand) asking people about how they han-
dle problem heartburn?
Or how about the petrified woman who
asks the local librarian � the librarian, of
all people � which hemorrhoid medica-
tion is best suited for her needs. Naturally
then, the librarian has just recently
catalogued a five-year study on painful
swelling and itch and knows exactly what
"doctors recommend most After all, it
only makes sense.
And did you ever notice how Robert
Young seems to know just when tragedy is
about to strike? Everytime some poor sod
gets angry, Young is nearby to lend a
hand. And inevitably, the problem rests in
the troubled one's poor choice of coffee,
never anything else.
"Gee, Rodney Young exclaims with a
puzzled face, "why so uptight?"
"Oh, 1 don't know the drowsy victim
laments. "My wife and kids were kidnap-
ped last week just after the house burned
down. 1 lost my job because my secretary is
filing a paternity suit against me And to
top it all off, my doctor says I'm getting
too much caffeine
The plot thickens
"Oh, that's terrible Young consoles.
"But have you tried Sanka brand? It's
100-percent real coffee
Or how about Cathy Rigby, who's done
nothing for the past five years but give
feminine advice to the same bunch of slow-
learning friends. Maybe she and Robert
Young ought to switch commercials!
Mike Hughes
Just The W� It Is
Oh, something else: Just what exactly
does a "sexy" sports car look like? Am I
missing something? 1 must be, because I've
never had the pleasure of owning one.
Slow, yes; thirsty, maybe. But never
"sexy
Then, of course, there are those
"hidden-camera" ads. It always struck me
funny that those people never seem to
catch on. They're never even the slightest
bit leery about being accosted by some
strange man and asked which brand of
tuna fish they prefer and why.
And the one with the man outside the
grocery store timing the woman while she's
busy inside. Simply because she spends
half an hour in the store, he dubs her a
"choosv mother Little does he know
-Campus Forum
Man Needs 'Pen' Pal
I am an inmate incarcerated in the
Department of Correction and would
like to correspond with anyone who is
willing to write on a friendship basis.
I'm 30 years old, and have been in jail
since November of 1972 for forgery. The
sentence I received was for 15 to 20
years. However, my sentence now ends
on Sept. 22, 1984. 1 finished high school
and took two years of business ad-
ministration at UNC-Chapel Hill under
the Inmate Outreach program.
I will answer all letters, but as stamps
are hard to come by in here, 1 ask that
they be mailed in a self-addressed,
stamped envelope. I'm lonely and hope
to receive some mail soon.
Reggie L. Parker
P.O.Box 137
Tillerv, NC 27887
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s).
that she spent 10 minutes rushing through
the aisles (so she could get back home m
time to watch General Hospital) and the
other 20 minutes waiting in the checkout
line.
Or how about those people who just
happen to have severe tension headaches
just when the Tylenol interviewer asks
them how they feel. "Would you like a
Tylenol?" he asks compassionately. And
"minutes later following a miraculous
recovery, the overjoyed headache victim is
so convinced, he's ready to buy out the en-
tire company. Ah. the marvels of modern
medicine.
And along those same lines, there's the
old woman who can't even lift the teflon
frying pan in the morning. She'd like to fix
the family breakfast (the same way she's
done it for 227 years), but she just can't
muster the strength. Then, after applying
the wonder-cure ointment ("available in
'natural' gray and original white ot
course), and taking her cure-all pills, she's
not only feeling better, but she's ready for
a game of touch football with the grand-
children!
Or how about the guy who gets on the
crowded elevator and starts bragging
about his extremely comfortable
underwear. Isn't there some place where
they put people like him? Maybe he'd en-
joy a nice "comfortably-padded" cell for a
change of pace.
And those 18-hour girdles Jane Russell
rants on and on about: What if, by some
terrible stroke of bad luck, a woman leaves
her's on for more than the allotted time"1
Does the girdle decompose, or does the
"full-figured gal" just fill out a little
more?
Speaking of filling out, those diet-
suppressing tablet commercials have to
take the proverbial cake for asimnity. Four
or five reborn twigs proclaim the wonders
of the new miracle drug, showing
"before" and "after" pictures. What thev
don't mention is that they each spent eight
weeks in the hospital recovering from
chronic anemia. And have you ever seen
someone who's lost 100 pounds? At least
when they were fat. their skin had
something to do other than just hang
there.
1 could go on and on. As a matter off
fact, I usually do. But I think you probably
get the picture.
By the way, don't blame advertisers for
all the stupidity on TV nowadays. After
all, they're only catering to "what we
want
And even if we did want TV advertising
to change, there wouldn't be much we
could do. Of course, we could boycott all
the companies with demented commer-
cials. But, then again, how long could we
life on Lite Beer and Life Cereal?
W
,1 p
V.
ne
wh
TRIM

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1
I





rUblASl CAROl 1NIAN
SfcPTEMBtR9. 1982
ne
asks
:ke a
And
ulous
I
odern
eilon
i i n t
le in
e's
� or
tnd-
on the
ragging
�able
where
d en-
I ' a
jsseli
some
in iea
c time?
lues the
little
ise diet-
Ihave to
ty Four
onders
ihowing
hat they
tnt eight
ig from
er seen
At least
in had
hang
latter of
Kobably
tisers for
s. After
hat we
Jvertising
uch we
vcott all
Icommer-
Ic'uld we
Watt Is Criticized
MU NG rON
(I 1M) Interior
Secretar James Watt's
new offshore oil and
caN leasing plan ran in-
to a ban age of criticism
Wednesday by senators
who saw it as a threat
to the environment and
as a vsaste of resources
needed for the future.
rectifying at over-
iight hearings before a
senate energy subcom-
mittee, the secretary
was immediately put on
the defensive by three
Democratic senators
and one Republican.
Opening the attack
was Sen. Howard
Metzenbaum, D-Ohio,
who denounced the
five-yeai plan to offer 1
billion acres of off-
shore lands for leasing
.in "the m o s t
monumental giveaway
in the nation's
histor "
I he Ohio Democrat
said it would benefit
only the world's biggest
oil companies by giving
em the oil and gas
"at bargain basement
prices
ith demand for oil
down, he said, "this is
no! the time to sell
Instead, he said, the
government should be
doing more "to con-
serve what we have
Reacting sharply to
e charges, Watt ac-
cused Metzenbaum and
critics ol being
c k to attack
without regard to facts
� � mess.
I he plan for explor-
ig the Outer C ontinen-
Shelf, he said,
would encourage com-
petition, strengthen na-
tional security by
reducing the need for
imported oil, and pro-
vide strict environmen-
tal safeguards. "The
greatest environmental
danger to the coastline
of America is the threat
of oil spills from
foreign tankers carry-
ing foreign crude man-
ned by foreign crews
he said.
Meten bau m and
other critics, including
Republican Sen. Lowell
Weicker of Connec-
ticut, remained uncon-
vinced.
Weicker, w h o
chaired the hearing,
said the accelerated
plan for tapping off-
shore oil resources did
not "strike a proper
balance between
energy needs and en-
vironmental protec-
tion.
W eicker, who is
seeking re-election in
November, also
criticized the plan as
posing "a threat" to
fisheries such as those
of the Georges Bank
off New England,
He noted that three
states � California.
Alaska and New Jersej
� have challenged the
offshore leasing pro-
gram in the courts.
Sens. Paul Tsongas,
D-Mass and Bill
Bradley, D-N.J join-
ed in the attack on the
plan. Only Sen. Don
Nickles, R-Okla
defended it, calling it
"reasonable and sensi-
ble
In response to
Tsongas' complaint
that speeding up drill-
ing over the short term
might deprive future
generations of a
vanishing resource.
Watt said short-term
development was
necessary because "we
must remain strong
Watt said the new
plan differs from
previous leasing policy
by letting industry,
rather than government
officials, decide where
to look for oil.
"The marketplace is
a wonderful thing he
said in contending the
new plan would
stimulate competition
and better serve con-
sumer interests.
Watt's praise of
competition was inter-
rupted by Tsongas,
who said, "The
marketplace, at this
point, is approaching
rigor mortis
ATTIC
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t
r





THF EAST CAROI INI N
SEPTEMBER 9, 1982
Organization AgainstCapitalism
By PATRICK O'NEIL
Staff W rilrr
A student organiza-
tion claiming to be the
only one of its kind in
North Carolina is
beginning its third year
of activity in Chapel
Hill.
The group, which
calls itself "Students
Against Militarism" or
more co m m o n I y
"SAM" is launching a
series of events and
programs on the
University of North
Carolina campus and in
the city of Chapel Hill
to forward its goal of
the revolutionary over-
throw of the present
United Slates govern-
ment.
"SAM is the Univer-
sity of North
Carolina's only anti-
imperialist organiza-
tion and only revolu-
tionary organization, in
a sense that it explicitly
calls for the overthrow
of the
capitalistimperialist
system said SAM's
chairman Mark Beaty.
Beaty, a fourth year
political science student
at UNC, has spent time
in prison as a result of
non-violent civil
disobedience actions
based on his political
beliefs. He claims that
about 20 others, mostly
UNC students, are in-
volved with the ac-
tivities of SAM.
According to an in-
formation sheet
published by SAM, the
group's "principle
point of unity" as ex-
pressed by its founding
members is "the strug-
gle against imperialist
oppression and the
recognition that this
oppression is an in-
tegral stage of
capitalism
"Therefore the tac-
tics of SAM have
focused on attacking
numerous manifesta-
MedSchool Move Continues
CHRIS HARRINGTON
sijtl W riKT
The S choo1 of
Medicine's move into
the Brody building will
be completed with the
upcoming move of the
medical clinic slated for
Sept. 24.
The Brod Medical
Sciences building has
been under construc-
tion since 1979, and the
building opened earlier
this year. The first
department to move in-
to the building uas bio-
chemistry, which began
July 12. It completed
the move on August 3.
All Of the school's
first, second, third and
fourth year students are
also now going to
classes in the building.
Faculty and students
assisted with transpor-
ting their own depart-
ment's belongings.
According to of-
ficials the biggest factor
when the move began
was the careful handl-
ing of the extremely
sensitive equipment
that is used in medical
and scientific
laboratories. The bulk
of the office equipment
was moved by the AA
Moving and Storage
Company.
Georgette Hedrick,
director of the medical
information and
publications office said
"the move was not
flawless, but that can
be expected when mov-
ing into a brand new
building She added
that "the move was
greatly needed because
the older accomoda-
tions were very in-
convenient
The complex in-
tegrates the medical
school with the allied
health programs to
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enhance collaborative
efforts in education
and research.
The medical school
still owns satellite
facilities at Irons, an
office building near the
hospital and teaching
space at the front of
Pitt Memorial
Hospital.
The official dedica-
tion for the building
will be held on October
25 from 3 to 6 p.m. and
Governor James Hunt,
Jr. will be present. The
entire E.C.U. com-
munity is welcome to
the open house and
tours.
tions of capitalist op-
pression and suppor-
ting the just cause of
peoples' liberation
struggles states the
information sheet.
"Either we're going
to make revolution or
we're going to destroy
the world says Beaty,
referring to the
possiblity of nuclear
war. SAM sees
resistance to the
nuclear arms race as its
major focal point.
"Obviously, you can't
have a revolution if
there's nothing left
declares Beaty.
The members of
SAM don't support the
Soviet Union, which
they also consider a
capitalist state, but they
do conduct "extensive
programs on Iran, the
Palestinians, El
Salvador, Southern
Africa, and U.S. im-
perialism
Beaty claims that in
the "not too distant
future the antagonism
between the ruling class
and the working class
will come to a point
that there's so much
tension that there will
be 'a breakdown' of the
present political
system
Center Growing
"In concrete terms,
the breakdown is going
to be a revolt. A
rebellion of the work-
ing class who have
finally been pushed so
far that rebellion is
their only choice for
survival claims Bea
ty.
The activities ot
SAM are financed
through fundraising ef-
forts and contributions
from participants in its
programs.
Beaty claims that
SAM is not a violent
organization, but he
does feel that violence
will probably play a
role in the final struggle
between the workers
and the ruling class.
Beaty feels that "the
natural development of
technology" in a
capitalist system will
ultimately oppress the
workers, and he further
admits that this
technological develop-
ment could also cause a
nuclear war.
ECU's Department
of Computing Infor-
mation Systems is
growing by leaps and
bounds, and the reason
is Dr. Glenn Crowe.
Crowe, the director,
came here from West
Virginia University in
August of 1980 and im-
mediately started to
make changes. A new
Umvac 1100 computer
was installed and the
ex siting Burroughs
6800 was upgraded.
"We updated Bur-
roughs and made it
faster, and gave it a
bigger memory
Crowe said.
Since last spring
semester, the number
of terminals in the user
room in Austin has in-
creased from three to
24. The staff has gone
from 27 members in
1980 to 60 members at
the begimng of tall
semester.
Crowe was to eager
to tell of the ac-
complishments of the
center so far, but added
that the best is yet to
come.
Crowe said that the
administration has
begun a commitment to
his department that will
benefit all who use the
center. He said in the
fall of 83' there will be
one computer, the Bur
roughs, devoted entire-
ly to academics, which
includes research and
teaching. The other
system, the Univac, will
be for administrative
use.
The data processing
equipment used by the
university is also shared
bv the medical school
and Pitt Count)
Memorial Hospital. All
of this is under Crowe's
direction. He sav this
was one of the tew
possible waN the enter
could afford to im-
prove its systems.
Crowe calls the
revitalization of the
center a miracle. "We
worked 24 hours a dav
for nine months he
explained.
The computer center
is open 24 hours a dav.
seven days a week,
another Crowe im-
provement
Crowe savs that right
now the biggest student
complaint is the was:
for programs to be run
out. He said the
average is about 40
minutes The cente-
now caters to 1.166
computer science
students, not to m.
tion others who have to
do programs.
Crowe urges student
to start their final pro
grams now. He said if
worth the trouble now
rather than run into the
onslaught ot compute-
use at the end of tru
semester.
All terminal
on campus are hooked
up to the main svsten
in Austin except tfi
in the school
business

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This calculator thinks business.
TheTl Student Business Analyst
Convocation: September 9th � 5:30
Wright Auditorium
Rush Week: September 13th-17th
If there's one thing undergrad
business students have always
needed, this is it: an affordable,
business-oriented calculator
The Student Business Analyst.
Its built-in business formulas
let you perform complicated
finance, accounting and
statistical functions-the ones
that usually require a lot of
time and a stack of reference
books, like present and future
value calculations, amortiza-
tions and balloon payments.
It .ill means vou spend less
time calculating, and more
time learning One keystroke
takes the place ot many
The calculator is just part
of the pa�. kag ' �lsv get
.i book that follows m
business courses: the (koines
Analyst GhkUosk Business
professors helped us write it,
to help you get the rrwst out
of i ak iilim and daaaroom.
A powerful vomhination
Think business.
With the Student Sy
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- - i ��-
i





I Ml I
� IV
-I I'l I MBl K
Vote 'Demo' OfficialUrges
K XI I 1 . i i. s erc toda is to tell
state the oldei people of this
. Nednesdav Vou bettei sit up
� ' back and i i k e lot ice
Democrat u candidates "here's no use in lock
' head oft mt the dooi aftei the
Republican plans to cut horse is stolen he
Social Set said
benefits Messei said pro
'The Social v it iected deficits in the
he line So tal Securit pro
1is fall - campaign gram an be eliminated
and the Republican b increasing the
d �in c a in o u n i o Social
k s and
s.t
Me
ion 'Po
Soeia S
alread
ismantle
Securit tax v oi kei s
and emplo ei s pay;
supplementing the pro
am with general
: t dei al i c enues; or
i. utting benefits.
He contended the
administration
the Republican
Pai � tia�. e opposed
an aid oi increased
foi Social
I s and plan to cut
administration
compassion foi
t elderly, i he pooi or
ppled and in
A a S ; iMessei said, but
� tax bicaks to
barons" and
� �
ose m beSen lesse Helms,
R-N.C, and the Na-
tional Congressional
Club are backing
"hand-picked" con-
cessional candidates
who support cuts in the
Social Security pro-
gum, Messer said.
Earlier Wednesday,
two Republican state
Senate candidates from
Wake County said they
will sue Go. James B.
Hunt Jr. and Atty.
Gen. Rufus I Ed
misten to block state
employees from work-
ing for Democratic can-
didates on state time.
Robert Hassell and
Richard Titus held a
news conference to an-
nounce plans for the
suit and said Hunt and
Edmisten were named
because they are in
positions to something
about the alleged prac-
tices.
The cited two letters
to back their claim.
( me from a state Motor
Vehicles employee in-
vited people to a birth-
day party for 4th
District Rep Ike An-
drews, D-N.C, and
listed a state telephone
number for calls.
The second was writ-
ten by Wayne
McDevitt, who has
taken a leave from his
job as head of the
Western Governor's
Office to head the
Democratic Party's
"Unity Campaign" for
this fall.
In the letter,
McDevitt said he would
be on leave during the
campaign season.
"This is just the tip
ot the iceberg said
Titus, who claimed he
has received several
other reports of state
workers using state
time and equipment for
political purposes.
McDevitt said
Wednesday he sent the
letters to "detail the
management system"
in the Western Gover-
nor's Office during his
absence and only b
were sent at state ex-
pense to state
legislators. Another 97
copies were mailed at
private expense, he
said.
State Employee Indicted
Bl K

i
eed 9

-
1
1 mplo ee
w ar d'
' i the in-
E v e r e 11 e
o w hat ap
�; processors
esota, Georgia
r'ork between
1981 and April
I he indicment
the 111m
tained obscene,
: cr ious, mde-
� h and v ile
a minor
aeed in sexual
dozen people accused
ol various crimes in in-
dictments returned
Wednesday
were.
R a 1 pn
Kennel! of
M,
said Everette
irraigned in
21. I!
faces a
sentence ot
: isonment
�ne ol a
The others
D e W a y n e
Pink Hill,
accused of threatening
President Reagan's life
in a telephone call to
the White House on
Aug. 19
Shelvon Donnic Lee
Melton, 28. of
Ahoskie. charged with
embezzling $46.297 of
federal housing funds
between August 1977
and June 1980. He was
employed by the
C h oa n o k e Area
Development Associa-
tion, a disbursing agent
in northeastern North
Carolina for a federal
housing program
Quinn J. Swartout of
Mornsville, accused ol
five counts of making
false statements to the
U.S. Labor Depart
ment and seven counts
of misapplying federal
job training funds. Mc-
Cullough said the
misapplication involv
ed about $7,000 to
$10,000.
Edward I ee Sprv
and Harold Lloyd Sprv
Jr charged with the
Aug. 26 robberv ot
$103,852.52 from The
Bank of Curntuck in
Moyock.
Kim Adnenne Pevia.
24. of L umberton, ac
cused ot embezzling
$4,036.97 from her
former employer, the
Lumbee Bank in Pcm
broke.
fiction:
x


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1982 Pep Ralley
Thursday, Sept. 9 � 8:00-9:00
Ficklin Stadium
IN ATTENDANCE:
Coach Ed Emory
KCU Football Team
ECU Marching Band
ECU Cheerleaders
Drawings will he held
for free prizes.
See You There
Distributed iocdii, b, Jeftre, s Beei ft � in
Now Open For Lunch
Beginning Monday, Sept. 13, 1982,
PTA's new store hours
will be SunThurs. � 11 a.ml a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 11 a.m2 p.m.
FREE COKES TOO
When it comes to pizza,
PTA comes to you.
757-1955
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TWO DOLLARS OFF
757-1955
Otter expires Oct I, 1982
Good only with this coupon
any large pizza
One discount pet ?izza
FRE DELIVERY
ANYWHERE IN OUR SERVICE ZONE
r





IHt I VSI C -R01 ISI N
Style
SUM EMB1 K �. 192
lgi
Cwp Runneth
Over A t The
'82 Playhouse
Season tickets hae gone on sale
for the East Carolina Playhouse
productions of musicals, dramas
and dance concerts to be presented
in the newly renovated McGinnis
Theatre on the ECU campus in
Greenville.
According to Playhouse General
Manager, Scott Parker, "This is the
first full season of shows to be
presented in our new theatre center,
and it's going to be a season of
tremendous variety. We'll be pro-
ducing everything from comic
operetta to contemporary drama
and modern dance, using some of
the most sophisticated theatre
equipment available
Slated to open the season on Oc-
tober 28, 29, 30 and November 1, 3
is The Mikado, which will be pro-
duced in conjunction with the ECU
School of Music. One of the most
popular musical frivolities in the
English language and written by the
ledgendary team o Gilbert and
Sullivan, The Mikado is the lyrical
and comic tale of fantastic happen-
ings in a mythical Japanese village
of Titipu.
The Shadow Box follows as the
next main stage production on
December 2 through 6. This highly-
acclaimed and powerful drama ac-
complished the rare feat of winning
both the Pulitzer Prize and the Tony
Award. Set in a California cottage,
three people live in a controversial
and experimental health center
presided over by an omniscient in-
terviewer.
On January 27-29 the very
popular East Carouna Dance
Theatre returns with modern, ballet
and jazz peformed by the talented
students in the professionally-
oriented dance programs at ECU.
And then the Playhouse presents
the North Carolina premier produc-
tion of C uster by Robert Ingram on
Eebiuary 17-22. This riviting drama
recounts the famed Battle of The
little Big Horn � what really hap-
pened on that fateful day and who
was to blame for the bloody
massacre that this country will never
forget.
Rounding out the Playhouse
season will be Our Town, to be
presented on April 14-19. One of the
most cherished and popular plays in
the history of the American stage.
Our Town is Thornton Wilder's
Puliter prize-winning chronicle on
the way life was lived in a fictitious
little New Hampshire town in the
first years of this country.
According to Parker, "With all
the sophisticated equipment now in-
stalled in the new theatre, we're go-
ing to produce some technically
complex shows that were never
possible for us to do before
All five productions will be
directed, designed and choreograph-
ed by the professionals on the
Drama faculty at ECU.
Season tickets may be purchased
in the Messick Theatre Arts Center
Monday through Friday from 10
a.m. until 4 p.m. They may be
ordered through the mail by writing
the ECU Playhouse, ECU, Green-
ville, or may be reserved by calling
757-6390.
More Auditions
A theatre for young people has
been established at East Carolina
University, and auditions for its
first production. Step on a Crack,
See YOUTH, Page 9
Anti-Cerebellum 'Brain' Trust Aspire To Upper Level Nirvana
That little band from Georgia the Atlanta-based foursome The
Brains, will perform all their greatest hits this Erida and Saturda
night at downtown Greenville's Upper Level nightclub (formerlv
JJ's Music Hall), located atop Rafters. They will also be available
for autographs at an extravaganza being held this Saturday from 3 to
4 p.m. in the Carolina East Mall Record Bar. The band has received
national critical acclaim for the progressive rock compositions on
each of their previous tw� I Ps and have just released an KP n the
landslide label, lauded foff ihe abundant eneryv. accurao. and
musicalitv of their live pertormances. Ihe Brains have amassed an
impressive local following despite misplaced local radio airplav.
While the band's sound is sometimes esoteric, sometimes avanle-
garde, it is also danceable. quite listenanle and. hence, alwavs ac-
cessible. This is The Brains fourth trip to Greenville.
Annie's Sandy Arfs While Public Barfs
By MICHAEL BLOW EN
Kshin Ghtht
"This is the summer oj Annie. It
should gross $200 million. When
people think oj Annie K) years from
now, they'll think of the movie, not
the play.
� Ray Stark, May 13
"Ray Stark is unavailable for com-
ment. "
� Columbia Pictures executive.
August 17
BOSTON � The sun never did
come out for the movie version of
A nnie.
The $52 million movie that Col-
umbia Pictures believed would cap-
ture the hearts and pocketbooks of
Americans has been driven from
first-run theaters with 54 admission
prices to sub-run theaters for prices
ranging from $1.50 to $2. In three
months, Annie has moved from the
Warbucks mansion to public hous-
ing.
How could this happen? How
could a movie based on a successful
stage play become so unsuccessful?
How could a heavily promoted
movie with a pre-sold audience
falter so dramatically?
Although the Columbia publicists
were overjoyed that 150 journalists
crammed into New York's Drake
Hotel in May to interview the stars
of Annie, these same people are now
mute. The exhibitors � ho put up ex-
orbitant guarantees to book Annie
are also atypicall) quiet. No one
wants to talk about failure.
"I don't blame them for not talk-
ing said Thomas Meehan. the
author of the stage pla who. alone
with Uncist Martin Charnin
composer Charles Strouse, shared in
the $9.5 million Columbia paid tor
the film rights. "The), ruined the
story, and now they're paving tor
it
The consensus among more man
20 film professionals interviewed in
the areas of distribution, publicity,
and exhibiton is that Columbia Pic-
tures, producer Rav Stark, the ex-
hibitors, the merchandisers and the
media all caught a bad case of Innie
fever. It seemed, back in the earl
spring, that Annie was a sure bet.
Like the Yankees, thev had a for-
midable lineup o stars and as much
monev to spend as George Stem-
breni
C arol Burnett, in the role of Miss
Hannigan, would bring in her televi-
sion tan- -iben Fmnev. as Daddv
Wa-huck and director John
Huston wouk id the more
serious movie-goers. The ludiciou
lv hand-picked screen innie. Aileer.
Ouinn. would captivate the children
and the theater-goers would be
drawn in b the music. On paper, it
looked a- :t Annie would be the
I the golden egg. Well,
she laid ai egg.
Ra stark overed his financial
bases with pre-release sales. He sold
Annie to cable and network televi-
sion, arranged for licensing
agreements with manufacturers and
retailers and received upwards of
S25 million in guarantees from ex-
hibitors. The total income received
from these sales. Film Comment
magazine reports, wa ShO million.
Consequentlv. before the film
even opened. Stark had recouped
the production costs and was S8
million ahead. However, when the
see ANNII WHO?. Page 9
A Star Is Born
Skaggs' Country Music Shines
Rescheduled Prep Talk On For Monday A t Hendrix
The darling of the prep set, Official Preppy Handbook author Lisa Birnbach, will present her Official
Preppy Program on Monday, September 13 at 8 p.m. in Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix Theatre.
Tickets are available at the Central Ticket Office, MSC at $2 (less than her book) for students, S3 for
ECU faculty and staff, and $4 for the public. All tickets sold at the door will be $4. It is rumored that
Miss Birnbach is quite a "looker
By JACK HIRST
Chicago Tribuiw
CHICAGO � Just over a decade ago, Ricky Skaggs
quit high school one English credit shy of a diploma.
Today he isn't particularly proud of it, as one can
discern from the halting way he gets around to mention-
ing it; but the stubbornness that led him to do it explains
much about why he is now the fastest-rising, most
revolutionary new star on the country music scene.
He left high school at 16, having worked the previous
summer with bluegrass pioneer Ralph Stanley's Clinch
Mountain Boys.
"The only thing 1 really failed in was English. Skagg
recalls. "I had an English teacher who wouldn't let me
make up none of my tests when I'd be out on the road.
She wouldn't try to help me. She'd just tell me. 'Boy.
you ain't gonna amount to nothing unless you get you a
diploma, get you a good education 1 said, 'Well. I
shore ain't gonna come back to school a whole year tor
one credit. You can forget that. I've got a job waiting
for me as soon as I walk out ths door
"My principal felt the same way the teacher did. He
said 'Boy you'll not amount to nothing
Today the high school dropout, born near Louisa
(which he pronounces "Lowezy"), Ky is the talk of
Nashville.
From the little Sugarhill Records, for which he
recorded an acclaimed album titled Sweet Temptation,
he has vaulted to the Epic label of huge CBS Records.
There he has recorded and produced the big-selling
album H ait in for the Sun to Shine, which spawned two
No. I country singles ("Crying My Heart Out Over
You" and "I Don't Care which hit the top of the
charts last week), a Top 10 single ("You May See Me
Walkin' ") and a Top 20 single ("Don't Get Above
Your Raisin' ").
Music
Although the recipient of awards from subordinate
country music organizations, he is expected to be a top
contender for the major awards to be presented in Oc-
tober by Nashville's 6.000-member Country Music
Association.
N aitin' for the Sun to Shine sets the record straight
about country music Beyond all doubt, it illustrated
that (1) to be popular, post rhan Cowboy country
music doesn't have to be bland and unexciting pop pap,
slop-swilling sleaze or a tired combination thereof; and
(2) that country music still has plenty of room left for
innovation.
One of Skaggs' most notable accomplishments is
showing that some of country music's most potentially
powerful strengths he in its own heritage, in largely ig-
nored Appalachian values that sustained its people in
hard times.
After the Great Depression, country music followed
country people from farms to cities and went after the
urban market it found there. It gradually began identi-
fying less with its rural values than with the brave new
ideals of the city dwellers whose patronage its growth re-
quired; it started singing about neon-lit beer joints and
open-all-night marriage beds. Eventually, the city folks'
attention was attracted; they were amused by its funny.
See STUMBLED, Page 10
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H� I A- I ' K 'I IMAN
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Annie Who?
Columbia's Flop Runs Big Tab
i ontinued rom Pant- 8
.UK!
I
iMIK'
IS
I
UI a n N a

foi v olumbia Pictures, with big stars and paid
"and it's still playing the price People like
quite successfull in Carol Burnett mugged
man first run theii wa through it
ttei s ' ,nui it threw the focus
Meehan said the off Stark also took out
novie "could, and some ol the host
should, have boon the musical numbers and
success thai Stark was moved the setting from
o more talking about, but the Christmas to the
forgot one thing I ho Fourth ol Jul He
iken forgot to make a good seemed to do
Rock movie When we put everything he could to
A three the pla toethei we ruin the pla
decided to give the rhe movie's failure
�. show primar impor- has affected the mer-
tance We didn't want chandisers and
ns big stars I"he went licensees who paid foi
Youth Theatre In Greenville
To hill 4 Tremendous Need'
lc
I ontinued from Page 8
� iled tot 1 hutsda
16 and ! 7 al
�, 206 ol the
entei on the
I i I irolina Youl h
ice plas tot
linj to Doug
men-
. �
i
�hil
. 1111 u ,
her fantasies and new stepmother,
rhere are si.x characters in the play:
two young girls about 10 soars old,
a young man ,nd woman about 20
and a mot hot and tat hot in their
mid-thirties Ml characters in the
pla sine
say on a (. rack is scheduled tor
�duction in the Studio Ihoatro ol
the Messick Ihoatro Arts Cent al
mi a m. on November 11 and 12.
and agaii at 2:15 p.m. on
Novembei 13 and 14 Rehearsal
times will K announced at the audi-
th( pla; a e on
� at the Joynei 1 ibrar on the
lei i ampus uditions are op
ECl students, faculty, stafi and
area residents Foi furthei informa-
i . 757 6390
the rights to sell Annie
dolls, (Kaltine, babv
carriages, posters,
lamps, buttons and
even a sott drink for
dogs
�'ItAnnie merchan-
diso) hasn't been mov-
ing as tast as we'd
like said a
spokesman tor the na-
tional chain of retail
stoics "Nobody seems
to want Annie as much
as they want E. 7
Meehan said that it
Stark had filmed the
play, "he would have
had a hit. I'm not just
saying that because I
wrote the play, but peo-
ple obviously wanted to
soo the play on the
screen. And even those
who haven't seen the
play wanted the appeal
oi Christmas and a love
story between War-
bucks and Annie.
"Stark equated the
fourth ol July with
Christmas as if they
were interchangeable
holidays. They're not.
I he fourth of July is
hot dogs, but
Christmas is a time
when dreams are fulfill-
ed He also took the
relationship intended
lor Warbucks and An-
nie and turned it into a
love story between
Warbucks and his
secretary
ARMY-NAVY
STORE
ARMY NAVY
STORE
W E SE w
LEATHER COATS
S
S V
H()r Kl I IK
Grande Avi
TS8
Pepsi and the Pirates
a winning combination
This Weekend Visit Scenic
AiHjTjff
With Burt Lancaster
And Susan Sarandon
The Student Union Free Flick This Thursday � 7 p.m.
Friday & Saturday - 5,7,9 p.m. Hendrix Theatre, MSC
Rated R
GRA ND OPEMSG
RCADE VARIETY
SHOP-N-GRILL
218 E. 5th and Reade Circle
(University Arcade Building)
Cigarettes
King's �A'
100s 57C
Cigarettes By the Carton
King's
s6s
loo $479
Limit 1 Pet Customer
Pepsi,
Mountain Dew,
Coke, Mello Yello,
Tab, Dr. Pepper
7-Up
2 Liters
89 C
Budweiser,
Miller,
Miller Lite,
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$059
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6 Pa
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AND GAME ROOM






10
THF EAST CAROLINIAN
SHTLMBLR9. 1981
He May Have Stumbled
Continued From Page 8
rural aphorisms about
man's eternal
weaknesses.
Under the onslaught
of the New Depression
(mental as well as
economic), even city
folks are exhibiting
diminished interest in
the hedonism of the re-
cent "Me Decade
And in country music
there has evolved a
fledgling movement
toward increased
respect for purer sen-
timents, more lasting
relationships, things to
believe in and hold on-
to.
It's leader is Skaggs.
Not only has he become
prominent as a pro-
ducer of his own
records, he has begun
producing those of the
Whites (formerly Buck
White & the Down
Home Folks), a blue-
grass-oriented family
act of which his wife,
Sharon, is a member.
The Whites' first
Skaggs-produced
singleYou Put the
Blue in Me is
scheduled for release
this month.
Skaggs' specialty is
taking a lot of nostalgic
old country and blue-
grass songs (along with
occasional new ones
discriminatingly
chosen) and
embellishing them with
an unlikely fusion of
bluegrass-rooted
acoustics and spare,
electric rockabilly.
Skaggs is a musical
genius whose abilities
range across virtually
every stringed instru-
ment. His knowledge
stems in large part from
a longtime preoccupa-
tion with bluegrass, the
lonely country subform
whose instrumental in-
tricacy and speed have
the same sort of
musical relationship to
mainstream country
that a sports car has to
a tricycle.
His apprenticeship
was considerable. For
two years during and
after high school, he
worked with Stanley's
obscure but prestigious
Clinch Mountain Boys,
"learning the heart and
soul of music he
says. He quit the group
because he "had all this
talent and wasn't mak-
ing no money with it
Soon afterward, he
joined the Washington,
D.C. -based Country
Gentlemen, a more ur-
banized group in which
he learned "about pro-
gressive bluegrass
Two years later, he
moved into the even
more innovative New
South band of Ken-
tucky bluegrass banjo
player J.D. Crowe.
With Crowe, he recalls,
he "learned how to
play traditional music
with a little more swing
and a more modern-
day sound
He then led his own
bluegrass group, Boone
Creek, for a couple of
years before joining �
at age 24 � country-
rock star Emmylou
Harris' popular Hot
Band. That, he notes,
"was my first venture
into electric country-
music. I learned a lot
about drums, bass,
piano and electric
guitar, stuff like that �
enough to where I knew
that the way they used
'em wouldn't be the
way I would, but that if
they were used by way,
it would come out
sounding like my
music.
"I've always felt like
I was 'Picky Ricky I
listen to something and
say, Wee-ell, now, 1
wouldn't do it that-
away I pick things to
death. So I feel like if
something really
sounds good to me, it
must be pretty good.
And I mean that in a
humble way
"Skaggs' distinctive
bluegrass-roc kabilly
approach seems to have
evolved from his
musical background.
But he can recall exact-
ly when he began to
realize that it had the
potential to become
popular.
"What turned my
head around was when
I did T'll Take the
Blame an old Stanley
Brothers (bluegrass)
tune, on the Sweet
Temptation album
he says. "I took an old
sort of backwoods
country song � kind of
a tragic thing: 'You say
I've done you wrong.
I've wrecked a happy
home' and so on � and
producd it into a
modern country
record.
"Then on Sugarhill,
a small label with little
distribution or finances
for promotion, that
record went No. 1 at
KIKK Radio in
Houston for six weeks
Now has a COLOR T.V.
and will be showing all sporting
events. Happy Hour prices will be
in effect during these events.
WHENTHET.VSON,
SO IS HAPPY HOUR
H hile there enjoy our fine food and pleasant atmosphere.
j'k4xvk-i
Thursday
All New
College Night
All Cans
70 All Night
Admission $1.00
!
&K
Friday
End of the Week Party
3:30-7:30�Free Adm. for all ECU students
3:30-4:30 � All Ponies 30
4:30-7:30 �All Cans 65
Friday 9-11 � All Cans 65c All Ladies'
wHappy Hour Stamp Admitted FREE
All Night
Sunday � Ladies' Nite � Free Admission for Ladies'
ftSC Draft while it lasts.
417 Cotanche St. (Downtown)
in a row. Nobody out
there (in Texas) knew
me except bluegrass
people. Younger people
must've thought I was a
misprint for Boz
Scaggs. But when 1
heard that record did
what it did, I really got
to thinking. 'Skaggs I
said to myself, 4I
believe you're on the
right track "
Skaggs doesn't like
to refer to his music as
"commercial He
preferes to call it
"competitive, because,
I'm competing � with
Kenny Rogers,
Alabama, Willie
Nelson and so on He
is competing so well
that last week Waitin'
For the Sun to Shine
had been in the country
album hit charts for 38
weeks and was still
positioned at No. 3 �
behind Alabama and
Willie Nelson and in
front of the current
albums of Dolly Par-
ton, Barbara Mandrell,
Waylon Jennings and
other big names.
Despite his com-
petitive spirit, Skaggs
wasn't drawn to the old
songs he sings just by
some hunch that,
embellished with in-
novative techniques,
they might prove com-
mercial. He was also
drawn to them because
he was � and is �
repelled by the
messages in the lyrics of
much of today's
mainstream country
music. He is a devout
Southern Baptist who is
concerned about what
he calls the "witness"
he makes for his
religion.
"Country music has
been putting out what
to me is some real filthy
trash he says. "It
seems like all of coun-
try music nowadays is
about 'let's get in the
bedroom, let's get
drunk and cheat It's
been run into the
ground. 1 won't do
them kinda songs. I did
one, an (unreleased)
album for Sugarhill
called Don't Cheat in
Our Home Town, but
that one's still got the
old values, which is
what I'm trying to br-
ing back in my records.
"I ain't trying to
save the world or save
country music. One
person can't do it. But
at least you can set
some standards, and 1
think mv music does
that. Like, a friend of
mine in Kentucky wrote
a song called 'Higrma
40 Blues' on my next
Epic album that'll be
out in September
There's a place in there
where it said, 'My eyes
are filled with bitter
tears1 sure could use a
good cold beer and 1
sang it that way for a
while. Then 1 got to
thinking about the kind
of example you are; so
I changed it to 'My eyes
are filled with bitter
tearsLord, I ain't been
home in years
"I could be a Chris
tian and still drink if 1
really wanted to, and 1
don't think. b doing
it, 1 would hurt
anybody. But it other
people think sou
shouldn't drink it
you're a Christian, then
you shouldn't drink in
front of 'em And I
don't personally like to
drink because alcohol
really tears m system
up; I can't handle it
I've done it bet ore. and
I just don't like it. I
don't teel like I'm a
religious fanatic,
although sometimes
people may think I
come on like that. But
I'm just trying to let
people know how 1
teel
"1 ain't gonna get
above m raisin' I '
song means more and
more to me even &
It there a -r gonna
he a time I would
that, ii would be now 1
could jus 'Aw,
man. I'm this I'n
that, and 1 don't hav
to go back and resj
oid' Monroe or Ka
Stanley and the
moral they're all just
real corn
"Bui I don'i a
thai I still hold 'em up
high
OPEN24HOURS DRIVE THRU WINDOW
ALL YOU CAN EAT �
CHICKEN $2.99
(dark meat)
This meal includes Chicken,
Fries, Biscuits &
1 Small Tea (no refills)
4-9 p.m. Mon Tues & Wed.
No Take Outs
1011 Charles Street � 752-1373 1 Block from Campus
C
PLAZA SHELL
6lO Greenville Blvd.
��4 hcu
756-3023
24HOURS
TOWIMC
SERVICE
ST. JAMES
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
UNIVERSITY STUDENT
PICK-UP SCHEDULE
Students who wish To attend Sunday morning worship ser-
vices, but do not have a ride, may attend the worship ser
vice at St. James United Methodist Church by observing
the following schedule. The church van will be used to
transport students to and from the church.
10:10
AAethodist Student Center
10:12
Garrett Resident Hall
10:15
Jarvis Resident Hall
10:17
Fleming Resident Hall
10:20
Cotton Resident Hall
10:25
White Resident Hall
10:27
Umstead Resident Hall
10:30
Tyler Resident Hall
10:40
St. James United
Methodist Church
S
Coffee and doughnuts will be served in
the fellowship hall, for university
students, from 10:30 a.m. until 11 00 a.m.
Students will be returned to the dorms
following the conclusion of the morning
worship service.
758-4591 417 Cotanche St. (D
��:��
CAR-TRUCK-GAS THEFT
WITH
ANTI-THEFT-TAMPER
ALARM
100 MANUFACTURER'S LIFETIME GUARANTEE
SIMPLE 30 MINUTE INSTALLATION
USES ONLY YOUR HORN
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OPEN DOOR, HOOD, GAS TANK
OR ATTEMPT TO RfcMOVE
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WITHOUT ALARM SOUNDING
IMMEDIATELY
�ALSO ADAPTABLE TO HOUSE GARAGE DOOR
ill
CENTER
A DIVISION OF PAIR Ell ClIIONCS "MC
105 Trade St. � Phone 756-2293
P

p
C
p
I
p �
I
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Wi
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tin
W
001
ofl
2?;
baj
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I HI I ASI C XKOl IMW
Sports
si PTEMBER9. 1982
Pane 1 I
s
Pirates To Invade Carter Stadium
B KEN BOLTON
vsisl�nt sp�rU frdilor
W ith the Fast Carolina Pirates ac-
counting for four of N C. State's
top 10 all-time home crouds, this
Saturday night's game promises to
he the center of attention in the state
� North Carolina.
1 CU head coach Fd Emory is
looking for his first win ovei N.C.
State In lc80, the Wolf pack were
ctorious 36-14 and came out on
top $l-10lasi year. The Pirates have
not won in the series since 1977, a
28 23 win.
But on the other side of the coin.
1 Cl is undefeated in their season
opener with Emorv at the helm, so
of these two streaks wiii end
Saturday night.
1 a Tuesday afternoon press
conference, Emor answered the
ften-asked question of who will be
starting quarterback. "We've
.�Je the decision to go with Greg
Stewart as our starter he said.
"Bvit we expect to use Kevin Ingram
a great deal against N.C. State
Now that the quarterback situa-
� is settled. Emory's biggest con-
cern on offense is kev injuries at the
tailback and center positions. "The
biggest thing offensively we'll be
ssing is Jimmy Walden at
tailback Emory said. "R:ght now
freshman Ions Baker is running at
number one with Milt Corsev and
Vernard Wynn behind him
At the center position, Tim Mit-
chell has been chosen to start. Both
John Floyd and Julius Sampson
have been oui ot practice with ankle
injuries. Freshman Greg Thomas
will be backing up Mitchell as the
second string snapper.
After eight years of running the
wishbone. Fast Carolina will
operate from the "1" formation in
1982 According to Emory, the
Pirates wen! to the "1" because of
the challenging opponents in
Division- football. "If we were still
in the Southern Conference, we
would still pla the wishbone. The
"1" formation gives us a chance to
run against people equal or better
than us
On defense, the Pirates will have
to try and contain Joe Mclntosh,
the ACC's wading rusher last season
as a freshman. Mclntosh rushed for
130 ards and two touchdowns last
week against Furman.
In the game against Furman, the
Wolfpack looked impressive in
posting a 26-0 victory was very
impressed with how far along their
offense was Emorv said. "With a
quarterback like Tol Avery and a
tailback like Mclntosh operating
behind a big, mobile offensive line,
they're not fooling anyone
State's defense gives Emory good
cause for concern also. The
Wolfpack shut out Furman, allow-
ing the Palladins only two yards per
carry. "If the published reports are
true, they've got to have the fastest
secondary in college football
stated Emory. "It will be a great test
for our new formation
The Pirates will be taking a
youthful squad to Raleigh on Satur-
day, with only five seniors slated to
start. Offensively, the starting
seniors will be Carlton Nelson at
flanker and guard Tom Carnes. On
defense, All-America candidate
Jody Schulz will be the only senior
among the linemen or linebackers.
Strong safety Smokey Norris and
cornerback Gerald Sykes will also
be starting seniors. Besides the five
seniors, the Pirates plan to start 12
juniors, four sophomores and
Freshman tailback Tony Baker of
High Point.
As for the kicking game, both the
punter and the kicker will be playing
in their first college football game.
John W illiams looks to be the star-
ting punter, and freshman Jeff
Heath from Virginia Beach will be
handling the kicking chores.
Whitley Wilkerson, the only four-
year starter for the Pirates, will per-
form at the special-team snapper
position. Ricky Nichols, a 5-10,
175-pound sophomore, is expected
to return kickoffs, and Chuck
Bishop will be receiving punts.
With the season only two day
away from starting, Emory's mail
concern is that fans will judge tht
Pirates by their first game A-
Emory puts it, they've been workinj
very hard to get ready for a whok
season, not just one game. And witr
one of the toughest schedules in tht
country, Emory has to prepare hard
for all eleven games.
Having to play seven away games
at places like Florida State and
Missouri will be tough, and Emory
knows it. "I might give out. but 1
won't give up he said.
Emory says the key to beating
N.C. State is execution. "To have a
chance to win, we'll have to play
great defense, have a great kicking
game and not make mistakes he
said. "We have better quality
athletes than ever before at ECU .
They might be favored, but we'll be
ready to play
mww$M
' w JVLIJjfcrtw-i'f�Kir,T

, .IflfcfrW?"Jrf. �
O'Roark Makes Apologies
State's Joe Mclntosh in last year's battle with ECl
NFL Strike Appears
To Be A Reality
F( I SPORTS INFORMATION
(Editor's note: After quitting the
ECU football team lasi year, Larrv
O'Roark made some deroiaior
statetm nts to the press concerning
head 'noihatt coach Ed Emorv.)
I ast year, split end I arry
O'Roark left the East Carolina
ersity football program at mid-
season and fired a few parting shots.
The 6-0, 176-pound senior is back
on the team again after getting a
e ot confidence from head coach
E . Emory and his teammates.
After issuing apologies to coach
y rr ry, the coaching stafl and the
squad, returning veterans
82-8 to reinstate O'Roark.
"Larry has come back and work-
hard Emorv said. "He said
he'd
willing
come back
without scholarship and plav anv
p isition. All he wanted was a
chance to prove himself.
"The squad telt like he could be a
tive factor with his intensity and
desire. We talked about the adversi-
; he'd go through coming back and
working his uav up from the scout
team. He knows it won't be easy,
bu: he's doing a good job handling
himself and the situation
O'Roark, who was starting split
end before leaving the team last fall,
walked on as defensive back at the
beginning ot tall drills. He was bat-
tling his wav up the depth chart
when a rash of injuries at split end
forced a position shift back to his
old position.
He'll make the trip to N. C. State
Saturday as a reserve receiver, hav-
ing lost starting honors to junior
transfer Stuart Ramirez. He lost his
icrsev number, 11. to sophomore
transfer John Williams during his
absence. He'll be wearing No. 12.
But, he's never lost his determina-
tion.
He's playing without scholarship,
attending classes and trying to hold
down a part-time job to make ends
meet.
"larrv tried to call me several
times this ummer when I was on the
move a lot. He talked to m wife
and to a couple o coaches Emory
said. "He wanted the opportunity
to talk to me. All he wanted was a
chance to talk
"We finally cot together and he
told me he wanted to get things
straight between us. He said he'd
made a mistake last fall. He wanted
me to .onsider letting him play foot-
ball here. He said his education was
important to him and that he missed
football. He asked for a chance to
apologize to the coaches and
players.
"1 didn't give him an answer for
three or four weeks. I thought
about it a lot. I talked to about 25
of our players and they all felt
I arry O'Roark
thathe deserved a chance to address
the squad. He talked to the squad
on August 15.
"He's handling the situation with
class and dignity
The Centreville, Va native
transferred from Frostburg State in
1979 and caught six passes for 68
yards in 1980 as a reserve, last
season, he pulled in six passes tor 81
yards and finished third on the team
in receiving despite missing the final
half of the season.
"1 was out of East Carolina for
nine months O'Roark said.
"During that period. 1 thought
about where I stood and how I need-
ed to better myself. My number one
priority is to finish my college
education. It is essential to get mv
degree whether 1 play football or
not.
"Secondly, 1 do love football and
like the competition. 1 called coach
Emory and asked if 1 could talk to
him. He gave me the chance. It was
difficult considering the cir-
cumstances. I'm grateful that he
gave me the many opportunities to
talk to the team and coaches.
"I'm going to try to contribute as
much as 1 can to help coach Emory
and everyone in the East Carolina
football program. Whether I play
or not, as long as I feel that 1 am
contributing to the team, 1 know I'll
leave here with a positive attitude
about East Carolina football and
the school itself.
"I'm definitely going to get my
degree O'Roark said of his pur-
suit of a geology major.
Whatever happened to the good
old days when football was plaved
for the sake of the game' In the
past, pro football has invaded more
living rooms on Sundav afternoons
than all o the Atari cartridges put
together.
Have vou ever thought about
what it would be like to live through
a calendar vear without a Super
Bowl It could ver well happen this
year for the first time since the post-
season game's inception 1" years
ago.
This season, instead of screen
passes we couid have screened
urinalysis tests; instead of pr-game
coin tosses, we have pregame
solidarity handshakes; to replace the
dependable Jaworski to Char-
michael bomb, we will have the
potential USFL bomb. And the big-
gest fumble o them all is the
possibility of a players' strike.
As the proposed start of the
season gets closer, the possibility of
a strike is very real. The main issue
is, of course, money.
The opponents o this disagree-
ment are the National Football
League Players Association
(NFL PA) and the NFl Manage-
ment Council. In other words, it's
the players' union against
owners.
Leading the arguments for I
piavers is Ed Garev. executive
director of the NFLPA On the
other side ot the issue is JaK
Donlan. who represents the owners
The main demand thai the players
are making is what is being called
"the 55 percent solution I he
piavers want their salaries to be
derived from 55 percent of the NFl
teams' total eross revenues.
KFN BOLTON
Sports Perspective
The piavers feel that thev should
have this wealth-sharing percentage
because of the socialistic nature of
NFL team organizations. No matter
how well a team does or how far
thev go in the playoffs, they will get
approximately the same amount of
revenue as the worst team in the
league.
According to the players, this
system gives the owners incentive to
go after younger players who will be
See PL AVERS Page 12
45,000-Plus Expected
Pirates vs. Pack Expected To Be Crowd Pleaser
N.C. State and East Carolina will
meet again for the thirteenth time
this Saturday night. And out of
those meetings, there has never been
one shutout b either team
The closest "skunk" victory oc-
curred in 1975 when the Wolfpack
beat the Pirates, 26-3. ECU sought
revenge, however, and won 28-23 in
1977. Now, four years later, the
Pirates are again in pursuit, with V
C. State having captured the last
four games.
More than likely, this year's con-
frontation between the two rivalries
will not prove to be a shutout either.
In tact, both teams are similar in
many ways. N. C. State's potential
starters include nine seniors, six
juniors, five sophomores and two
freshmen. For East Carolina, the
Pirates have five seniors, 12 juniors,
five sophomores, and one freshman
listed for the N. C. State line-up.
Sta'e and ECU each have young
kicking teams, with two freshmen
placekickers. Sophomore John
Williams will be punting for the
Pirates and State's Marty Mar-
tinussen will be handling the
Wolfpack's punts.
On an average, the Pirates' star-
ting offensive line weighs
248-pounds; offensive backs, 187;
defensive line, 232; linebackers,
222; and defensive backs, 185. In
comparison, the Wolfpack's offen-
sive line weighs in at 250-pounds;
offensive backs, 183; defensive line,
232; linebackers, 223; and defensive
backs, 189.
In the quarterback position, biu
and State have had several prospects
vying for the number one spot this
year, junior QB Greg Stewart has
finallv landed the position and Tol
Avery started as the number one QB
in State's opening game against Fur-
man lasi week. ECU's Kevin Ingram
and State's Ron I araway are next in
line to lead the offense.
Both offensive teams also run an
I formation variation and have
outstanding hacks. In last year's
game against ECU, State tailback
Joe Mclntosh ran for 167 yards,
scored one touchdown and passed
for another. The Pirates have
Earnest Byner in the fullback posi-
tion. Bner had 193 yards rushing
on 28 carries last season and averag-
ed 6.8 yards. Tight end Norwood
Vann finished with 20 receptions for
288 ards. a 14.4 average and two
touchdowns. ECU's total offense
and passing leader for 1981 was
Carlton Nelson, who has been swit-
ched to Hanker.
sense, it's like we're playing two
opening games he said. "We
don't know what they're going to do
because we haven't seen them.
"They've got a new game, having
switched from the wishbone to the
"eye and we're also in the dark
about wha. they'll be doing on
defense. It's always better to have
seen a team in action, but, just like
facing Furman, the only thing we
can do is anticipate
Kiffin said the team will also have
to play better than it did against
Furman. "We've got to have better
tackling, better blocking and better
execution. Our practices this week
are important because we're playing
so many young people and also
because of those piavers who had
the virus in fall camp and haven't
Cindy peasants
JD� I ook Inside
The Wolfpack's defensive team
will be led by free safety Eric
Williams and linebacker Vaughan
Johnson. Johnson had 18 tackles in
last year's game. All-America can-
didate Jody Schul heads an all-star
cast, including Hal Stephens, Steve
Hamilton and Sam Norris.
With the Wolfpack having played
one game already, one may consider
State a step ahead of ECU. But Kif-
fin doesn't see it that way. "In a
Pirate Head Coach Ed Emory With Whitley Wilkerson, special teams snapper, and Kurt Earkins, kicker
practiced that much. Experience
comes not only from plaving in
games but also in practice
The head coach reported a good
practice Tuesdav but is concerned
about his offense. "Probablv our
biggest concern right now is the tact
that we're banged up in the offen-
sive backfield
Mclntosh. who was sick from a
virus earlier this week and has been
bothered by a hip pointer he sustain-
ed in last week's game, was expected
to begin practice on W ednesdav
As usual, this Saturday's game
should be exciting and physical. A
crowd of 45.000-plus is expected to
turn out for the event. If ECl is
seeking revenge, this is the team to
achieve it.
"Looking at ECU, we think this
is the best team we've played since
I've been here anyway Kiffin said
"And if you look back in past years,
they (ECU) have had some outstan-
ding teams. This team mav be one
of them
Kiffin added that the Pirates have
great speed on the defensive and of-
fensive teams and praised ECU's
new offense. "1 think their changed
offense presents the runner and the
pass
To retaliate, Kiffin said his team
must play good defense. "Our
young team played with a lot of hus-
tle and intensity against Furman
he said, "but we can't afford to
make the same mistakes against a
good team like ECU
Revenge is sweet. Winning is
sweet. And if the Pirates take the
Wolfpack, victory will be sweeter
than ever.

f
I





12
T HI LAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 9, 1982
Pitt, UNC To Hit The Grid
PITTSBURGH
(UPI) Expect the
unexpected in the na-
tionally televised
season opener between
No. 1 Pittsburgh and
sixth-ranked North
Carolina at Three
Rivers Stadium Thurs-
day night.
That's the approach
the coaching staffs of
the respective teams
have been taking to
their game
"I'm sure they will
give us some things we
haven't seen before,
just like we've added a
few wrinkles says
Pitt offensive coor-
dinator Joe Daniels.
"That's always the pro-
blem with a season
opener. You exchange
game films, but that
doesn't give you any in-
dication of what kinds
of changes a team has
installed over the sum-
mer. It's not so much
of a problem later in
the season, because
then you're exchanging
films from this year's
games and can get a
better idea of what
kinds of things to ex-
pect
Teams are especial!)
capable of adding new
crinkles to successful
old game plans when
their personnel includes
a large number ot
returning starters, as is
the case with both Pitt
and North Carolina.
The Panthers, 11-1 the
past three seasons and
No. 2 in the final rank-
ings the past two, have
18 returning starters;
the Tar Heels, 10-2 in
1981 and ranked ninth,
return 15.
Besides, both teams
are capable of doing
more than what they're
famous for.
Pitt is known as a
pass-happy team
thanks to the track
record of its Heisman
Trophy-candidate
quarterback, Danny
Marino, already the
Panthers' all-time
leading passer, and his
dynamic receiving trio
of flanker Dwight Col-
lins, split end Julius
Dawkins and tight end
John Brown.
But the Panthers
have two potent runn-
ing backs in sophomore
fullback Marlon Mcln-
tyre and senior
halfback Bryan
Thomas, who managed
to rush for 1,132 yards
last year despite the em-
phasis on passing. And,
if the Panthers run true
to last year's form,
don't be surprised if
Marino passes to Mcln-
tyre and Thomas as
much or more than to
his regular receivers.
Adding to Pitt's un-
predictability on of-
fense is the fact that
Marino has and makes
use of the freedom to
audible out of a play at
the line of scrimmage if
necessary.
That's why North
Carolina Coach Dick
Crum says he can't af-
ford to worry about
any one particular
aspect of the Pitt of-
fense.
"It's the whole pic-
ture that concerns me
he said. "In Dan
Marino and Bryan
Thomas alone they
have a fine offense. I
think their passing
game will be as good or
better than last year's,
and with a 1,000-yard
rusher returning,
you've got to expect the
running game to be bet-
ter too
Conversely, tailback
Kelvin Brvant, the na-
tion's third best rusher
last year although he
missed about half the
season, is supposed to
be what makes the Tar
Heels' offense go. But
Pitt would be remiss to
concentrate on stopp-
ing him at the expense
of ignoring senior
quarterback Rod
Elkins.
"If we concentrate
too much on Kelvin,
they're going to throw
the football all over the
place said Pitt's first-
year head coach, Foge
Fazio. "Rod Elkins is a
great football player,
very strong and very ac-
curate as a passer
Elkins passed for 994
yards last year despite a
mid-season ankle in-
jury that nagged him
the rest of the year.
Crum expects Elkins'
senior year to more
resemble his
sophomore season,
when he led the Atlan-
tic Coast Conference in
passing.
"I'm expecting a big
year from Rod Crum
said. "A lot of people
would have been happy
with the year he had
last season, but not
him. He's the kind of
competitor who always
thinks he can do bet-
ter
Neither Pitt nor
North Carolina field
predictable defenses
either. In fact, the onlv
thing predictable about
either one of them is
their respective
stinginess: The Pan-
thers ranked first
against the rush and
first in total defense
last season, while
North Carolina ranked
fifth against points
scored.
"Their defense is
really a lot of
everythng Pitt offen-
sive coordinator Joe
Daniels of the Tarheel
defense. "They're very
effective in stunts, but
yet they don't do an
over amount of stun-
ting. Rather, they have
a knack of stunting in
the right situation in-
stead of where it would
be predicted. They real-
ly keep a team on its
toes.
"They have fine
athletes. They aren't
necessarily a big defen-
sive team, but the most
impressive thing is their
athletic ability and their
excellent team speed.
Thev will get to the
football
In short, he said,
"Their defense is a lot
like our defense
The Big Bat A ttack
East Carolina star-
ting split end Stuart
Ramirez, a transfer
from San Fransisco Ci-
ty College, is nursing a
bruised shoulder after a
bat attack in an ECU
classroom Monday
morning.
The 6-0, 202 pound
California native was
entering a Labor Day
morning class when a
bat which had been
hanging from the
classroom ceiling began
to fly around the room.
In the ensuing panic,
Ramirez was shoved in-
to the door.
After a brief trip to
Sports Medicine, he
returned to class with
an ice pack on his
shoulder, casting a
cautious eye at every
ceiling.
Head softball coach
Sue Manahan was a
member of "The
Stompers" softball
team, which won the
women's national tour-
nament in Atlanta,
Ga this summer. Cyn-
thia Shepard, a lad
Pirate softball player
also competed in tht
tournament and was
named to the second
all-America team. In
all, 39 teams par-
ticipated in the tourna-
ment.
Head coach Ed
Emory will again host
an informal public
gathering each week to
discuss Pirate football,
starting Monday, Sept.
13.
The gathering,
known as the Quarter-
back Club, will meet
each week at the
Ramada Inn at 6:00
p.m. A buffet of heavy
d'oeuvres will be served
each week at a cost of
$4.00 per person.
Food will be served
at 6:00 p.m then
Emory will address the
group and answer ques
tions from 6:30-7:15
p.m.
The QB Club will be
followed by the Ed
Emorv Talk Show on
WRQR-FM radio, 94.3
on the dial, from
7:30-8:30 p.m. This is a
call-in talk show with
host Henry Hinton
The show will originate
live from the lounge ot
the Ramada Inn with
those attending the
Quarterback Club as
special guests of the
lounge.
Both the QB Club
meeting and the talk
show are open to the
public.
The ECU MK'cer
team opens its season
this Sundav when the
Pirates host
Christopher Newport
College at 2:00 p.m.
Admission is free
and head coach Robbie
Church invites all
students to come out
and support the team
"We expect to have a
good vear said
Church. "So tar, we
have had a very good
preseason
As voted on by the
players, the captains
for Sunday's game will
be Dennis Elwell and
Bill Merwin
After Christopher
Newport, the Pirates
will host the William
and Marv Indians, who
are nationally ranked
AsxsiK :�;���
:jf�x-�;v��:����:�:�� ?-$ � ���
Players' Strike
A Real Threat
i n
!93M9tJ
r�ATfOOriAU
SPORTS WRITERS NEEDED
Apply in person at The East Carolinian office. Old
South Building, across from Jo ner I ihrarv . Experience
preferred but not necessary. Must be dependable and
willing to learn.
i ontinued From
Page 11
lling to play tor It
monev than the
veterans.
Compared to other
professional sports, the
plavers have reason to
be upset. The average
annual salarv for a
player in the NFL is
578 000 Most
people wouldn't com-
plain about that kind of
monev. but the average
alarv of a pro basket-
ball player is 1186,000.
Be-ides the proposed
solution, some of the
other plaver demand
are: increased life in-
surance, a serious ef-
fort to get rid of ar-
tificial turf, doubled
retirement benefit
and all cut plavers to
automatically become
free agents and not
have to go through
waivers.
With all of these
negotiations and ar-
bitrations, there is no
wav that the game ltselt
cannot be scarred.
Compared with the
baseball troubles la
year, the ones most
hurt bv the whole d
will be the fans. In-
stead of across-the-
tield passes, we might
have to settle for
across-the-tabie offers
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-HI





I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 9. 1982
13
it
irn
I he ECU baseball team is having fall practice and is scheduled to play
I NC-l'hapel Hill on Sept. 15.
Did You Write Your Mom
Yet This Week?
Have You Visited The Library
Yet This Week?
Have You Visited Historic Ayden
Yet This Week?
Have You Read Anything
More Stupid Than This
Yet This Week?
THINK ABOUT IT
Rough Week For A CC
(I PI) - It could be
a rough week for the
Mlantic coast Con-
ference.
National champion
�mson fell to Georgia
Monday night and
night, North
( arolina goes against
-ranked Pittsburgh.
Saturday, Georgia
Tech hosts fourth-
ranked Alabama and
Maryland visits fifth-
ranked Penn State.
irginia, coming off a
I 10 record, will be the
rider dog against
Navy, while Wake
forest, although
mating Western
( arolina last week, is
bucking the odds in us
game against Auburn.
North Carolina
State, which downed
Furman last week, is
favored going against
East Carolina. Duke is
idle.
Tar Heel Coach Dick
( i urn believes Pitt-
sburgh deserves its top
ranking.
"Pittsburgh is pro-
bably the most com-
plete football team
we've played in our
time at Carolina
Crum said. "When you
look at them on film,
you really can't find
one area of weakness
Crum said there is no
way the Tar Heels can
hope to stop Pitt
quarterback Dan
Marino completely.
"We've got to make
some big plays on him
and hope he's not hav-
ing a great night
Crum said. "We would
like to just contain him,
but that's so difficult
because of the skills his
receivers have
Georgia Tech beat
Alabama in its season-
opener last year and
then did not win
another game.
Alabama finished 9-2-1
last year with a loss to
Texas in the Cotton
Bowl.
Yellow Jacket Coach
Bill Curry notes this
will be Bear Bryant's
25th season at
Alabama.
"I believe that all
signs are pointing to the
fact that Coach Bryant
has decided to make
this a big year for his
Alabama team Curry
said. "We've watched
their spring game, read
what he's said and
noticed the atmosphere
surrounding the
squad
Maryland, 4-6-1 last
year, will be playing its
first game under Coach
Bobby Ross. Maryland
has beaten Penn State
just one time in 26
games and has never
won at Penn State.
George Welsh, the
new coach at Virginia,
will be going against a
Navy team he coached
from 1973 through
1981. Virginia is com-
ing off a 1-10 season.
Welsh, while saying
his team will be
prepared for the Navy
game, stresses the out-
come won't make or
break the Cavalier
season.
"We've tried to
prepare our football
team to play an
11-game schedule, and
we have not sacrificed
laying the groundwork
necessary to do that in
order to prepare for the
first football game he
said.
Wake Forest has won
its last two games
against Auburn, which
will be playing its first
game of the 1982
season.
The Deacons are let
by quarterback Gary
Schofield, who passed
for 225 yards and two
touchdowns against
Western Carolina.
"Gary did a nice
methodical job said
Coach Al Groh. Tt
was not as good as he's
going to play and not as
good as he has played.
He's the field general
and as he goes, so goes
our offense
North Carolina State
downed Furman 26-0
but Coach Monte Kif-
fin, noting the score
was 0-0 at half time,
said the Wolfpack must
show improvement
against East Carolina.
"We'll take the ap-
proach that we've got
to get better than we
were against Furman
he said. "We've got to
have better tackling,
better blocking and bet-
ter execution.
"Our practices this
week are important
because we're playing
so many young people
and, also, because of
those players who had
the virus in fall camp
and haven't practiced
that much
DEDICATION
MAKES THE DIFFERENCE
CONCERN
MAKES THE DIFFERENCE
EXPERIENCE
MAKES THE DIFFERENCE
ABILITY
MAKES THE DIFFERENCE
COVERAGE
MAKES THE DIFFERENCE
KNOW-HOW
MAKES THE DIFFERENCE
Carolinian
MAKES THE DIFFERENCE
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
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East Carolina University, Greenville, N. C. 27834
(or bring subscription form by office)
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MMMMIH �'�"�
t
r
t






14
fHE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBERS, 1982
Bryant Not Taking Tech For Granted
(UPl) � Alabama
Coach Bear Bryant will
be 69 years old Satur-
day, and his players
know what he'd like for
a present � a season-
opening victory over
Georgia Tech, the only
team to beat the 4th-
ranked Crimson Tide in
1981.
In one of its most
embarrassing moments
in many years,
Alabama, favored by
three touchdowns,
sleep-walked through a
24-21 loss to Tech,
which didn't win
another game all year.
This year, Alabama,
which wound up 9-1-1
in '81. has the national
championship as its
coal while Georgia
Tech, which wound up
1-10, figures to suffer
through another losing
season.
But the always-
cautious Bryant says
the Crimson Tide better
be more prepared to
play the Yellow Jackets
than last year.
"It's our first game
and that makes it a big
one said Bryant.
"Bill Curry (Tech
coach) had his team
ready for us last year
and 1 hope that will be
an incentive for us. I
think we are capable of
beating them, but we
have to go over there
and do it
Although Bryant
says he'll be disap-
pointed if Alabama
isn't better this year, he
adds the Tide goes into
its opener "not in good
shape with our depth,
which has been serious-
ly cut by injuries. But,
this is a way of life in
football. We'll just
have to go with the
players at hand
Curry feels Bryant is
just crying "wolf
"All signs are pointing
to the fact that Coach
Bryant has decided to
make this a big year for
his Alabama team
said Curry. "It's an
awesome task for
Georgia Tech to take
on Alabama year after
year in the season
opener
As for capturing the
national title in what
many feel will the next
to last season for the
winningest (315 vic-
tories) coach in college
football history, Bryant
says: "We have an op-
portunity to control
our destiny and we
must do that if we ex-
pect to accomplish the
goals we have set this
year
There are two other
games involving
nationally-ranked
teams being played in
the Southeast Satur-
day. Seventh-ranked
Georgia, which knock-
ed off defending na-
tional champion Clem-
son, 13-7, Monday
night, hosts 19th-
ranked Brig ham
Young, and 16th-
ranked Florida, which
beat 15th-ranked
Miami (Fla.), 17-14,
last Saturday, hosts
Southern Cal.
In other
Southeastern Con-
ference action. Auburn
opens as host to Wake
Forest; Kentucky opens
at Kansas State; Ole
Miss, 27-10 winner over
Memphis State, hosts
Southern Miss, 45-27
winner over Nor-
theastern Louisiana;
Mississippi State, 30-21
winner over Tulane,
hosts Arkansas State;
Tennessee, 25-24 loser
to Duke, hosts Iowa
State; and Vanderbilt
opens at Memphis
State.
Also, Miami hosts
Houston and Tulane
will be at llth-ranked
Southern Methodist.
Georgia Coach Vince
Dooley is concerned
about having to face
aerial-minded Brigham
Young, 27-0 winner
over N e v ada - La s
Vegas, less than five
full days after the
physically-draining bat-
tle with 9th-ranked
Clemson. But the
Bulldogs have two
pluses � Herschel
Walker is ready to play
a full game and new
quarterback John
Lastinger now has a
game under his belt.
Walker, who broke
his right thumb less
than three weeks ago,
played sparingly
against Clemson, gain-
ing only 20 yards on 11
carries. But the two-
time All-America
junior tailback will
start Saturday, and
Dooley says, "I think
Herschel will be better
against Brigham Young
but he still won't be at
maximum effec-
tiveness.
"That will take
awhile Dooley add-
ed. "He's only practic-
ed for a week this fall
and he's rusty
Tennessee Coach
Johnny Majors is wor-
ried about Iowa Slate,
especially after the way
his team played against
Duke.
"1 look for Iowa
State to be bigger and
stronger than Duke
was said Majors.
"Although they lost
their quarterback and
tailback from last year,
they replaced them with
outstanding junior col-
lege players. We must
toughen up our defense
this week
Wake Forest, which
opened last week with a
31-10 victory over
Western Carolina,
upset Auburn last vear,
24-21.
"At best, we're go-
ing to be adequate on
offense Dye said.
"We don't have the
physical capability in
some places to be better
than that.
Want To Gain
Some Practical Experience
In The Media
ECU SPORTS INFORMATION
needs
Student Interns
Writing Experience Preferred
But Not Necessary
If interested, call 757-6491
Classifieds
PKRSONAL
THE PERSON removing
valuables (rom blue Pinto on Sept
6 please return prescription
qlasses to Mendenhall Into Desk
No questions asked
HAPPY ANNIVERSARY SMA
from CT
ROOMMATE
WANTED
TWO ROOMMATES needed
�i bedroom house. 2 blocks from
campus S'S per month Call Buzi
Chadw ck 7S2 4961 309 E Uth St
I OR 2 female roommates needed
Lanqstnn Park Apt Call 752 0082
or come bv Hearts Delight
Available now
ROOMMATE NEEDED Cannon
Cou't Ap's 'S6 '36? for mforma
tion
WANTED
NEEDED CERTIFIED scuba
diver for volunteer work Begin
within one to two weeks Flexible
hours depending on schedule Con
tact Dr David Porretta Mmges
Coliseum 757 �44l. after 5 pm
call 7 58 0489
LOST AND
FOUND
Lost in FOUR SEASONS
restaurant Lady's yellow gold
Bulova watch engraved on back
Great sentimental value Reward
Call 758 7903 and ask for Shern
FOUND LADY S watch in vicmi
ty of library Call 638 8147
LOST BROWN framed
eyeglasses in brown case If found.
call 762 709!
FOR SALE
FOR SALE JVC JAS 22 Stereo
Amp 45 wattsc J1S0 or best offer
752 0469
FOR SALE Stereo with 8 track
and radio Turntable doesnt work
25 tapes S60 752 3334
FREE KITTENS NEED A good
home call 758 6402 ask tor Chris
1979 Chevette white hatchback
air. am fm, low mileage one
owner like new. call 756 4913
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL Typist wants to
type at home Reasonable rates
756 3660
PROFESSIONAL Typing service
experience, quality work IBM
typewriter Call Lanie Shivo
758 iiv 0 . . j "�"�' "6 106
TyI'ing if HW r-ip � . � � lumei
thes s 't Call v �
3 SB3S
Angel Flight is an honorary, professional, service
organization of dedicated individuals from leading
colleges across the nation. It is an organization that
works closely with Air Force ROTC, however,
membership in Angel Flight requires no military
obligation. Fun activities are socials, Military Ball,
and being together as a group! There are fun and
rewarding service projects, too, that make you feel
good about yourself. If you're interested in having
fun, Angel Flight is for you!
RUSH DATESTO REMEMBER
Attend 2 out of 3
Tues Sept. 20th, 7:00, Wright Annex, Rm. 201
SUBMARINE PARTY
Wed Sept. 21, 7:00, Wright Annex, Rm. 201
ICE CREAM PARTY
Thurs Sept. 22, 7:00, Elm St. Park COOK OUT
I
I
I
I
Welcomes ECU Students
for a special Happy Hour
on Saturday, Sept. 11
from 3 till game time.
$1.25 for 32 oz. bucket
$ .25 for 10 oz. cup
1 Game will be broadcast
i
over sound system
Located on Hillsborough St.
across from Meredith College
only minutes from the stadium
os
Sick to
Death
of Fast
Food?
Try home cooked
meals at
The Carolina Grill
From the Student Center take
Breakjast anytime 9th st West just a quarter mile.
CORNER of 9th & DICKINSON
MONSAT. 6 a.m3 p.m. Phone 752-1188
IJ!HHHHH M f-SS:
f�(H4
Buck's Gulf
2704 E. 10th St. 758-1033
Complete Automotive
Service
24 hr. Towing Service
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���' �� HI- ���!�� II�!�� �� � �!� � � Nl � II
What
do you
have
r
to sell?

CLEAR VUE OPTICIANS COUPON
s
(This coupon must
accompany order
12
Off Complete
Eye Glasses With
This Coupon
Offer
Good
'til
83182
Greenville Store Only
(Earnilman
classifieds
If you'd like to
make some extra
cash by selling
something � come by
the media board
secretaries office today!
25 OFF
for ECU students on
prescription glasses.
Bring in ad & student I.D.
30
DISCOUNT ON
B & L RAYBAN
SUNGLASSES
(WITH G 15 LENSES)
CALL US FOR AN EYE EXAMINATION WITH THE DOCTOR OF YOUR CHOICE.
pucians wm
315 PARK VIEW COMMONS 752-1446
ACROSS FROM DOCTORS PARK
OPEN 9 A.M. TIL 5:30 P.M.
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY
B J's
Family Restaurant
2518 E. 10th Tlfll, Gro�nvill�
Cut Corners on Your Family's
Budget With Our September
inftATion
FIGHTCft
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Ribeye Steak
Dinner For Two
6"
Plus 2 baked potatoes sour cream 2 green
salads 2 roils and butter & on the so" arm you
care ror P'eose present when ordering 'hen give
to cashier Gooa anytime 'hru Sept 30 "82
BJ's Fomiiy Re�taufont
I �� �� MB J s I imiiy Rest aura � ������
Ribeye Steak
Dinner For Two
99
6
Plus 2 baked potatoes, sour cream 2 green
sooas 2 roils and butter & oil the SoH dr�nk you
care 'ex Please present when ordering then gtve
'o cashier Gooa anytm-te thru Sept 30 t�ts
BJ's Family Restouront
J S Family Rcs'aor ?-� mbbm
�f

.





Title
The East Carolinian, September 9, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 09, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.213
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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