The East Carolinian, September 2, 1982






She
(�amltiitaii
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.4
Thursday, September 2, 1982
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Registration Linked
To Financial Aid
B CORDON IPO K
Mull Urn.
I ncle Sam is gearing up to hit
militar registration resisters where
u hurts; in the wallet.
1 egislation has been passed by
(. ongress that will deny all federal
educational assistance to male
students tailing to register with the
Military Selective Service.
The measure, originally introduc
ed bv rhomas Hart net I (K SC), vvas
adopted by a joint House and
Senate committee a an amendment
to the "Enforcement ol Military
Selective Service Act
I he measure essentially states:
"Any person who in required to
present himself for and submit to
strationand fails to .io so shall
be ineligible for any form ot
assistance oi benefit provided undei
title 1 of the Higher Education c
ot 1965
Assistance and benefits are
described mi the legislation as
"loans, grants, or work assistance
The amended act is a part ot the
Defense Authorization Bill, which
has passed both ho s - ol congress
and need only the president's
signature to become law.
Fifth District Congi essman
Walter B. Jones voted tot the bill
jnd supported the measure linking
financial aid to registration.
tones said, "If one is going to
make use ot government programs,
he should think enough of that
government to list his name with the
selective serv ice
I he wording of the bill hints that
institutions oi higher education may
be required to help enforce the act,
au that specific regulations
necessary tor its enforcement will be
issued, by the Secretary oi Educa-
tion, later.
Robert M. Boudreaux, ECU
directot oi student financial aid,
said that his office was neutral con-
cerning dratt registration, but said
lie was opposed to this bill because it
would likely place the burden of
prool on the institutions.
" 1 his could open up a whole new
in ot worms tor us he said, ex-
plaining the red tape that might be
required. "It this doesn't stop soon,
the financial aid staff required to
process the work could become
enot mous
Boudreaux also said the proposed
law would discriminate against male
students seeking financial aid, and
would hkelv slow the processing of
aid to all students.
I he law is scheduled to go into ef-
fect July 1. 1983.
Job Opportunities
Scarce For Grads
Photo By SCOTT LARSEN
Vm Cool
A youngster models the latest in designer shades. A future engineer? A
future writer? Who knows. But obviously, by his flashy style, a future ECU
student.
By GREG RIDEOUl
College graduates around the
country are finding that the job
market is not good, and it may get
worse.
This is the prognosis being of-
fered by placement and employment
experts across the United States.
They say that even the so called
"hot majors" � engineering and
computer science � are getting
fewer job offers.
Furney James, director of career
planning and placement at ECU,
agrees that it's been a difficult year
for last year's graduates. He said
that in a survey being conducted by
his office one oi every three degree-
earners are without jobs.
I he College Placement Council, a
trade association of campus place-
ment offices, reports job otters to
June grads declined for the first
time in six years
James echoed this fact. He has
found that fewer jobs are being of-
fered, but he stressed that some ma-
jors are still being sought after.
"Nursing, physical therapy and
medical technology people tmd
jobs he said.
William Heartwell, executive
vice-president oi the Interstate Con-
ference Ol Employment Securities
Agencies, has found that most com-
panies have curtailed the hiring ol
new employees.
Linda Pengillv, ot the College
Placement Council, said that
employers are being more cautious
this year because of the economv
Some companies, such as Sperrv-
Uni vac's mini computer division,
aren't hiring at all. And Exxon,
traditionally a major college
recruiter, is only doing so at selected
schools.
James said that Exxon hired two
ECU grads last year, but the had
both completed master degree pi
grams.
With the iob market dim for high-
tech majors, the outlook tor those
with liberal arts degrees should be
completely dark.
No; so according to James. "It a
liberal arts major is very articulate.
has a high G.P.A active, gets
along with others and com-
municates well, he has a good
chance
The outlook, according to m
placement officials, in general, is
not good tor liberal arts majors.
One official cited that the earning
power of these degrees has decreas-
ed in the last 10 vears.
Students Complain About 'Open Gym' Policy
Ho PA IRK KOMil 1
Stafl VV rn r
"Th?re's 14,000 people inthis
schooland there's n ibut one pace
to pia bail.s.llli!I dri. ers
ed ucai.dent Cornell Speas
Sthree other stud;nts
' C '�igh
� bein pi o dedloi
use olthebasketb;ill courtsm
Minges. j 1gymnastums.
" 0sched .kfor open l:v m
at Mil" �ut50 pet ol
the tiine it closed said; '
Sr ���a um�puter s leice.
Acc�rdingo ECldireci iin-
tramurals, l)rWayt ti d a aids 1!
�here"sll t: ic ientn umbets
� � iderts canhave tin� gym.
all nigu it thev vto 1 aw- ' N
and hiassistant Mr.Palox siaim
�hat wlen the"open gm" program
� T'TJ
� H
was available at Minges in past years
very tew students took advantage of
the opportunity. "What we have
found was an average of say, three
or four, maybe six students using
the gym (at Minges) said Cox.
" I uition went up and they're tak-
ing away services and programs
ed Mark Willis, another ECU
putei science major. "1 unders-
tand thai East Carolina has limited
facilities, but we're just asking that
we be able to use Minges and
Memorial
Cornell Speas claims that he and
others were asked to leave Minges
gym by last Carolina Physical
1 ducation professor Dr. William
ain.
Cain is responsible; for the
scheduling oi activities of Minges.
there wouldn't be any more tree
time at Minges gym.
The students were using the
basketball courts at the time, Cain
told the East Carolinian that these
students were using the facilities
without official intramural supervi-
sion. This supervision is required bv
the athletic departments policy,
because ot various security, safety,
and health reasons.
"Abuse of the building has oc-
cured said Cain. He noted the oc-
curance oi some vandalism, many
larcenies from lockers and other
related problems. Cain added that
these problems are often created by
"local residents" who are not ECU
students. "There has to be
somebody there to check ID cards it
that door's open
Minges gym facilities are current-
ly not being used for recreational
basketball because of the limited de-
mand, at this time oi the year, for
indoor sports, said Edwards.
"What we also run into, is that
we can never have a consistent
schedule tor Minges he added.
1 his is because the ECU mens and
womens varsity basketball teams
and the womens volleyball team
have priority use of Minges tor their
practices and games, he continued.
Memorial Com is open seven days
a week tor the students recreational
use according to schedules publish-
ed by the Intramural Recreational
Services Department in its 1982-83
student handbook and monthly
newsletter "Tidbits
It (Memorial Gym) is only open
18 hours for a whole week said
Cornell Speas. He added that there
are other hours when Memorial gym
may be open, based on availabili-
ty
"It so uncertain, you have to go
there (Memorial) and take a
chance said a fourth student. Id
1 ash, a sophmore in commercial
art. "When Memorial is
unavailable, Minges should be open
as an alternate facility "
1 ash and the ot tiers claim that
Memorial is sometimes "so crowded
you can't gel a game I hev added
ihat they may often have to waitl
over an houi to get in a game.
Edwards agreed that this may
sometimes be the case in December
or other winter months, but not uir-
rentlv "Wintei time is the problem
Right now we'te in very good shape.
Since Monday this gym (Memorial)
has not been to capacity added
Edwards.
"If we pay tees here then we
should get the activities said I ash
"We shouldn't go up there everyday
and get turned away
Edwards said that he trys �"not to
spend money unnecessarily when
the facility is not being used He
added that Memorial is presently
open 39 hours a week for "open
basketball use" until intramural
tournaments begin later in the
semester.
The intramural basketball pro-
gram is open to all students and in-
cludes over 150 teams. Ga les won'
start until 5 p.m. said Edwards so
that there will still be two hour- I
"open gym" in Memorial before the
team games.
The four students also complain-
ed thai Campus Security sometimes
closes Minges" tor no apparent
son " Edwards and Cain both
said that it the gym isn't supervisee
bv intramural department
employees then it can't be used.
"People are going into the lockers
stealing, breaking doors, and tear-
ing the place up said Cain The
students also hoped that a regular
weekly schedule of "open gym"
hours could be published in the East
Carolinian. "We certainly have an
adequate budget. There's no crisis
said Edwards who often hires
students for the supervisory work
needed for "open gym" activities
"1 try to safeguard student money
as wisely as 1 can continued Ed-
wards. He invited any students with
any requests, questions, or pro-
blems to feel free to approach him
or Cox for assistance.
Solidarity Demonstrates
who has been held in custody since The C.S. State Department in a
Photo By SCOTT LARSEN
Let's Play Follow The Leader
Students engage in an age-old custom before attending class. The "Follow the Leader"club meets daily in front of
the student supply store. Admission to the festivities is by ID and activity card.
By PATRICK O'NEILL
SMR Writer
Demonstrations laced with
violence took place in Poland on
Tuesday as thousands of Polish
citizens took to the streets to com-
memorate the second anniversary of
the existence of the independent
Solidarity union.
Two people were killed when
police and regular army troops
opened fire at one point in the pro-
test. As many as 1,500 people have
been arrested for "crimes against
the state
Demonstrations took place in
nine cities to show support for the
suspended union and demand
freedom for its leader, Lech Walesa,
December 13, the day martial law
began.
Polish police and military soldiers
used tear gas, concussion grenades
and water cannons to battle the
crowds which were often chanting
"Free Lech Walesa" and a steady
call of "Solidarity, Solidarity,
Solidarity
The demonstrations were organiz-
ed by fugitive union leaders in de-
fiance of stern warnings from Polish
officials to citizens to not par-
ticipate in the action.
The gatherings seemed to indicate
that the spirit of the resisience
movement in Poland remains
strong.
formal statement said the
demonstrations "show once again
that repression will not solve
Poland's problems and called for
reconciliation.
The Soviet Union released a state-
ment from Moscow through their
press agency, TASS, saying that
"foreign subversive centers" were
coordinating the demonstration to
increase the tension in Poland.
The largest gathering took place
in Warsaw where 10,000
demonstraters defied martial law to
march in the streets toward the com-
munist party headquarters. Security
forces turned back the marchers as
they came within a mile of the head-
quarters.
Alumni Association Sets Record Rescuer Crushed By Train
By DARRYL BROWN
staff Writer
Despite the current economic-
recession, the East Carolina Alumni
Associaton and the ECU Founda-
tion set a record for fund raising in
1981-82 and is expecting to do so
again this year.
The foundation and association
work closely together as a principle
means of gathering private funds
for the university.
The alumni association was
recently selected as a finalist for the
U.S. SteelCouncil for Advance-
ment and Support of Education
Award, making it one of the top
four associations in the country for
this size university. They have won
the award twice in the last five
years.
The association and foundation
excelled both in the number of
alumni who give to the university
and in the total amount of money
contributed. In 1981-82, private
gifts to the ECU Foundation
amounted to $888,000.
Dr. F. Douglas Moore, vice
chancellor for alumni relations,
cites the record number of alumni
meetings as well as a friendly ap-
proach to fund raising as reasons
for success.
"We were up last year in every
area of fundraising said Moore,
including corporate, alumni, foun-
dation and special gift contribu-
tions. He added that "we've had a
good start to date this year" and
that he expects even more growth.
"We're not at our potential he
insisted in reference to scholarship
funds, "but we're heading in that
direction Moore noted that the
BB&T gift to the business school is
"really an endorsement of the
university" and that he expects to
expand the scholarship through
more corporate and alumni con-
tributions.
BOSTON (UP1) � A newlywed
who jumped onto subway tracks to
irescue a drunken man from an on-
coming train could not scramble out
bf the train's path in time and was
crushed to death.
Although he heard a train com-
ing, David McNeice, 22, of
Hingham tried to save the drunk,
said his co-worker, Michael Mad-
digan, who jumped off the subway
platform to help McNeice but
managed to get off the track just in
(time.
The drunken man, lying in the
middle of the tracks, suffered a
severe leg injury.
"He (McNeice) was yelling, 'Get
up, get up but the man couldn't
Maddigan, 24, said after the acci-
dent late Tuesday.
"I managed to get out of the way
by climbing a ladder but David was
crushed between the train and the
platform and the man was
underneath the train screaming. It
was an incredible nightmare
McNeice, who had just gotten
married this summer, was pro-
nounced dead at Boston City-
Hospital.
The 26-year-old drunken man was
run over but was in guarded condi-
tion at the hospital after surgery for
severe trauma to his left leg.
"There's a question with whether
his leg can be saved said a hospital
spokesman.
Massachusetts Bay Transporta-
tion Authority spokesman William
Couglin said the motorman on the
southbound train packed with
Boston Red Sox fans returning from
a game reacted properly.
"The second he saw the men he
slammed on the brakes and in facl
he was going slower than the 10 mph
approach limit Couglin said. ,






rHE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 2 1982
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
� .v v. i i 'd i tal
-
OUTDOOR
RECREATION

NCSL
SPORTS EDITOR
WANT ED
� .�
PERSONAL CARE
ATTENDANTS
FRESHMEN
. � - �
MEETING
� � ' M
is f- � . .
;
SIGN LANGUAGE CLUB
� -1 ' . � � enterluage skills
PRESS RELEASE

" t , �� ���;�'� � � � � brai , �
�, v ���� toft a I � u , ri f � � . f.
�. � .brocl re! i �
OFFICIALS NEEDED
i oo �r M on a a y s " - ?t
A'ecf n � rxoer ipnte s
tecessary training clinics are
required and rie first clinic �s on
Thursday Sep tembei 2. n
Memorial 'r Room (03 si DO
p m Plea-ie br.rig wy.u r-j s � r,
' i taros ar. d Class
APPLY NOW
itudenfs fxi .mend 'o jiii . 'o
major m Social Work or Correc
ticms in the (-all of 1982 snouid re
ones' an application and an ap
pomttncnt tor an interview from
KM Department Office. 312 farol
Belk. (Aiiiert Heattti 8ui"linij-
I � mwp intormal'on call Mrs
Joyner. 75? �9 I E �t 218
Dead! 'ie tor tall applications
S e p' e Ti o e r
KAPPA SIGMA
I i i Bi otttei s a d I "�� 5 stei s
ATTENTION
A pre registration i. t . t,
ai hi edui ationrfl ,
ties 'i eiet ti unn s and
t � �. ac � a'�
. ISA �
'i Lrabi
nt'
A II
SCEC
CADP
1 ' . Campus " itH ' and Or ug
h i � I - � �
� . eptetnber (,�
l 30 p n . � 't-i( � at oi
ten � f Erwii tiatl Any
. � . � � � furthering
i tti luted toward the
il sub! tam ia is en
i age It attend � nori
nal ill 757 6793 oi '57 4649
ATTENTION
MODEL UNITED
NATIONS CLUB
11 wi �� ted i'
t hold aft �' gamzat eting
on Septernbt r I9P.
Aii t� held in � i l
Ar.� leresti tti
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at J 00 in H 104 i ! hui - '
eptemi r j
HOME ECONOMICS
GOD
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want
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CATHOLIC NEWMAN
CENTER
N e w m a � '
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SUPERVISOR WANTED
� � i pt
Ml t
RESUME
PREPARATION
WORKSHOPS
SCIENCE MAJORS
PHI ETA SIGVA
A T Tt? NTION
KARATE
EVANGEL 1ST
tn i � a � .
HONOR STUDENTS
SUGGEST
SEMINAR TOPICS
AHEA YH �
Phi U
-A.l.
� ' I . " � ' � A
� - , � re and
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HOME EC STUDENTS

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iges 8 7 88
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HOUSING
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RUGBY
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GEOLOGY CLUB
SELECTION
COMMITTEE
TUTORS WANTED
ATTENTION
- � ��
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rar y beg
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- � . � REBI
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'ECUSURFCiUBN ' - '� SK - -
PSI CHI CRiMINALJUSTlCE SCHOLARSHIPS
'

SPORT CLUBS
SIGN LANGUAGE CLUB
RESIDENCE HALL
CHORUS
BETA KAPPA ALPHA
�.
alpha phi big
brothers

� � ' . - :
� � ' A "� � . . r � . J,
� A
� . ti 103 ol
JEWISH STUDENTS
� � � i
KAPPA
SIGMA
The Kappa Sigma Frater-
nity located at 700 E. 10th
Street across from
Umstead Dorm would like
students of hCU to get
ready for the Fall Rush,
which will begin next week
Monday, Sept 6, LABOR
PAINS PAR1Y, Beer Blast;
Tuesday, Sept. 7, BLUE
HAWAIAN LUAU;
Wednesday, Sept 8, The
Original LAS VEGAS
PLAYBOY BUNNY
NIGHT"
For additional informa-
tion call 752-5543. Rides
are available
THE MOST
MAN IN THE
COUNTRY
8:30 p.m. � (ea. night)
"SPECIAL GOLD SALE
$10 oft all 10K Traditional Rings
$15 off all 1 OK Fashion Rings
$25 off all 14K Rings
Tar Landing Seafood
Restaurant
Tar Landing SeafoodMoa.Thurs ALL DAY
Sat. � Lunch 11-3
Restaura
M
Ck.s Greei S'r. i ' fi- "11-
rake left at I i �
Located �nt block down on left
All You Can Eat
TROUT
$3.99
SHRIMP
$
4.99
A;rpcr- PaJ.
Sree&vilU Sorth Car:na
SunThurs. � 11 9p.m.
Fri. & Sat. � 11 10
REGULAR DAILY SPECIAL
Flounder & Shrimp Plate
$2.89
TAKEOUTS
AVAILABLE
758-0327
You're ready! For the biggest and
the best that life has to offer And for
the college ring that will speak vo1
umes about you�and your achieve-
ments�for years to come.
What's more�you can afford it1
Because now, for a limited time you
can order from the entire ArtCarved
collection of 14K gold college rings
and save $25. Come and see the
exquisitely crafted styles�from the
classic to the contemporary And
choose the ring and custom options
that most eloquently express you
Now is your time to get what you
deserve And remember�nothing
else feels like real gold.
IRIvTIRVED
i ASS RINGS (NIC
Date: Time: Place:
Sept. 8 10, 9am 4pm Student Supply Store
13 & 14 Lobby
'Deposit Required MasterCard or Visa Accepted is&? MCwvm ass Rings mc
.7iiT�TmT�T�TwT�iT��T�T�Ti.T��T��Ti"�i,TiT�TiiV.i7.iT7,iT7T�TT(.T,
4





Ml I AS I CAROI IMAN
SEPTEMBER 2, 182
inc
Flu Protection Found
WASHINGTON
(UPl) With the an-
nual flu season ap-
proaching, a govern-
ment research institute
reported Wednesday
that a Vermont study
shows two related
drugs can protect most
people against the most
common kind of in-
fluenza.
"It virtually erases
anv question people
had about the utility of
these drugs, either one
of them said Dr.
John I aMontagne, in-
fluenza program of-
ficer at the National In-
stitute of Allergy and
Infectious Diseases.
The drugs are aman-
tadine. which is sold
under the brand name
of Symmetrel, and
rimantadine, still an ex-
perimental anti-viral
agent. Both were tested
during a flu outbreak
last winter in Burl-
ington, Vt in 450
healthy volunteers bet-
ween the ages of 18 to
45.
The study, con-
ducted by scientists at
the University of Ver-
mont and reported in
the New England Jour-
nal o Medicine, found
the drugs effective in
preventing infection
from the A type of in-
fluenza. That includes
the current Hong Kong
and the Russian flu
varieties and produces
the most s e v e r e
epidemics.
The volunteers were
divided into three
groups � one group
taking amantadine
tablets twice a day for
six weeks, one taking
rimantadine and
another receiving an in-
active dummy drug.
When compared with
the group taking the
take pills, rimantadine
reduced the rate of
influenza-like illness by
65 percent and aman-
tadine cut the illness
rate by 78 percent.
"The effects were
even more striking
when the investigators
analyzed reductions of
rates of laboratory-
confirmed influenza A
illness the institute
said in announcing the
findings. Rimantadine
reduced this rate by 85
percent and aman-
tadine was 91 percent
effective.
However, riman-
tadine produced fewer
side effects such as in-
somnia, jitteriness and
difficulty in concen-
trating than did aman-
tadine. LaMontagne
said that as far as side
effects were concerned,
rimantadine was almost
the same as the fake
pills.
He said despite its
availability, aman-
tadine has not been
widely used, probably
because doctors were
concerned about side
effects.
The infectious
diseases institute, a part
of the federal National
Institutes of Health,
said the low number of
side effects from
rimantadine found in
the Vermont study sug-
gests rimantadine
should be "the drug of
choice" in preventing
influenza A.
Rimantadine has
been used abroad, par-
ticularly in the Soviet
Union, but has not yet
been approved by the
Food and Drug Ad-
ministration for general
use in the United
States, because it had
not been widely tested.
LaMontagne said ad-
ditional studies of
rimantadine are plann-
ed this winter when
more type A flu out-
breaks are expected.
Both amantadine
and rimantadine are
manufactured by Endo
Pharmaceuticals, Inc
a subsidiary of the Du-
Pont Copany.
Reception Slated
U (,RK. RIDEOl I
1 CT Students will be
given the opportunity
to meet Chancellor
lohn 1. Howell at a
reception on Sepi. 7.
1 he e eni is spon-
sored b the Depart-
ment ol University
I nion and is scheduled
begin at 7 P.M. It is
designed to give each
idem a chance to
meet informally, with
D and Mrs. Howell.
Rudy Alexander,
direct oi ot university
union, said that this is a
� ,t i'oi the a erage stu-
show support
t lew administra-
n.
How oil was elected
�e eighth chancellor in
he university "s "5 year
- : in May 14
exander aid that
the dress code would be
informal, and no stu-
dent would be turned
aw av.
"Just come he
said.
1 he university union
depai tment arranges
the different programs
the univesitj does each
vear. It consists ol a
proffesional stafl and
student organizations.
I he stafl members ad-
ise the various student
committees.
Retreshments will be
served. Tins includes
deli snacks, fruits, soft
drinks, and beer.
Klexa ndei also
ed out thai enter-
tainment will be pro-
Jed. Ron Maxwell, a
formei president of the
student union, will plav
the piano.
"It's going to be a
real nice affair, and
everyone should come
on out he explained.
FRIDAY ONLY
ALL YOU CAN EAT!
FLOUNDER DINNER
�&
INCLUDES FRENCH FRIES. COLE SLAW. TARTAR
SAUCE & HUSHPUPPIES
SHONEYS
S369
264 By-Pass
Greenville, N.C.
items and Pnces
E"ective th'u Sat
Sept 4 1962
in Greenville
Copyright 1982
Kroger Sav on
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold To Dealers
on
600 Greenville Blvd Greenville
Open 8 a.m. to Midnight
Open Sunday 9am to 9 p m
�, �-�. jn
aanjun civs mu
Si� � ��-
i
CRISP N TASTY
Jeno's Pizza
Pico
KROGEH
Peanut Butter
U.S. NO. 1 B-fcU�
DELICIOUS
Gold Apples
5H49
Bag
J KROGER ALL MEAT
Chunk
Bologna
$118
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Breyer's
Yogurt
3$-i09�?
a-Oz �
Cups � I
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Breyer's
Ice Cream
$
1-Gal
Ctn.
219
A HOP IIONSUC '
2th WtfcKOF
PREGNANCY
ABOUT IONS FROM I 3 16
WEEKS
AT HjKIHtK EXPENSE
UBS 00 Pnqnancy Test. Birin
Control and Problem Pieqnn
i V Counseimq I or tui fher intui
�nation call 832 OSJS (Toll Fr
Number 800 271 2S68' between I
AM and S P M Weekday
RALEIGH WOMEN S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
917 West Morgan S'
Raleigh N C
Not all clinics are the same.
ABORTION is a difficult decision that's
made easier bv the women of the Fleming
Center. Counselors are aailable day and
night to support and understand you. Corn-
tort, safety, privacy, and a friendly staff . .
that's what the Meming Center is all about.
Immn tctpltd Fm prejtnano testing
Ml iiu liiMtr tees Saturday appointments
I p lit 1H wet-kv V�fj earl prejnano tests
Call 7X1-5550 da or night.
I he I- U-nimuenter makes, the difference.
3
NEW BUS ROUTE
The SGA Transit would like to announce the start of a new
bus route. The Brown Route will operate between the hours of
7:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Monday-Friday.
Maps & time-schedules of all bus routes can be picked up at
the Student Store and Mendenhall Student Center.
BROWN SCHEDULE
(7:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.)
PLACE DEPARTS
Speighton the hour
Oak and 1 st St3 after hour
Elm Street 5 after hour
Willow & Woodlawn 8 after hour
Avery & Holly10 after hour
5th & Elizabeth15 after hour
Mendenhall20 after hour
Speighton half hour
Oak and 1st St27 till hour
Elm Street25 till hour
Willow & Woodlawn22 till hour
Avery & Holly20 till hour
5th & Elizabeth 15 till hour
Mendenhall10 till hour
� ATTENTION: This bus route must be utilized by the
students living on the route or it will be cancelled after the fall
semester.
PI KAPPA PHI FRATERNITY
ANNOUNCES ITS
ANNUAL FALL RUSH
803 Hooker Rd.
Come out and party with m by the Lake �
Sept. 6-9 � All party's begin at 8:30
Come out and feel the excitement!

i






Oil!? East (Earnliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
WAVERI v MlKKII l
Robert Rucks, a
Pun t ip Mam ss. , �
Chris l u hok, .
Joni Gi ruRii.
FlU DING Mill LR, ���, Vmvgn
Miki Hughes, ttowmo.
ow, . .�� idwmm-g Cindy Pleasants, s�
� ���� Ernest Conner, s �,
Ui Ui� Sll L: BACHNER, Emenammtni
. �, lf�i, CORNE1 1 Ml 1)1 OCK, v
. �� Mire Davis. ���� uemei
Sentcmbei
ns:
Opinion
Page 4
Solidarity
Dilemma Of A Proud Nation
This week marks the second an-
niversary of the founding of
Solidarity, the labor union which �
more than anything else � has
changed the face of communist
Poland.
Unfortunately, this week will also
be remembered as yet another
episode in the continuing turbulence
which has characterized the east-
European nation in recent years and
especially in recent months.
As thousands of Poles gathered
to demonstrate in Warsaw, Gdansk
and Wroklaw on Tuesday, police
tired tear gas. water cannons and
concussion grenades into the
crowds, once again showing the
martial-law government's in-
capability of dealing with the needs
of its people.
The demonstrations were called
for by Solidarity leaders as a means
of testing the loyalty and determina-
tion of union members. They hae
not demonstrated even in any semi-
official form since martial law was
first imposed last Dec. 13.
But on Tuesday, crowds in the
Baltic port city ot Gdansk, where
the union was born, gathered at the
central railway station there and
chanted "Freedom and "We
Shall Win possibly as some sort
of preface for what may come.
So, once again, military suppres-
sion has failed to quell the underly-
ing spirit and determination of a
downtrodden people. Once again,
martial law has been proven an in-
viable means of repression.
All reports coming out of Poland
indicate that the widespread pro-
tests and demonstrations arc quite
peaceful. In fact, no incidents of
violence have yet occurred to our
knowledge.
That is, none had occurred until
the unprovoked retaliation of the
Polish military police on the
demonstrators. I sing their
"humane riot-type weapons, the
police have had relative success in
dispersing the crowds on a more-or-
less regular basis over the past few
days, despite the chants and cheers
that ring out in support of basic
human rights, rights we Americans
all-too-often take for granted.
But try as the martial-law govern-
ment may, it cannot consume the
proverbial fire burning in the hearts
of Solidarity's members. The Polish
people have been through .too much
in the past to quit now. Perhaps,
some day, they shall win.
Campus Forum"
A Lonely Prisoner
In my late 2K and having been in-
carcerated foi the past few vears with
one ear remaining, I am finding myself
becoming more alienated with society as
a whole. With newspapers and a radio to
listen to, 1 am not totally isolated from
Ihe outside world, but there is something
missing � the lack of sharing with
everyday people.
though most inmates are everyday
people who can relate to each other, they
are a different class ot people in
themselves with limited forms of expres-
sion and tor the most part share only the
repetitious days of prison life as a whole.
I seek to remedy this condition by
reaching out to the students reading this
and ask that they take the initiative to
respond by corresponding with myself to
share an equal and honest basis of
friendship.
! am an intelligent individual with
humane interests and a good sense of
humor so that I can converse on most
subjects, physical or spiritual.
Some letters and pictures from the
outside would definitely brighten up my
davs and add a bit more meaning to my
life, and I will answer all letters received.
Thank for your time and caring.
Stephen Shield. 83609
P.O. Bob 100
Somers, Conn. 06071
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our ofice in the Old South
Building, across Jrom Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted.
1 wagNT aLWaY& LiKe "faiS.
I VJa& a U.�. SeNaToR! THeK I
6�T cau6HT wlfil a CPMGRe&SiotfaL
paGe. ONe PeRveRSioN uoib
aNoTHeR aNP aNOTMeR until�
UNTiL�&OB!�I VoTeD lb Rai&e
Taxe& n an eiecfioM YeaR!
ffl:
mm
't'
BOCHY mtn M�.Wg-NE�
133
"Kxcuse me, is this � Introduction to Metaphysics?"
Slim Whitman Never Had It So Good
The TV Salesman Thrives
"Now you � YHS YOU � can have this
beautiful, stainless-steel, two-tone (black
and white) medalian engraved with the
silhouette of your very favorite performer
and sent to you on this fabulous gold-
colored Strrrrretch chain Be the first on
your block to own your very own com
memorative necklace, featuring the noses,
chins and hairlines of the singers you love:
Slim Whitman Boxcar Willie Floyd
Cramer Ace CannonAnd if you act
now we'll send you � Absolutely Free �
this matching two-piece oral rec-
tal pot roast thermometer with vinyl ac-
cessory case. Yes, you'll be the envy ol all
your friends and enemies, and for the
amazingly low price of only $19.95! Here's
how to order
Sound familiar? Well, maybe not exact-
ly, but it you (or someone you love) have
ever watched television between the hours
oi noon and midnight, you're at least
somewhat familiar with this multi-million
dollar industry boasting 1.001 products
you "absolutely must have
My only gripe about them is that they're
"not sold in any store?"
1 mean, how did we evei get along
without a steak knife that doubles as a tree
saw? Or without a watch that tells the ex-
act time in all the countries oi the tree
world and even Canada? It's hard to
believe we actually made it without these
tine products.
And how many times have you woken
up in the middle of the night craving a
scrambled egg? But not just any egg will
do. You're craving one that's scrambled
from inside the shell. Boy. wouldn't your
life be just dismal without the "Ronco E:gg
Scrambler A steal at only $19.95!
And did you ever consider why
everything always costs "only S19.95?"
Simple. The American public has been
onditioned to believe that $20 is a lot of
money But anything less than that is
quite a bargain!
Mike Hughes
Just The Wa It fa
"Hey, don't throw away that month-old
tuna sandwich Just because the gangrenous
pumpernickel is making you nauseous;
steam it fresh with the new Oriental Bam-
boo Steamer. And enjoy that nutritious-
vet-economical meal while listening to
these genuine Chinese wind chimes, ship-
ped directly to you from our warehouse in
Idaho
And what party would be complete
without the tun-filled adventures of Mr.
Microphone' 1 know 1 can't think of any.
One more thing. Did you ever notice the
songs that those mulii-gadgeted
chronometer watches play? They're the
computer II versions of the same songs
Slim Whitman sings on his hit album. But.
then again. I guess no one should have to
go without the fabulous sound R I
River Valley' for more than an ho
time.
And what man can call hum
angler without owning the mini "P
Fisherman (Obviously invented to
those slow davs at the office 1
just isn't right.)
But doesn't it just figure that
come out with the ' Uenuine One-P
Diamond Ring" only weeks after I blew
bucks on a cheap imitation?
� � �
Believe it or not these rv c
their night-club announcers do
business - an outstanding b i
year after year, thanks io the t
public, a society o suckers and hoai
of "collectible unique ' And I do m�
junk'
Just stop and thmk foi a second f
really � honestly tre which soi .
touched Burl Ives' heart ovei th
course you don't No one does
And do you reallv think five mill
pie actually needed the " ondei w
1 doubt it. But as long as the demand
these "limited -time-only or
tinues. K-Tel and Ronco will fail
oblige with more of the same.
I can see it now; the new gadgt
buvers in 1982 � the Cathv Rigby Na -
Holder0
Editor's note: Mike Hughes is a set
year senior from Lizard Lick, N.C .
enjoys listening to Burl fves ami i
cooking with his Ronco Egg Scrambh �
Situation In U.S. Prisons Desperately
Inconducive To Criminal Rehabilitation
B PAT O'NEILL
We've all seen the movie depictions.
read I he news accounts or heard someone's
personal story of what life is like within the
confines oi a prison or jail. Believe me:
these stories, accounts and depictions are
true. My summer experience ol having
been incarcerated in two North Carolina
county jails and four U.S. federal prisons
confirmed every evil belief 1 had oi the
horrors of prison existence.
"Never in my life have I seen so main
lonely, helpless and hopeless people I
wrote those words many times in my letters
10 friends describing the sadness 1 observed
among mv fellow inmates. These
psychological aspects oi confinement are
perhaps more deliberating even than the
physically meager and medically limited
aspects.
During the reign oi the Reagan ad-
ministration, there has been a dramatic in-
crease in the number of prisoners in U.S.
facilities. (This increase may reach 25 per-
cent by the end of this year.) The connec-
tions are obvious: firstly, as the economy
declines and more social services are cut,
more people turn to crime as a solution to
their economic woes.
Secondly, Reagan's hard line on crime is
influencing the beliefs of the American
people convicted of crimes. This usually
means longer sentences for offenders and
will ultimately mean the construction of
many more prisons.
The obvious question that is not being
asked is: "Do prisons actually help solve
the problem of crime? From what I've seen
this summer, the direct opposite is true.
"Prisons may be the number-one cause of
crime
Incarceration seems to be society's
response to the great fundamental evils of
poverty, racism and social inequality.
Instead of addressing these major
wrongs, we build more prisons to segregate
these victims who are invariably the poor
and minority elements of our society.
Every prison I was kepi in this summer
had a disproportionately high number of
black and minority persons in their inmate
populations. (In N.C, more than 50 per-
ceni ol the state's inmates are minorities.
despite the tact that minorities make up
only 24 percent of North Carolina's
population.)
These figures show the continued ex-
istence of racism m our nation. It's easier
to imprison the poor, the blacks and the
outcasts ol our society than to provide
them with the basic necessities of life, such
as jobs, fair housing, good educational ser-
vices and health care.
And worst of all, "Prisons don't work
Fhey lust temporarily remove a person
from society. In a few years he's back out
on the street again, but this time much
worse off. He still has no job, possibly no
tamilv left for support, and now he's an
"ex-con with few prospects for survival.
hen 1 was released from prison, I was
given a set of clothes, a bus ticket and $50
"rehabilitation money That's it! Not
even any pre-releasc counseling. This pro-
cedure is the same for any inmate �
regardless of the crime, regardless of the
sentence.
DOONESBURY
What hope do these people have? V
can they go? Ho do thev cope with then
anger? Psychological problems?
loneliness' Finally, how do thev s
without having to return lo crim
behavior?
I'm not advocating letting rapists a
murderers run loose in the streets; I'm
referring to the "77 percent" ot the
mates who have been incarcratcd w
"non-violent" crimes.
These people stand nothing to gain froii
a prison experience. It can only mak
"better" criminals or completely ruin
lives � and ultimately, it may rum ours.
because. wv too are the victims ol ilm
visdous, vengeful cycle
It's time thai thi. age old tradition ol
keeping people in cages, tor breaking laws,
be re-evaluated. The need for crcatiu
alternatives to incarceration is grea .
right now, before President Reagan a
other state officials start approving
funding the construction ot many more
jails and prisons
by Garry Trudeau
since
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Illl I Wit AKOI IN!
si rn MBI k 2. i�:
Trudeau
1

P4 . pw

Lebanon Still Has Problems
B KFITH BRITTA!N tighting clans, Chris-
tians versus Moslems
With the evacuation still exists
�I the Palestine 1 ibera- She also described
tion Organization from the government ol
I ebanon's pro I ebanon as having to
n s are b no means "walk a tightrope
ei. between the Christian
' ns belie! was av,1 Moslem factions
� b Di Sai tlra Behind the excite-
V i - H o u g h . men 0Ne, ,he
H professoi ol withdrawal of the PLO
in a hosl of problems
are ol concern to
tbanon and the
led States.
� jd thai i �
lems vill . � .d
hi ta ion o! i
pi n - i . � � � �
�1 e m
1 oicign aimies still
i. np much o! the
Wilson Drug Bust
Xets 45 Offenders
W II st)
N .
II
I . ilson police
Wednesday 4
people h a e b e e n
.i t i e month
operai n reported to
be the largest under-
cover drug investiga-
t he city's
ory.
Police officers and
iv hol 1 aw 1 n
ccmeni agents began
esting those charged
h ui ; .t m total ol
"I people had been
;ked up b late
a dnesdav mornine
I he airs
endt
aid
mas
�� er
the
five-month undercovei
p olice and
Ml
id
ounce.
' e believ e l
"i ounce .aid "We m
v sellers.
v aftei w hai
he run-
Warrants .harging
I slate
drug laws were issued
against the 45 people.
Younce said one war-
rant vas for drug
possession and the
others were for sale or
conspiracy to sell
di ugs.
He said the drugs in-
voked include mari-
juana, Q u aa1u d es,
I SD, barbituates, am-
phetamines and heroin.
Undercover agents
made at least two buys
from most of the alleg-
ed dealers, Younce
said. He declined to sa
exacth how many of-
ficers participated in
the investigation, but
said more than one
ian vas inolved.
Police also plan to
ze eight ars used b
accused drug dealers,
he said, dnd Al L- of-
ficials were c o n
m plating action
against five taverns
where drug sales or li-
quor law violation
allegedly occurred.
country � 60,000
Isrealis in the South.
30,(XX) Syrians in the
Bekau alley.
rhere are also 75
s m all g r oups ol
militants roaming the
streets ol Beirut.
1 he 1 ebanese ai rm
it sell has many
obstacles to overcome.
It is presently too small
and ill-equipped to take
care ol it's internal and
extei nal problems.
1 v en t hough t he
7,100 PI O lighters and
5.200 Syrian troops are
Is e i n g e v a c u a ted,
500.000 Palestines are
left who still seek a
homeland General
Sharon, Israel's
deter.se minister and
architect of the June 6
i asion, maintains
that. "The Palestines
have a homeland, and
n is Jordan 1 nis v tew
is not necessarily
shared bv the Palestines
and others involved in
the conflict.
Christian Phalangtst
I e a d e r, B u s h i I
Gemayel, was elected
president. Gumeyel is
known to be pro-Israel;
thus it is believed that
he may bung peace to
the vvar-torn region.
ui ili-Hough stated
that Gemayel might be
important to the region
in that his pro-Israel
stance could enlist
military assi st an c e
from that country.
she also stated that
the new president is in a
touchy situation.
��Because ol his ties
with the West he must
be careful not to
alienate his ow n people
(the Arabs)
There are tears in tlie-
Arab world, however,
that Lebanon may-
become an Israeli
satelite. The Israelis
deny this and maintain
they are strong ad-
vocates ol Gemayel on-
ly because ot their
belief thai he can bung
stability io the region.
Stability is the long-
range plan of the U.S.
and Israeli govern-
ments. Both govern-
ments, though, are very
concerned over the
M),000 Syrians in the
northern Bckuu Valley.
Israel will not permit
Svna troops so close to
u border. Unless the
problem is alleviated
1 ebanon w ill soon
again be in the midst of
intense lighting
Rebuilding the
destruction left bv the
war is estimated to run
into the billions ol
dollars. Wealthy Arab
nations have already
pledged two billion
dollars m reconstruc-
tion funds.
With the PI O leav-
ing Beirut, firing its
Russian made Ak -47
assault titles in celebra-
tion vollies, the Habib
peace plan apparently
worked. A final pro-
b 1 e m that worries
Wshington is that some
PI () members have
said they vvill denv
Arafat's ordeis to leave
Beirut.
Israel has vowed to
drive any P1 ()
members left in Beirut
out bv force.
Downtown
ATTENTION
ALL DANCE
STUDENTS!
V 4 i
THE COLLEGE STUDENTS'
HEADQUARTERS
FOR ALL DANCEWEAR
J
COFFEEHOUSE
AUDITIONS
Sept. 17 & 18
Room 15 Mendenhall
9:00-11:00
Those interested in performing
please sign up at the Student
Union Office, Mendenhall.
VSfcA
'V
U
vj
m
h
CAPEZIO
AND
DANSKIN

a
I
We have o
complete
selection ut
leotards tights
anrt lap,
batiet and
modern
dance shoes
in a spectrum
ot colors'

"Home of Greenville's Best Meats'
PIRATE COUPON
5 DISCOUNT
Coupon Expires 9482
on all orders $10.00
or more.
Address
ID Number
I
' Amt. of Purchase
I.����
211 Jarvis St.
2 Blocks from ECU
PRICES EFFECTIVE SEPTEMBER 2-4
Fryer Leg
Quarters
59 C
Drumsticks
69c
Lb.
Lb
Breast Quarters
79C
Lb.
2 Liter Bottle - No Limit
PEPSI OR COKE
98C
MELLO YELLO OR
MOUNTAIN DEW
89 C
2 Liter Bottle w
Heavy Western
Sirloin Steaks
2"
Lb.
T-Bone Steaks
2"
Lb.
Budweiser
Beer
6 Pack
12 Ox. Cans
$T19
2
Chicken of the Sea
Tuna
6'2 Oz. Can
In Oil or Water
68C
DA 1R V FRESH SPFA IA IS
Fresh, Whole
Maola Milk
' 7 Gallon
Paper Carton
98C
Old South Fresh
Orange Juice
12 Gallon
Paper Carton
98
Mod a Best Grade
All Flavors
Ice Cream
12 Gallon
$159
1
Nehi Soft Drinks
6 Pack - 12 Ox. Cans QQ�
Your Choice� jr jr V
Orange, Grape or RC Cola
Nehi 2 Liter
Soft Drinks 58C
Fruit Flavors
Cottonelle
Toilet
Tissue
4 Roll Pkg
98C
New Crop
125 Size
Red Delicious
Apples
Peanut Butter &
Jelly Specials
Jif Creamy or Crunchy
Peanut
Butter
$149
18 Or Jor
1
Each
10C
Garner Apple or
Grape Jelly
68
I6O1 Jot

t





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
SEPTEMBER2. 1982
Page 6
Chariots' To
Set Hendrix
Theatre Ablaze
This Thursday, Friday and Satur-
day night at 5, 7:15 and 9:30 p.m
the Student Union Films Committee
will screen 1981 's Academy Award
winner for best picture, the inspira-
tional Chariots of tire.
The film will be shown in
Mendenhall Student Center's Hen-
drix Theatre and admission for
students is by ID and activity card.
Faculty and staff will be admitted
by current MSC membership.
Starring Ben Cross and Ian
Charleson, Chariots of Fire is a
story of struggle, courage, deter-
mination and ultimate triumph of
men driven by the passion of com-
petition.
Set in Britain in the early 1920s,
Chariots explores the realm of com-
petition on several levels, most
notably the inherent desire to win
felt by two young athletes of distinct
backgrounds.
Although Chariots is entirely
entertaining simply as a film about
the trauma of Olympic training, the
juxtaposition of athletics and
religion is dominant throughout the
movie, even to the point of becom-
ing its driving force. But a close
look at the religious backgrounds of
the two reveals completely different
reasons for the quest for victory.
Charleson studied acting in Lon-
don, appearing in that city's West
End in plays such as Otherwise
Engaged, and, as a member of the
National Theatre Company, he ap-
peared in productions of Julius
Caesar, Volpone and The Hun-
chback of Mot re Dame. For the past
two years, Charleson was with the
Poyal Shakespeare Company, and
his credits include The Taming of
the Shrew, Piaf and Once in a
Lifetime. Chariots of Fire is his first
film.
Ben Cross studied at the Royal
Academy of Dramatic Art and has
appeared in Shakespeare with the
Prospect Theatre Company. Cross
played in Joseph and the Amazing
Technicolor Dreamcoat, Equus, a
revival of Irma La Douce, Privates
on Parade and the leading role in
Chicago in London's West End. His
television credits include The
Minkier and Strangers.
Hugh Hudson, director of the
film, has won most of the major
awards in his field. Chariots of Fire
is his first theatrical film assign-
ment. A talented and successful pro-
ducer and director of documen-
taries, Hudson began his career in
the cutting rooms producing and
directing 10 documentaries.
Ian Charleson in a scene from the 1981 Academy Award winner for Best Picture, Chariots of Fire, on campus this weekend.
Dolly Parton Right At Home In 'Whorehouse'
ByCIIFFJAHR
I adirs Htwne Journal
NEW YORK � Mention her name and people smile.
They think of a sunny little woman teetering on high
heels, the hourglass figure spilling out of her dress, her
pretty face framed in a cloud of wiggy blondness made
radiant by a smile that sometimes appears sweet and
sometimes sassy.
Dolly Parton is an original and, to intimate friends,
the woman inside is even more complex than her
evocative image. This complexity was heightened during
the recent filming of The Best Little Whorehouse in
Texas, in which she co-stars with Burt Reynolds. (The
film is held over at Greenville's Plaza Cinema.) Making
the movie. Miss Parton claims she faced "more pro-
blems, sorrows and enlightenment" than ever before in
her life.
"On the movie, we've gone through so much bit-
terness she says, "tension, quarrels, hurt feelings 1
threatened to quit so many times. Oh, 1 don't ever want
to work that hard again. Or need to. There is a tiny
voice in me that keeps saying, 'This is the last movie thai
you will ever make "
Burt Reynolds was finishing his last two days of work
on the film when I arrived. Even,one seemed to heave a
sigh of relief as he departed, for Reynolds had grown
difficult. America's No. 1 male box-office star was
under the gun after his last three movies had grossed less
than expected � and a fourth looked shaky.
But also, he knew what people at the studio were say-
ing � that Miss Parton's irresistible glow would walk
off with the picture. She plays Miss Mona, a brothel
madam with a heart of gold. When the role was offered
to Miss Parton, she knew she was born to play it.
Nonetheless, she accepted only after some prayer and
soul-searching because of her concern about the film's
T.S. Carp's World Comes To Creenville, At Last
Carp author John Irving, at left as the referee, and comic Robin Williams, center, in a scene from The
World According to Carp, now playing at Greenville's Plaza Cinema along with The Best Little
Whorehouse in Texas (see Dolly Parton story) and Zapped The Buccaneer Theatre has An Officer and a
Gentleman, Slight Shift and The Beastmaster. At the Plitt Entertainment Center, Carolina East Conve-
nience Complex, are E. T Young Doctors in Love, Fast Times at Ridgemont High and Friday the 13th
Part 3 in 3-D. The Park Theatre, downtown Greenville, has the re-released Star Wars (coming to campus
later this fall) with a weekend late show of The Return of Bruce Lee. The Tice Drive-In, located on
Highway 11, is showing the musical extravaganza Annie and the 264 Playhouse, Highway 264 West, is
running the steamy triple-X rated Peaches and Cream.
frankness.
"I am not trving to glorify prostitution she says,
"but if I do, may God forgive me. Not everyone is so
lucky as me to get a chance to portray a whore instead
of having to be one. But I kinda wanted to make a state-
ment with this picture. It points a finger at a lot of peo-
ple, and some of 'em ain't whores. Like people who get
fake religion. It's a shame the title sounds so risque,
because certain people in the Moral Majority who
should see it may be turned off.
"There are many wonderful people in this world, but
there are many more people who just think they're
wonderful. In fact, they are self-righteous hypocrites,
sinners because they commit crimes like judging thy
neighbor. The truly religious forgive. I have been judg-
ed a bad woman by some of these people just because I
am too open and free and honest.
"Prostitutes, I will tell you, are some of the sweetest,
most caring people I've known because they've been
through everything. I've met them at parties, and I've
talked with them. Usually they're people with broken
dreams who never had a chance in life or were sexually
abused or ignored as children. A lot sell themselves to
get some kind of feeling of being loved. The movie will
show these women have feelings. You're gonna cry your
eyes out
Miss Parton's own storv would make quite a movie as
well. A former country-music queen, vhe gained na-
tional attention five years ago with a hit recording
("Here You Come Again") and with her television ap-
pearance with Johnny Carbon on The Tonight Shon
Then she scored an enormous hit in her first movie he-
she outshone her more experienced co-sias, Jane Fonda
and Lily Tomlm, in .ine to Five.
Miss Parton wa born the fourth of 12 children to a
poor farmer and his wife who lived in a two-bedroom
log cabin that had no electricity. The house was nestled
by the Little Pigeon River near Sevierville in the Great
Smoky Mountains of Tennessee.
By guitar picking, she discovered earlv her talent for
music. At age 10. her Mnging an d songwriting led to
local television appearances and. b age 12. I 3 a debut
at the Grand Ole Opry. And she proudly admits that the
way she looks today owes a lot to prostitutes she saw as
a child.
"I always liked the look of our hookers back home
she says. "Their hairdos and makeup made them look
more. When people say that less is more. I say more is
more. Less is less. I go for more
Therefore, Miss Parton built overstatement into what
See F FR BOD . Page 7
Charlie Daniels
Homespun Rocker A Politico
By STEVE MORSE
Bul�a �.h�hr
NASHVILLE,Tenn. � For years, Charlie Daniels
was viewed as just another hell-raising good ol' boy
from North Carolina. But in the past year, he has releas-
ed two hard-hitting topical songs that have changed his
image and brought him national attention.
Leaving behind the humor of his previously best-
known song, "The Devil Went Down To Georgia the
tobacco-chewing Daniels has come out with the
patriotic anthem "In America a No. 1 country hit last
year, and the controversial "Still In Saigon about a
returning soldier's plight that has recently become a ma-
jor pop hit.
The two songs have pushed Daniels from the music
pages to the news pages of many papers.
"I'm just strictly speaking for myself Daniels says.
"And I'm only speaking from a human point of view,
rather than from someone who knows, or even cares, a
lot about politics
Instead of being on a political crusade, Daniels, 46, is
speaking his mind in the tradition of people he admires
� country philosophers, rodeo cowboys and self-reliant
ramblers. "They were people who weren't afraid. Life
didn't intimidate them he says.
Daniels began making waves last year with "In
America a song he wrote to quell national cynicism.
Seeming like a pep talk, the lyrics read:
"This lady may have stumbledBut she ain't never
fell,And if the Russians don't believe thatThey can all
go straight to hell
And then came "Still in Saigon written by New
York songwriter Dan Daley. More of a straight rock
song compared to the Southern-rock Daniels usually
favors, it is a vivid portrait of a Vietnam War veteran
who suffers flashbacks from a jungle war he never
understood:
"AH the sounds of long agoWill be forever in my
headMingled with the wounded's criesAnd the silence
of the dead
The song has thrust Daniels into the role of a
spokesman for the Vietnam veterans.
Music
"Looking back 10 years later on that war. I think
everybody kind of thinks. "Those guys got a raw deal
he says. "It was a poor man's war. The people who
had to go didn't know a senator and didn't have any
political clout. They were boys off the street � and
farm boys � who were just used as cannon fodder
The song has drawn wide acclaim for its sentiments,
though not from everyone.
"I've had stupid criticism of it from some people who
were very much out of touch Daniels says.
"Like there was a guy with a little paper in Johnson
City, Tenn who said that it was an insult to all Viet-
nam veterans, and an insult to all American citizens that
it took nine years for my Skoal-infested brain to realize
there was a problem. Well, that's downright stupid,
because I was doing benefits for Vietnam Veterans of
America before I ever heard 'Still In Saigon
"I recorded it first of all because I thought it was
good music. I thought it was an excellent song,
regardless of what the subject matter had been. It did
happen to go along with something 1 felt very strongly
about, but first and foremost and always, I record a
song because it's good music
"In America" was adopted as a conservative redneck
anthem. Ironically, it has been just the other way
around with "Still in Saigon which has been inter-
preted as a liberal protest song.
"I don't really see the two songs as being at odds with
each other Daniels says. "We don't fit any molds or
bags or anything. Everytime somebody thinks they got
us pinned down, we jump out from under 'em
See N.C. NATIVE, Page 7

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THi FASTC AROl INIAN
SFPTFMBfR 2. 1982

!hink
leal
and

tnson
s that
ealie
njpid,

n was
song.
It did
Krongiy
scord a
redneck
ier way
in inter-
im with
lolds or
ey got
Dolly
Continued From Page o
she calls her gimmick
that is, looking trashily
sew on the surface
while being sweet,
vsatm and down to
earth in the inside. "I
look one was and am
another she says. "It
makes tor a good com-
bination 1 always think
ot 'her' the Dolls im-
age, like a sentnloquist
does his dummy. I hase
tun with it. I think,
what will 1 do with her
this sear to surprise
people'1 What'11 she
wear? What'II she say?
" ou know she
sas sighing, 'I'm
careful never to get
caught up in the Dolls
image, other than to
develop and protect it.
because it you start
believing the public
persona is sou. sou get
trustrated and mixed
up I ike, 1 suppose 1
am a sex ssmbol, but
that idea is tunns to me
because 1 see Dolls as a
cartoon.
"She's tat. wear a
wig and so on. Oh.
sure. 1 feel sexs. and to
some people I come
across as extremely
sexs, but Dolly's as big
a joke to me as she is to
others
She remembers
something and grins
slyly. "M husband
Carl alssays said to me,
'Angel Cakes, sou
know whs sou are just
so beautiful to me? It's
the way sou make
yourself more than
what sou actualls are
Because sou just lack
about a halt-a-inch of
being ugly as hell
She squeals with
laughter.
Clearly, Miss Parton
doesn't take herself or
her image too senousls
unlike het co-star.
some sas. Insiders
mo a n abou I Burl
Reynold's odd
behavior during
H horehouse, complan-
ing that he's starting to
believe his image �
stepping on people,
blowing up and making
snarling demands
Miss Parton won't
criticize Reynolds,
though she admits there
ssere "sensitise times
when things ssere said
� not meaning to �
that brought tears to
his or mv eves.
"He's had a very
hard time she ex-
plains "His broken
heart with Sally Field,
broken plans, working
too hard, all those
things can cause him to
overreact in a lot of
situations, especially
being as sensitive as he
is. But I do beliese that
inside him there's a
wonderful, wonderful
man. And I think we
hase screen magic
What thes had off
screen was "even
sweeter than a lose af-
fair she declares. But
there was talk at one
point that their rela-
tionship was exactly
that sweet. Reynolds
reportedly spent several
nights with Miss Parton
during her 1 as Vegas
debut. She is not talk-
ing. "I ain't saying yea
Ol nay she drawls,
holding back a grin,
and repeats, "Just
sweeter than a lose at-
tair
But Miss Parton's
lite recently hasn't been
all weekends with
handsome Burt. In
fact, she has noticed a
major turnaround in
her lite every sesen
years. In 1974 came the
wrenching split from
Porter Wagoner, the
country star who
discovered her; and in
1981 the year she turn-
ed 35, she says she suf-
fered more, experienc-
ed more and realized
more than ever in her
life.
"My heart was shat-
tered in the beginning
of the year, not by a
romance, but by an af-
fair of the heart. And it
about killed me She
won't elaborate. "1 do
have a right to some
secret spots she says.
Seeming somewhat
apart from Miss Par-
ton's ups and downs is
her husband of 17
years, Carl Dean. Dean
has become to her fans
an intriguing shadow
figure, always the
mystery ma m the
other room. He almost
never speaks to
reporters and has been
photographed only,
once, five years ago,
w hen a spy cameraman
caught him speeding
away in a truck. Yet,
the next day, when I am
on the set, 1 am surpris-
ed when Miss Parton
sidles up to me and
says, "C'mon, you got-
ta meet Carl
Nobody much
notices the goodlook-
mg guy in plaid shirt
and buckskin boots
who sits nonchalantly
on the set, on the
whorehouse's front
porch. He has big
rough hands and soft
brown eyes and no one
can miss what Miss
Parton must see in him.
His fine features and
short chestnut hair
combine with about 6
feet and 3 inches of
sinewy muscle to pro-
ject, at 38, an image of
sexy boyishness. His
well-lined skin is a
result, no doubt, of so
many hours working in
the sun.
He often visits,
unrecognized like this,
"just to do nothin
when Miss Parton is
working away from
home for long periods,
in this case, a nine week
absence. No longer an
asphalt contractor, he
still "hoists and
hauls especially in
the running of their big
house near Nashville.
He prefers anonymi-
ty because he has "no
meone is with an open
hand.
"Carl 'n' 1 are good
friends Miss Parton
explains. "We have a
real special relation
ship, and they'll hase
to wait a long, long
time for our divorce.
We're so totally open
and free that whateer
happens, happens
Though they may be
"Daddy" and
"Mama" to eacn
other, the Deans decid-
ed against having
children, partly because
they helped raise so
many relations to
whom thes are known
as Aunt Granny and
Uncle Pee Paw. The)
have a big white planta-
tion house, an exact
copy ot Tara in Gone
With the H ind which
stands unseen behind
high gates on 65 wood-
ed acres outside
Nashsille, Tenn Fur-
nished "real gorgeous"
by a top I os Angeles
decorator, their work
areas are in seperate
wings, with a decor ac
cent on durability.
His rustic den has
hardwood floors to
repel an outdoorsman's
muddv bo ots. and
Miss Parton's blue and
gold music room is
finished in washable
fabrics because,
"When I write songs, I
live oser there, and I
want to be able to spill
Kool Aid or Jello or
peanut butter she
says. "It's real plush,
though. When you pull
the eiirtains up. they're
all puffy. Of course,
our bedioom belongs
to both of us
Preferring privacy,
they mostly do their
own housework,
thereby being free to
run naked between hot
tub. swimming pool
and a small private
lake That's about the
extent of Miss Parton's
exercising, though she
will briefly fast or occa-
sionally diet to get her
weight down
"1 look better fat,
though, don't you
think?" she asks
"Skinny, mv face looks
too long. I'm just vers
hefty People are
always telling me to
lose weight, but being
oserweight has certain-
ly never made me less
money or hurt my
career . Besides,
evervbodv loses a tat
girl
N.C. Native Daniels
Old Cowboys, Young
Continued From Page 6
Daniels, son of a Wilmington. N.C, lumber-
. has parsed out a special niche in the music
He has escaped from that curious limbo
the cliche coe, his music is too country
rock stations, and too rock for country, sta-
He has succeeded despite those limitations.
. because of rigorous touring and b the
force of personalits.
Daniels has built an audience devoted to his
ry songs whether they're about Vietnam
eterans, old cowboys, fast women, young
iwdics, angrs Cajuns, dreamers, mavericks oi
� hobos! Amid accompaniment ranging
legrass tiddle to hard rock guitar, the
oi self-reliant, rugged individualists.
Daniels includes himself in that category. He
ks h wn tood on his 250-acre Tennessee
and his favorite sports are steer-roping
: ig cutting horses. He hunts and fishes
Sings Songs About
Rowdies, Etc Etc.
when he can. attending to his own needs rather
than leading a pampered existence.
�'People just ain't tough anymore he says.
"Everybody is more concerned with 'When is my
vacation coming? What time am I getting off
work? When do 1 hase to be at work in the morn-
ing'1 How main sick days can 1 take out? And
what is the union going to do for me?'
His voice rising. Daniels elaborates on a recent
song he recorded, "Ain't No Ramblers
Anymore which sums up his philosophy as well
as any tune he's done.
"It's about a vanishing breed of people � peo-
ple like k C . Tibbs who beat around rodeos all
his life and traveled the country Daniels says.
"He wears the name oi being the best saddle
hi oik ndet that ever lived. I met him a few years
ago He's the only rodeo cowboy who has eser
been on the cover of I itc magazine. He was that
hot at one lime. But he was just an old hell-
raiser. He loved to dnnk and carouse. That kind
ol person is what I'm talking about
ambition in show
business Miss Parton
says. "Soon as you
pose for 'just one pic-
ture well, how do you
say no to the next?"
It is clear that he
loses "Mama"
(meaning Dolly) and
sice versa, despite what
is often rumored in the
tabloids about the
"openness" of their
marriage. Dean doesn't
hide his half-serious
flirting with showgirls,
and Miss Parton lightly
kids about it. esen eggs
him on. Anyway, she
likes to mimic Daisy
Mae flirtations with the
guys herself � mostly
for laughs. After all
these years of a tsso-
career marriage, they
seem a happy example
of the adage that the
tightest hold on so-
FOR
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Everything 10 Off
Tell them Terry sent you.
2500 S. Charles St. Extention Phone 756 3344
Pi Kappa Phi
2nd Annual All-Campus
TOGA PARTY
Sept. 2 � 9-1 p.m. at TkO House � 803 Hooker Rd.
featuring GOLDRLSH Band
Toga required for admission.
FREE beverages while it lasts �
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Apply in person to News Director,
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24 hr. Towing Service
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Jones To Continue Education
Sports
sin imbik: is�k: Pa�� I
K
Olympic-Bound Star To Return To ECU
B (INin PI E ASA MS
Sports I- i1Uor
Former ECU basketball great
Sam Jones has acquired a new title
these days around Minges Col-
iseum.
I lie previous Pirate all-America
performei is now being called
"Coach l eora Jones She. along
with last ear teammate. Lillion
Barnes, have both been named as
assistants on Coach Cathy Andru-
i's team.
Having played with main ot the
returning basketball players, Jones
admits that coaching her fellow
teammates is difficult. "We use to
clown around a lot together, " she
said, "hut this is totally serious,
lones said that there is a mutual
respect between she and the players,
which helps to make her job a little
easiei
.lone who just recently returned
from a European trip with the U.S.
National Handball team, was living
in New Jersev to begin training for
the '84 Olympic games and the world
games in Hungaria. She decided.
however, to return to ECU and ob-
tain a degree in Special Education.
Hei decision was not a hastv one
either, according to Jones.
"I did a lot of thinking while I
a as in Denmark she said, "And I
decided that I wanted to finish mv
studies. I owe it to myself to finish
school
rhe 14 members o the U.S.
Handball team live in New Jersey
together and must support
themselves during the two-year
training period. Because the team is
evaluated every six months, Jones
said there was a chance that she may
have been cut before the Olympics
and has decided to wait and try out
again next year.
But Jones is not olympic-bound
vet. "Right now, the Olympics is not
mv goal she said. "1 have to make
the team first, and then I'll start
worrying about the Olympics
Jones, herself, is still a little
shocked about her discovery of the
sport o handball and what it has
brought her thus far. She has
travelled to Paris, East Germany,
Denmark and Ireland and has ex-
perienced more than she ever
thought possible. "It was like a
dream she said. "1 never thought
1 would be seeing Europe, especially
bv playing handball
The first time Jones had ever
played in an official handball game
was when she tried out for the na-
tional team in June. Two weeks
later, she was on a jet to Europe
with 13 other handball players.
Because of Jones' exceptional
athletic ability, she was able to make
the transistion from basketball to
handball, but there were some ma-
jor differences to overcome. Unlike
basketball, a handball player can
take three steps after picking up a
dribble.
Although handball and basketball
do have main similarities. Jones
believes they are different in many
wavs. "You can net awav with a lot
in basketball she said. "In hand-
ball, a call is made by the referee
and play begins right away. There's
no time to complain about a call
Jones described handball as being
a combination of sports. "You have
to throw the ball like you're throw-
ing a softball, you have to know
how to dive like in soccer, and you
have to be able to explode just like
in football
As far as the physical demands
go, Jones said only those players
that are not hotheaded can plav the
sport. "You can't plav handball it
you have a bad attitude she said.
"There's always someone hanging
on you. And it you sore. you
almost always get hit Jones. ,ts
well as the rest of the players, were
t
Jones handles the hall during ECU basketball action
not allowed to wear anv tvpe ot ;
lection except tot knee pads
As a iadv Pirate. Jones I
sidered a superstar, but �.
the ase in handball. "1 ou I I
one star in handball,1 she sj.j
"Everybody is a threat Jone
plained that everv plaver on
court can sore from her p
At the National Sports Festival in
Indianapolis, lnd Jones scored a
goal in everv game, including three
m a row in the championship game
Jones, who plavcd the wing
right back positions, was a met'
ot the Sot. � :h won
gold medal.
Now that the vet � a
played two sports at a highlv c
pel live level, which
prefer? 'Nothing can take the p
ot basketball she -aid. "But M I
had started (playing handl
age ot five or six, 1
know
Vs tor next year, J
she will have to be at her
order to make the future olyn
team. "It will be hardei n
team next vear because the t i
getting more popular she sa
"People are beginning
game and are finding
exciting it is to watch
But hopefully, h
enable Jon
tins time to I os Angeles
put mv heart into it. I feel like !
be there in '84 l e iaid v. �
make up nn n I do
Frosh To Make Big Splash On Swim Team
B KEN BOLTON
tssfetaol sports f Ultor
With freshmen making up 75 per-
cent of last year's ECU men and
women's swimming and diving
team, this vear's team will be young
but strong.
Out of 29 men on the team this
vear, 22 are freshmen or
sophomores. On the women's side,
19 out of 22 are freshmen or
sophomores, with no seniors.
v ith all of the young members on
the team, one might ��xpect this
year's team to be questionable. But
thai s not so according to head
coach Rick Kobe. "Last year's team
had the most talented freshman
class ever he said. "The potential
is there this year for the best swim
team ever at ECU
This will be Kobe's first year as
head coach after serving the last two
years as assistant coach. Last vear's
squad finished with a record of 6-5
for the women and 5-6 for the men.
According to Kobe, the swimm-
ing program at ECU is on an upsw-
ing now. Last year's women's team
finished 16th in the Division-Il na-
tionals. The men's team finished
fifth at the Eastern Championships.
With all of the talent in last year's
freshman class, it would be hard to
believe that this vear's group could
be even better. But it'sftrue. "Our
freshmen this year are already ahead
of the group that we had last year
said Kobe. "There will be no weak
spots on this year's team
The incoming freshman class will
be expected to step right in and
Sherman Confronts Challenge
B CINDY PEEASANTS
spurts Kdilwr
First-year tennis coach Patricia
Sherman has met challenges before,
and this year she will have the
chance to confront another one.
The Minnesota native is now in
the process of selecting members for
the ECU men and women's tennis
teams. And with a total of twelve
players returning, Sherman's main
concern is building a team that will
be competitive at the Division I
level.
Five female players will be com-
ing back this season. At the top of
the list is Katherine Tolson, ECU's
first female tennis player to ever
ieach the regionals in national com-
petition. Tolson won the consola-
tion bracket. Another top seed,
Debbie Christine, will be returning
along with Janet Russell, Kim Har-
rison and Laura Redford. Accor-
ding to Sherman, five walk-ons are
trving out
"I think for the women at this
point, we have five strong players
she said. "But we do lack depth
Sherman added that she is still
looking for prospective players for
the spring and fall season.
During the fall, the women will
compete in two home matches. The
Pirates will play Duke Tennis Club
on Saturday, October 9 at 12 p.m
Peace College on Thursday, Oc-
tober 14 at 3 p.m. and travel to N.C.
State on October 20 for the only
NCAA match. The Bucs will play
the Wolfpack at 2 p.m.
At the present time, Sherman
holds three tennis practices each day
in order to evaluate potential
players. Having lost three top-seed
players on the men's tennis team,
Sherman has a total of 27 men vying
for one of the ten positions on the
squad. Sherman said seven men
from last year's team will be return-
ing, however, and will probably not
need to fill too many positions.
ECU tennis player hits forehand return
"I think we have some good
strength on the men's team she
said.
Assisting Sherman will be two
graduate assistants, Alan Farfour
and Andrew Sledge. Farfour
primarily worked with the men's
team last year. Sherman, who has
never coached two teams at the
same time, is looking forward to
directing both teams this season. "I
enjoy working with both she said.
"The time is limited but with my
assistants' help, I think we'll im-
prove rather quickly
The men's team will also play
three games this fall. On October
19, the Pirates will go up against
Campbell University and will then
face the University of Richmond on
October 25 at 3 p.m. On October
28, the Bucs will play their only
away match at Atlantic Christian
College at 2 p.m.
Sherman said the fall season will
give her a chance to see the level of
competition and also give the
players an opportunity to work on
their games.
Although Sherman has a young
team as far as experience goes, she
has high expectations for the '82
season. In fact, Sherman has always
found a way to achieve what she has
wanted. For instance, in 1973 the
Iowa State graduate student under-
went elbow surgery for tendonitis.
Unable to play right-handed, she
switched her grip to her left hand
and has been winning tournaments
ever since.
She's a coach that expects and
demands the most from her players.
"If I'm out there giving 100 per-
cent she said, "I expect the same
out of them Sherman believes
that making the most of each player
and having good communication is
the key to any successful team.
Because Sherman is still selecting
tennis players, she has not set any
goals with the team yet. But the
head coach said she has heard some
of the players' individual goals
wJich match her own. "We would
like as many of our players as possi-
ble to go to the nationals she said.
"We are shooting high
challenge some of the existing lime
records at ECU.
Heading the list o the male
recruits will be Dan Booth. Kobe ex-
perts Booth to break the freshman
100 and 200 meter breast-stroke
records.
"ATNtre fffMejrr�v"rrnmer will
b'JEnC 3ebtaick.il transfer from Ap-
palachian State University. ECU
was fortunate to pick up Sebnick
when Appalachian State dropped
their swimming program. Sebnick.
who is the reigning Southern Con-
ference breast-stroke champion, will
have a good chance ot breaking the
varsity breast-stroke record.
Other freshmen expected to have
an immediate impact are Chris Pit-
telli and Marty Ross. Pittelh will
have a good shot at the freshman
sprint free-style records and Ross is
expected to be the top freshman
distance swimmer.
Besides the men, the Pirates have
also landed some excellent women
recruits. Leading the list will be
Michelle Joyner, who has already
recorded times taster than five varsi-
ty records.
Joanne McMulley will have a
chance to set three v arsity records in
the breast-stroke. Sandy Schneider
is another recruit who, like Joyner,
has already recorded times that
would break at least five varsitv
records this vear.
1 he incoming recruits will have to
really be impressive this year it thev
are going to match last vear's per-
formance by the treshman clasv
There were a total oi 19 freshmen
records set last vear. 10 bv the
w ' rWtUWdi-W-bv u" men
�Vccordirig Io coa'eh Kobe, the
most important point that he could
stress to his swimmers would be to
think positive and to set a goal. "If
vou have a positive attitude and
a reasonable goal, then vou will be
successful in life no matter what vou
do he sa
last vear was the first vear that
ECU has had a diving team U
along with the swimming team. The
diving team is a valuable asset to the
Pirates, and diving coach Jon Rose
has done a great job. according to
Kobe. I eading diver Scott Eagle will
be expected to score well at the
Eastern Championships this vear.
I he main goal that Kobe would
like to achieve this year is to have a
winning season for both the women
and men. In the past, there were
some seperate meets for the women
and men. but now thev will all be
dual meets.
This vear's team will be the
largest ever at ECU with 51 team
members, including 12 returning
men lettermen and 5 returning
women lettermen. The previous
rd of team members was J8
which was set last vear.
This vear's schedule wil b .eh
and will feature some of the top
teams in the South. The Pirates
sometimes have trouble getting
reams ro-compere against because Of
ECU's historv o upsetting favored
teams Some of the teams included
on this year's schedule are N.C
North Carolina. Old Don
nion, and Villanova.
According to Kobe, swimmers are
a different kind ol people The
kidv put in 10.OX) vards in the poo.
a da, along with lifting we:g �
three times a week With the swim-
ming season lasting from the start of
school until the second week in
March, the swimmers have to re
dedicated. For example, the da
after Christmas the ECU swimmers
will again resume training for the
spring season.
As Kobe puts swimming is dif-
terent from anv other kind of sport.
The most important thing in swim-
ming is for each swimmer to work
up to their best time at the verv end
of the vear
The first meet is scheduled for
Nov. 13 against Old Dominion
Kobe hopes to see a lot of spectators
at all the meets this vear. "There's
nothing more exciting than a college
swim meet Kobe said.
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r






I HI IASK K) IMAN
M M I MBI-k
L-
-A
.
tfwg ipse � Opening Round
I �t ii M U DISPAIv HIS
The regal might that
carried Bilhe Jean King
to the semifinals at
Wimbledon failed her
dismall) Tuesday when
he vsas upset on the
opening day of the U.S.
Tennis Cham-
pionships b a teen 20
years her junior.
e r sleeping
through the first three
games. King suddenly
lost her touch and
dropped the next seven
games as she lost to
18-year-old Susan
Mascarin 6-3, 6-2.
Ivan Lendi, who has
won just about
everything in tennis, ex-
cept win a major cham-
pionship, overcame a
nervous start to beat
Ramesh Krishman of
India. 6-4, 7-6, 6-1 in
an opening round
match.
Fourth seed Guiller-
mo Vitas, the 1977
champion, defeated
Chris Dunk. 6-4 (3-7),
6-3. 6-4. 6-2.
Mats Wilander, the
17-year-old French
champion from
Sweden, seeded 11th
here, made his Open
debut with a 6-4, 6-3,
6-1 victory over Bill
Scanlon; No. 14 Brian
Teacher disposed of
former N.C. State star
John Sadri, 6-3, 6-2,
6-2. and No. 15 Raul
Ramirez of Mecico beat
Eddie Edwards, 6-3,
6-3, 6-1.
King, seeded 12th,
was the first seed to be
knocked out of the
Open. A ihree-time
Open champion. King
didn't play here the
past three years.
Mascarin, a one-year
pro from Grosse Point
Shores, Mich is rank-
ed 51st by the com-
puter, while King is No.
13.
King, who said she
wasn't bothered by her
toublesome knee, made
one last bid to get back
into the match when
she broke in the fifth
game of the second set
for 2-3, but Mascarin
won the final games.
"Susan just played
too well tor mc King
said. "1 gave her easy
volleys and 1 lost
because of that. 1 guess
I'm a little disheartened
by losing in the first
round. I thought I'd
last longer. I never ex-
pected to go all the
way, but I expected
more than this "
Mascarin said she
took advantage ol poor
volleys bv King and ad-
ded that the 38-year-old
veteran appeared to be
playing tired.
"1 got psyched when
I learned I was plaving
her, and I think that
helped me a lot
Mascarin said
tR�cr�Mc-H�3
Tidbits
The fall semester groups should be in at
organizational meeting tendance ai this impor-
t r all intramural tani meeting.
representatives will be ��
he id on rhursday,
Sept. 2 at 4 p.m. in Anyone interested in
Brewster B-102. IM being a manager or tr
representatives tor all ing out tor
residence halls, trater
nilies, sororities, clubs,
departmental orgama
ions and independent
women's basketball
;eam. please contact
( oach Cathy Andruzzi
ai 757
A CC Season
Begins Saturday
I ' c
1982 Atlantic
( oast Conference foot-
ball season begins this
. id with North
( aroiina S;ate and
v ake Forest hoping to
3tne back from dismal
81 performances and
ke trying to continue
t a inning ways.
d, on Monday,
. ems � will try to
asi year's na-
i nampionship
a asn' i a fluke.
N � " Carolina State
I urman, Vk ake
� sts Western
: a and Duke
Tennessee Satur-
Monday night,
-cd Clemson
71h-ranked
i i in a nationally
has been writ-
it the loss of
e back
;c he 1 Walker
a ise ' a broken
- Clemson
Danny Ford is
: e of it.
re expecting
play Ford
v- e I n'l need
� � fv s e don't
H down there
him trot out
� eld, pull otf
ersey and have
l .i n 0 n
it That's
He's the
I .�: e -e- seen
� be smooth
i the Tigers if
manage to get by
g a They should
n iered favorites
e Nov. 6 game
t g a n 61 h - r a n k e d
North Carolina.
B " North Carolina
State and Wake Forest
are attempting to come
back from 4-7 1981
records.
The Wolfpack lost its
,jn: six games, unable
to .ome up with a con-
tent offense despite
presence of
freshman sensation Joe
McKintosh, who led
the ACC in rushing
h 1,190 yards.
Although an ACC
team is usually con-
sidered the favorite
anytime it goes up
against a Southern
Conference foe, Fur-
man has the edge in its
series against North
Carolina State at 6-3-4.
The Paladins. 8-3 last
year, won the last
meeting in 1976.
The hopes of Vvake
Forest rest on junior
quarterback Gary
Schofield. Last year.
Schofield led the ACC
with 2.572 yards pass-
ing. He hit tor 18
touchdowns.
Wake Forest Coach
Groh has predicted
Schofield will be one of
the nation's top two or
three college quarter-
backs by his senior
year.
Western Carolina
was 4-7-1 in 1981, win-
ning four of its last six
games. Ronnie Mixon
is scheduled to start at
quarterback after pass-
ing for more than 3,000
yards in the past two
seasons.
Duke is coming off a
6-5 year, its first winn-
ing season in seven
vears. Tennessee was
8-4 last vear.

m
J. A. UNIFORMS
SHOP
All type- o uniforms at reasonable
prices, loo coats, stethoscopes, shoes,
and hose. Also - used ECU nurses
uniforms. Trade-ins allowed.
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive.
Near Hollowell's Drug and old hospital.
Pepsi and the Pirates
a winning combination
mmbbbmop
NXXNVNXNNX
VVNVXVVXVXXN.X'XX VX V X
RUSH
Gamma Sigma Sigma
National Service Sorority
WHFVSept.7,8,9 6:30 p.m. each night
WHERE Coffeehouse (located in Mendenhall, bottom floor)
WHAT: Ice (ream Part, Service Project, Cookout (respectively)
H E MAKE THE DIFFERENCE BECA USE
H FARE THE DIFFERENCE!
For more info call: 758-8702 � ask for Terry
"There are several
things about Tennessee
that have us worried
said Duke Coach Red
Wilson. They have
outstanding team
speed. I'm not sure if
there is any team in the
country that has wide
receivers as fast as
(Willie) Gault and
(Mike) Miller. They
also have an excellent
offensive line and a
very fine defensive
line
Wilson said his team
is in good physical con-
dition.
"We've been coming
along quite well he
said. "Everyone
reported in good shape
and we are relatively in-
jury free
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
Welcome Back E. C. U.
PLAZA SHELL
610 GREENVILLE BLVD.
756-3023
24 HOURS
Sorority cRish
tJzach ins iPsak . . .
301 Evans St. Mall In the Minges Building 752 5476
INTRODUCING OUR All You Can Eat
BUFFET from 5-9 p.m.
Mon. Thru Sat. � for only S5.95
t4
Buffet will include:
�Chicken
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�Seafood
�Ham
�Vegetables
�Meatballs
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�Iced tea or coffee
Sijn Up forHlush beteim
Aujfust 31st and September h
Croatan and Bookstore
Convocation: September 9th � 5:30
Wright Auditorium
Rush Week: September 13th- 17th
Also offering our full lunch menu
from 11:30-2:30
our full dinner menu
from 5:00-10:00 MonSat.
CLOSED SUNDAY
I
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$1.00 off Buffet
One coupon per person only.
Good between 5 7 p.m. Exp�res Sept 26, 182
1
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M�





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 2. 1982
Won't Be The Same Without Walker
ATHENS, Ga. (UP1)
Georgia All-America
tailback Herschel
Walker will have his
broken right thumb ex-
amined again Saturday,
but Coach Vince
Dooley said Wednes-
day he still feels Walker
will not play in Monday
night's nationally
televised battle against
Clemson.
"It all hinges on the
doctor said Dooley.
"If he says, 'Okay, he
can play, but these are
the risks then I have a
decision to make
Bui Doole stressed
that Dr. William
Niulherin had told him
earlier it would take a
minimum of three
weeks before Walker
could play and the
three weeks will not be
up until Sept. 11 when
the 7th-ranked
Bulldogs face
Brighman Young in
their second game.
"All these things add
up to me that he's not
going to play said
Dooley.
Walker, who worked
out Tuesday for the
first time since his in-
jury with a thick pad on
his thumb, said he
might not know until
Monday if he can play.
"I'm going to take
what the doctor says
and I think he's going
to take what I say,
too said Walker.
"He really can't see
much even from the
X-ray about how it has
healed. I'm going to
listen to him and see
what the odds are that 1
would hurt it if I play. 1
would like to play
Dooley said he
understood the skep-
ticism expressed by
Clemson coaches and
players over whether
Walker would not be
available.
"I don't blame them
(for being skeptical)
Dooley said. "It's a
natural attitude. I also
feel our fans are sitting
there hoping that what
they hear is not true
Walker said he
thinks the Bulldogs can
beat the defending na-
tional champion Tigers
without him.
"I would like to play
but if the doctor and
everyone says I can't, I
won't beg Walker
said. "But if they say
it's up to me, I will
Play
Asked if he was
afraid of reinjuring his
thumb if he played,
Walker replied, "There
is a risk involved in
everything
Dooley said Walker
would be replaced by
senior Carnie Norris.
"He is a good, solid
performer who has
answered the bell on a
couple of occasions for
us, but he is no;
Herschel Walker said
Dooley.
Dooley said there
will be more pressure
on little-used junior
quarterback John
Lastinger, who will
make his starting debut
against the 9th-ranked
Tigers.
"He will have more
pressure than he would
have if Herschel was
playing said Dooley.
"Now he becomes the
focal point. All eyes
will be on him � that
is, all Clemson eyes.
It's a tough way for a
young quarterback to
begin his career
Dooley said Norns, a
5-9, 190-pound senior,
is "all banged up" and
needs to take things
easy until Monday. He
said Norris will be
spelled by freshman
Tron Jackson and
Keith Montgomery.
"How good are ure
without Herschel
Walker?" Doole mus-
ed. "I don't know. 1
know there is a big
dropoff.
"Where we will miss
Herschel is on the 3rd
and I, 3rd and 2, and
4th and 1. where we
don't make it and have
to gie up the ball. That
takes a toll on morale.
"It wouldn't be SO
bad if we weren't play-
ing the No. 1 team in
the country, and that's
exactly who e are
playing said Doofej
"Clemson is er
good added Doole.
"They won them all
last year against some
big-time opponent and
the have most of their
plavers back
"It's a acckttva
challenge and we've goi
to face that challenge
without the best foot-
ball plaver on our
team
Classifieds
WANTED
WANTED I or 7 temale pro shop
helpers on part time basis E�
penencc not necessary bu'
helpful Must be attractive and
personable Cjii 'or appointment
Gordon Fulp at Greenville C C
"S6 (ISO'S
PAKT TIME soccer coaches need
ed seven coaches to work with
youths Is' �th qrades Start Sept
7th tor '1 weeks, 10 to 20 hours
weekly at S3 to per hour E�
peripnc, and knowledqe 0 playinq
and ruiis required Call Ben
James at T1 4137 e�t 248 or apply
At Citv HaU personnel oMice cor
ier ot uii and Washmqton Sts
WANTED Bass player with
vocals tor workinq part time rock
band 'So 1971
PART TIME position available
a a phone collector MUST HAVE
experience in collections Call
Phillip at ?S' 1330 alter 1 00
ROOMMATE
WANTED
3 ROOMMATES needed
�j r. cir torn house. 2 blocks from
campus S'S per month Call Bun
Chadwick 'S2 4�6l 309 E 13th St
FOR SALE
COTTAGE FOR rent at N Myrtle
BEach Labor Day weekend �?00
tor 3 nights Sleeps 6 Call 751 707
Rebecca
FOR SALE Cabinet built lor
dorm room Holds small rel.
briqht yellow with white lormica
top Price negotiable. Call
757 138
FOR SALE JVC JAS 22 Stereo
Amp 45 wattsc tISO or best oiler.
7 52 0469.
FOR SALE One Schwinn varsity
10 speed bicycle, one large desk.
one chifterobe Call 752 4287, Mrs
S H Skinner, 615 Maple St
FOR SALE: Couch chair, end
table and wall hanging 752 9231
alter 6pm
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL Typist wants to
type at home Reasonable rales.
7 56 3660
PROFESSIONAL Typing service
enperience. quality work. IBM
typewriter Call Lanie Shive
758 S301 or Gail Joiner 756 1062
LOST AND
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Lost m FOUR SEASONS
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Great sentimental value Reward
Call 7S� 7903 and ask lor Shern.
Godfather's

GREENVILLE
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Delivery Hours:
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FriSat. 4 p.m12 a.m.
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Lowest TV Rental
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Fellowship of
Christian A thletes
Student Athletic Board
mm
mm
Get the SPIRIT moving to the lobby ot Student
Supply Store tor "Meet the Coaches Day
Many of the coaches will be there from 10:00
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Wednesday, September 8,
1982, so come on over and join in.
The Pep Band, Cheerleaders, Student Athletic
Board, and the ECU helmet will be there to help
start the fall sports season off right. To make
this occasion complete, all we need is you!
TELE RENT TV
1 Phone: 756-9100
2905 East 10th Street in Greenville
b
Oscar and Linda Roan
Former Professional Football Player
from Cleveland Browns �
All American WR from SMU
FCA-SAB STUDENT RALLY
Oscar will share his testimony �
Linda will share in song.
Jenkins Auditorium
8:00 p.m. Tonight
Student body invited �
No Admission
A Time of Sharing & Fellowship
STUDENT SUPPLY
STORE
Wright Building
Owned & operated by East Carolina University
Winners of Student Supply Store Drawing
550.00 � Rence Walden 222 White Dorm 801
$30.00 � Steven Perry 113-C Scott
$15.00 � Wanda Dove 710 Green Mead Dr.
821449
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 2, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 02, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.211
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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