The East Carolinian, August 31, 1982






�he SaHt (Earoliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.3
Tuesday, August 31, 1982
Greenville, N.C.
16 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Problems Caused By Financial Aid Hold Up
B DARRYL BROWN
Mai! Wrmr
By the opening of school last
week, federal assistance funds still
were not aailable. leaving many
students without means to pay ex-
penses, and the Financial Aid Office
scrambling for alternatives.
According to a report to the ECU
Board of Trustees dated August 20,
the school "did not receive an
allocation of funds from the federal
government until August 16 leav-
ing "East Carolina University, as
well as all other schools, operating
in the dark in regard to student
financial aid
Funds usually arrive around the
first of July.
In addition, "the school received
only a partial allocation the
report said, "with no indication of
what the final authorization will
amount to With 80 percent of
financial aid originating from the
federal level, most aid was
unavailable as tuition and other bills
came due.
Robert Boudreaux of the Finan-
cial Aid Office admitswe're hang-
ing on with a shoestring, hoping to
find something out before we run
into overcommitments He cited
several reasons for the hold up, in-
cluding a six-month delay in the
start of aid programs at the federal
level.
Also, this year the government
for the first time verified every Pell
grant application until June 16 when
Congress cut off funds for this pro-
cess.
Normally only 10 percent of the
applications are reviewed. In addi-
tion, less funds were available this
year due to budget cutbacks.
Vice Chancellor of Student Life
Elmer Meyer Jr. was also frustrated
and concerned with "the inability of
the U.S. Department of Education
to provide institutions with timely
information"and he, too, blamed
some of the problem on the policies
of the Reagan administration. "The
university is not happy with the way
this has had to work said Meyer,
"but we're powerless to make it
work better
While angry at the federal govern-
ment for playing politics with stu-
dent aid, Meyer was confident that
no students had yet been forced to
drop out, and that most who need
aid will eventually receive it.
Boudreaux was less confident,
noting that while students were able
to enter school through suii last
minute actions by the Financial Aid
Staff as deferments of tuition and
emergency loans, many may not
have the funds to continue the
semester and meet basic expenes if
federal aid does not come through
soon.
The Sarah E. Clement Emergency
Loan, for example, which many
students obtained in order to enter
school, is no more than $400 and
must be repaid within 60 days.
According to the trustees report,
more students will need emergency
aid this fall than ever before, due to
"the small number who have thus
far been awarded financial
assistance and Bourdeaux em-
phasized that the school still does
not know exactly how much money
will be available for students this
year.
Last year, approximately 9,100
financial aid awards were given to
between five and six thousand ECU
students.
Meyer noted that many students
expected and prepared for less
money to be available, but no one
anticipated this current drastK
uncertainty of federal aid.
Meal Plan Use Increases
B CORDON 1POCK
siaff Wnlrr
The customary aversion that ECU
students have had tor on campus
dining over the past 15 years is slow-
ly but surely lading, due to changes
in the economy, improvements in
facilities and an overall change in
student attitudes.
According to Dr. Elmer Meyer.
vice-chancellor for student life, the
number of students on meal plans
has nearly doubled in the past three
years from "94 to nearly 1500 this
fall A 50 percent increase in the last
year.
L a reek because of increased par-
ticipation, the two most popular
meal plans (15 and 20 meals per
week) are 18 percent cheaper than
they were two years ago. Escalating
prices in restaurants and fast-food
outlets are compelling many
students, especially freshmen, to eat
on campus.
Improvements in the facilities are
also a factor. The old Jones
cafeteria is now the remodeled Col-
lege Hill Dining Hall. The galley
also sports a shiny new facelift, and
plans for the redecoration of
Mendenhall snack bar are slated for
the near future.
The majority of dorm students
still eat out or in their rooms, ex-
plained Meyer. This is fortunate
since. Meyer stated, the present
facilities are just adequate to serve
the numbers now using them.
According to Meyer, the College
Hill Dining Hall is operating at near
capacity and Jim Mayo, manager of
Mendenhall snack bar, says that
facility is doing five times the
business it was designed for.
But the extent of in room cooking
will be curtailed significatantly in
the future. The ECU long range
planning document states, "as soon
as possible, but no later than 1988,
the preparation of meals using
cooking appliances shall be pro-
hibited in residence hall dorms
where students reside
All of these factors point to the
need for a new dining facility on the
main campus and to the likelihood
that one will be constructed in the
near future. According to Meyer,
the only delay is state funding tor
such a project.
Registration Resister Jailed
B PATRICK O'NEILL
�siatf nirr
On Thursday, 21-year-old college
student Benjamin H. Sasway was
found guilty in federal court for
refusing to register for the military
draft.
Sashay is the second person in as
many weeks to be convicted, as the
Justice Department continues its
crackdown on non-registrants.
Last week Enten Eller was also
cvonvicted of registration refusal in
federal court in Virginia.
So far only five men have been in-
dicted for registration refusal from
a total which, some estimates claim,
numbers near one million.
The charge for refusal is a felony
and carries a maximum penalty ot
five years in prison and a S 10,000
fine.
Federal District Judge Cordon
Thompson Jr. ordered Saswav to be
held in jail without bail awaiting his
sentencing which is scheduled for
October 4. THompson gave the
order just minutes after the eight
women and four men jury announc-
ed its verdict concluding 50 minutes
of deliberations.
Thompson jailed Saswav because
he felt that he might attempt to flee
to Canada to avoid a jail term.
Saswav claimed, during a July
television interview, that a decision
to flee would be a selfish action.
"He has said he wouldn't (flee), but
the statement indicated he knows
about it said lhompson.
Saswav. like Tiler, is a student.
He is majoring in political scienced
at Humboldt State University in Ar-
cata, California.
Eller attends school in Virginia.
In a 1980 letter to then President
Jimmy Carter, Saswav stated that
he objected to registration and a
draft on moral urounds. He believes
Photo By SCOTT LARSEN
Thought MASH Was On
A TV junkie eagerly awaits his favorite program. Sources confirmed that moto-TV will soon be available at
your local motorcycle dealership.
Attorney General Post Vacant
By PATRICK O'NEILL
staff Writer
The 1982-83 post of ECU student
attorney general still remains vacant
as a result of student body president
Eric Henderson's decision not to ap-
point either of the two students
recommended by a "blue ribbon"
selection committee last spring.
The committee was made up of
five members who included Carolyn
Fulghum, associate dean and direc-
tor of residence life; Jame Mallory,
associate dean of student life; the in-
cumbant attorney general plus
representatives of the honor and
review boards.
During the spring interviewing
sessions, the committee recom-
mended student public defender
Hank Little and Ken Hooper.
Henderson, in a letter to Mallory,
dated July 16, said that after
carefully considering both can-
didates, he made his decision to not
appoint either.
"I had a chance to experience
both of these guys in action during
the conflict of my adminstration
said Henderson, "and I didn't
believe they were qualified for the
post
Little told the East Carolinian
that he "expected" he would not be
chosen due to his support of David
Cook in the student election. "He
(Henderson) wrote a letter to me,
saying that due to the recent events
of our past, he felt we couldn't work
together said Little.
Henderson was referring to the
spring trials in which he and David
Cook were going through legal bat-
tles to determine the final presiden-
tial choice.
Little added that "the attorney
See HENDERSON, Page 3
i
Photc 8, SCOTT LABSEK
Book Buying
Students, once again, spent their hard earned money on books. They found prices this ear higher than ever,
with some students spending as much as $150.
that the draft could lead to United
States involvement in another Viet-
nam like conflict. He called the U.S.
role there "interventionist
"Ususally registration lead to a
draft, said ECU art student Jeff
Hoppa "1 couldn't justify myself
going to war unless the United
States were attacked
Hoppa, a sophmore, believes the
next war will be an "economic war"
and he wouldn't support it. He did
however register for the draft.
Student reactions to the Justice
Department prosecutions have
generally been mixed. Two weeks
ago a group of ECU students
demonstrated in support of Eller at
the 10th Street Post Office.
Others such as freshmen biology
student Richard Bevis think that
Eller and Saswav are "copping out"
by their refusal to register.
"Everybody has a patriotic duty to
his country adds Geology-
freshman David Rhodes. "Refusal
to register is being unpatriotic
Rhodes says that Eller and
Saswav should have sought non-
combative service instead of refusal.
Bevis and Rhodes have also both
registered.
Another ECU Art student senior,
Dorothy Gardner, opposes the
registration and the draft for a dif-
ferent reason. "If there's going to
be a draft 1 believe it should fall
equally on men and women she
said. A 1981 Supreme Court deci-
sion disqualified women from the
draft.
"Thomas Jefferson said he would
be willing to be a soldier, so his son
could be a farmer�I would be will-
ing to be a soldier so my daughter
could be president continued
Gardner.
ECU Catholic Campus Minister
Sister Helen Shondell who has been
offering draft counseling for East
Carolina Students who are struggl-
ing with their decisions said, "There
needs to be some vehicle or method
by which people can express their
conscience without threat of pro-
secution
Outside the California courtroom
a group of opponents of a possible
draft demonstrated their support
for Saswav.
His parents Joseph R. and
Delores C. Saswav were both upset
with the decision of Thompson.
During a tearfilled press conference
following the verdict they defended
their son. "It's unjust if you can't
make a moral decision in free coun-
try said Mrs. Sasway.
Mr. Sasway claimed his son
wasn't given the chance to share
with the jury the philosophical and
moral deminsions of his position of
opposition to registration and the
draft. "All law. to be just, there
must be individual consideration
he said.
Judge Thompson said that he
respcted Benjamin Sasways
"conscience" but that he could not
respect hs position because it was
against the law.
He only allowed the jury to con-
sider two elements of the law.
failure to register and intent Ben
should have had the opportunity to
at least face the jury and say why he
was doing what he was doing
declared his father.
Sasways attorney Mr. Charles T.
Bummer said there would be an ap-
peal. He added that his client was
trying to "improve his countrv" by
taking a stand against what he con-
sidered an unjust national police.
Sister Shondell said she regarded
Sasway and Ellers sentences as
"harsh" and "terribly vindictive"
in a "supposed" peace time when
there is no draft yet in effect.
Presently three other men have
ben indicted, on registration refusal
sharges, by the Justice Department.
A total of 160 young men are alledg-
ed to be slated for further indict-
ments in the near future.
NOW To Begin Fund Raising
Candidates To Receive Support
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Mill W rllrr
With the recent defeat of the
Equal Rights Amendment (ERA)
still fresh in their minds the Na-
tional Organization of Women
(NOW) announced last week its
plans to begin a $3 million fund rais-
ing drive to back candidates who are
sympathetic to womens issues.
National NOW President Eleanor
Smeal laid out the ground work of
the new proposal during a
Washington, D.C. press conference
last Thursday.
Thursday also marked the 62nd
anniversary of womens gaining the
right to vote.
NOW plans to have more than 80
political action committees (PAC)
in 39 states before the November
elections. Smeal said that $1 million
of the money would be used to sup-
port local and state races, with the
other $2 million being used for
federal races.
If NOW's goal of $3 million is
reached it will make them "one of
the largest PAC's in the nation
said Smeal.
In North Carolina, which was a
crucial state in deciding the final
fate of ERA, the NOW committee
has targeted Anne Bagnal, a former
Republican state senator, for
defeat. Bagnal, who was outspoken
in her opposition to ERA, is trying
to defeat Democratic representative
Stepehn L. Neal, who Smeal says is
"dedicated to women's rights
Greenville's NOW chapter presi-
dent Dot Gronert is enthusiastic and
supportive of the national drive to
fund candidates who are strong in
their support of womens issues.
"We're not stressing 'getting out' so
much as we're stressing getting
women 'in' - or men who are sym-
pathetic to women's issues
Gronert told the East Carolinian.
The local NOW chapter took part
in a series of nationwide events, this
past Saturday, to dramatize and in-
form the public of the new PAC
campaign. The main North
Carolina event was the
"PACWALK-A-THON" which
was walking event that took place
said
from "Boone to Beaufort'
Gronert.
"There was somebody on the
road all across North Carolina
she added.
The walk took place in three-mile
segments and was designed to pro-
mote the new campaign as well as to
assure the public that "equal rights
for women is not dead The slogan
for the walk was: "All across North
Carolina - women make the dif-
ference
Despite the defeat of ERA,
Gronert seemed optimistic that the
amendment would be back. "We
don't have equal rights, we need to
start now and change the laws which
discriminate against women, one by
one she said.
The ERA was re-introduced in
congress on July 16th, but it will
probably die in committee.
Gronert and NOW hope that
enough pro-ERA candidates are
elected in November, that the ERA
will eventually be adopted to the
See WOMEN, Page 3
t
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 31, 1982
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
it you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
� � the announcement column,
mease type it on an announcement
�orm and send it lo The East
Carolinian in care o the produc
'�on manager
Announcement form are
available at me East Carolinian
ottice m the Publications Building
Myers and handwritten copy on
odd sized paper cannot be ac
i epted
There is no charge tor an
nouncemcnts but space is often
mited Therefore we cannot
guarantee that vcuf announce
men' will run as long as you want
and suggest 'hat you do not rely
solely on this column for publ'Ci'y
The deadline tor announcements
s s p i-i Monday tor the T uesday
lot" ano 5pm Wednesdayy for
Ihc I'sdav paper No ar
notmcemctlts received after these
deadlines witt be printed
'� I pace 'S available to an
ampuS organizations and depart
its
OUTDOOR
RECREATION
Registration and information on
a variety ot outdoor recreation op
pir-u.tics are available through
"e 'S5 Cu'door Receation
Cefi'i" in M3 Memorial Gym
Recently scheoe'ed events m
)e Horseback Riding
September r y is 23 30 Segmn
-a Canoeing Clinic September 3
M 4 Whitewater Ra"mg Tr,p
Nri�eber 10 and 1) Call 7S7 6911
Stop b� the center 13
v-��-� a Gym1 or tur'ner inter
APPLY NOW
Students w"c r'enc 'o apply to
M "r n Soc-ai work or Correc
� -ns in the Fall of 1981 should re
3ues1 an appcat'oo and an ap
potntmenl tor an -n'erview from
me Department Offce 312 Carol
Belk lAllied Health Bu'lding'
cor rrere information call Mrs
. rs' (iv6' F' 718
Deadline 'or fall applications
September 7. Students are en
"jQvtc appiv 3ur Tg summer
SPORTS EDITOR
WANTED
rrpr'rreni of 'ntramura'
Recreational Services s looking
' is an EJi'er for tie m'ramura!
Nwsoaper TENNIS SHOE TID
P T S Experience 'n writing
lyovl a desig- required Con
tacl Na'ic Vile 204 Memcr'3:
� . - call Tfj "
IVCF
i e i Varsity Christian
Fellows?) c �" have 'ner �-$!
neeting n Wednesday
p tern tier 1 a- 'CO pm
v. � hal R'Vjir 248
TIBETAN BUDDHIST
GROUP
' IIP tOt V dtSCUSStOfl dOO
practice ot T.he'p Vatrayana
B"fl'Srr orrne last year will
beg n �' .��v is w a nppf ng
September 1 a S OC at UI3
� vr�r' tifi a" interested per
- ns r'p r�vted f-cr .ntormatiop
b? ?5fl OSS even ngs
SUPERVISOR WANTED
" ne Department of im REC Ser
SI "as a dosi'io- oper tor a pe'
� ' it-wiedge and skii' n
�t 9US spec's ol ou'eoor 'ecrea
tincluding ampig backpack
ami"ig and biking Please
� o c x ,�' ?5? 6187
MODEL UNITED
NATIONS CLUB
The V'ldei United Nations Club
will tmo an organizational meting
m pr'emtxT 7. 1987 The meeting
:i he heia t room BC 104
Anybody interested m attending s
, P r-� o come The meeting .s
at 3 DO n BC 104 or Thursday
epten r.pr ?
KARATE
aii tcaate Club officers and
members are asked to meet in the
� f Memnr.a' Gym.
September 2nd a' 7 30 p m Br.ng
, � r Gi tor a short workout
�S7 4S4
KAPPA SIGMA
The Kappa Sigma Fra'urn'v
located at 700 E 10th Street across
from Umstead Dorm would like
students ot ECU to get 'eady tor
the Fall Rush which will begm
nex week Monday Sept 6
LABOR PAINS PARTY Beer
Blast Tuesday Sept 7, BLUE
HAWAIAN LUAU Wednesday
Sept 8 the Orqinal LAS VEGAS
PLAY BOY BUNNY NIGHT1'
For additional information vail
752 S-S43 Rules are available
OFFICIALS NEEDED
A new school year is begimniz
and as usual many students a-e
looking lor ways o earn ex'ra
money The Depar'ment ol
intramural Recreational Services
has lobs available for apprx
imately 35 40 students The work
hours range from j 45 p m o
I 1 00 pm MonoavS through
Thursday and occasionally "r
weekends No expedience is
necessary Trammg cin.es are
'equired and the tirst chin is on
Thursday Sep'ember 2. in
Memorial Gym Room 102 at 6 00
p rri Please bring with ycxj Social
Security cards and Class
Schedules
RADIOTALK SHOW
HOST
The Department ot iM REC Ser
vices is looking re a person in
teres'ed m communication broad
casting to hos' a radio show In
teres'ed persons shoulo contact
Nance Mize 204 Memorial Gym
or call 757 638?
MEN SGLEE CLUB
The ECU Men's Gioe c'ur in
vites any men interested in sine
ng in 'he iv82 "83 Glee Club to
contact the School ot Music The
Glee Club will be perform ng "ie
Beethoven Ninth with the ECU
Orches'ra n November anc �
make its annual Sprmq Tour
March as well as mak. Ifl
numerous ether concert a1
pearaces ttirouori :u; Nortl
Carolina The Glee Cop met -k
M W F at 12 00 (I hr credit and
is open to a mei campus widi
For more in'urma'idn, or t y j
have a screen e conflict conta '
Mr Glenn a' the School ot Musk
757 6851 or at 758 7090
HOME ECONOMICS
New s'odenfs. old students even
if you're not a s'udem corn
over to a lomt meeting of 30 mc
Home Ec organizations on iirs
day. Sep 7"d a' 5 00 p "� in the
Van Landmgham room ot the
Home Ec bu'ding You'll have trf
opportunity 10 find Oc ' what
AHEA YHDL. FCA NCVA CTA
Phi U anc SPA are an about met '
some new oeopie hear a lerril
speake' anc best ot sli therrv
be retresh"ie'1s So be there an?
be sQuari
GOD
Dcyc-ubei-eveGod? Were � u
taught tha' God wants us to have
an abundan' en'oyable I '
ijohn 10 '0 I 1 n othy f 17. God
lays out 'he pr nciples ano a'
titudes you need to live n" er
icyabte. full life in the Bibv a" '
is H s 3'C ' i Pete' 1 0
Come check cu' our rellOWShiot
where we learn to live Itte or
lovably like God wants �. I
hursday Sept J no Monda
�sep' 6. a' Mendenha
Cen'er a 7 3C p m in RM 243
NCSL
' he fc CU delegation ot the NCSL
will mcel 7 30 Tuesday night
Auyust 3) in Room 217 of
MendenhaH Student Center All
members and interested persons
are encouraged to attend
HONOR STUDENTS
SUGGEST
SEMINAR TOPICS
fcve'y students dream of being
able to design h.s or her own
course can become a reality tor
Ireshman nd s- nhomore Honors
students a" East Carolina
asl si" ester the Honors Pro
gram offers several topic
oriented, non spec alist Honors
Seminars which are generated by
either faculty proposal or Honors
ciude-i request
Ideally, these seminars are m
lei disc ipunarv ano are moderated
by 'wo tai ulty members from dit
terent departments Some.
however are handled by a single
p, rtesot rhey aw on topics which
'i hly nder the headings on
1 i)i' 87 8tj ot the 1982 84
. itall g 11 They meet tor noe ses
each week .no narr 3 sti
credit towards General Education
r pc)uiriTe-i's
I- a Ity members from an
depart I ents Ol the university are
invited 10 submit proposals tor
sen- nars to be 'aught Likewise
Honors students may submit both
toe cs an I � ggested ia uli.
mc mbi rs 1 noderate the
seminars �� a '� ry tommittee
on 'hi Honors Pi or am sr' ts the
sen, � . � �� iHered
STUDENT ATHLETIC
BOARD (SAB)
Are you interested in getting to
know our coaches and
athletes special seating ar
rangements for football
games being involved with the
total athletic program"
Come to the Orientation
Meeting on Wednesday,
September 1. 1982 at 7 00 p m in
244 Mendenhall Student Center
PRESSRELEASE
Do you need a book or a tournal
article from another East
Carolina University library" Try
'he delivery service now being ol
tered by the three campus
libraries (Joyner. Health
Sciences, and Music I Requests
tor books and or lournal articles
may be made at any ol the three
libraries, and the requested item
will be delivered to the library ol
your choice Deliveries to each lib
rary will be made three times a
day, Monday through Friday This
service is oltered to ECU faculty,
staff and students
To request an item, you will
need to go to one ol the libraries
anad lilt out a request form In
Joyner, go to the Circulation Desk
tor book requests and to the
Periodicals Desk tor lournal re
quests At the Health Sciences and
Music Libraries, all requests are
handled at the Circulation Desks
For more details, brochures are
available at each ol the three cam
pus libraries
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or
use a separate sheet of pap i if
you need more lines. There are 33
units per line. Each letter, punc
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end of line if word
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac
cepted over the phone We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid. Inclose
75C per line or fraction of a line.
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lower case letters.
Return lo THE EAST CAROLINIAN
office b 3:00 ruesdas before
Wednesday publications
Name
Address.
CityState.
No. lines

i
at 75C per line $.
Nn insertions.
.encli'c-d
rr1����F��"�� �j4j -
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.1 1 1 1 i 1


T1 11 1 1 1t t
i
PERSONAL CARE
ATTENDANTS
Applications are needed from
those interested in becoming Per
sonal Care Attendants to
wheelchair students We are par
ticularly interested in anyone who
ahs a background ot assisting m
dividuals whith their activities ot
daily living For futher details,
contact Office ot Handicapped
Student Services. 212 Wicharo
Building. 757 6799
ATTENTION
The Junior Varsity Cheerleader
Tryouts will be held at the east end
of Mmges Coliseum at S 00 p m on
Thursday. September 9. 1982
Practice sessions will be held on
Wednesday Sept 1, Thursday
Sept 2, Monday Sept 6, Tuesday.
Sept 7 at the east end ol Mmges
Cohseum at 5 00 p m
Come to the first practice ses
Sion on Wednesday Sept 1 dressed
10 work out
CATHOLIC NEWMAN
CENTER
The Catholic Newman Cenier
would like to invite everyone It
10m in with us tor celeorating
Mass every Sunday in the Biolog
Lecture Hall starting at '2 30 and
s. 00 everv Wednsday at thi-
Catholic Newman Center Dmner
and good friendship follows Mass
every Wednsoay so come out and
OFF CAMPUS
HOUSING
' � c wiii o� teed ng a
mate or wou lie lo I
s' are an apar" � I for Fa
tac' the Oft Campus H . .
� - �� .
757 68' before June 14 Or � ��
'�or will begin a' 'ra I
many student w 1; De �,e�.ng k
commodacns A-
TUTORS WANTED
� �� � �
� � . �
� -
� . .
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Sep'enbet6-1 �Dr David
Sanch�i sC Kr d i na 1ur oit the
HonoS P� O'am 1n English
p. paA isliiBuildma
1 an 1US Ft �n 'herinformation
Df-ng a friend ing
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CLEAR VUE OPTICIANS COUPON
PSI CHI
"� � . ,��� � thru psyco
� ration, tt r. i 0 irgam?
fo a structured,
nfortabli H 1 the i.brar�
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k is over 83 ' rVolunteers
needed 1 . e longer
irs it . j �� � terested, stop
����: siqn oup or call
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brary hours Monday 10 1
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rsday 1 Friday MM
Ie 1 pa ' �' t s Cli access this
nester I v car pat.ng .n th
ll ir vil o i. well as the
, meetings Ps Chi ol
�� ��� always looking withir
iresi ind new deas Please di
" . � lea snai �
ATTENTION
The rW BEBEl IS eri It 1
m ssec I nr hte spr.nq. you an
pick II up m Mendennan � ' �
Library beginning Sept 1 A ,
artistrs and illusfrator�. a' si
work was pnr'ed in the ffc"Bl .
may pick I or in the RE BE
fice in the Polbica' one B I '�
mwf from? DO 113C Copm
las' year s writter subm ss
may be dug up 'oc
The REBEL need ar Av at
Ecitor to 'earn a"d w rfc rw ire
nex' year s Ed torship The n sii
reguirement is ded'ca'io- Ji - �
m any maior can app:� Di f I .
the office and spean to Rick G
don the Ed'tor. durg S oHci
hours MWF 9 00 M 30
I he t list Carolinian
� : I 1 .inc!
'a'e S2C ar ly
,1 olinuin olf ices
�hr Old South
1 ampgs ot ECU.
$
(This coupon must
accompany order
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Off Complete
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til
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Bring in ad & student ID.
30
DISCOUNT ON
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ACROSS FROM OOCTORS PARK
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Today from 4 p.m. on
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ONLY 99C ADMISSION.
All food 30 off
Music by D.Js
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& Roy Richardson of
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Everyone be
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6J66 ejd? 630'
E�30�3����1�CT
RUSH
Gamma Sigma Sigma
National Service Sorority
WHEN: Sept. 7, 8, 9 6:30 p.m. each night
WHERE: Coffeehouse (located in MendenhaH, bottom floor)
WHAT: Ice C ream Party, Service Project, Cook out (respectively)
H h JA KE THE DIFFERENt E KEC 4 I SE
WE ARE THE DIFFERENt El
For more info call: 758-8702 � ask for Terry
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Is offering the students
a back to school SPECIAL
Hair Cuts - reg. $7.00
thru Sept. 4, 1982 - $5.00
Call for Ella, Paula or Kim
Pitt Plaza Shopping Center �
Greenville
Phone - 756-2950 or 756-4042
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I nLrko.MMUrvMn W. "k "� i A d


j
j
Photographers Needed
Apply before Sept. 1 st w ith
Media RonrH ;p
flooi . i .icatioiii Bunding.
I
I
i
Must have:
Phone & Car
I B & W Darkroom Experience
f f,T 4L M Located i mile past
JF lr 1 -�ff Hastings f-ord on
" 1 . 1 W0 10th St. extension
Monday, Tuesday,
and Wednesday
Ocean Perch Nuggets
$1.99
Crab Cakes
$1.99
Hamburger Steak
$2.99
Beef Tips$2.99
French Fries or Baked Potato, Tossed Salad
may be substituted for Slaw359 extra
SOI �.S�3t. Across from
GorrA Dorm
Gei Afuamtd







THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 31. 192
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Rep Faces Prison Term
WINDSOR, N.C.
API! State Rep. G.
Ronald Taylor faces a
possible prison term of
up lo 40 years after
pleading guilty to con-
spiracy and willful bur-
ning in a fire that
destroyed three
warehouses owned by
another lawmaker.
Taylor, D-Bladen,
pleaded guilty to the
charges Monday and
agreed to halt his re-
election bid. On the
same da, another man
was indicted on nine
counts of conspiracy
and vMllful burning in
the destruction o the
warehouses.
Howard F. Waits.
48, was indicted on six
counts of conspiracy to
burn and three counts
ol willful burning in the
April 23 fire at
warehouses owned by
state Sen. J.J. "Monk"
Harrington, D-Bertie.
Bond was set at
$75,000.
Taylor also faces a
federal bribery charge
in connection with an
FBI investigation in
Columbus County.
Watts was charged with
aiding and abetting in
that bribe.
Sentencing for
Taylor, who pleaded
guilty to one count of
conspiracy and one
count o( willful burn-
ing, was delayed until
the next term o' Bertie
County Superior
Court, scheduled to
start Oct. 25. He faces
a mavimum prison
term of 40 years.
Prosecutors claimed
la!or conspired with
B1 a d e n Counts
residents Graham
Franklin Bridgers and
Sandy White Jr. to
burn three warehouses
owned by Harrington.
Taylor heads a farm
machinery business
that has been involved
in legal battles with a
company owned by
Harrington over
patents for tobacco-
harvesting equipment.
In agreeing to delay
sentencing, Fountain
told Allen Bailey,
Taylor's attorney, he
expected Taylor to
resign his House seat
and drop his re-election
bid. Taylor won
nomination for a
fourth term in the June
29 Democratic
primary.
"I can assure you
that this matter has
been given considera-
tion and that it will oc-
cur Bailey told Foun-
tain.
Incumbent Rep. Edd
Nye, D-Bladen, lost out
in a three-way race for
two legislative seats in
the June primary. Nye
said he will seek the
ballot position vacated
by Taylor.
A federal grand jury
indicted Taylor last
month on a charge of
taking a $1,500 bribe in
exchange for his help in
getting a liquor license
issued in the town of
Bolton. The indictment
was part of an FBI pro-
be of corruption and
other crime in Colum-
bus County.
Special prosecutor
Lester Chalmers told
Superior Court Judge
George M. Fountain
three $100 bills given to
Taylor by undercover
agents investigating the
Columbus County case
were recovered from
Bridgers, who has
pleaded guilty to
charges of conspiracy
and willful burning of a
building.
Watts also was in-
dicted with Taylor in
the federal bribery in-
dictment. That indict-
ment charged Watts
traveled from Colum-
bus County to Myrtle
Beach, S.C to receive
a $1,500 bribe from
FBI undercover agents.
The indictment said
Watts, described by a
prosecutor as a
"strong-arm man
aided and abetted
Taylor in the alleged
bribe-taking. Bond was
set at $10,000 for Watts
on that charge.
Henderson Acts
Within Rules
Continued from page 1
general does not work
the SGA presi-
s a solid work-
u mship bei
wee !i the two isn't
ssary anyway
Hoopei c mid not be
�vd for comment,
ma qualified
iree, I he I astaroli-
earned thai he
gch sen for
the p 'He feh like
� e . tabbed in the
Ht - ampaigned
Eric,1 said the
soui .
H oper also claimed
al Henderson said he
"wasn't loyal enough"
added the source
"I'm not here to
judge personalities
d Henderson. "He's
� oper) supposed to
iideni eader and
lidi ihow up for a
trial during the spr-
ing " Hei dei in felt
thai H?oper's no show
vas ample reason not
to appoint him.
According to
Mallory, everything
Henderson has done
has been above board.
"That's his prerogative
as president. This is not
the first time this has
happened said
Mallory.
We're not going to
plav games. The
judicial process is big-
ger than L;nc Hender-
son or Dean Mallory
added Mallory. "We
won't make a farce of
this process He in-
dicated there is a limit
to how many rejections
an SGA president can
make.
The "blue ribbon"
selection committee
will be reconvening this
Thrusday at 2 p.m. in
the W hichard building.
Mallory invites all
students interested in
interviewing to come
bv. "We'd like to get a
whole loi of can-
didates said Mallory.
"Competition is the
spice oi lite
Henderson says that
he has no personal
preference as to the
final choice he will
make. He also says that
he harbors no bad feel-
ing for HoopeT or I it-
tie. Recently, he even
appointed Little to the
committee which will
be rewriting the elec-
tion rules, he said.
WomenOrganize
Continued From Page I
I nited States Constitu
tion. "We want to be
ready when the Equal.
Rights Amendment
comes back to the
states said Gronert.
Gronert also said
that local women's
rights groups in Green-
ville would soon be
making an announce-
ment to the public of a
special nature in their
drive for womens
equality.
Other state races
which will be heavily
targeted by the
NOW PAC program
include those in Il-
linois, Florida,
Missouri, and possibly
Nebraska.
Their primary pro-
ject will be an effort to
defeat Illinois governor
James Thompson.
Thompson, a
republican, particularly
angered ERA sup-
porters by his refusal to
meet their demands
during the often bitter
struggle there.
Smeal said that an
"ERA supporters"
PAC group would be
forming a base of sup-
port for Thompson's
challenger, Democrat
Adlai Stevenson. The
Illinois races will be
funded with over
$100,000 from NOW,
Smeal added.
Although the new
poliical action commit-
tees have not ruled out
their support of
Republican candidates,
both Smeal and
Gronert were not hap-
py with most
Republican candidates.
"Republicans by and
large have deserted
us concluded Smeal.
Shuttle Begins
Beginning on Sept. 7,
the SGA Transit will
begin a shuttle service
between Mendenhall
Student Center and the
ECU School of
Medicine.
The shuttle will
operate through Oct.
28, at which time a
decision will be made
whether to continue the
service, depending on
the amount of student
use during the two-
month trial period.
Therefore, insufficient
use by students will ter
minate the shuttle ser-
vice.
Transportation will
run between 3 p.m. and
9:30 p.m. Monday
through Thursday, and
there will be no service
on school holidays.
The shuttle will
depart Mendenhall on
the hour and half hour,
with the final run at 9
p.m. and will leave
from the School of
Medicine at quarter
past and quarter till the
hour through 9:15 p.m.
T
I
The East Carolinian Requests
Student Support For It's New
Health Column, Any Questions
Concerning Health Will Be
Answered By A Qualified Nurse.
Direct Questions To News Desk.
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407 Evans Mall
Downtown Greenville
JO SPARROW MIKE ROBINSON
BUSINESS - 758-2452
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I





(Wr �a0t (Ear0ltnfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, owm
Mike Hughes, &e
WAVERI V MERRITT. hror�f Mwr�M�
KOHl Rl RlX'KS, Buunas Manaxrr
Phil I IP MANESS. rt Mtar
Chris lichok, nnvismw mnmm
JONI GUTHRIE, ,vhi,loUf��.r
Cindy Pieasants, �,&���
Ernest Conner, ,���
STEVE BACHNER, tmmmmmtmi UHm
Cornet i Medlock, � ti�
Mike Davis, ��,�,��� ���
August 31, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Textbooks
Rising Costs Outrageous
We all knew college was going to
be expensive long before we ever got
here. That came as no surprise �
or, at least, it shouldn't have.
But something that does come as
a surprise � actually, more like a
shock � is the outrageous prices be-
ing charged for textbooks and other
class materials. This year, for exam-
ple, full time students are finding it
next to impossible to exit the
bookstore without spending at least
$100. Some bills total as high as
$150.
It's nothing to spend $25 to $35
on just one class. In fact, most
larger textbooks cost that much by
themselves. Still, many classes
"require" two or three smaller texts
as parallel reading, references, etc.
And each of these may be $5 to $10
as well.
Granted, the cost of a college
education is exorbitant, and none of
us came to Greenville expecting to
iive money. But likewise, it's pretty
safe to say that none of us came
here expecting to pay ridiculous
sums for textbooks.
And whatever happened to last
year's SGA campaign promises of a
university-wide system of book ren-
lal? It certainly seemed like a great
idea last year. Was Eric Henderson
serious? Was it merely a convenient
ploy to attract a few more votes?
Who knows?
Perhaps the rising cost of books
and supplies doesn't concern
everyone. For some students, the
prices may not have increased
substantially to call for outrage. But
for most of us, the cost of materials
has escalated far too much already.
For instance, a recent, informal
mini-study of the textbook re-
quirements used for several classes
on campus indicated an average in-
crease of approximately $5 per class
from two years ago.
In other words, the books re-
quired for many courses will cost
you about $5 more than that class'
materials did in August 1980.
Multiply that times five classes.
Sure, several courses now require
additional texts, but most have
simply increased that much in price.
Maybe that's not so bad, until you
consider what you get back at the
end of the semester � that is, if you
can sell your books back. A good
deal of the time, you can't. And
sadly, there just isn't much use for a
$30 collection of single-owner
philosophy-of-science textbooks
once the class is over. (Some of us
couldn't find much use for them
while the class was in session.)
It is difficult to pin the blame on
any one party in particular. Higher
prices are more the result of a sort
of chain reaction.
Textbook authors revise their edi-
tions about every-other year to keep
up with advances, changes and the
like. Publishers take advantage of
nationwide demand and raise the
bulk costs to individual distributors,
like the college bookstore. (Printing
costs have, indeed, risen, but not
sufficiently to justify the increase in
book costs.) And, in turn, the cam-
pus bookstore raises the cost to in-
dividual purchasers (i.e poor col-
lege students).
And the campus dilemma is set.
Teachers and professors �
although probably with absence of
malice � adhere strongly to the
publishers' edition changes, forcing
said students to buy new books
every-other year or so. But, then
again, instructors have a duty to
"keep up" with the trends and ad-
vances in education � a duty to us,
the students.
Still, it is conceivable that
teachers could try to economize for
the benefit of students by planning
course structures and schedules in
advance. Students have no qualms
buying the necessary books and sup-
plies for their classes. But nothing is
more frustrating than dishing out 25
bucks for a text which gets used on-
ly once or twice all semester.
Indeed, college does cost a lot �
a bundle to run and an arm-and-a-
leg to attend. But textbook buying
� of all things � is (or should be) a
controllable factor in the total cost
of higher education. Unfortunately,
we at ECU have yet to see that con-
trol in practice.
Dear Mom and Dad,
I really wanted to write sooner,
but this first week of school has
been grueling indeed

��
Judge Gives 'Vindictive' Sentence
�"Campus Forum"
By PATRICK O'NEILL
"Perhaps the most fundamental objec-
tion to draft registration is moral. Only in
the most severe national emergency does a
government have a claim to the mandatory
service oj its young people. In any other
time, a draft or drajt registration destroys
the very values that our society is commit-
ted to dejending. "
The above is a quote from Ronald
Reagan during his 1980 presidential cam-
paign. The convictions last week in federal
court of Enten Eller and Benjamin H.
Sasway for refusal to register are indicative
of Reagan's continued sellout of the
American people. Another "promise" has
gone unkept.
Registration is a bad idea; a draft is a
bad idea; and what they lead to � war �
is also a bad idea.
Approximately one million American
men have opted for refusal � the Supreme
Court "refused" all women from involun-
tary service � and now Eller and Sasway
have their heads on the justice depart-
ment's chopping block, while millions of
others will never have to face prosecution.
These types of "selectivity" are
descriminatory and unconstitutional, and
furthermore, they weaken the patriotic en-
thusiasm of our youth � all this at a
tremendous monetary cost. The tab for
registration is high, and the subsequent
prosecution of resisters will cost U.S. tax-
payers milions of dollars more.
Eller and Sasway have both cited their
moral beliefs as the reason for refusing to
register. Both have openly and honestly
documented their positions with the justice
department.
"It's something I do with a great deal of
sadness said Eller, a Christian opposed
to military service. "The reason I made
this decision and maintain it is simply that
I'm trying to be faithful to God
Sasway is also morally opposed to
military service. In 1980, he wrote a letter
to President Carter saying that resumption
of registration and a draft could lead the
United States into another Vietnam-like
conflict.
Sasway's fears are legitimate. I have
always believed that if you give a military
general a bunch of bodies, he'll find some
way to use them. Remember, when there
isn't a war going on, the military is fun-
damentally unemplod. In other words,
they're searching for work. The end of
their search may bring on the deaths of our
sons � possibly us all.
The harshness exhibited by Federal
District Judge Gordon Thompson in his
refusal to release Sasway pending his Oc-
tober sentencing adds further to the vindic-
tiveness and selectivity of this dangerous
law.
Thompson jailed Sasway, without bail,
because he believed Sasway might decide
to flee to Canada to avoid a jail sentence.
Thompson disregarded the fact that
Sasway has no prior criminal record.
Sasway is on record (from an interview
he gave in July) that he would not flee, that
he personally considered such actions as
"selfish
What basis did Thompson have for not
believing him? Obviously, Sasway is will-
ing to accept the consequences of his ac-
tions; he has been up-front and open from
the beginning.
"He has said he wouldn't (flee), but the
(July) statement indicated that he knows
about it Thompson said.
How absurd! Anvone. faced with the
prospect of having his head blown off in a
war, certainly knows that his options in-
clude going to Canada Whv didn't Saswav
leave long ago if this was his intention1
Because he wouldn't cop-out, because he
wanted to help change a bad law. because
he is a man of conscience who is willing to
sacrifice his own freedom1, and comforts
for a higher moral value.
Ben Sasway wouldn't compromise
Enten Eller wouldn't compromise. In to-
day's society, it's nice to see that the
United States of America still has citizens
who believe in principles and liberties
Resorting to war as a solution to interna-
tional conflict is no longer (and never a
a viable option.
In our nuclear-armed world, anytime we
opt for violent solutions to our probJenis,
we risk Armageddon.
Ben Sasway and Enton Eller know
it's time we all did. We should ail recai
words of pacifist A.J. Muste: "There
way to peace � peace is the wav "
Draft Registration: The Way To Equality?
Resisters Using 'Understandable But Selfish Reasons'
The recent trials of young men refus-
ing to register with the Selective Service
have again brought the issues of the
draft and registration to our attention.
A protest even took place recently in
Greenville. Yet, I question the patent ex-
cuses that most resisters give: moral,
religious and political objections to war
and the American institutions for wag-
ing war. Certainly some young men are
sincere in their beliefs, but let's be
honest. Those who are crying the loudest
are, for the most part, white and middle-
or upper-class, and don't want to serve
for understandable but selfish reasons.
It's a drag being in the Army when you
can spend your time in college. Don't
draft me! Let the poor kid who can't
find a job volunteer. Put the black guy
in combat boots; I'd rather party. This is
the truth hidden in the hearts of most
resisters and their parents who support
them. They have no qualms about let-
ting the poor, the minorities and the
disadvantaged defend America. It mat-
ters little to them that although blacks
account for about 11 percent of this
country's population, they make up
about 40 percent of her army.
Whether it was right or wrong, the
draft insured that all segments of
American society shared equally in her
defense. Today's volunteer force
amounts to little more than the repug-
nant practice, common in the first half
of the 19th century, of paying another to
serve in your stead.
Citizen armies have been the
trademark of democracies from
Classical Greece to Israel today. It was
the citizens of Athens who met the Per-
sians on the beach at Marathon, not
their slaves. And whether you like Israel
or not, you must admire her citizen army
that has repeatedly defended her. A ma-
jor difference between the Roman
Republic and the Roman Empire was
that the former's armies were comprised
of Roman citizen soldiers, and the tat-
ter's armies were professional soldiers
hired from provinces outside Italy.
America's professional volunteer forces
are starting to look more and more like
those mercenaries of empirial Rome.
So look at the faces, clothes and ex-
pensive lawyers of America's resisters.
How many are poor, black, Samoan,
Puerto Rican, Hispanic or Filipino?
Then tour a Navy ship, or visit an Army
base; look at the faces of the soldiers
and sailors.
Immoral or not, the military draft was
about the only real equality the nation
has ever had.
Gordon I pock
Senior, English
Registration Laws
I am worried about our country
because of some recent events about
some young men who are threatening to
go to prison rather than register for the
draft.
We must have laws and laws that men
obey and respect, or our whole world
will really turn into a jungle. However, I
understand why a young person might
want to be forced into the military ser-
vice. Our military has a bad record of
mistreating young people.
I read some criticism of the Army
from a communist colonel who defected
to our side in the Korean war. He said
that our Army encourages cheap
politicking. I think that good com-
manders see to it that the different ranks
don't mingle together. If 1 am up for a
promotion, and he is also up, but he is
going over to the boss' house for dinner
every night or taking the boss out for a
beer, then he might jus' get promoted
before I do.
I don't want to be part of a war
machine that drops bombs just to get rid
of bombs and not hit military targets.
This our Air Force did in Germany and
probably elsewhere.
No, the American people can't elect
leaders who try to make fools of our
young people and expect our laws to be
respected.
There should be some way that poor
living conditions, such as loud music or
a drunk barracks companion could be
reported quietly without bringing atten-
tion to the person making the report.
Commanders who fail to take action
against an enemy who is preparing an at-
tack against the U.S. should be shot
Only then should we prosecute a man
for failing to report for the draft
Bill Bloomer
218 Esplanade St.
Charlotte, NC 2821?
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Jovner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfsj. Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. AH let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks wilt be permitted.
Al
S'
7

� i





I HI EAS1 c AROl 1MAN AUtU S �l. 1982 $
J
.
i u c
be
�n a
ne �e
1 IdTlS,
.1 the
s no
p
?
le a man
K" letters
Mail or
Hd South
irar
ail letters
ijor and
number
Letters
n pages.
All let-
brevity,
honal at-
Scholarship Established
H Kl News Bureau
Because of a father's
dedication io formal
schooling and devotion
to his alma mater,
students in the School
v�t 1 ducation at Easi
(. atoUna I niversit)
will benefit in years to
come from annual
scholarships in his
name.
1 he famih ol the late
J Worth Carter of
Fayetteville has given
$10,000 to establish, a
memorial at ECU to be
known as the J . orth
Carter Scholarship in
Education Fund.
"It is something he
would have wanted,
something he talked
about and intended to
do,1' Mis Jessie Carter
said ot her husband,
who was a school prin-
i. pal in Cumberland
( ounty, N.C. . tor 2S
ears.
"He felt so strongly
about education and
was so loyal to 1 as!
Carolina, we all knew it
was the right thing to
do said .1 Worth
Carter Jr. of
Goldsboro, one ot
c arter's two sons who
are ECU graduates.
daughter.
Char I tte Carter ot
Favette !l!e. is a senioi
a: ECU.
"He didn't want his
tildren to go to school
any place else " said his
net son. Donald C.
i a: ter of Greenville.
Both sons hold
master's decrees
in
business administration
from ECl .
Carter died last No.
3 at the age ot 59. Born
Edgecombe Count).
�a; Rock Mount.
N.C.
he received
tu-
rn aster's degree in
education administra-
tion a' East Carolina in
1952. Aftei tour years
in the Sampson Coun-
ty's school sstem he
ime principal a
tovei b lenientar
School in Cumberland
Count) in 1953 and
from 195b until his
retirement in 1980 was
principal oi William H.
Owen Elementary near
Fayette tile.
He had served as
district president ot the
N.C. Association oi'
Educators in the 197()
and as a delegate to the
national convention.
He was active in prin-
cipals' organizations
and serv ed on
legislative committees
of the NCAE.
I he family met with
ECU Chancellor John
M. How ell. Dr.
Richard Warner, dean
of the School ot Educa-
tion, and Di . F.
Douglas Moore, vice
chancellor of Institu-
tional Advancement
and Planning, to pre-
sent funds for the
memorial. In addition,
thev presented several
hundred dollars in con-
tributions from
v arter's friends, col-
leagues and co-workers
who had heard ot the
scholarship plans.
There will be
mote Mis (alter
promised Dr. Howell.
1 he funds vv 111
establish a corpus from
w h ic h scholarshi p
awards will be made
from interest earnings,
beginning this year, to
an undergraduatge stu-
dent from Cumberland
County w ho is a i ising
junior or rising senioi
in the School ol i dura-
tion. Awards will be
based on scholarship,
need and citizenship.
"We are delighted to
have this memorial
Howell said. "This is
one thing we've always
not had enough of
student assistance pro-
vided by private help.
We are most grateful
and inspired by this
gift
W ai net said I he
scholarship memorial
RESEARCH PAPERS
. r gra Jei Rus ' X '
. . .
i , � . lit aca ����� t �� �
Kt-iw-Hr. h �if m t- � ' C . 1st
will be regarded by
faculty, students and
future students "as the
best kind of expression,
from the wife and fami-
ly of one whose love of
education was deep and
lasting He expressed
thanks for "something
we quite frankly don't
often get in educa-
tion
Moore added that
ECU officials
"recognize the overall
impact oi' this gift, and
the long range effect it
will have on the univer-
sitv and the reci-
pients It is an exam-
ple, he said, "of what
we want to do
university-wide
through alumni and
private gift support.
The university wants
to provide every area
with a base of scholar-
ship support, and place
the awards where the
people affected can
make the decisions
Moore said. In this
case, the Carter
memorial will have an
impact upon education
and an impact upon
Cumberland County,
he said.
The first recipient of
the J. Worth Carter
Scholarship in Educa-
tion will be selected
next spring with the
award for the school
year 1983-1984. Each
scholarship will be for
one academic year and
will be renewable,
Moore said.
m
mm
STUDCNT UNION
UJIOUKUIU UMVHHin
gfJpBffV Fach ot these advertised .terns 7 qu.red to be readily a.a.lable �o� ���� A
(luTOHSSlbeto,h'advefi,sed pr,ce ,n ach A&p s,�" eicep spoc'V J
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Gt eenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville, N. C.
COMPLETE
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WE SEW
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Kk
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Fast delivery
7 days a week.
BEER COMING SOON
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of the Attic
215 E.8th
752-2183
� Video Games
Open MonWed.
10:30a.m. 11:00 p.m
ThursSat.
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Sun. 12:00 noon-11 p.m.
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DINNlRSPtCIAlS
EVERY DAY So clock til lOo clock
Mondo. H ippy Hour 0C s
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Tuesday Pzza Buttp' $J 9 Ladies
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Happy Hour Every Day
10C Draft
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t AST CAROLINA'S
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FRIDAY
END OF WEEK PARTY - 3-7, 9-11
Check club to. bar tpme'tatt)
SUNDAY
LADIES' NITE
U.S. 1 EASTERN ALL PURPOSE
White Potatoes
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79
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i
i
t





HI i S1 . AKi -l INIAN
At Gl SI 11, 1982
Fired Worker Kills Man At IBM Plant Durham
1
Kl S E A RCH
Rl NGI I PARK,
. (I Pi) � A
formei employee who
had threatened co
i kei - opened fire
with an � imattc rifle
at an IBM plant Mon
iy, killi on ma i
and woundinj inother.
. rid rtun : i � himsell
in the head with a den
ngei foll � i high-
speed i hase luthorities
lid
uthoi i t iden
tified � ht -���� pect as
. onai d ' � k'ho
s. � � i i o i
n b I in
an u tad for
mosi twi before
he was dismissed -Vug
i i i � mutated
hai i ' made
;om
other employees at the
IBM facility said
Dui ham County
Sheriff's Department
Capt. Tommy King.
Sheriff William
Allen said police of-
ficers who stopped
Avery at a roadblock
did not realize he had
wounded himself.
"Evidently, when he
stopped. he shot
himself with a small
derringer and threw it
up under the seat
Allen said. "My people
said thev thought it was
a bruise. They took him
to the hospital and an
ra showed a bullet
in his head. That's
when he told them he
shot himself
The dead man was
identified Ralph A.
Glenn. 53, an
"inventory control
specialist" at the plant,
which is a major IBM
research facility that
also produces com-
ponents for computer
keyboards. Glenn had
been with IBM since
1973.
Glenn died during
surgery at Duke
Medical Center.
Richard D. Martin,
who was wounded in
the chest, also under-
went surgery at Duke.
Three other people,
reported to be suffering
minor injuries such as
cuts and scrapes, were
treated
Michael F. Pandich,
director of communica-
tions for the plant, said
neither of the wounded
men had been Avery's
supervisor. He said he
did not know if Avery
knew either man.
He declined to say
why Avery had been
dismissed.
Pandich said Avery
avoided security per-
sonnel by entering
through a loading dock
of Building 205 in the
IBM complex, which
has 19 buildings on 521
acres and employs
5,500 people. Pandich
said Avery, wearing
military fatigues, fired
some shots in that
building but no one was
hit.
He then used a
passageway to go to
Building 201, where
Martin and Glenn were
hit. Pandich said Mar-
tin was standing out-
side his office when he
was shot.
He said he did not
know where Glenn was.
A warning was given
over an intercom
system to workers, tell-
ing them to barricade
themselves in their of-
fices.
"All of a sudden I
heard a friend of mine
running down the
hallway saying a guy
had come in with a
weapon said 1MB
employee Ron Coe
said. "The guy went in-
to the first aid room, 1
heard two shots and he
came out of first aid
Pandich said no one
was hit in the first aid
room.
Authorities said the
man exchanged shots in
a nearby parking lot
with officers respon-
ding to an emergency
call. Shots by officers
knocked out some of
the windows of Avery's
car.
He then headed for
Interstate 40 and a
chase began � with
speeds up to 90 mph.
Avery was arrested
when he stopped at a
roadblock on the out-
skirts of Raleigh,
authorities said.
Horace Roberts, an
IBM employee who was
in the parking lot, said
the gunman fired from
his car as he was leav-
ing the area.
"I turned around
and he started shooting
out the window
Roberts said. "I bit the
dust
Allen said an
automatic rifle, a
.22-caliber rifle and a
derringer were in the
car.
Allen said Avery
would be charged with
murder.
It was the second at
tack at an IBM plant
this year. In May, a
former employee drove
his car through glass
doors into IBM offices
in Bethesda, Md , and
opened fire, killing
three people and woun-
ding eight others before
surrendering 7 hours
later
During the seige, the
suspect, Edward
Mannn. 18, of Mit
chelKille, Md told a
reporter he staged the
shooting to get even
with the compan) He
worked tor IBM
about 13 years and quit
after becoming involv
ed in a workmen's .om
pensation suit
Mann is to stand trial
Dec. 6
Prison Inmate Dies
RALEIGH. N.C.
(UPI) � A state Cor-
rection Department of-
ficial says an autopsy
has been ordered to
determine what caused
the death of a 19-ycar-
old Polk Youth Center
inmate.
Stuart Shadbolt said
Charles E. Hargrove
became ill about 3 p.m.
Mondav and was taken
to the center's first aid
room, where he lost
consciousness.
Hargrove then was
taken to the C entral
Prison Hospital, w nere
he died about 6:30 p.m.
after efforts to revive
him tailed.
"I' apptrar
been death by natu
causes Shadbolt said
"No Foul play
suspected
Shadh. Ii a :
hodv a- sent I The
North Cai
Memorial Hospital
Chapel Hill for an
autopsv
milmi ii ii ii i in i�
ECU'S
Party
Center
i C razy Tuesday
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rhurs College Nite
End of Week Party"
Best in Dance Music
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V
V ,
417 Cotanche St. (Downtown)
libfctUiljiMJiillMilMlitftfJjtfCMHifa
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Students!
We align, full rotate
& computer balance.
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320 W.Greenville Blvd.
Phone 756-5244
pekwg aim
Hair Salon Unisex
With a large number of
ECU students (male & female) as
our customers, we are looking forwar i
to catering to our every hair care
need. College students of today
demand certain styles that H �
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doing We stay open lues & 1 hurs
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I!
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v. ?
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jte
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When it comes to pizza,
PTA comes to you.
Pizza
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i irnpujwuiwi ��u"u
r





THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST SI, I9�2
en
4e
tor
m
liv-
m-
rial
ic
It a
in
in
Garden Growing Is Fun
B MlkEHXMKK
Muff n!�r
The tune is i, jhl i
students who want to
start a tall garden at
their apartments, 01
perhaps even in a dorm
room.
One it ip to the
grocery store will v1k
tate the wisdom ot tr
mg to grovk . me
egeiables AnJ mosl
gardeneiv would tell
you that tending a
garden is worth the ef-
fort even when it
doesn't work out to be
the most economical
way to eat egetabh.
The taste of the
home-grow n egetabl
usually confirms the et
fort and leads the
gardener t. sweat thai
next year's effort will
be the best ever.
According to Sam
Uzell, the Pitt C ount
Agricultural Extension
agent, two things are ot
vital importance ii
planning a fall garden
These are the control ot
insects and an abihu to
water youi plants.
Greenville weathei
tends to be er dr
during the months ot
September and Oct bet
and most of the insect
population seems to
have achieved its full
potential at this time.
Many ot these insects
just love to eat young,
tender greens.
Uzell recommended
planting mustard
greens, spinach, beets,
carrots, broccoli, cab-
bage, kale, kohl-rabi,
radishes, rutabegas,
and leaf lettuce (head
lettuce would have a
problem). Ine adven-
turous gardener may
also want to try snap
beans (choose a 50-day
variety), cucumbers,
and squash. Uzell also
recommended that
gardeners use Wando
peas if they want to try
growing sweet peas.
Ms. Jan Kitrell, a
local greenhouse
owner, also recom-
mended onion sets,
sugar snap peas, and
turnips. She recom-
mended that collards be
planted from seedlings
rather than from seed
at this date.
I he Organic Garden-
ing inagaine recom-
mends, in addition to
the above suggestions,
thai eardenerss can also
try brussel sprouts,
parsley, and parsnips at
this time. Don't expect
your parsnips until
March.
Gardeners who use
chemical pesticides will
most likely want to use
either sevin dust or
malathion, according
to Uzell. If gardeners
don't know which in-
sect is chomping down
on their young, tender
plants, they can bring a
specimen of the insect
to the agricultural ex-
tension office for iden-
tification.
Gardeners planting
collards, cabbage, or
others of the kole crops
will have trouble with
cabbage loopers, im-
ported cabbage worm,
diamondback moths,
and harlequin bugs
said Uzell.
Organic gardeners may
want to try bacillus
thuringiensis, also
known as dipel to fight
these bugs.
Another trick, accor-
ding to Uzell, would be
to find an infected
worm (blackish in col-
or) and put it in a cup
of water and then into a
blender, and then spray
the mixture on your
plants. Chances are
pretty good that the
other worms will catch
the virus and die -
hopefully.
Students living in
dorms will have a much
more difficult time in
getting a crop of food
growing, but certain
vegetables can be
grown in containers.
Containers should
have good sterile pot-
ting soil and good
drainage, besides a
location where they can
get maximum sunlight
while they are growing
to maturity. "Leaf let-
tuce doesn't need too
much sun said
Kitrell, "but a cherry
tomato plant would
need 6 to 8 hours of full
sun
More information on
fall gardens can be ob-
tained by calling
"Extension Teletip a
service of the North
Carolina Agricultural
Extension Service. The
number to call is
-7301 and ask
number 2919.
pencil and
1-800-662-
for topic
Have a
paper
notes.
handy to take
Walking Gets You Around
By PATRICK O'NEI! I
siff W -llfi
Editor's note: This is
the second of a two-
pan series on way to
travel in Green ville. In
the first part, rma
lion about the SO. 1
bus, city bus and local
bike routes was eiven.
This segment will sun:
up the other way s to f
arround in Greenville.
There are three moi
ways to get around
without a cai walk
ing, wheelchaii am:
motorcycle.
Walking, you
way of getting i und
the university. ilso
fine wa to see ireen
ville. Within the city, i
you know whore u
look, is a house that
was a boat.
wilderness park, a seep
ing spring on a hillside,
a night-lighted stained
glass, a rose garden and
a manicured residentila
area near a towering
modern chruch steeple
Historic interest sup
plements the seme at
the Jones-Lee House,
the Long House, the
Humber House, the
J a r v i s House, the
decaying Port Terminal
(a former gambling
den) and the barred
windows of an old jail
For more informa-
tion on these and other
locations contact the
Greenville Area Preser-
vation Association.
Medical research en-
dorses Harry Truman's
habit Walking is a
good and healthy exer-
cise and here in Green-
ville, it can be one of
the gest was to see the
city .
In the area of
wheelchairs, East
Carolina is proud of
eading the state in
naking its building ac-
cessible. Still some
lassroom buildings
ick elevators or have
in entrance ramp at
ne door only.
Barrier-free campus
levelopment continues
and this fall a
multicolor campus map
-bowing parking area
and coded to show ac-
cessibility will be
available from the of-
fice of Handicapped
Student Services.
The Greenville
engineer reports that all
new curbs in town are
built with ramps but
some problems do ex-
ist.
"Downtown's not
too bad said ECU
wheelchair student
Brian Rangely referring
to w heelchair ac-
cessability. Rangely, a
junior, majoring in
English, says the
university has worked
with the city to build
curb cuts in the
sidewalks to make
wheelchair travel
easier.
He did feel, however,
that "apart from the
downtown area"
wheelchair travel was
often dangerous
because there are often
no curb cuts and many
times no sidewalks at
all.
"Sidewalks would be
a major improvement
in many area said
Rangely. He also added
that placement of curb-
cuts were not always
logical, because they
were often only placed
on one end of a block.
According to Range-
ly, 10th and Charles
street areas are the
most dangeruos.
In contrast to the
above modes of
transportation, motor-
cycles and mopeds re-
quire gas, but not much
more. And as with
bicycles, you can main-
tain the machines
yourself.
If you can afford the
up keep, insurance,
license, registration and
parking fees, travel
with a car offers con-
vience to the in-
dividual.
Typical daily fixed
cost are estimated at
$3.42, whether driven
or not. If in addition,
eight miles are com-
muted the estimate goes
up to $4.38 per day
driven.
Your schedule,
together with housing
may force you to com-
mute so consider car
pooling. For long-
distance trips,
Mendenhall furnishes a
pool board.
For long distance
travel via public-
transportation, there is
the bus, train and air.
The bus station is
four block from cam-
pus. AMTRAK sta-
tions are in Rocky
Mount and Wilson.
The Greenville bus runs
to the commuter airline
at Greenville Airport
for connections to ma-
jor airports. A regional
airport is 30 miles away
in Kinston and the
Raleigh-Durham air-
port is about 100 miles
away.
Additional informa-
tion about ways to get
around can be obtained
at the office of the vice-
chancellor for student
life, phone 757-6541.
NTE Examination Offered
By GREG HIDEOUT
4c.uMaai t�s hdilor
Education majors
will be offered the Na-
tional Teachers Ex-
amination (NTE) four
times this school year,
Educational Testing
Service has announced.
The NTE consists of
two parts; the core bat-
tery, which tests com-
munication skills and
general knowledge, and
a speciality area test.
According to ECU's
department of educa-
tion, the test is not
reguired for graduation
but is a necessity for
certification to teach
North Carolina.
Core area examina-
tions will be offered
Nov. 13 and March 5.
For the 82-83
academic year the core
section of the test does
not count. John S.
Childers,� director of
the testing center, said
the core is in an ex-
perimental phase in
North Carolina.
Specialty area tests
will be given on Oct. 30
and Apr. 30. These
tests determine the pro-
spective teacher's ap-
titude in their specialty.
NTE scores are used
by many school
districts as part of the
criteria in the section
of new teachers. A
higher score is presum-
ed to offer better
employment chances
according to some
sources.
Students who want
further information
should contact the
testing center at
757-6811.
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THfc EASTCAROI INIAN
Entertainment
Al GUST31, W2
Page)
Auditions For
'The Mikado'
Being Held
'8283 MSC Theatre Arts Series Has 'Acting Company' For March
Above: A scene from The Acting Company's current production of classic Tartuffe'm the Hendrix Theatre. For further information about
Shakespeare's Twelfth Night. The troupe, under the direction of John the entire series or season ticket availability, phone theentral lickti
Houseman, will perform the play in Hendrix Theatre on March 25. Office in Mendenhall Student tenter at 757-6611, extension 266, bet-
1983. On March 26, the company will he performing Moliere's comedy ween the hours of 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.
Ml NEWS Bl RUl
GREENVH 1 1 Singing, danc
ing, and acting audition- tor the
East Carolia I niversity production
ot (.filbert and Sullivan's operei I
The Mikado, arc scheduled foi
Monday, and ruesday, Nop! 6 and
7, in EC l 's Messick Theatre Arts
Center. The auditions will begin at
p.m. each evening in Room 206.
The production, a ioint venture
ot the ECU Playhouse and the 1(1
School ot Music, will be the fourth
in Last Carolina's 75-year history.
The Mikado is well known as one
ot ihe mosl popular musical
frivolities m the English language.
Written bv the iegendar team of
Gilbert and Sullivan, the operetta is
a ivrieal and romantic tale I I
tastk happenings in a mythical
Japanese village alL p I
There are 30 roles open :
amg bv the newest member ot the
ECU drama faculty, Cherry (
rison. M- Garrison comes I i f
with more than 100 directing
from California campuses �
tI San Fransisco State and
Jose City College
"We have a wide vanetv ot role-
available tor the how she
"We'll be looking tor singers and
dancer- vho are also talented a.
udii inees should c ome
prepared to sing one ballad or aria
and one comic -one. perhaps from a
(iilbert and Sullivan show A pianit
will be provided, and audmonee-
should bring their own music. They
should aKo prepare a one-minute
serious monologue and a one-
minute comic monologue. A simple
movement audition will be required
1 role- It ! also nquired that
auditionees bring a photograpv and
resume, if available
Ihe fikado will be perl in
McGinnis Theatre Octobei 2s 2�.
Nov. 1 and 3 1 I I students,
and staff and local r
arc all invited fo audition.
Scripts are available in the
Reserve Room at Joyner library on
campus lor turther information,
Phone 757-6390
Spielberg's Childhood Fantasies Come To Life
B MIC HIKOKAKITAM
NEW YORK � As a child growing up in the '50s,
Steven Spielberg knew, just knew, that another magical
and somehow terrifying world lay just beyond the placid
surface of his family's suburban life. F.ven the tiny
crack in his bedroom wall, illumunated by the hallway
light, promised all sorts of awful marvels.
"1 remember lying there, trying to go to sleep he
says, "and 1 used to always imagine little Hieronymus
Bosch-like creatures inside, peeking out and whispering
to me to come into the playground of the crack and be
drawn into the unknown there, inside the wall of my
home in New Jersey
lo this day, Spielberg says he continues io be
fascinated by "what I think is there but cannot see
That capacity for wonder, combined with a prodigal im-
agination, has informed nearly all his films from Jaws
to Close Encounters of the Third Kind to Raiders of the
Lost Ark.
In his latest pictures, Spielberg returns to the subur
ban milieu of his own childhood, but invests that world
with two dramatic and highly disparate visions of the
supernatural: Poltergeist, which he produced and co-
wrote, is a darkly imagined horror movie, portraying a
family threatened by the vengeful spirits of the dead:
while T the story of a 10-year-old boy who befriends
an extraterrestrial stranded on earth, is, in effect, a con-
temporary fairy tale, offering a vision oi innocence and
hope.
"Poltergeist is what I fear, and E. I. is what I love
Spielberg explains. "One is about suburban evil and the
other is about suburban good. I had different motiva-
tions in both instances; In Poltergeist, 1 wanted to ter-
rify and I also wanted to amuse � I tried to mix 'he
laughs and screams together. Poltergeist is the darker
side of my nature � it's me when I was scaring my
younger sisters half to death when we were growing up
Hollywood Legend
Fonda Worked Hard At Craft
By V1NC FNTCANBY
Nr� N ��rk limes Nr�s Sericr
NEW YORK � It always is difficult to describe ac-
curately what Henry Fonda brought to his perfor-
mances that made him different from every other film
and stage actor of his generation. That is a measure of
his particularity.
As a leading man Fonda, who died recently at the age
of 77, was always a character actor, and as a character
actor, always a leading man, even when showing up as
Admiral Nimitz in something as disposable as Midway.
Except for Young Mr. Lincoln he never went in for
much make-up. He didn't wear putty noses like Paul
Muni. He wasn't the sort of romantic figure who could
compete with Clark Gable or Cary Grant, though he
was almost Grant's equal when it came to comedy. He
could affect a drawl when necessary, but he didn't
possess the distinctive mannerisms of James Stewart or
the politically aggressive machismo of John Wayne.
Spencer Tracy was always more laid-back � more
comically in charge of the circumstances around him �
than Fonda who, even toward the end of his career, in-
vested his performances with a kind of intensity that
was forever youthful.
Where James Cagney. in the recent Ragtime as in the
early Public Enemy, seems barely able to contain the
energy of his personality, Fonda seems always to be har-
boring his, as if it wouldn't be good WASP form to let it
show. And he didn't, not until his Oscar-winning per-
formance in On isolden Pond, which, though his energy
must have been in short supply by then, is one of the
most vigorous, most witty performances of his career.
He was such a good guy that when he played a bad
guy � a thoroughly rotten, sadistic, murdering S.O.B
as he once did in Sergio Eeone's Once upon a Time in
the West � we tended to side with him, assuming that
this was the new order of the cosmos. It was one of
Leone's darkest jokes.
The public personality of Henry Fonda was so
modest, so steadfast and so self-effacing that too often
we didn't recognize the decisions, the discipline and the
intelligence that gave shape to his work. We mixed up
the actor with the roles he played. We thought of him as
the ail-American boy of the pre-World War II genera-
tion, and those all-American boys didn't become actors.
That was sissy stuff.
All-American boys stayed close to the soil (The
Farmer Takes a Wife), played cops-and-robbers (Jesse
James, The Return of Jesse James), protected hearth-
and-home (Drums Along the Mohawk), honored mom
(The Grapes of Wrath), fought injustice (Mister
Roberts) and occasionally became its victim (You Only
Live Once, The Wrong Man), and were astonishingly
naive around women (The Lady Eve).
Cinema
In idealizing Fonda in this way, we shortchanged the
artist. However, that was very much the way films
worked on the imaginations of those of us who grew up
attending to the shadow-figures on movie screens in the
'30s, '40s and '50s.
It was therefore something of a shock when I once
heard him talk with passion, insight and a good deal of
humor about acting. It was in the mid60s in the course
of an interview that had been set up in connection with a
piece about Peter, Jane and Henry Fonda as an acting
family, the "new" Barrymores, which they never really
became or aspired to become.
Fonda's public relations man had arranged the
meeting reluctantly since, he said, Fonda did not like to
talk about his children and wasn't at all happy about
some of the things they were then saying in public. Hav -
ing been given a list of all of the things Fonda would not
discuss, I entered the office where he was waiting with a
certain amount of apprehension.
"Well he said, "what do you want to talk about?"
He was, perhaps, the healthiest looking man I'd ever
met. It was nothing that seemed consciously acquired. It
just looked natural, as did the casual but expensive
tweediness of his clothes. He was formidable not in
manner but in physical perfection � I was not used to
meeting movie stars.
I told him that I had originally been interested in what
he thought about the then-burgeoning careers of Jane
and Peter, but that I'd been warned that this was forbid-
den territory. He hesitated a second or two, sighed,
laughed and then started to talk, and the supposedly
shy, taciturn public personality didn't stop talking for
more than two hours.
Among other things he recalled the first time he had
seen Jane on the Broadway stage in, I think, a not-great
play called The tun Couple. He had been the nervous
parent, not at all sure that she was ready for the big
time. The curtain went up, the parental panic increased
and then suddenly, as he described it, he was aware that
she had "taken off She was safely inside the role and
the performance was airborne.
There is, he went on, a magical moment early in each
See FONDA'S, Page 9
� and I. - nn optimism about the future and mv op
limism about � hai if w i- like to grow up in Arizona and
New Jersey
(Poltergeist and II ate held over at Greenville's
Plitt Entertainmententer.)
� romantic and an idealist when it come- to making
movies. Spielberg is not so much interested in depicting
lite a- it is, so much a- life a- it might be � heightened
and idealized on the wrreen
CihoN (Poltergeist), extraterrestrials (IT.l I 1 (-
(Close Encounters) and vengeful killer shark- (Jaws
help anima e his Jure In others, a single incident �
a young outlaw ouple's decision to retrieve their ch
in The Suaarnnd Express, tor instance, or the ap
pearaike of a J ;se submarine off the coast
( alifornia in 1941 triggers an accelerating sequence
ot even's, the -n ot wonderfully improbable event-
that happen onlj in the movies.
"I havt. .i real chemical imbalance between wh,
and what's not Spielbe- T tend to side
with what isn't real in picking a subject, more than I do
th what's really happening o ere in ihe street �
enough Ji' t :i tke movie- that reflect life a- we see
t ev . day .
'There's no proof UFOs exist or that ghovts ev
but it always nice to imagine what ou think could be
'here, and the bes movies that are slightly above one-
normal eye level � something vou have to reach up
and uspend . sbelief
Indeed, the s movies Spielberg kes mat
have " - e effect on audiences 'hat the p
saw a- a young boy had on his youthful imaf 03
I - "take peOj
ot then -eat- to get them involved � through shcfwi
Nee KID. Page 11
s
m;
ont
-
m
� I
au(
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1
j

Henry Fonda in one of his best-known roles as the legendary Tom Joad in a scene from The drapes of M rath
A
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'





5 he
ion;
It oul
nan-
?'
N rath.
Fonda's Style Was Unique
THE EAST CAROl INIAN AUGUST 31. I9K
Continued From Page 8
stage performance, no
matter how many times
one has done the role,
when the actor either
becomes airborne or re-
mains unhappily earth-
bound, hoping that the
audience doesn't know
the difference. When
he was aware that Jane
knew what he knew, he
didn't have to worry
about her being an ac-
tress any longer. She
was on her own.
Since that interview
I've talked to a number
of people who were
associated with Fonda
in various stage ven-
tures and almost all of
them have remembered
the care � sometimes
maddening � with
which he prepared for
his roles and his
sometimes angry impa-
tience with what he
took to be the sloppy or
the second-rate.
Backstage he was not
the benign fat her-figure
we might have liked to
think he was. He was
from one piece of ice to
the next in the movie's
climactic sequence, but
that Hay down Fast
was a "personal
triumph" for the young
leading man.
Fonda never did
make that many
unintentional, out-and-
out howlers. Offhand,
1 can think of only one
other, the 1973 Ask
H ednesday about the
terrible emotional com-
plications that confront
a 50-ish woman
(Elizabeth Taylor) who
has head-to-foot
cosmetic surgery to
make her look a less-
frumpy 40. Fonda got
in and out of that one
easily, as the woman's
husband who's seen
briefly at the beginning
and at the end.
With his first film
The Farmer Takes a
Wife (1935), a screen
version of his Broad-
way play, Fonda's
Hollywood career
became airborne and
remained airborne for
the rest of his life.
Uraham Bell he also
played the lead in John
Ford's Young Mr. Lin-
coln and Frank lames
in Jesse James with
Tyrone Power.
In Fonda's greatest
performances our
idealized vision of him
as the staunch, unaf-
fected, completely
natural American male
worked to mask the
talent. Although he
created the way we
thought of him,
especially his would-be-
playboy in Preston
Sturges' The l.ady Eve
and his Wyatt Earp in
Ford's My Darling
C lementine.
If Fonda's finest per-
formance up to 1955
was in Mister Roberts,
our inclination was to
credit this to the fact
that the role was writ-
ten for him and that he
had, after all, played it
for more than 1,000
performances on the
stage. We took him so
much for granted that
few critics realized ex-
actly how fine he really
was as the bookish, in-
troverted Pierre in King
Vidor's underrated
War and Peace, in
which his very
American-ness italiciz-
ed the perfect simplicity
of the character.
In the later years of
his career, as he turned
his attentiobn more and
more to the stage where
he could play the sort
of roles that appealed
to him, such as
Clarence Darrow, he
continued to make a
good living in films
playing smallish or
cameo roles designed to
lend class to such pop
epics as Rollercoaster,
Battle of the Bulge and
Midway. These Films
didn't enhance his
reputation, but they
didn't hurt it either.
When On Golden
See HENRY, Page 11
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an artist who worked
extremely hard to ac-
quire his manner of ef-
fortless grace, which in
films is sometimes
bestowed by the cameia
but which, in the
theatre, is as impossible
to fake as a high-C.
Fonda was not only a
great film star, he was a
great film actor He
lent authenticity to the
good films and.
somehow, was never
seriously damaged by
the bad ones. In review-
ing his second film.
Way down Fast, Andre
Sennwald, The Times
film critic, wrote that
the movie was an
unintentional
"howler what with
Rochelle Hudson's
woebegone, unmarried
mother-to-be leaping
through On Golden
Fond. There were years
that weren't
memorable and plenty
of films that don't im-
mediately ring a bell �
Spendthrift (1936) and
Wild Geese Calling
(1941), among others
� but the studio
system was good to
him
He wa making so
many films, in siKh
rapid order, that the
good films and-or the
good performances
neutralized the possibly
damaging effects of the
films that were per-
functory. No one could
ever build a career play-
ing Thomas Watson to
Don Ameche's Alex-
ander Graham Bell, but
the same year Fonda
made Alexander
pand OpeoinsT
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10
Mil l-ASl t ARCH INI
MCI SI 31 182
Poland's Amazing 'Man Of Iron'
Itself A Living Part Of History
oil? lEast Olaroltman
This Wednesday
evening, Sent 1, in
Mendcnhall Student
Center's Hendrix
Theatre, the Siiidcni
Union Films Commit-
tee will screen Poland's
gripping political
drama Man of Iron
The 1981 Oscar
nominee tor Best
Foreign I anguage Film
will begin at 8 p.m ad-
mission is h ID and
Activity Card tor
students and MSC
Membership for faculty
and staff.
Following the film in
Room 244 (MSC
Auditorium) of the stu-
dent center. Dr. Philip
.1. Adler of the History
Department will lead a
short, informal discus
sion of Man of Iron
Coffee and doughnuts
will be served and all
interested student�.
faculty and staff are
welcome to attend.
ewsweeli film critic
lack Kroll discussed
Man of Iron in the
December ?8, 1981 edi-
tion of the magaine.
Following is an excerpt
from his review. (Use
b permission; all
rights reserved):
"The events in
Poland have made An
drej Wajda's Man of
Iron even more com
petting, more necessarv
to sec. than it was The
film is not onlv a
remaikable svnthesis of
art and history-tn-the-
making; it is itself a liv
ing part of the history.
Filmed at white heat in
: h e w a k e o t i h e
dramatu events thai
culminated in the
triumph of the Solidari-
; moement in Augu:
1980, Man of Iron was
rushed to completion
asi Mas ujs! before its
scheduled showing dur-
ing the Cannes Film
Festival. Mam doubted
that the Polish
authorities would allow
a film so critical of the
government to be
shown, at least without
extensive cuts. But an
uncen sored Man of
Iron arrived at Cannes
at the last moment and
won the Golden Palm
as best film. There's lit
tie doubt that it was on
lv W ajda's interna
tional standing and
reputation as Poland's
leading filmmaker that
got his picture through
the Polish censorship.
"It's hard to think of
anothei film that has
the special excitement
o! Man of Iron. As
boih a romantic and a
revolutionary in the
Jjsmc Polish vein, a
d a has always
dramatized the clash
beiwec n huge,
d e h u m a ii i i n g
historical forces and
the individuals caught
up within fhem. From
A deneraiion, Kanal,
and Ashes and
Diamonds in the '50s to
his present work, Wa-
jda's films are a history
of the Polish sensibility
as it collides with the
great totalitarian forces
of the century � the
Nazis in World War 11
and Stalinist Com-
munism after the war
"He shows you
human beings trying to
create a genuine moral
revolution within �
and against � these
false political revolu-
tions. Wajda knows
that just as the great
political enemy is the
sheei physical force of
the oppressor, the great
moral enemy is the bad
faith and cowardice of
the oppressed. That's
why he tells the storv of
the Solidarity revolu-
tion through the eves of
W'inkiel, a once
courageous TV jour
nalist and filmmaker
who's become a scared
and alcoholic hack.
"W'inkiel is sent by
his superiors ostensibly
to do a story on the
Solidarity strike in the
Gdansk shipyards, but
in reality to smear one
of the strike's key
figures, a worker nam
ed Maciek � the "man
of iron As W inkicl
encounters and
interviews" the
various figures con-
nected with Maciek �
old friends, relatives
and Maciek's wife, a
filmmaker who unlike
W'inkiel refused to
knuckle under to the
system � the journalist
gripped by conscience
and trapped between
his admiration for the
Solidarity people and
.�v
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Kid Spielberg
Giving Us Modern Movie Myths
. hi 1 i AKHI iMAN
AUGUST 31. 1982
11
Film
Continued From Page 10
Continued From Page 8
ship � ma kind of
emotional dialogue"
with the film.
Spielberg says he
never dreamed of
becoming a director as
a child; he dreamed of
becoming "all those
heroic people up there
on the screen And as
far as he is concerned,
making movies still
provides a certain
vicarious pleasure, a
kind of celluloid
substitute for all his
Walter Mitty dreams.
"In the past he
says, "I've made
movies about ex-
periences that I've
never had because that
uav I can explore all
those 'what-ifs You
see, I'm all the
characters in my
movies. I was as much
Indiana Jones as Har-
rison ford was in
Haiders, and in E.T I
was t.Ts eyes.
Through the movie, I
had to imagine what it
would be like to be a
creature visiting earth
and what life would be
like from his perspec-
tive
The real heroes in
most of Spielberg's pic-
tures, however, are not
such an o m a IO u S
characters as H.T but
people who represent
his version of Alfred
Hitchcock's innocent
bystanders. They are
"ordinary people as
Dr. Lacombe says in
(lose Encounters,
"under extraordinary
circumstances" � peo-
ple like the suburban
families m Close En-
counters. E.T. and
Poltergeist, who live in
pleasant ranch houses
filled with appliances
and television sets and
refrigerators stocked
with beer and Cokes
and potato salad.
"Thev're common,
everyday tvpes of peo-
ple to whom nothing
really happens until I
come along Spielberg
says. "In the movies
I've made. I've tried
very, very hard to take
the bystander, toughen
him up. thereby robb-
ing him of his in-
nocence, in order to
combat the forces that
are against him. I love
movies where there are
opposing forces and
they're stronger than
the hero and the hero
must succeed either by
finding a way around
or straight through
In the case of E. 7
Spielberg points out,
the opposing force is
not a tangible enemy
like the shark in Jaws,
Henry
Fonda
( ontinued From Page 9
Pond came along, it
seemed as if he had
been saving up for this
for the last 20 years.
Unlike his earlier great
performances, this one
looked effortless as
well as theatrical. It
was as if he had finally
combined everything he
had learned in films
and on stage to create a
character that was
simultaneously larger
than life but not so
large that it would be
out of the camera's
focus.
As usual Henry Fon-
da had not attempted
to disguise himself. He
hadn't radically altered
his look and his man-
nerisms to imitate so-
meone. Instead, he had
absorbed the character
in such a way that the
special Fonda per-
sonality became that of
Norman Thayer. This
is the secret of the kind
of "effortless" film ac-
ting of which Fonda
was a master. His tim-
ing was as impeccable
as Jack Benny's. He
saved the best to the
last.
but the intrusion of the
grown-up world.
Whereas 10-year-old
Elliott wants only to
love and be loved bv his
extraterrestrial friend,
this grown-up world,
represented by corps of
doctors and techni-
cians, wants to preserve
E.T. as a specimen of
alien life.
"1 always thought of
the adult world as being
symbolized by tall peo-
ple who cast giant
shadows Spielberg
says, "people who
don't think like kids,
but think like profes-
sionals. Th.it's
dangerous � they
might understand E.T.
biologically and scien-
tifically, but they'd
never ever understand
that he had a heart
A similar message
has long been a favorite
theme in children's
literature � from J.M.
Barries Peter Pan to
Antoine de Saint -
Exupery's The little
Prince � and E. T. is
filled with references to
well-known books and
films. During one
scene. John Williams'
score recalls the music
used in The H izard Of
(z to accompany the
Wicked Witch. Miss
Ciulch; and in the
movie's penultimate
scene, Elliott and his
Inends soar into the
skv on their bicycles, in
much the same way
that Peter Pan and
Wend) flew off to
Never Never 1 and.
Most of Spielberg's
movies have featured
children in important
or ensemblematic roles.
Sugarland. lose En-
counters and
Poltergeist all involve
the attempt of a mother
to regain custody of her
child. And in both
C lose Encounters and
E. 7 it is a child � and
those adults who main-
tain a childlike in-
nocence and openness
to the possibility of
miracles � who is
granted communion
with these visitors from
outer space and a vision
of a more lovely world.
I've always wanted
to do something about
kids because I'm still a
kid says Spielberg,
who at 34 atill radiates
a boyish enthusiasm
and ingenious charm.
"I'm still waiting to get
out of my Peter Pan
shoes and into my
loafers. I thing it's
easier for me to have a
complete conversation
from Pac-Man to ex-
obiology with an
11-year-old than it is to
sit down with an adult
and discuss Nietzsche
and the Falklands.
Why? 1 guess because
I'm probably socially
irresponsible and way
down deep I don't want
to look the world in the
eye. Actually. I don't
mind looking the world
in the eye, as long as
there's a movie camera
between us
That is exactly what
Spielberg has been do-
ing since he made his
first home movie at the
age of 12. The son of a
computer specialist and
a concert-pianist
mother who were
divorced when he was a
teenager. Spielberg says
he was an awkward
child � "the weird,
skinny kid with the
acne" � who didn't
have a lot of friends.
His parents moved
several times, from
Ohio to New Jersey to
Arizona to California,
uprooting Steven and
his three younger
sisters, and leaving him
with a lasting sense of
dislocation.
Movies, the young
boy discovered, opened
up a new world of
possibilities � an ex-
citing world wonderful-
lv different from the
suburbs his parents
always lived in � and
he soon learned that he
could express himself
more easily with a
movie camera than by
talking in school or
writing papers or hav-
ing grown-up conversa-
tions with his parents.
"Movies took the
place of crayons and
charcoal he says,
"and 1 was able to
represent my life at 24
frames a second At
12, he filmed a collision
between his Lionel
train sets. At 13, he
earned a Bov Scout
merit badge by making
a three-minute 8mm
film that featured one
of his friends robbing a
stagecoach and coun-
ting the money. And at
16, he made
"Firelight a2'z-hour
science fiction movie
that anticipated Close
Encounters.
While enrolled at
California State Col-
lege in I ong Beach,
Spielberg spent most of
his free time sneaking
onto the Universal lot
and making his own
16mm films. In 1969,
he made Amhlin a
24-minute short about
a pair of hitchhikers,
which won awards at
the Venice and Atlanta
film festivals.
That led to a contract
with Universal, and
Spielberg was soon
directing television
episodes of Mght
Gallery, Marcus Helhy
and Colombo. Duel, a
television movie about
a motorist pursued by a
malevolent, phantom
truck, won him critical
acclaim, and. at 25,
Spielberg was directing
his first feature film,
The Sugarland Express.
He never believed in
anything, Spielberg
once said, until he
discovered film, and it
is onlv recently that ex-
posure to friends out-
side the business has
made him realize that
all those hours spent in
dark theaters as a kid
left certain "emotional
and intellectual gaps
"I'm still filling them
in he says now. "But
you can't just pick up
20 years of lost
weekends. Movies are
my life, but I see now
that for some people
movies arc only a twice-
a-year experience and
that in the rest of their
lives, there are great
desisions to be made:
when to have children,
where to send them to
school, are they grow-
ing up OK, and how to
make enough money to
provide for everyone.
It's sort of made me
realize that there's
more to life than mak-
ing movies � though
it's still easier to say
than to demonstrate
his fear of the cynical
and sinister bureaucrats
and security agents who
threaten him with dire
consequences if he
doesn't do the smear
job on Maciek.
"Using flashbacks to
the abortive uprisings
of 1968 and 1970, cut-
ting into his story with
actual footage of those
violent clashes and the
euthoric events of 1980,
Wajda creates an ex-
cititng juggernaut of a
film. Binding the real
and fictional elements
together is the figure of
Solidarity leader Lech
Walesa, who appears in
both of them. The
presence of the Roman
Catholic Church as a
� social force is deftly
conveyed: in one scene
; strikers confer, while in
the background priests
robe themselves for
Mass.
"The key relation-
ship is that betwen
Maciek, the man of
iron, and his father,
Birkut, the title
character of Wajda's
previous film Man of
Marble, a worker
honored by the state
for heroic labor and
then shot down in the
street in 1970. Father
and son are played
powerfully by the same
actor, J e r . y R a d -
ziwilowicz. The film
titles are not just
slogans: marble refers
sardonically to the
awful statues of Birkut
made when he was a
"hero" of communist
labor; iron symbolizes
the forging of his own
character that Maciek
had to accomplish to
stand against the lies
and violence of the
state.
"The courage and
strength it took for Wa-
jda to make these
points border on the in
credible: Man of Iron
must be the strongest
overtly critical film evet
made in an Iron Cur
tain country. Made
under extreme
pressures of time and
circumstance, the film
is no agitprop exercise
that happens to be on
the right side. It is
masterly in execution
and rousing in its in
spirational force. Wa-
jda doesn't neglect even
the comic side ot his
lull human spectrum:
Winkiel is a wonderful
ly ironic figure as
played bv Marian
Opania � a jitierv,
sweaty, boozy little guy
huffing along with his
tape recorder and
totebag dragging down
his shoulder, smoking
endless cigarettes and
looking for a drink in
Gdansk. (I iquor has
been locked up b
order of the austeu
I a
hi?
h
in
Sohuai strik rs ho
want cleat ' lish I eads
for theii re1 olution ,i t.
one memorable - nt
Winkiel gets hold
bottle of vodka
he drops it n
bathroom flooi
dives to hi Iti
anguisl oaking ;
booze ith a towel md
wringing it
"With W inkiel, Wa-
jda md even be rcferi
ing to elements ol ��� I
conscience in his ov n
charactei '1 am no
more innoceni
anyone else
said, i - to an
early I Uinisi p o
paganda fil orfc
cd on as i
tant di
gene i
c learlj ' land
tists and ;
h m Wajda icgards
with a jaundi ed se In
ent :onversatkn in
-v w � ork be said,
I i than once I
thought I knew where
� ,i . ing, but 1
v as vi ong. I In.
� i i.r e more im-
It was a
- a) the Gdansk
�. ho gave his
n� � Film its title when
asked Wajda:
�� ire �� u going to
ki
men
mu I
can I
t'oi
assis
More
n k i ;
film about us
��" 'Artists
humble' said
'V e arc in
,ei vice It we
up society we
naV e such
.I films
uch sentiments
live Western
ier� a tough
ss in Waida
that comes out at the
end of Man of Iron
when a politico tells
Winkiel that the agree-
ment between Solidan-
t and the government
isn't worth the paper
it's printed on 'We're
not here to share
power says a govern-
ment official.
Wherever Wajda is
now in Poland, he may
already be planning a
sequel to his men of
marble and iron �
perhaps the ultimate
substance of history,
flesh and blood
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'
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
AUGUST31.1W2 Page 12
Goals Set By
Soccer Team
B KKN BOl TON
visUnl sporu l- ditor
After the first week of practice,
the LCI' soccer team has shown
great improvement according to
new head coach Robbie Church.
But there is still a lot of work that
needs to be done before the season
opener against Christopher
Newport on Sept. 12.
In the past, ECU has relied on a
gambling type of soccer that
featured many long-range shots.
With coach Church calling the
shots, however, this year's team will
employ a system of short passes and
ball-control with an emphasis on
controlling the tempo oi the game.
As Church stated, it takes a lot of
creativity to play soccer. "During
an average game, a player will only
have control of the ball for about
three minutes out of a 90-minute
game he said. "So it takes a lot of
creative ball-control
This year's squad will have it's
share of versatile players. According
to Church, the defensive position
has looked strong so far. The
leading defenders are Steve Brody,
Dennis Elwell, Tom 1 awrence, and
Dwavne Degaetano.
Church said the defense should
also get a lot of help this year from
three freshmen. Mike Shytle, Jamie
Reibel and David Fiore will all be
pushing the starters.
The midfield position is usuallv
considered to be the place where the
game is won or lost. Church said.
I he Pirates will be relying heavily
-
on Bill Merwin, who Church calls
his "field general Other mid-
fielders that will be counted on are
Chip Baker, Stan Griff. Danny
Whelm, Ted Melton and freshman
Jav Berger.
Up front, the forwards will be
depended on to do a lot of scoring.
This group will include Mike Swain,
the fastest player on the team and a
very dangerous threat on the wing.
Other forwards are Mike Hardy,
Brian Winchell, Doug Kelly, Kyle
Milko and freshman David Skeff-
ington.
With the defender, midfield and
forward positions shaping up, the
toughest position to fill will be
goalie. With all-star Steve Brown
having graduated, the goalie will be
a big question mark for the Pirates
this season.
At this point, the leading con-
tender is freshman Tony Rechner
from New Jersey. "It will be tough
for him to step in and play as a
freshman Church said. "But he
has done a very good job for us so
far
With one of the toughest schedul-
ed in the South, the Pirates will have
to work very hard to come up with a
successful team.
Church's main goals for this year
will be to:
put together a winning team and to
be physically and mentally prepared
to play every game. "We will try to
do as good as any team at ECU has
ever done he said. "The talent is
there, but it will take a lot of hard
work
As a player, Church was an often-
Holt A True
Supporter Of
Pirate Sports
B CINDY PI FAS A NTS
sports t-ditm
There's no doubt that the East
Carolina athletic programs can use
all the support and promotional
help it can get.
And Pamela Holt, assistant
athletic director of student life, is
determined to drum up as much en-
thusiasm in the student body as
possible.
How is she going to do this? By
building a program called the Stu-
dent Athletic Board (SAB).
Cindy Pleasants
SSP I ok Inside
Pirate Soccer Coach Robbie Church says EC Is soccer team has shown
great improvement.
sive specialist. As a coach, he will
use an offensive-minded philosophy
and his plan will call for a wide-
open, entertaining game.
Offensively, the Pirates showed
their capabilities last week in a
scrimmage game against a team ot
Marines from Jacksonville. They
won that name 11-0 and have
another scrimmage set for next
Wednesday against Atlantic Chris-
tian College.
With the tough schedule, the
Pirates will need a lot oi support
from the fans. As Church puts it.
"We invite everyone to come out to
the game and support the players
that have been working very hard
According to Holt, the SAB is
made up ot students who are in-
terested in staging athletic events,
meeting athletes and coaches and
promoting the ECU program bv
recognizing athletes and boosting
school spirit.
I ast year, the SAB had approx-
miatelv 50 members, but Holt
would like to see at least 1(H) SAB
members this year. Holt is also
looking for those students who can
serve a- leaders.
During the 1981 -eason, the SAB
only worked with the football team
and the women's and men's basket-
ball teams. But SAB president Kity
Kinane is hoping that an increased
membership will enable the board to
assist all athletic programs.
The SAB, which is similar to that
of a high school Pep club, organizes
several projects to carry out through
the year. For example, the athletic
board will once again sponsor a
Poster Banner contest during the
football season. The winner of the
contest will receive a free keg ot beer
at each home game, which will be
provided by a local Anheuser-Bush
distributor. Points are awarded in
the categories of visibility, theme
and creativity. To compete in the
contest, each organization must
come bv the athletic director's office
and pick up the rules for the contest.
Holt, who was here during the
Pat Dve era. said she has seen a dif-
ferent attitude in the student bodv
this vear. "At one point, it was at a
real low she said. "But the kids
seem to be more excited now than
ever before"
Holt is a true believer in promo-
tions and believes that the students
should show their support. "The
kids need to get involved more she
said, "and it's a lot of fun too
The athletic director has high
hopes tor the SAB and expects the
program to be a verv successful one
in about five years. "1 know it will
take time to build a tirsi-rate pro-
gram she said.
The first meeting of the SAB will
be Wednesday. Sept. 1 at 7 p.m. in
room 244 at the Mendenhall Student
Center.

JiMfft,
�ftF1
Television Kicks Off '82 College Football
Year With National Live-Coverage Games
(AP) With 41 fewer "major"
teams but two additional television
networks, the 1982 college football
season gets underway this week.
The National Collegiate Athletic
Association had a busy off-season,
trimming Division I-A from 137 to
96 teams and giving a piece of the
live TV action, which had been
ABC's exclusive property for 16
years to CBS and the Turner Broad-
casting system. The price was a
whopping $281.1 million � $263.5
million from ABC and CBS for the
next four vears and $17.6 million
from TBS for a two-year sup-
plemental package of prime-time
night games.
The traditional powers, of course,
are still in Division I-A, but leagues
like the Mid-American, Missouri
Valley, Southern and Southland
conferences and the Ivies have been
bumped to Division 1-AA.
Most of them are happy about it
because the Division I-A A playotfs
have been expanded, giving them a
chance at a national championship
which they would not have in Divi-
sion 1-A, where the champion is
determined bv the Associated Press
poll.
ABC and CBS each will televise
14 "exposures or live games �
either national or regionaltelecast
into each market on the network.
Within its 14 "exposures
however, each network must present
a minimum of 35 games. In addi-
tion, TBS will show 19 night
games-14 Saturdays. tour
Thursdays and one Sunday.
TBS actually will get a jump on
the others and kick off college foot-
ball's 114th season bv airing the
Bngham Young-Nevada-I as Vegas
game Thursday night. ABC in-
augurates its schedule Monday
night, Sept. 6. with Clemson at
Georgia � a matchup of the 1981
and 1980 national champions �
while CBS kicks off its series Thurs-
day night. Sept. 9, with North
Carolina at Pitt.
The list of 96 Division I-A teams
includes the top seven conferences
� Atlantic Coast. Big Eight, Big
Ten, Pacific 10, Southeastern,
Southwest and Western Athletic �
the seven-member Pacific Coast
Athletic Association; Central
Michigan and Toledo o the MAC;
New Mexico State. 1 uUa and
W ichita State ot the MVC and 20 in-
dependents.
There will be 16 major college bowl
games, the same number as last
vear. I he C.arden State Bowl drop-
ped out. but a new kid on the block
is the Aloha Bowl in Honolulu.
Rule changes tor 1982 are negligi-
ble, although the penaltv was chang-
ed to five yards for incidental grasp-
ing of a face mask and 15 vards tor
twisting, turning or pulling on it.
Former Football Pro
To Speak Thursday
ECl tennis squad started practice this week under the guidance of head
coach Patricia Sherman. Sherman encourages anyone interested in trying
out to contact her.
Injuries Plaguing
Pre-Season Pirates
Despite hampering injuries and
the temporary loss of a few starting
players, the ECU football team is
intensely preparing for its first con-
frontation of the season against N.
C. State.
In preseason practices, four out
of five starting linebackers and four
top tailbacks have been injured.
Tailback Jimmy Walden, who
was diagnosed as having a strained
ligament, will be weai ng a cast until
the end of the week. Junior tailback
Milton Corsey has missed contact
practice because of a pulled muscle.
Receiver Carlton Frazier has also
been unable to practice due to a ten-
don injury.
On the defensive end, linebacker
Gerry Rogers broke his hand and
will be out of commission for six to
eight weeks. Amos Twitty, another
starting linebacker, has been sidelin-
ed with a mild shoulder separation.
John Columbia, who serves as a
back-up for Rogers, will undergo
knee surgery and is out for the
season.
ECU flanker Stuart Ramirez has
been having problems with his
ankle, and sophomore flanker
Stefon Adams has a shoulder
separation.
Centers John Floyd and Tim Mit-
chell have also experienced ankle
and knee problems.
Because of injuries, many of the
players have been changing posi-
tions in pre-season practices. For
instance, cornerback Bernard Wynn
has been moved to the offensive side
during practices.
Although some of the injuries
have proven to be more serious than
others, most of the players are ex-
pected to recuperate before Sept.
11.
Quarterback Greg Stewart has avoided pre-season injury and is expected
play in ECU's opener against N.C. State on Sept. 11.
former professional football
athlete Oscar Roan and his wife.
Linda, will be visiting East Carolina
University on Thursday, Sept. 2 at
Jenkins Auditorium.
The Roans, who are both Dallas
natives and graduates from South
Oak High School, will hold a pro-
gram at Jenkins Auditorium at 8
p.m. for all ECl students.
The Roans have been working as
vouth evangelists ever since Oscar
retired from the Cleveland Browns
in 1978.
In high school, Oscar was an
outstanding pcrtormcr in football,
baseball, track and basketball. Dur-
ing his senior year, he was all-
distnct in the four sports.
After graduating in 19"0. Oscar
received a football scholarship to
U.C.L.A. and played freshman
football and basketball there before
returning to Dallas in 19" 1.
Completing his Associate Arts
degree at El Centro College. Oscar
enrolled in Southern Methodist
University and graduated in 1974
with a business degree, specializing
in accounting and finance. At
SMU, Oscar earned all southwest
conference honors in both basket-
ball and football. During his senior
year, he made the Time magazine's
1974 All America football team as a
tight end.
Oscar participated in three post-
season football games his senior
year; the East-W est Shrine game in
San Francisco, the All-America
game in I ubbock and the Hula
Bowl in Hawaii. In the Hula Bowl,
Oscar established three records:
most yardage by a pass receiver (205
yards), most touchdowns scored (3)
and longest touchdown pass (98
yards).
to Drafted in the third round by the
Cleveland Browns in 1975, Oscar
caught 41 passes for 463 yards and
three touchdowns during his rookie
year. He was named the fourth
runner-up for the rookie-of-the-vear
award.
The 6-6 tightend played for the
Browns for four years before retir-
ing. The Roans now work full-time
as evangelists and travel around the
country to share their personal
testimonies.
Linda, a graduate of East Texas
State University, has been singing
pubhclv sinse 194. The coupie has
two sons, Mario and Quincv. and
reside in De Soto. Texas.
The program is being sponsored
bv the Student Athletic Board and
the ECU Fellowship of Christian
Athletes.
Grid Tickets
On Sale Now
For Opener
Football tickets for the ECU �
N.C. State game will be on sale
through Thursday only at Minges
Coliseum.
The ticket office will be open
from 8 am until 5 p.m. each day.
After Thursday, Sept. 2, no tickets
will be on sale.
Because of previous confusion
about the selling of the tickets, the
N. C. State and ECU athletic
departments have decided to extend
the time in order for ECU students
to purchase the remaining tickets.
The Pirates will play N.C. State on
Sept. 11 at Carter Stadium in
Raleigh.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 31. 1982
13
i
o
ale
hnges
pckets
usion
I, the
thletic
Extend
uiem
Ikets.
'e on
m in
Y'

TIV
� � vf fi�j.
� i
Mb
California Concept
Hair Design Center
Easily within walking
distance of ECU
Across from Biscuit Towne
Easy Care Hair Designs
at affordable prices.
752-2967
Appointment
please.
The Pirates go info action in Raleigh against the Wolfpack on Sept. 11.
Chuck Muncie To Rejoin Chargers
Tar Landing Seafood
Restaurant
SAN DIEGO (AP)
Running back
Chuck Muncie will pro-
bably rejoin the San
Diego Chargers within
a ueek after undergo-
ing drug treatment for
2! davs. his business
advisor uas quoted
Saturday.
Muncie reportedlv
as been at Camelback
Hospital in Scottsdale.
Arizona.
Muncie "never had a
problem agreeing that telephone interview Muncie returned to been burglarized twice,
he should receive treat trom New Orleans, ad- his home in Kenner, San Diego opens the
ment he was just ding "he's fine and 1 la to be with his preg- regular season of the
against three weeks of think he will be back nant wife, Robyn, for National Football
it advisor Allen with the Chargers next two days this week League in a game Sept.
Werner said. week after their home had 12 at Denver.
That hurt his pride
because he didn't have
any detoxing to go
through. But he did
need an education and
an explaining.
"The teatment really
has been very good for
him Weiner said in a
Henderson Steals
Brock's Record
In the third inning of
Friday n i g h t' s
Oakland-Milwaukee
game, there was no
re and Oakland had
a man on first base.
The thing that made
this situation unusual
was that the man on
first was Ricky Hender-
son, and he was about
to attempt to break
Lou Brock's major
league record of 118
stolen bases.
After Milwaukee pit-
cher Doc Medich tried
unsuccessfully to pick
him off four times,
Henderson broke for
second on the first
pitch to the plate.
Catcher Ted Sim-
mons' throw was slight-
ly off to the right, and
Henderson slid head-
first under the attemp-
ted tag of shortstop
Robin Yount.
As if that effort
wasn't enough,
Henderson went on to
steal three more bases
in that game to bring
his record total to 122.
That was the third time
this season that he had
stolen four bases in one
game.
After realizing that
he was safe at second.
Henderson sprang to
his feet among the
cheers of 41,600 par-
tisan Brewer fans. He
then proceeded to pull
the bag from it's moor-
ings and raise it above
his head in triumph.
Henderson's success
has something to do
with his unique ap-
proach to the art of
base-stealing. Instead
of taking as large a lead
as possible at first,
Henderson prefers to
take a smaller lead that
enables him to keep his
momentum going
towards second base.
Even with the record
and the publicity,
Henderson still isn't
satisfied. "I can steal
162 bases if things go
right he said after the
game. "If I can help
the team by keeping on
running, there's no tell-
ing how manv I can
get
f
SPORTING GOODS
Downtown
752-4156
rTar Landing Seafood
Restaurant
S: I
A"

218 Arlington Blvd.
756-6001
Cross Green Slree' B' 'dq
Take left a' 1st Lit)
Located one block don on i�
MonThurs. ALL DAY
Sat. � Lunch 11-3
All You Can Eat
TROUT
$3.99
SHRIMP
clearance sale
All Men's Swimsuits
25 off
All Men's Tennis Shorts
by Court Casual & O.P.
25 off
All Ladies' Tennis Shorts & Shirts
25 off
Greek Jerseys &
Sweat Shirts,
Pants & Jackets
are now in stock!
J. A. UNIFORMS
SHOP
All typ of uniforms at reasonable
prices, lud coats, stethoscopes, shoes,
and hose. Also � used ECU nurses
uniforms. Trade-ins allowed.
$
4.99
k
Airpart ?i:
:ec;ri�. forth CwoliM
REGULAR DAILY SPECIAL
Flounder & Shrimp Plate
$2.89
TAKE OUTS
AVAILABLE
758-0327
.GREENVILLE ATHLETIC CLUB
BEACH PARTY
ACTIVITY

Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive.
Near Hollowell's Drug and old hospital.
mznnzzEBnnnnzzzznnzzm

rruloaacatV
This Wed. & Thurs. only
� Avg. $12 per roll �
Great for dorms, apts bedrooms, etc.
KIMERY'S
FURNITURE
924 Dickinson Ave. 10th & Railroad Crossing
nnnnnnm
DON'T GET FAT & LAZY BECAUSE
YOU'RE BACK IN SCHOOIKEEP
THAT BIKINI FIGURE AND GOLDEN TAN!
COME H ORK OUT A T THE GREENVILLE A THLETIC CLUB
YOUR STUDENT IDAAAKESYOU ELIGIBLE FOR OUR
SPECIAL STUDENT MEMBERSHIP
THERE'S NO INITIATION FEE &
ONLY $40.00MONTH -
- THAT'S JUST $1.35 A DAY
AND FOR THAT $1.35 YOU GET:
�8RACQUETBALLCOURTS
� OUTDOOR SWIMMING POOL
(25 METERS)
� NAUTILUS WEIGHT MACHINES &
FREE WEIGHTS
� BODY MAINTENANCE (CO-ED
AEROBIC EXERCISE CLASSES) �
WILD&CRAZY
� INDOOR RUNNING TRACK
� STEAM ROOMS, SAUNAS, HOT TUBS, AND LOCKER
FACILITIES
� PROFESSIONAL INSTRUCTION IN ALL ACTIVITIES AND
IN INDIVIDUAL DIET AND EXERCISE COUNSELING
SPECIAL STUDENT HOURS:
Monday-Friday: 6:00a.m12:00noon
2:00 p.m4:00 p.m.
Sat. & Sun 8:00a.m2:30p.m.
5:00 p.m7:00 p.m.
SPECIAL SEMESTER RATES:
4MONTHS (SEPTEMBER-DECEMBER)
130
00
SAVE $30.00
THIS AD ENTITLES YOU TO ONE FREE VISIT
DURING OUR STUDENT HOURS �
EXPIRES SEPT. IS, 1982
COME IN AND JOIN TOD A YH

��r,if�. Ma
2'
t





14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 31, 1982
Pitt Number One In AP Poll
(AP) � The Univer-
sity of Pittsburgh, com-
ing off three con-
secutive 11-1 seasons
but sporting it's third
head coach in seven
years, has been picked
to win the 1982 na-
tional championship in
the Associated Press
preseason college foot-
hall poll with defending
champion Clemson in
the no. 11 spot.
The Pitt Panthers
received 36 first-place
votes and 1,092 of a
possible 1,200 points
from a nationwide
panel of 59 sports
enters and broad-
casters. The
Washington Huskies
were second with 15
first-place votes and
1,064 points, followed
b Alabama,
Nebraska, and North
Carolina.
The last team to win
ihe AP national cham-
pionship after being
ranked no. 1 in the
preseason poll was
�Mabama in 1978. Pitt
won it's last title in
19-6 after starting out
no. 9.
That was Johnny
Major's last year as
Pitt's head coach.
Jackie Sherrill coached
the Panthers to four
Top Ten finishes the
last five years, in-
cluding the runnerup
spot behind Georgia in
1980 and fourth place a
year ago.
However, Sherrill
left Pitt last January
for Texas A'M. His
succesor, former defen-
sive coordinator
Serafino "Foge"
Fazio, finds himself in
the unique position of
being ranked number
one before his debut as
a college coach.
Rounding out the
preseason Top Ten
behind fifth-rated
North Carolina �
which, by the way, is
Pitt's opening-game
opponent on national
television the night of
Sept. 9 � are Southern
Methodist, Georgia,
Penn State, Oklahoma,
and Southern Cal.
Third-ranked
Alabama received three
first-place votes and
966 points, Nebraska
had two firs' and 949
points and North
Carolina also had two
no. 1 votes and 863
points. Then comes
SMU with 743 points,
Georgia 698, Penn
State 682, Oklahoma
638 and Southern Cal
624.
The remaining first-
place vote went to
Clemson, but the 1981
kings, the only
unbeaten team in the
nation a year ago,
totaled just 561 points
for 11th place. Last
year, the Tigers were
not even in the
preseason Top Twenty
but stormed to their
first national chain
pionship.
Besides Clemson, the
preseason Second Ten
consists of Michigan,
Arkansas, Ohio State,
Miami, Florida, Texas,
Notre Dame, Arizona
State and UCLA.
Michigan was no. 1 in
the 1981 preseason
poll.
The final 1981 Top
Ten consisted of Clem-
son, Texas, Penn State,
Pitt, SMU, Georgia,
Alabama, Miami,
North Carolina and
Washington.
The Second Ten had
Nebraska, Michigan,
Brigham Young,
Southern Cal, Ohio
State,Arizona State,
West Virginia, Iowa,
Missouri and
Oklahoma.
The ECU volleyball team starts its season off against N.C. State on Sept.
14. (.arm- time is 7 p.m.
SPORTS WRITERS NEEDED
Applv in person at The Fast Carolinian office. Old
South Building, across f rom ,o nef 1 ibrarv. Experience
preferred but not necessarv. Must be dependable and
willing to learn.
fH1��Ht1tHKt:1L1L1L1LLlL1LlWtLlL1Lim
1982 U.S. Open
Begins Today
!
A'
m
DELI KITCHEN
CPv Home Cooked Food
NEW VORK(AP) �
He fending U.S. Open
champions John
McEnroe and Tracy
Austin will play their
first matches at the Na-
takes on Bill Scanlon.
Also playing on
Tuesday will be Ivan
Lendl of
Czechoslovakia, the
number three seed, and
LmSJ-
Meat&2Veg Bread, Bc
$ '10 0 Free re f ill i on
� coffee X 'fa.
Breakfast Served 6:30 a. m. -10:30 a. m.
Sausage & Ham Biscuits � 5(K
Lunch Served from 11:00-7:30
Homemade Biscuits & Desserts
Eat In or Take Out
103 Raleigh & Dickinson Ave.
752-5339
H hy eat anywhere else when you can
eat at the Deli Kitchen
c
:
BaBMMBMBBBBBM�iBaBBHHaBBHBHMaMWMW�anHMMMW��BMHWMW
301 Evans St. Mall In the Minges Building 752 5476
INTRODUCING OUR All You Can Eat
BUFFET from 5-9 p.m.
Mon. Thru Sat. � for only $5.95
�.
Eional Tennis Center former champion Billie
Tuesday as the 1982 Jean King,
championships get
under vay.
Austin will play the
tirst match on the
stadium court at 7:30
p.m. against Catherine
Tanvier of France,
while McEnroe will
follow against Tim
Ciullikson.
Mats Wilander of
Sweden, the French
Open champion, will
hegin the two-week
tournament at 11 a.m.
EDT, Tuesday when he
Two women players
have withdrawn from
the main draw singles,
the U.S. Tennis
Association announc-
ed. Sue Barker of Great
Britain and Petra
Delhees of Switzerland
have been replaced by-
Amanda Tobin of
Australia and Lilian
Drescher of
Switzerland. No reason
for the withdrawals
were announced.
ABORTIONS UP TO
I 2'h WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 l
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSl
8. 90 qnancv Te��, B
uiItw 0 Pronirnt Pregr
,ttiq �' 'u'lher in-
tall 83 ' � (Toll F
dOO 2. � i�B bet wet
A M and tPM Weekdays
i
CLUB
for Men & Women
Open Under
New
Management
. . Co.
fna�'0
Numbi
RALEIGH WOMEN S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh. N C.
RECENTLY REMODELED It's that time again to
get back into shape. Nautilus is located on E:ans
Street, within walking distance from campus. Featur-
ing a full line of Nautilus equipment, Olympic free
weights, sauna, whirlpool and locker room.
Call and ask about our �- rated s. mien i rates and
group rate. un(1 scfW(Jue a
jree introductory workout.
HOURSOF OPERATION
MonThurs. � 10 am 9pm Friday � 10 am -8 pm
Saturday � 10a.m5p.rn Sunday � I p.m5pm.
Buffet will include:
�Chicken
�Lasagna
�Seafood
�Ham
�Vegetables
�Meatballs
�Roast Beef
�Salad
�Dessert
� Iced tea or coffee
Also offering our full lunch menu
from 11:30-2:30
our full dinner menu
from 5:00-10:00 MonSat.
CLOSED SUNDAY
I
I
I
I
I
I
I.
$1.00 off Buffet
One coupon per person only.
Good between 5 7 p.m. Expires Sept 26. 1982
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
S
Sorority lush
zfzacn ins iJ aak . . .
JVC 29
95
Hi-Fi Stylistic System
9
30 watts
perch.
$
TC-FX2
159
95
behy
Sign Up for,
August 31st and September th
Croatan and Bookstore
Convocation: September 9th � 5:30
Wright Auditorium
Rush Week: September 13th17th
TWO MOTOR STEREO CASSETTE DECK
B3Mjjg8i)(pfr�
KENWOOD
vTX STEREO FOR YOUR CAR
DIN SIZE
� W are music.
KRC-11 2 AM FM Cassette
with Auto Reverse
LOUDNESS LOCKING FAST FOR REV
169
FREE T-SHIRT WITH THIS AD
Financing
Available
T
ii
11 a ;i
9 AM. Th.
9-8 Fri.
9-5 Sat

r

i
r -





THE EAST CAROl INIAN
may iy. l-ao
15
ECU IRS To Offer
Fall Whitewater Trip
Did you ever wanl to
take a thrilling ratting
:np "on cold, cleat
watei tin ouuh a
ful gorge offer-
e a variety oi scenic
l w s.
We . now you're in
le ECl Depart-
oi Inti amui al-
i ci ices Is-
ofl m such
ip to the Nantahala
Ri ei (in wester n
N.C.).
1 his trip oi fei s a
ting experience"
foi novices and
enced raftei s.
' . caravan will
part Greenville
� ton of Friday,
10, arriving in
Bryson City (a
15 mmutc drive from
the ner) that night.
The river trip begins
the next morning at 10.
The eight-mile trek
takes about 3 hours,
although additional
time will be spent in in-
struction and shuttle
bus transportation.
Participants will
dej the river center
at approximate!) 3
p.m. Saturday and
return to Greenville late
that night.
Reservations can be
made through the out-
door recreation center.
Room 113 Memorial
Gym (757-6911), b
noon on 1 riday, Sept.
Exercise Classes
A vailable In Fall
3. limited space is
available, and reserva-
tions will be taken on a I
first-come-first-served
basis.
The total cost for the
trip, including registra- j
tion, transportation,
lodging and the river
trip is $35. However, j
arrangements may be
made at the outdoor
recreation center tor :
those who wish to pro-
vide their own
transportation and
lodging.
A pre-trip meeting
will be held in Room
11)2 Memorial Gym at 7
p.m. on Tuesday, Sept.
7. Additional informa-
tion will be available at
that time.
The ECU Depart-
ment of Intramural-
Recreational Services is
now offering classes in
physical fitness.
Included are both
aerobic fitness and ex-
ercise fitness classes.
They will be offered at
many times during the
week. All classes begin
the week of Sept. 27
and last eight weeks.
The exercise classes
are being offered at 13
different locations
around campus, and
students can register in
Room 204 Memorial
Gym between now and
Sept. 27 for the class of
their choice.
Also, the IRS
reminds students o. -jp-
coming intramural
events:
A bicycle race will be
held on Sept. 8, with
registration from now
until Sept. 6.
Play begins on Sept.
13 for intramural flag
football. Entry dates
are Sept, 6, 7 and 8.
And students in-
terested in intramural
co-recreational slow-
pitch softball can
register at Memorial
from Sept. 13 to Sept.
15. Play begins on
Sept. 20.
WED fltiC Att.
j J 00 r. 7 H
7
Was
a
Great
Success

4;
w
Vv- - .
�� 3
Classifieds
WANTED

basis
but
- � Auq
.1 7 p m or call 7i1 1378
SANTEO Bass player with
vocals for v.orkinq part tmt? rock
band 'SA 4972
FOR SALE
COTTAGE FOR rent at N Myrtle
BEach Labor Day weekend �200
tor 3 niqnt Sleeps 6 Call 7S8 707
Rebecca
FOR SALE Cabinet built tor
dorm room Molds small ret
brtqht vellow with white formica
p P'ice negotiable Call
- "a38
FOR SALE JVC JAS 22 Stereo
Amp 45 watlsc 1S0 or best otter
'52 0469
FOR SALE One Schwmn varsity
10 speed bicvcu: one large desk
rhifferobe Call '52-4287 Mrs
S H Skinner 615 Maple St
FOR SALE Couch chair end
fable and wall hanging 752 �231
�6pm
ROOMMATE
WANTED
2 ROOMMATES needed
4 bedroom house. 2 blocks from
campus 75 per month Call Bun
Chadwick 7S2 4941 309 E 13th St
ROOMMATE needed tor nicely
furnished apartment Call 758 3894
for more into
ROOMMATE wanted tor partial
ly furnished apt at Stratford
Arms Call 75 690
FEMALE roommate wanted Nice
furnished duplen near campus
Two bedroom air and carpet
SIO0 month no deposit Ready
Sept 1 Call 758 9127 Susan
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL Typist wants to
type at home Reasonable rates
7 56 360
-J
WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH FOR:
CLASS RINGS WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS
ALLGOLD& SILVER
SILVER COINS
sa CHINA& CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
j 8l RING i
-0p �Y SAIES CO ,�c
401 S. EVANS ST. open 930530MON sat.
(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH) PHONE 7523866
YOUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER.
R
0
Western
Sizzlin

Th
ri.
irit
Free Small Salad
with purchase of any meal
Expires Sept. 30, 1982
FREE DRINK with any meal
Expires Sept. 30th
Lunch Special MonSat.
4-Oz. U.S.D.A. Sirloin served
with Baked Potato or
French Fries � $1.99
with Salad Bar - $2.99
Offer good MonSat. 11-2
Two current locations to serve you better!
2903 E. 10th St.
phone 758-2712
264 By-Pass
756-0040
HAVING PROBLEMS
DRUGS?
with
ALCOHOL? FAMILY?
SCHOOL?
We Can Help
Students helping Students
CAMPUS ALCOHOL & DRUG PROGRAM
301-303 Erwin Bldg
757-6793
tSSEQSK3 MIIH
aswow
USDA Choice Beef loin
LFPIHCSCVA6A
Tkoit fttt good thru
Saturday, S�ptbe 4. 1982
I Lk t��i $��� f r
J
rRMOUK
HAW
UJDA Cfc.lu ( Un
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F r.rt u
Sptrtribs
UJ0A tk.tt 8��f Uta t�ea
M68 Powerboat. Steak u 288
is, '
Pk. if 11 Oi. Cut
Budweiser
Beer
1 S litir Rkiankiilir fi: � !i i
P.ikCkiklu Ep.i � Ckikln
riltll �' 11 11 0: tfi
Pabst
Beer.
99�
1 l'��r IP f
Pepsi pscoj
W Cola ty
It OlMt
lit Oi. f .M T.w
p� Macaroni
& Cheese
�k, PiT '1 09
� k, Ply 16 1-
9
12 Omii
Del Monte
Catsup
Wkt Plf '1 19
32.
mskMtt in
SODW
J
i p�, $��
S89
1 Ik Mtrtrl�( QMrtir
Shell's Spread
69
4 Rtll Pitk 1 Pi.
Page Toilet Tissue
48 9
) Own Ukkf i
Potted Meat
a89
�� fed Urn Hkt
Hof D09 Buns
I Put F�M Urn HimUnti t
399
Qktrl
10.1 Ohii
JF� Mayonniass Qf Texas Pete Chill
$279
�ki( ��!� 10 0"
Uquid Wisk
$25
�� l Alt! Ill
Apple ice
Half U �� Wki.k ����
49 Oi Nitk $�(!����
21
Detergent
� , Pi, 1 19
II 0i. It OH
Wesson
m
Mk, Pi, 1 09
wesson
-�5. Jl"
ieno's
Pizza
Vk, Pi, M 19
T1
Prieoi �oo� et 6r����ill� Food To�� Store oely
I
I





I
1

�m
m
m
, . WELCOMES ALL ECU STUDENTS BACK
FOR FALL SEMESTER
STARTING TOMORROW
AT 6 A.M.
WZMB KICKS OFF THE FALL 7r7
WITH "ALL REQUESTS" DAY 'J ' "ODJD
AND WE'LL DO OUR BEST
TO GET IT ON FOR YOU.
PROGRAM SCHEDULE FALL 1982
REQ UES T LINES ARE ALWAYS OPEN.
" 97.3 FOR YOUR FA VORITE SONG DIAL 757-6657
FOR NEWS AND INFORMATION, LISTEN FOR NEWS 91. HEARD 8 TIMES MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY . . . 4 NEWSCASTS ON WEEKENDS
TIME
6 p.m.
8 p.m.
8 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
11 p.m
11 p.m
2a.m.
Monday
z
Tuesday
Z
Wednesday
Z
Thursday
z
Friday
Z
Saturday
Z
Sunday
MORNING ROCK
MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY
THE SOFTER SIDE OF YOUR FAVORITE ROCK ARTISTS.
MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY AT 9 AND 10
WZMB PRESENTS CLASSIC MUSIC FROM THE PAST
WITH OUR FEATURE ARTIST SERIES
MORNING ROCK
LIGHT'N UP
9 a.m10 a.m
THE BEST IN ALBUM ORIENTED ROCK
MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY NO HOLDS BARRED ROCK
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Title
The East Carolinian, August 31, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 31, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.210
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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