The East Carolinian, August 26, 1982






3foe ?Ea0t (Earoltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.2
Thursday, August 26, 1982
Greenville, N.C.
22 Pages-2 Sections
in ulation 1(1.(KM)
BB&T Presents Gift
To Business School
B GREG HIDEOUT
Branch Banking & rrust Com-
pany announced Monday that it
School
o
would give ECl
Business $250,000.
The money, presented at the an-
nual fall convocation, will he fund-
ed over a five-yeai period. It will be
used to support the center for
management dev elopment
BB 1 President, I . inceni I owe
Ji , in a prepared statement said the
is intended to aid and promote
all types ol education, service and
research for business management.
1 owe cited a"long and rewarding
relationship" between BB&l and
ECl
"We have relied heavily on the
k'ersity and particularly on the
ol x' Business to provide highly
ilil ed graduates foi our manage-
ment development program 1 owe
said.
Dr. James H. Beat den. dean oi
the School ol Business, said the gift
will aid the center's deveopment o!
managerial talent.
"This will be a shot in the arm in
managerial development in our
' Bea den added.
( inc� ' lohn M How ell said
the gift will enable the center to ex-
pand its capabilities and help imple-
ment the goals he has set for the
university.
Ashley B. Futrell, chairman of
the Board of Trustees, pointed out
that the center would be named the
Branch Banking & Trust Company
Center for Management Develop-
ment in honor of the donation.
Dr. F. Douglas Moore, vice-
chancellor for institutional advance-
ment and planning, described the
university community as being
delighted with the gift and that it
looks forward to working with
BB&T.
The BB&T gift is the first major
outside funding for the center,
which has been conducted for over a
decade.
Howell noted that several agen-
cies are set up by ECU to serve the
public. Among these are; the
Regional Development Institute. In-
stitute for Coastal and Marine
Resources and the Regional Educa-
tion Institute.
A formal acknowledgement of
the gift was given by the Board of
Trustees at their meeting monday
afternoon.
PHoto bv GARY PATTERSON
Hey, Where's My Daughter?
These parents search for their daughter as the attempt to move her in to the dorm. I hese
people were among the many who populated the campus this week.
Public TV To Air Adult Education Program
CHAPEl mi i . N.C (l PI) -
iversity of North Carolina's
for Public relevision is shif-
. gears in efforts to let people
it a nev� program using
tele ourses to reach adults
who need basic education.
In a program sponsored b the
center and the state Department of
Community Colleges, three courses
" rent educational levels will
tdcast for 11 to 17 weeks star-
rer 6 rhe pi ogram, w nh
twice a day, will he
Ianuary
dults wno might n f have been
ahk attend irses regularly at
cal colleges will
r i duli Basic Educa-
al 1 du ati nal Dev elop-
ment or pre-GED courses by wat-
ching a WUNC-TV channel.
Jim Protzman, spokesman for the
Center for Public Television, said
Tuesday a simple approach is being
us -d to spread the word about the
new program. The center, which is
providing SI50,000 of the nearly
$200,000 budget for the program's
first year, is handling marketing and
promotion.
"The appeals are very simple
Protzman said. "We're saying, 'Put
your TV to work
The program is being promoted
through community colleges, public
service announcements, public
television ds, fliers and other
advertising. Protzman said.
Protzman acknowleged that
public television ordinarily gears its
promotional efforts to a highly
educated and literate audience. He
said televising basic courses is a
"first-generation" effort like others
being used across the country to
utilize the mass appeal and audience
of television for education pur-
poses.
"It's the realia'ion tha' mass
media can support the educational
objectives o traditional
educators he said. "It was quite a
challenge to shift around and be go-
ing for people on such a different
level
Adults may enroll in the program
through community colleges or
technical schools � by mail,
telephone or in person. The only
cost is up to $10 for a series o
workbooks and a $5 testing fee for
those who take the GED examina-
tion at the end of the course.
Protzman said the program,
designed by the center's division for
educative services, is modeled on
similar efforts that have proven suc-
cessful in other states. The ("enter
for Public Television decided to ex-
pand its educational programs,
which began with an emphasis on
children's programs, because of the
high adult illiteracy and high school
dropout rates in North Carolina, he
said.
An estimated 30 percent oi North
Carolinians leave high school
without obtaining a diploma, and
the state has an estimated 2 million
high school dropouts.
"What we've discovered is we've
got this big hole (in educational pro-
grams), and there's a legitimate
need he said. "That's our obliga-
tion as a public broadcaster
Protzman said the community
college system has tound most
adults live within 30 miies oi a
technical institute or community
college, and tees for basic courses
usuallv arc low But factors such as
child day care expenses
transportation problems can keep
people from enrolling in those
courses, he said.
Greenville Population Increases
A Guide To Greenville Travel
Bv MIKE HAMFR
niiH Wnirr
Bv PATRICK O'NEILL
1 very year at this time, thousands
new re; dents come into the
Greenville area, most ol them
hmen students at ECl .
Moving into a new city for the
� � time an be a verv harrowing
contusing experience. Simple
ities, such as finding one's way
md a new campus, going to the
laundrymat or doing the grocery
shopping can become major pro-
' 'Us.
1 he are two mam ways to travel
in town with a car and without a
.dr rhose without a ar can con-
sider two kind ol bus travel, three
kinds tit a heels and the wheel-less
wav.
Firsl we will discuss the "without
a car" method.
On The Inside
Inside Index
Announcements
Classifieds
Opinion
Campus Forum
Features
Sports
2
B-9
4
4
B-l
B7
Grease, the Broadway smash, is
coming to ECU. For more informa-
tion about auditions, etc see
Features, page B-l.
ECU's Student Government
Association is one of the few stu-
dent governments that supplies a
campus transit system.
Student Government Transit
(SGT) is financed through student
fees, operated by students and
directed by students.
There are two routes, purple and
gold, scheduled with the primary
objective to get students to and
from classes. Both run Monday
through Friday.
SGT tries to be reliable, passing
each stopping point within a half
hour. Schedules are posted at many
stops and listed on wallet cards. To
get a schedule or more information,
see the SGA transit office in room
225 of Mendenhal or call 757-6611,
est. 216.
Greenville runs three bus routes.
Together, they put any place in
Greenvill � and outside as far as
Pitt Community College � within a
short walk of a bus line.
Its annual loss is subsidized by ci-
ty taxpayers. Service is from 6:30
a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Fri-
day and 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. on
Saturdavs running about hourly.
The fare is $.40 ($.20 for elderly
and handicapped) and exact fare is
required.
Schedule leaflets can be obtained
from a bus driver, city hall or the
transit office in the Public Works
building on Beatty street.
Bicycling gives door-to-door ser-
vice, saves money, oil, air, hearts
and lungs.
The experienced bicyclist,
especially a graduate of an effective
cyclying course, is safe in traffic.
For the less experienced and the
recreational cyclist, a Greenville
bikeway system is being developed
as part of an extensive long-range
plan. When ready, if well maintain-
ed, the bikeways will be safer and
more relaxing than riding in the
traffic.
In the meantime, some streets can
be recommended for pleasant com-
muting to campus:
From the East tak Fourth street.
It is wide and tree-lined.
From the North, Jarvis and Elm
streets offer scenic blocks and the
fewest stops.
From the west follow the bike
route on W. Fourth street.
From the southwest cross Hooker
street at SylvanGlendale. Continue
on Perkins, Harris, Howell Beatty,
14th, Washington, 11th and
Lawrence street.
From the South in the Kearney
Park area go the southwest route or
from the Sratford area use Charles
blvd. Otherwise, take Arlington and
Red Banks east, turn on Chrusidc,
Oakview and North on Elm street.
From the southeast follow bike
route signs to Fifth and Cemetery,
then go a block North to Fourth and
West.
Bicycles are vehicles; regulated in
Greenville by the North Carolina
Vehicle Code. So for safety as well
as legality use reflectors and a light
for night riding and obey all traffic
laws.
Riding on campus is further con-
trolled by ECU traffic regulations.
A $5 fine is provided in campus
regulations for riding on a campus
sidwalk and can be enforced by
campus police. Bikes must also
bear a registration permit for ECU
or Greenville. Unregistered bikes
may be impounded.
For more information on
bikeways, contact the chairman of
the citizen Bikeway Commission,
Jim Hix, at the chemistry depart-
ment.
For more information on Pitt
County Bike Rides, contact Vice-
Chancellor Elmer Meyer's office at
757-6541. For more of the advanced
system of bicycle routes in the state,
contact the Bicycle Office, N.C.
Department of Transportation in
Raleigh. And for more information
on national routes and other bicycle
matters, contact the League of
American Wheelman at 10 E. Read
Street, Baltimore, MD, 21203.
In the next issue we will cover the
wheeled means of travel, including
the wheelchair.
Greenville's population rose 23
percent according to 1980 Census
figrues which were recently released.
The figures show that Greenville
currently has a population of 35,750
citizens. This figure includes the
East Carolina student population.
According to the figures, the me-
dian age of males and females in
Greenville is 23 years. And the
largest part of Greenville's popula-
tion is between 22 and 24-years old,
reflecting the university's influence
on the city population figures.
There are 7,051 single males in the
city and 7,738 single females, all
over the age of 15.
Women also outnumbered men in
the separated and divorced
categories of the census. There are
726 separated women verses 395
separated men and 774 divorced
women versus 446 divorced men.
The figures also showed an over-
whelming majority of widowed
women over widowed men, 1,748
compared with 273 widowed men.
The figures also showed that
Greenville has 6,770 families and
11,226 households.
By race, there are 23.386 whites in
Greenville and 1099 blacks
Greenville also has other racial
groups represented in the city.
These groups include the American
Indian, Eskimo. Japanese. Chinese,
Filipino, Hispanic, Korean, sian
Indian, Vietnamese, Hawaiian.
Guamanian and Samoan.
One item from the Census Bureau
o' particular interest to ECU
satudents was the range o rent
prices paid in the city. Prices ranged
from less than $50 for a housing
unit to units in the $400-500 price
range, of which there are 10.
The median contract tent is SI56.
Campus Traffic Fines Increase
By KEITH BRITTAIN
M�ff Writer
The Board of Tustees in a Mon-
day afternoon meeting approved a
measure to raise the the cost of fines
for 18 of the 38 traffic violation
with fines.
The board was acting on a recom-
mendation from a June 21
chancellor's staff meeting.
Among those fines going up in
price were; failure to stop at a stop
sign � from five to ten dollars, one-
way street violation � from five to
ten dollars and reckless driving �
from $15 to $25.
were mainly made in what were
deemed problem areas he explain-
ed.
While going over the final draft, a
Board of Trustee member was upset
by section two of the document
dealing with freshmen regulations.
The section stated that "freshmen
who disregard the policies regarding
motor vehicle or registration will
result in a first-offense fine for il-
legal operation.
The portion which was deleted
stated that "notification shall be
forwarded to the freshman's parent
or guardian and driving privileges
on campus will be suspended for
one year
The changes will not go into ef-
fect until the new handbook ad-
dressing the issues is published.
Trustees Re-elect Officers
In addition to price changes, the ITlf � J m 8 2 A PflriPYYIlP PHY
newly approved regulations created M J9 J KJJ lllfUt'�fIV M Vlil
six new violations. The highest pric-
ed among these being littering with a
fine of $25.
Dr. Elmer Meyer, vice-chancellor
for student life, stated that the laws
governing traffic have not been
revised since 1978.
The task of modifying the laws
was begun last Spring by various
faculty and staff members. What
ensued was a 26-page final draft.
Meyer feels that the changes will
have little effect on students because
they are so minimal. He added that
the Board of Trustees and himself
hopes that "the changes will act as a
deterrant in preventing the infrac-
tions in the first place. The changes
By GREG HIDEOUT
siM��t Nf�� r ditiM
The ECU Board of Trustees re-
elected their present officers at
there first meeting of the year on
Monday. Ashley B. Futrell of
Washington, as chairman; C. Ralph
Kinsey of Charlotte, vice-chairman;
and Harvey Beech of Kinston,
secretary were all retained in there
present positions.
In accepting the chairmanship for
another year, Futrell asked that
members put aside their petty dif-
ferences and get ready for the "big
job" ahead.
The trustees also approved an ac-
tion by the finance committee to
resurface the football field. The
$163,000 dollar venture would be
completed by next year and funded
from excess reserve money.
A proposal to recognize a gift of
$250,000 from Branch Banking and
Trust was unanimously approved by
a standing vote.
The board also approved new
traffic regulations after a minor
revision.
Each vice-chancellor and Director
of Athletics Ken Karr gave progress
reports on their departments.
Chancellor Howell closed the
meeting by saying that he has en-
joyed working with the board for
the short time he's been in office.
j
t
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26, 1982
Announcements
KAPPA SIGMA
The Brothers ot Kappa Sigma
wouio liKe to extend a warm
�eiiome to all incoming
Freshmen transfer students and
all returning students We Mope
that everyone has a good and pro
sperous semester Living it Up
Down East Rember Fall Rush s
lust around the corner Go
Greeks' I'
PERSONAL CARE
ATTENDANTS
Applications are needed from
those interested m becoming Per
sonai Care Attendants to
wrvelchair students We are par
ticularly interested in anyone who
ahs a background ot assist,ng ,n
0viduals wh:th their activities ot
dfliiy living For tuther details
'a Ottice ot Handicapped
S'udent Services 21? tAic'iard
8 d�ng '57 679v
OFFICIALS NEEDED
A new school year is beginmg
ano as usual many students are
. king tor ways to earn extra
mortev Tle Department ot
intramural Recreational Services
has !obs available tot approx
Vf!i 35 40 students The work
hours range from 3 45 pm to
II 00 P n- MonoayS through
Thursday and occasionally on
weekends No experience s
necessary f'aij clinics are
redu'ted and tr e t rs' il.nic is on
" ' . s.Tav Sep'ember 2, n
v � �� �l Gym Room 102 at e 00
p m Please br-ng with vou Social
ur.ty cards ar'o Class
Schedules


STUDENT ATHLETIC
BOARD (SAB)
re , ol. .nteresteJ in ge�ing to
. a our coac hesand
a'fe'es special seat.nqar
ra"gemcnts for tooball
g,iies being involved with the
total athletic program"
ne '0 the Orienta'ion
Meeting on Wednesday
-P-nDer 1 iv82 at 7 00 P m in
2ti Mencennali S'udent Center
KARATE
All Karate Club officers ana
members are askeo to meet in the
D 010 Ot Memorial Gym
September 2nd at 7 30 P m Bnng
G' tor a Short workout
Ka'a'e Cub officers can me a'
"52 9454
BIOLOGY CLUB
RECREATION
RENTALS
An outdoor recreation equip
mem rental service has been pro
vided through the Department ot
intramural Recreational Ser
vices items available tor rem in
elude Backpacks, tents, canoes,
and tandem bicycle the outdoor
recreation center is located m the
equipment room 115 Memorial
Gym Hours ot operation are
2 00 5 00 p m Monday through
Fricay information is available
on S'ate and Federal Cam
pgrounds backpacking Trails.
Day n.kihq Trails and Canoeing
Rivers
CATHOLIC NEWMAN
CENTER
the Cathotk Newman Cenler
would like to invite everyone to
idin in with us tor celebrating
Mass every Sunday in the Biology
iecture Hall starting at 12 30 and
5 00 every Wednsday at the
Cathci'C Newman Center Dnner
ano qood friendship follows Mass
every Wednsday so come out and
bring a friend
Pi Kappa Phi
Pi Kappa P' !���� sisters
welcome back to school1' Our first
meeting is Sunday August 29 7 JO
p m AM active Mile sisters please
be there it is at the Pi Kappa Pt,
house
OUTDOOR
RECREATION
Registration and information on
a ar ety ot outdoor recreation op
portunities are available 'hrough
the iRS Outdoor Recreation
Center m 113 Memorial Gym
Recently scheduled events in
elude Horseback Riding
September 2 9 16 23 30 Begmn
ng Canoeing Clink Sep'ember 3
and 4 Whitewater Ratting Tr,p
September 10 anc U Call 757 6911
or stop b t the center I 113
Men � a c tot further infot
ma �
HONOR STUDENTS
SUGGEST
SEMINAR TOPICS
Every student's dream ot being
able to design hts or her own
course can become a reality lor
freshman and sophomore Honors
students at East Carolina
East semester the Honors Pro
gram otters several topic
oriented, non specialist Honors
Seminars which are generated by
either faculty proposal or Honors
s'udent request
Ideally, these seminars are in
terdisoplmary and are moderated
by two faculty members from dif
terent departments Some,
however, are handled by a Single
protesor They are on topics which
tall roughly under the headings on
pages 87 88 of the 1982 84
cataiogye They meet tor noe ses
Sion each week and carry 3 s h
credit towards General Education
requirements
Faculty members from all
departments ot the University are
invited to submit proposals tor
seminars to be taught Likewise,
Honors students may submit both
topics and suggested faculty
members to moderate the
seminars An advisory committee
on the Honors Program selects the
seminars to be offered
In order to be considered tor the
spring 1983 offerings, proposals
must be submitted m writing by
September 6. 1982. to Dr David
Sanders. Coordinator ot the
Honors Program, co English
Department Austin Building,
Campus For further information
call 757 6548
RADIOTALK SHOW
HOST
ne Department � v DEC Ser
g tot i pei st n
tmg l host a rad show
esteo persons s uld ci "��
� it 7041 Memorial Gyn
ATTENTION CU . eybaii lean tryouts
I lav August 2i 2 17 F ot
� � - .ion contact Coac
� JS � al 757 6'6I
ANNOUNCEMENTS
H you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcement column
please type it on an announcement
form and send it to The East
Carolinian in care ot the produc-
tion manager
Announcement forms are
avlabtt a' 'he East Carolinian
� �e in tne Publications Building
f S and handwritten copy on
odd sijed paper cannot be ac
cep'ed
There is no charge for an
ncements but space Is often
miteti Therefore we cannot
guarantee 'hat your announce
- , t will run as long as you want
ar.o suggest that you do ti �� �
. , on this column tor pub
i rteadtim tot a- louncements
s 5 pm Monday tor the Tuesday
toper ano 5 p m Wednesdayy for
the Thursday paper N; ar
ncements received after these
Oead nes will be pr inted
EQUIPMENT
CHECK OUT
The Department ot intramural
Recreation Services provides an
equipment check out service tot
students. Faculty and Staff It you
tave playful notions but lack the
right equipment stop by the equip
menl check out room located m
115 Memorial Gym Equipment is
available tor Basketball. Football
Frisbee. Horseshoes soccer
Volleyball sottball. Racquetbaii
Tennis and Badminton to mention
a few items This is a free service
(excluding late tees) so take ad
vantage ot a good opportunity
LIFEGUARDS
The Department ot Intramural
Recreational Services is hiring
lifeguards tor the 198? 83 school
year Approximately 20 25 guards
are needed for work at the Mmges
and Memorial Pools Basic hours
available are M F 11 30 a m to
1 30 p m , M F 3 30 p m to 6 30
pm.MWF8.00pm to 9 30 p m
and Sat and Sun 1 00 p m to 5 00
pm CPR Certification and either
Advanced Litesavmg or WSl s re
quired Interested students should
apply at Memorial Gymnasium
Room 102 Monday. August 30. a'
5.00 pm Please br.ng your Social
Security Card. Class Schedules
and CPR WSl and Advanced
Litesavmg Certiticatio Cards
APPLY NOW
Students who intend to apply to
maior in Social Work or Correc
tions in the Fall of 1982 should re
quest an application and an ap
pointmeni tor an interview from
the Department Office 312 Carol
Belk (Allied Health Building)
For more information call Mrs
Joyner. 757 6961, Ext 218
Deadline tor fall applications
September 7, Students are en
couraged to appi 1 during summer
school
AMBASSADORS
Our t rs' meehng will be held on
Wednesday Sept 1 .at 5 00 Your
attendant e is really important tor
tn.s special meeting We ve got i
great eat ahead ot us and you're
� � i ntial P" ' I ' We II plan
.� i , r ur firs' lather
mail Muitipur
I Roon
SPORTS EDITOR
WANTED
� � Dei .����' � '
K ec rea �� � � � '
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or j
use a separate sheet of paper it
you need more lines There are 33
units per line. Each .etter punc
tuation mark, and word space
counts as one unit Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly Leave
space at end of line if word j
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac
cepted over the phone. We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
7SC per line oi fraction of a line.
Please prinl legibly! Use capital and
lower ease letters.
Return to THE EAS1 CAROLINIAN
office b 3:00 1 uesdav before
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phone.
at 75� per line S.
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,���T� � �� 4�i�� �1T ; 4-i!
r �-
i�i�14�i�j
��r-4-
I��,illV?�r���
T��Il1�- 1
11J- �" ?
11 i���1
j�I�r,
1�11 ii-i�-I1�. �.i
?
Editor ten
Newspaper 1E. nn
b'Ts Experien
.i v ul .t i les I
'ac Nance Mie
Gym call 757 6387
he inii imut al
IS SHOE ' iD
e t .�
.� u red
204 Memi � i
NEWMAN CLUB
Saturday. Aug 28th there is a
picnic for all Catholic students
Meet at the Newman Center a'
noon Bring your own lunch and
S5 00 to cover Oeer, soda and 'he
use ot the picnic grounds
Sunday August 29 there will be
a cnokou' at 3 00 p m Hot dogs,
soda and beer provided tor $? 00
Bring something to share such as
chips, salad or cookies Everyone
welcome
ATTENTION
FRESHMEN
The Biology Club is conducting a
special meetinq on Tuesday.
August 31. m the Biology Buildmq
room BN 103 tor all freshmen w.tn
an interest m biology This
meeting will help acquaint the m
coming biology students with �� e
department and faculty and the
Bioioby Ciub The Biology Cluo
will outhne it's plans for the up
ming far and membersl I
(ration will take place
ATTENTION
rtie Junior Varsity Cheerleader
t r routs will be held at the east end
� V naes Coliseum a' 5 0C p m on
I , September 9, 1982
. � � be held
Wednesday
Sep' " IV Sepl 6 T ��soay
l at ttv i ' � � x'
eun ai 5 0C p n
C � � tne first praci
s n ed � � lav St l'
� rfc .u-
OFF CAMPUS
HOUSING
It you will be needing a room
mate or would like to find anc
share an apartment for Fall, con
tact the Of Campus Hdusmg Of
lice. 2U Wh,chard Building
757 6881, before June 14 Or.enta
t.on will begin at that time and
many students will be seeking ac
commodations We need your
i,sting
SPORT CLUBS
Get ready tor a fantastic year
Fmo out every'hng you ever
wanted to know about Sport Clubs
C ji-rentl, Field Hockey Gym
nasties, karate Pugoy Soccer
Surl.na. Team Handball and
. itei �- ,iac've Spori Clubs
It you and your tnends wish tc
begin a new club attend the sport
club informational meehng ALL
SPORT ClUBS MUST attend
THE FiRSt meeting WHICH
. L BE HE.D AEDNESDAY
SEPTEMBER 22. IN MEMCR AL
GYM ROOM 105 B AT 4 00 p m
. � port clubs should r,a,e
� j- � ii meetings tor the
elect "cers and prepara
I . . '� pi ' to the IRS
meei i
SUPERVISOR WANTED
Dei n � UREC Ser
: � ' � p"
.�. �� � a �-
� � � t outdoor re
� . . amping, backpack
� . ind biking Piease
tact Pat C � �' 387
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
Bsnop SAidney Sanders of the
Episcopal Diocese of East
Carolina will celebrate the Holy
Communion of Tuesday, August 31
a'5 30pm in St Paul's Episcopa'
church tor the student serv.ee An
informal picnic will foiow a1 the
rectory of the Rev W J "Bill"
Hadden. Chaplain
FOLCF
The Fountain ot Life Christian
Fellowship will hold its f.rst
Fellowship meeting Wednesday.
September 1 at 7 00 at the Cultural
Center behind tne Student Health
Building AH members are asked
to come out
ECU FRISBEECLUB
Welcome Back Fenow F
mgers it's time tc orga- �e are
spend Our ftara earned money
Elect new officers gc or roadt' ps
etc Meetings �rtll 0 every Won
day night 8 o'c icck 248
Mendennau Everybody show up
on August 30 lO'n Ame'ica s and
ECU fastest growing spor'
Fr.soee!
Phi Kappa Tau Little
Sisters
There �fill oe a mee'ng o the
Ph, Kappa Tau I We ss'ers
Sunday AuguS' 29 a' ' OC A
tie s.sters are enpectes o attend
MEN SGLEE CLUB
The ECU Vie- s :� M
� tes gr , �e' -�?��� '
ng r " '982 1983 Ge
cofac t-e Scti � ' '�'
Giee C uta � tie pe
geet.e N � '�
Orcnes'ra n S.�e�"oer I
mane �� I
Va'cr as we as m��
numer; us f�" concert
pea'ances tht
Care -a The Gee Clun -
v a F at II 9 redii a-c
s cpe" to a campus �
For moa I � �
"aye a sctWOhi
Mr Gie a �-�' I WuS
757 685' B� a' 7SI fQK
IShik nJLniversitp
Qtaircutters
World Issues Conferences Planned
B PATRICK O'NEILL
i�ff Wrilrr
The proliferation of
nuclear weapons, the
situation in El Salvador
and the increasing
number of people suf-
ieiung from the condi-
tions of poverty and
hunger have been three
major news issues of
1982.
All of these situa-
tions will be discussed
during conferences to
be held in North
Carolina during
September.
On the weekend of
September 17, a con-
ference titled,
"Celebrating a vision"
will be held in the
K ileigh-Durham area
by "Bread for the
World a Christian
citizens lobby organiza-
tion.
The three-da
seminar will discuss
arious skills and
strategies for lobbing in
North Carolina as well
as an update on the
hunger problem.
The program will
take place at William
B. L'mstead State Park.
Another workshop
will be conducted on
that same weekend,
also in Raleigh, by the
"Carolina Interfaith
Task Force on Central
America
The workshop will be
led by experts on Cen-
tral America and will
include 17 hours of lec-
tures and and study. It
will be held at the
McKinnon Center and
will cost SI 5.
'�Swords into
Plowshares: Toward a
Dependable Peace" is
the third conference
which will be held in
Charlotte on the
weekend of Sept. 24
and 25.
Vox more informa-
tion on these events call
758-4906 or 752-4216.
I he haM Carolinian
every Tu � �
� . icaden
ever i � �
.
� : i
ewspapei � E�
. � owm
: pul eo tor a
� . � . ' � . i' ' Caroi �
Subscription Rate 470 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located m the Old South
Buiidinq on the campus ot ECU,
Greenville. N.C
' ��� � R Send address
- � Tne Eas' Card n a-1
� ng ECU Green
nc :u
Tel-phone 'W 6346 6367 630
Located on Corner
of 14th & Charles Blvd.
in Gold Leaf Warehouse
NOW
OPEN
Excellence in easy care.
Low maintenance, precision haircuts.
offering a
Back-to-School 20 Discount
to all ECU.
Students
wvalid I.D.
752-0559
j
i
i
0
I
i
j
i
i
Photographers Needed
Apply before Sept. 1st with
Media Boaid secretary, 2nd
floor of Publications Building.
i
Must have:
�Phone & Car
� B & W Darkroom Experience
SERO
SHIR'I MAKERS
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
At East Carolina University
752-7240 Meeting m the Methodist Student Center
7 58 0145 501 East Fifth Street
S( VD41 S trom 5:30-8:00 p.m.
hRtIE MOVIE, S 4 M K fi( FFET,
and DISC I SSIO about movie:
Stewart LaNeave
Campus Minister
We feature at all of our
fine stores a truly traditional shirt
by SERO with the following features
� 1000 Cotton Oxford
� Button Down Collar
�Single Needle Tailoring
�Full Placket Sleeves
�Box Pleat
�Seven Button Front
�Safetv Lock Button Fasting
Reg.2tf0 NOW $20.00
Downtown
September 5 � You Only Live Twice
September 12 � Brian's Song
September 19 � ind Justice tor All
September 26 � Ordinary People
October 10 � orba. The Creek
October 24 � Kramer Vi Kramer
October 31 � Hhos Afraid of Virginia Wool)
oember7� The Greek Tycoon
November 14 � Butch Cassidy and
the Sundance Kid
November 21 � American i,igolo
November 28 � The Rules of Marriage
December 5 � The t.arthling
Tt TSDA IS at 12:30pm.
STAFF-FACULTY LI SCHat MENDENHALl BUFFET
TUESDAYS� 5
PROGR A M and SI PPtR for S Tl
Tall Study on American Religious (
August 31 � Margaux's
September 7 � Siechuan Garden
September 14 � Marathon
September 21 � Sweetarolines
September 28 � Iriendly
October 5 � Pizza Hut
October 12 � hour Seasons
30 p m
l)hTS - S2
ults: Off and (
October 26 �
November 2 -
November 9 -
November 16
November 23
November 30
December 7 -
M for meal
)nampu
Margaux 'j
Szechuan Garden
Marathon
� Sweet (. arolines
� Friendly
� Four Seasons
Pizza Hut
tetnbecfe'tf
ATTENTION
ALL DANCE
STUDENTS!
I


THE COLLEGE STUDENTS'
HEADQUARTERS
FORALLDANCEWEAR
Downtown
Evans St. Mall
MEN'S SHOP
Carolina East Mall
Pitt Plaza
FRIDAY ONLY
ALL YOU CAN EAT!
FLOUNDER DINNER
WEDNESDA YS from 12:20-1:30 p.m.
GRAD. STUDENT LUNCH m MENDENHALL SNACK BAR
We'll gather at one of the round tables.
THIRSIJA .S from 11:45-1:30 p.m
HOT DOG LUNCH in the (,ROl � E� tl o) the
METHODIST CENTER, (K each
COMEJOIS LS-
FELLOWSHIP FOOD
DISCUSSION
Attend weekly worship services at First Presbyterian,
14th & Elm Street, or any of the other area churches.
Plan early to be a part of the fall retreat to
Washington, D. C, on November 4-7 to look into
how religion influences the American Political Pro-
cess. We will be staying at the Pilgrimage next to the
Church of the Pilgrims, 2201 P Street, N. W.
INCLUDES FRENCH FRIES. COLE SLAW. TARTAR
SAUCE & HUSHPUPPIES
cSHONEYrS
264 By-Pass
Greenville, N.C.
CAPEZIO
AND
DANSKIN
We have a
complete
selection of
leotards, tights,
and tap,
ballet, and
modern
dance shoes,
in a spectrum
of colors'
1






THE FAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26. 1982
I
Changes Announced Theatre Renovation Complete
EC! NEWS BUREAU
irLl School of Art
ecentl announced an
administrative
eorganization creating
two major departments
and the appointment of
new chairpersons.
The art school.
which has approx-
imated 700
undergraduate majors
and graduate students.
is one of the universi-
ty's largest and best
k low n prottesional
hools.
Dean Richard 1 aing
announced the forma-
n ol the departments
of Fine Arts and of
Design which will, in
el feet, consolidate nine
a e administrative
it s
'This will provide a
more effective, more
efficient a d -
mimstsratie system
I aing said. He said a
need had existed to
"reorganize for a much
more streamlined ad-
ministrative process
Paul Hartley,
associate professor and
a widely-known
painter, will be the
chairperson of the
Department of Fine
Arts v hich includes the
cumcular areas o
painting-drawing,
sculpture, printmaking,
art education and art
historx
C harles
l hamberlain. pro-
fessor and former
chairman of ceramics.
will chair the Depart-
ment of Design, Laing
said. Design will in-
clude the areas of com-
munication arts, in-
terior design, ceramics,
textile design, fabric
and weaving, metal
design and wood
design.
Laing also announc-
ed appointment of
Micahael Ehlbeck,
assistant professor, as
coordinator of the
school's foundations
program.
Services Held
By CHRIS
HARRINGTON
SUff Writrf
1 he renovation and
construction of the
Messick Theatre Arts
Center is complete and
according to Scott
Parker, general
manager of the ECU
Summer Theatre, "the
faculty, students and
staff are very pleased
with the results
When McCiinnis was
condemmed in 1973,
because it was too old
and broken down for
theatre production, the
state board began ask-
ing for monies to build
a new theatre. The
money (in all it would
be a 3.5 million dollar
project) became
available after a long
wait.
Soon the construc-
tion project became a
three-phase project �
the construction of a
new auditorium, the
stage construction and
the renovation of the
Taylor Coats School,
used to r practice
teaching back when
East Carolina College
was known as a
teacher's college.
The completed
theatre complex is bar-
rier free, according to
state law, for handicap-
ped persons.
The School of
Drama and Speech at
one point was moved to
downtown funeral
parlor temporarily. The
scl. I has now been in
its renovated facility
for one year with the
grand opening perfor-
mance, "Showboat'
conducted during the
Spring semester.
The largest of the
three dance studios was
fitted with a bouncy
floor which is of the
same design used by I he-
New York Ballet. The
building houses,
classerooms and of
fices.
A memorial service
for Reggie Swinson will
be held Tuesday even-
ing at 7 p.m. in the Ar-
bortorium Gazebo near
the biology building.
Swinson, 20, died
Monday from injuries
suffered in an
automobile accident
Julv 18.
The rising senior.
was returning to ECU
after a weekend of duty
with the Coast Guard
Reserve when the driver
of an oncoming car had
a massive heart attack,
crossed the center line
and struck Swinson's
car head-on.
He was a resident of
Virginia Beach, Va. He
was majoring in
business.
Not all clinics are the same.
ABORTION
Insurance accepted
V n um�e lot's
IS eek
� cull decision that's
n of the Fleming
available da and
idei stand you. Com-
d a fi iei dl staff . . .
. � - about.
t ree pregnancj U'siiny
jitmlaN appointment
V t-r earl? pre�nanc lesis
Call 781-5550 da or night.
I he Flemingenter makes the difference
QUALITY
HAIR
DESIGNS
752-2967
AFFORDABLE PRICES -
9-6MONSAT.
Lowest TV Rental
Prices In Town!
TELE RENT TV
- I Phone: 756-9100
2905 East 10th Street in Greenville
Episcopal Students
First Fall Service of
Holy Communion
Tuesday, August 31
Bishop Sidney Sanders, Celebrant
5:30p.m.
St. Paul's Episcopal Church
406 E. 4th St.
(one block from Garrett Dorm)
Picnic will follow.
Sorority Ihish
a oc
OLT
� Selected Shirts $1200 & 1 500
I

Plus Tax
ECU Pirate Shirts 500 j
I And 25 off
all other shirts in stock

IAYDEN GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB
Open 7 days �746-3389
- ECU STUDENTS GREEN FEES $6.00 DURING WEEK -
(�(� ����! ��'�HHBMKlia!�!��
All this month at Jack's
YOU JUST CAN'T AFFORD NOTTO EATSTEAK!
�� ese inflation fighting coupons to treat yourself and your whole
, to go d jvnolesome eating at money saving prices!
t's Jack's way of helping you keep September's budget � ana
� mber' linners well balanced.
MjOiSffgCgUQS�:
500 W. Greenville Blvd.
756 5788
JACKS
STEAK HOUSE
1
1
1
1.
1
1
J
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
STEAK DINNER
FOR TWO, s6.99
pi. r�
featuring Two Rib Eye Steaks
- -
- - al
1 ����
JACK
STEAK HOUSE
A KID CAN DINE
FOR 5
JACK!
B STEAK B8B8�
1 T-BONE STEAK DINNER
J FOR TWO'6.99 p.USTa.
I f utirnf Tin T-tM Steaks
I
I
I
P . r?�eo po'a'oe a" you car oea' sa'ad
oar sou' crttr n awti bu'r d an ne so
� . �� Pt��asP D'Vn nn OrdV'inQ
ttltfl g�t � ftSfhe &OO0 BW � ' � Ougfi Sep JC
I
I
I
I
I
L.
itr'T V
sama
STEAK DINNER
FOR TWO, 6.99
Pius Ta�
Featvnf Two life En Sttaks
1
I
I
I
I
I
- US t bao potatoes, sovc cream a" you can ee'
iac hdf 'oms �fvj Dy"e' a"d an "e so orin you
'r p,ee present �.rwr O'der.ng then g.v� 0
is" r" Sooo a mf rrtroug" Sept �
A KID CAN DINE
FOR59
UM Nwt ronus .ovipor' fo' a yveii ba'arvcea great
-ts' B - VN rre tor .qV $�c ptus ai' tn ludes
"�abo'ge Fr�jnc F'es Jeno I So Drink
i.a o"i� tor � , unoer Pieatse present wrer
oroe' r�g �fn give 'o t ai ��� Good any t.me
-rougr See' 10
T

i
� 4
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
T-BONE STEAK DINNER
FOR TWO s6.99 u�n,
f utir ii Twi Mw Steaks
PLUS 7 oa�ea po'atoev a" fovr care o eat wad
D�r sour cream 3 '�'�15 �nrj bur and ai tttf sot
� � you care tor Picas present when ordering. i
�nen gve �o csi'�r Gooday ftrne throw gn Spt 30
n tfzs if-sak
7.
v
s
Sin Up forRush bebyesn
Auaust 31st and September 9$h
Croatan and Bookstore
Convocation: September 9th � 5:30
Wright Auditorium -w
Rush Week: September 13th-17th
When it comes to the food at Taco
Bell there's really only one school
of thought. What a difference'
To begin with, your order s made
up fresh from the best ingredients
That's different. And it's all served
up piping hot to be sure you get all of
the delicious flavor. That's different
You also get served fast, which
means that our schedule will keep
you on yours. That's different.
And you get it all at the terrific
Taco BelL price. That's really different.
Plus, where else do you find food
with deliciously different names like
Taco Supreme . Burrito Supreme,
and Enchirito-? Each one a far cry
from the usual fast food fare (not to
mention whatever that is they serve
in the cafeteria).
So cut out the coupon, then cut
out for Taco Bell and see for your-
self what a difference we make.
'oooST
PLEASE PRESENT THIS
COIPOS WHES ORDERING.
LIMIT ONE COt POS
PER PERSON
PER mw
Free Taco
With The Purchase Of One At Regular Price.
Crisp corn tortilla. Fresh ground beef. Lettuce and real cheddar cheese.
TOM A BE lib
GOOD ONLY AT 319 E. Greenville Boulevard Greenville
OTCOODTTH
ASi OTHER OFTER
OFFER EXPIRES
October 3i m:
h

f





Olfte iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
FiEI DIM. Mil I tR. General Manage,
Mlkt Hi GHES, 4aantldi��
Waveri v Merritt, . Cindy Pieasants. v ,�.��
Robi rt Ri ks. �� ue Ernest Conner, s �.��
PHIl 1 11' MANESS, i Ma. STfcVb BACHNER. Emttelmmmmi Editor
Chris I ichor, i wJi Mire Davis, �-� w0
Joni ciriHRii. r.�� w Cornell Medlock. so
August 26, is:
Opinion
Page 4
BB&T
Mutual Gratitude Expressed
Every so often (aelually so rare-
ly), some person or group of per-
sons makes an aet of such generosi-
ty that it deserves instantaneous
recognition � if not resounding ap-
plause.
Such was the case Monday at the
first ECU Board of Trustees
meeting.
It was during that year-opening
meeting that the Branch Banking
and Trust Company of Wilson
made its donation of $250,000 to
the ECU School of Business' Center
for Management Development.
The quarter-million-dollar gift
will be administered oer a five-year
period and will be used to promote
education, research and service in
the fields of business and manage-
ment through lectures, seminars and
the like.
Like most institutions of higher
learning, ECU must rely heavily on
such acts of generosity if the
school's dreams of progress arc ever
to be realized.
And large or small, every con-
tribution is meaningful and useful.
All too often, companies and cor-
porations fail to realize that educa-
tional training is the basis for sound
business.
And again, all too often, those
same corporations in eastern North
Carolina seem to neglect the fact
that ECU has furnished them with a
large percentage of their trained
employees
But despite the forgetfulness of
some of ECU's nearby businesses,
the university is likewise quite for-
tunate in its loyalties. These
virtually-unsung heroes somehow
escape their much-deserved recogni-
tion year after year.
One can only hope that they
realize our deep appreciation for
their past, present and future sup-
port of ECU and that the example
set by BB&T will carry over to other
area businesses.
BB&T President L. Vincent
Lowe, who presented the gift to the
trustees, emphasized that much of
his bank's finest personnel have
come from the ECU School of
Business. The gift, therefore, is in-
tended as a token (indeed, a very
large token) of gratitude as well as a
means of preparing and building for
the future.
In return for the donation
(although by no means intended as
repayment), the trustees voted to
change the name of the 10-year-old
center to the Branch Banking and
Trust Center for Management
Development.
But such generosity cannot be
adequately repaid merely by a
gesture of mutual respect. Such
unrestrained generosity as that
shown by BB&T can only be fully
repaid by ECU's students, students
who will be better qualified, thanks
to their support.
Year-Old Papers Predicted Recession
Reaganomics
B Jack Anderson
and Joe Spear
WASHINGTON � The American peo-
ple can be forgiven if they don't believe a
word that comes out of the White House
on the state ot the economy. The president
and his adisers don't even let Congress
know what they're up to.
Right now, for example, the congres-
sional Joint Economic Committee is trying
to obtain some unpublished White House
working papers that were prepared in
February of 1981. And the White House is
stonewalling.
What's so hot about these documents
that arc nearly a year-and-a-half old? Not
much, really. They were working papers
prepared by Murray Weidenbaum, who
was then the chairman of the President's
Council of Economic Advisers. The papers
predicted what was going to happen to the
economy in 1981. That's right � last year.
But Weidenbaum has refused to turn the
briefing papers over to Congress. He's try-
ing to claim executive privelege to keep
Congress from finding out what's in the
documents.
And here's the reason why: The Weiden-
baum papers predicted an economic
downturn for the second and third
quarters of last year. In February of 1981,
a month after Ronald Reagan was in-
augurated, his economic advisers knew
there was likely to be a recession a few
months later.
But they didn't tell Congress or the
American people. Instead, the administra-
tion was saying that prosperity was just
around the corner. All that was needed to
ensure good times was for Congress to give
the president everything he asked for in tax
and budget cuts.
Rep. Henry Reuss, D-Wis is the chair-
man of the Joint Economic Committee.
He wants to know why the Reagan ad-
ministration didn't let the American public
in on the secret of the 1981 recession. And
he wants the Weidenbaum papers so he can
show just how much the White House kept
Congress and the public from knowing.
In fact, we are told Reuss is so steamed
up that he has been talking to members of
the Senate Banking Committee. He wants
to hold up the nomination of Weiden-
baum's successor, Martin Feldstein. until
the White House turns over its dirty little
secret.
Meanwhile, President Reagan may have
to put personal pressure on the nation's
bankers if he hopes to bring down the
astronomical interest rates that are stifling
the economy.
He quietly succeeded on the Washington
front in prodding the Federal Reserve
Board to loosen its grip on the money sup-
ply. He expected that interest rates would
drop and that savings on the cost of bor-
rowing would be passed on to
businessmen.
Unfortunately, the strategem has failed.
The banks, pleading hard times, maintain-
ed their interest charges at about the same
rates, thus providing themselves with hefty
profits. They were able to borrow more
cheaply on their own while at the same
time charging more to their customers.
Every politico is aware that high interest
rates loom as a major factor in this year's
congressional election and could cost
Republicans dearly at the polls in
November.
Our sources tell us that if the banking in-
d"stry doesn't voluntarily initiate interest-
cutting moves, the president will resort to
some direct arm-twisting for the good of
the party.
The White House and GOP public
pulse-takers already realize that time is
running short for Reaganomics to produce
any significant upturn from the recession
before November. Even a modest recovery
won't salvage them from some key defeats.
Political analysts on both sides of the
fence tell us that the Republicans may be
able to break even in the Senate races,
where they already hold control, but lose a
minimum of 15 seats in the House, where
Democrats reign.
Reagan's political advisers intend to
claim that a 15-seat loss is a victory in as
much as the party in the White House
traditionally loses ground in mid-term con-
gressional contests. Privately, however,
they admit that even such a minor
numerical setback could cost them the
precarious edge they've held in the House
with the support of conservative
Democrats.
?NSv
ii� . . -
SMS HE WANT3 TO RX10W M MZ.�
DOONESBURY
by Garry Trudeau
HLHsEr law. wars
PfiSm IT G0IN6 OUT
1 v
PRETTY GOOP I'M
4USETTIEPN70MY
MH OFFICE AMPLACEY
IS ALREADY OUT
CAMPAIGNING.
I MUSTSAt ITSREAuiAN
EXP&JBNCE. MTCH1N6 MS
MEET UMTH PEOPLE SHE
CERTAINLY NOT SHY ABOUT
STANPIN&ONt�XReCatP'
WH&t w 901 UXUS
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THE
JNE
We're A Nation Of Waiters
Have you ever considered the line?
Now there's a stupid question. After all,
we're in college.
But do you realize that we probably
spend more time standing in line during
our college careers than eating out at fine
restaurants or even brushing our teeth?
And yet, for the tens of thousands of
rulebooks and guides for dining etiquette,
can you believe � there are absolutely no
rules of etiquette for standing in line.
Think about it. How many times have
you been in a drop add line behind so-
meone who probably hasn't taken a
shower in three days? Not only does he
smell bad, but you could probably lube
your car with his hair.
Or how about the guy who has a piece of
something caught between his two front
teeth. You know he's probably never own-
ed a toothbrush. And doesn't it just figure
that he's the kind of guy who loves to
smile at you.
rCampus Forum
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Buiding, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes oj verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All tet-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted.
Mike Hughes
Just The Wav It Is
For all of us who have experienced these
dreadful horrors, I have devised the
following rules of thumb, which 1 ap-
propriately title Rules To Stand By. I hope
these guidelines will make standing in line
a more pleasant experience for us all.
Rule No. 1 � Be considerate of your
fellow sidewalk dwellers. Don't eat a Mex-
ican breakfast. The trauma of waiting in
line is already immense without any con-
tribution from you.
Rule No. 2 � Don't be a menace. Leave
your dog at home. Yes, Fido may be great
company at the beach or at the house, but
he'll onlv make enemies in a drop adc
line. Remember, most lines on campus
tend to wrap around at least one fire
hvdrant
Rule No. 3 - Avoid pestering others
Don't bother the person behind you He
doesn't care where you were born AJI he
cares about is the line. W hy? Because all he
sees is the line.
Rule No. 4 Consider simple
mathematics. Before um cut into a line,
add up the number of people who have
been waiting longer than you. This should
give you an accurate measurement of the
number of people who would like to kill
you should you cut in.
Rule No. 5 � Don't drink out of
discarded cups or bottles. Sure, standing in
tine is thirsty work, but remember, thev
also put caramel coloring in chewing
tobacco.
Rule No. 6 � When people want to go
to an outdoor concert, they buy tickets.
Leave your ghetto-blaster at home with the
dog.
Rule No. 7 � Since other people have to
look at you while you're in line, bring a
razor. Chances are, you'll be there over-
night, and you'll want to start the day off
fresh. Besides, by the time you get to the
front of the line and Find out vou waited
for nothing, you'll probably want to slit
your wrists anyway.





THE EAST AKOl IN1AN
AUGUST 26. 1VK2
S
Iher
He
he
he
jould
If the
kill
I
they
fwing
go
tkets.
It the
le to
tng a
ver-
iv off
o the
aited
io slit
Finnish Student Tells Of U.S. Experiences
By PATRICK O'NEILL
IWfWlIlM
"It's very easy to get
aquianted with people,
but it's hard to nuke
friends said Yla
I indholm, commenting
on some of her ex-
periences with
American people dur-
ing the nine months she
has spent in Greenville
as a isting student
Mom Finland.
L indholm, 2 came
to this country uith her
husband, Martin
Romantshuk, who had
earned a biology
scholarship to work
with the ECl Medical
School He will he con-
tinuing his woik in the
United States for four
more months.
She has a degree in
library science, which
she completed in
Finland, and she also
took additional library
science courses here at
East Carolina.
'l wanted to see
what it's like here and
learn more about the
libtaty system in the
United States said
I indholm.
L indholm - praised
U.S. libraries,
"especially the school
libraries which I work
at home she said.
1 indhom has been on
leave of absence, from
her 10b in Helsinki,
which will end in
September.
She left Greenville on
Friday to accompany
hei husband to a lec-
ture he will be giving at
a conference in New
York
"People have realv
been wonderful Lin-
dholm told the East
Carolinian, while ad-
ding many other obser-
vations which many
Americans might find
less than comforting.
"People (in the U.S.)
think about money too
much, they're so
materialistic she said.
I.indholm said she ex-
perienced a "cultural
shock" when she first
came to the U.S. She
was overwhelmed by
the commercialism.
There is a need tor
something else, but
people don't seem to
find what they are
looking for. There all
these books on how to
make yourself happy,
she added.
I indholm was not a
typical tourist during
her American visit. She
and her husband
became involved in
various political ac-
tivities. Her face often
appeared on television
and in the newspapers
while she attended
numerous demonstra-
tions and vigils in
North Carolina.
The couple traveled
to New York City for
the United Nations
anti-nuclear rally last
June. They joined Car-
roll and Edith Webber
of Greenville on their
600 mile trip.
"When I came here,
1 was not interested in
this cultural you can see
on the surface,
McDonalds and Coke,
and thing like that. 1
was interested in the
alternative culture
said 1 indholm. "1 was
looking in Greenville
for something like that,
and 1 searched for a
month, until I found a
poster on a bulletin
board which said,
'Greenville Peace Com-
mittee' and 1 said 'oh
yes, here it is. 1 have to
phone this number im-
mediately which I did
and we started to go to
the peace committee's
meetings and got in-
volved in that work
She praised the peo-
ple she met at the peace
committee and other
"progressive" groups
she became involved
with. "On, 1 thought
they were wonderful,
the best people I met
here
Lindholm, who con-
siders herself a pacifist
in a non-religious
sense, noted that the
threat of a nuclear war
is a "horrible thing that
might happen any
time
She also felt that the
threat of a nuclear war
was "greater because
of United States agres-
sion" than because of
Soviet agression.
"1 don't really think
they (the Russians) are
a threat to world
peace said Lindholm,
but she did add that the
actions of the Soviet
Union in Poland and
Afghanistan were
wrong. "The United
States has a history of
imperialism, more than
the Soviet Union, real-
ly she explained.
Lindholm cited the
present U.S. position
of providing military
support to El Salvador
and Chile in 1973 as ex-
amples of this im-
perialism. "The CIA is
everywhere she add-
ed.
"Everybody who
travels can see that
everybody is just alike
everywhere. People are
people wherever you
go noted Lindholm.
"It's a myth that the
Russians are different
in some way or that
they are evil and things
like that. That's not
true she explained.
Lindholm did admit
that the Russians do try
to influence other na-
tions' policies through
their activities, but she
does not believe the
Russians want to in-
vade this country.
Finland has a
democratic government
with a parliamentary
system. They have a
friendly relationship
with the Soviet Union
and usually vote with
the Soviet position at
the United Nations.
They have free press
and elections and con-
duct trade equally bet-
ween the East and
West.
Lindholm praises the
American people as
"good organizers and
"dedicated
She sas the
American people "have
the power to change it
(the world) through
peaceful, democratic
means if they would
only organie. All these
silent masses. Just
think of the pec pie
voting for Jesse Helms
in North Carolina
That seems to be a ter-
rible thing They iust
don't know
She thinks that na-
tions need to set aside
things that aren't im-
portant and just uet
down to important
things when working
for disarmament "I
think there's a potential
here in this country to
do something. It could
happen reallv fast. le
seen thing during the
last half year since I've
been here. 1 he
grassroots have sud-
denly started to work
tor the anti-nucleai
movement she noted.
"1 think the x e
rallv in New York was
great said Lindholm
referring to the June 12
rallv which brouj hi
over 700,000 people to
New Yotk in suppor! ul
disarmament.
Hunger WulkFinished
B MIKE HAMER
Miff V�nlrr
"He was lean, but in
great spirits was the
wav Rev. S. Graves ot
Kill Devil Hills describ-
ed Chris Loftis as he ar-
nved at Jockey's
Ridge, completing a
700 mile trek across
North Carolina
Loftis, a recent
graduate of Duke
University walked that
distance to call atten-
tion to local and global
hunger needs and to
raise money for CROP.
Loftis walked into
Greenville at noon on
August 10. on one of
those hot, sticky and
very quite August davs
when most of the ac-
tivity that is stirring in
Greenville is happening
at the tobacco
warehouse.
There wasn't a large
welcoming committee
to greet him. It con-
sisted reporters from
Channel 9, The Daily
Reflector and The East
Carolinian along with
Major and Mrs. Davis
from the Greenville
Salvation Army and a
couple of people from
ECU's Newman
Center.
Loftis said. "I am
making this walk, not
as a statement against
all of the wrong of
soeietv which produce
hunger for one-fourth
of the earth's people.
My voice can nly be a
whisper in the ongoing
global discussion of
what to do about in-
E.C.U Division of the
Clean Government Party
Organization meeting at the Neptune� Friendly
Eating House, 507 E. 14th & Charles St. National
Independent Party Goals: World Peace, En
torcement ot the U. S Constitution, Educate the
Public, Demand the Truth from all elected of
ficials
TIME: 9 p.m. til (free draft beer, tea, coffee,
soft drinks)
The Truth: Topic �
"Do Flying Saucers Exist?"
creasing hunger and
malnutntution, both in
this country and
abroad. But a whisper
speaks louder than
silence
The idea to make the
walk came to Loftis a
year ago from a need he
felt to do something as
a college graduate from
Duke University.
Loftis' walk
generated close to
$100,000 in direct con-
tribution and money
that will be generated
by eight walks,
throughout the state,
which were inspired by
the walk. This accor-
ding to Ed King, direc-
tor of Carolina Chruch
World ServiceCrop.
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Pirates & Freshmen
Fast delivery
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6 l HI S I �. KOl IMS MJGUST 26, 1982
m
Welcomes
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im LASIAKOI 1MN
Al t SI 26. 1982
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thru Sat. Aug 28. 1982
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f





THH EAST CAROl INI AN
AUGUST 26. 1982
O'Neill Speaks On Prisons
By JAY STONE
M��l W rilr�
In contemporary
American society crime
has come to be a major
concern for most
citizens. During his
first six weeks of in-
carceration Patrick
O'Neill was moved to
six different prisons
and jails in four dif-
ferent states. As a con-
sequence he had an op-
portunity to observe
criminals and society's
response to crime first-
hand.
If you were to ask
O'Neill, point blank,
what his feelings about
prisons and putting
people in jail are he
would be likely to say;
"I believe that in-
carceration is society's
simplistic response to
the evils of poverty,
racism, and inequality.
Instead of responding
to these social problems
which are largely
responsible for crime,
the people want to
build more jails which
does not solve the pro-
blem
"Prisons are a fiscal
failure O'Neill says
gesturing. He adds:
"They waste our
money and they are a
social failure because
they don't rehabilitate
people. North Carolina
has seventeen thousand
inmates. We have the
highest per capita in-
carceration in the na
tion and prisons are the
third highest budget
Herpes Information
We at the Student Health Center
have felt a need to broaden our
health educational program. One
wav is a bi-monthly column in the
lasi Carolinian to provide you with
an oportunity to send in written
questions pertaining to health pro-
blems without identifying yourself.
Three or four questions will be
chosen every two weeks and
answered in this column. To make
this a successful and beneficial col-
umn we will need the cooperation of
the student body.
To begin our column we thought
we would give you some basic infor-
mation about Herpes Simplex Virus
Type 11 (HSV-II).
HSV-II is a virus that generally
affects the lower half of the body
especially on or around the sexual
organs. HSV-II is generally thought
to be contracted directly from one
wet surface to another wet surface
(as in sexual intercourse) but by no
means is this the only method of
transmission. People who are not
sexually active can and have
developed HSV-H.
Herpes can be spread by direct
contact with someone who has the
irus or from one part of the body
to another. Herpes can also be pass-
ed to a newborn during childbirth if
there is an actie sore at the time of
delivery.
Even though these means of con-
tact are generally accepted by most
health care providers, there is much
about HSV-11 transmission that is
not completely understood. Studies
show people affected by viruses may
have some alterations in their im-
mune system.
Genital herpes occurs in two
stages, primary and secondary or
recurrent. Primary Herpes indicates
the initial outbreak and may occur
anvwhere from a few hours to two
weeks after exposure. Some people
experience a tingling or burning sen-
sation 1-2 davs before the actual le-
sions appear. The lesions appear as
tiny blisters and they progress rapid-
ly to an ulcerative stage. External le-
sions tend to be extremely painful
and much swelling may be involved.
Internal lesions of the vaginal wall
and cervix are usually not painful.
The lesions may be accompanied
bv fatigue, general body aches,
swelling in the legs, runny eyes, loss
of appetite and fever. The ulcers
may last for two or three weeks.
then heal comlpetely leaving no
scars. Although the ulcers have
disappeared, the virus may be dor-
mant in the body and may cause
recurrent or secondary HSV-II.
Recurrent outbreaks of herpes are
less extensive, and may even be just
a cluster of annoyig blisters which
clear after six to seven days. These
recurrent lesions may appear for no
reason or may be related to a recent
illness, stress, a menstrual period or
overexpoure to the sun.
Although genital herpes has not
been absolutely identified as a pro-
bable cause of cervical cancer in
women, it is true that among women
who have had HSV-II, cancer of the
cervix occurs 5 times more frequent-
ly. Therefore, it is very important
that any women with HSV-11, get
yearly Pap smears or more frequent-
ly, if advised by her health provider.
The Pap smear can find such early
changes in cells.
There is no specific cure for
Herpes other than the ability of the
body to muster its own defenses by
creating protective antibodies
against the virus. Indeed, this does
occur and is why subsequent
outbeaks of Herpes are less exten-
sive. Many potions and drugs have
been tried over the past few years
without success.
Zovirax is the brand name for
acyclovir. an anti-viral drug recently
approved by the Federal Drug Ad-
ministration for use in the manage-
ment of a first episode of hcrpe�-
genitalis and in other limited herpex
simplex viral infections.
Unfortunately, this drug is not
considered helpful in the treatment
of recurrent herpes genitalis. Cur
rent studies show no real decrease in
the duration of discomfort or heal
ing time (although there ma be
slight decrease in the length of time
the virus is communicable).
Because of this lack of significant
clinical benefit and because of the
expense to the patient ($17 � $24
per ounce tube) this ointment is not
usually necessary in the manage-
ment of mild, recurrent herpes,
genitalis.
There are some things you can do
at home to ease the symptoms of
HSV-II and make you a little more
comfortable.
1) Sitting in a tub of warm water 4
or 5 times a day
2) Blow drying the affected areas
instead of towel drying.
3) Aspirin (two every four
hours).
4) Avoid intercourse for the
duration of the attack.
5) Wash hands frequentK to
avoid spreading the attack.
6) Drink 6-8 glasses of fluid a
day.
7) If urination is painful,
urinate while bathing or while pour-
ing water over the vulva or penis
8) Keep yourself as clean and
dry as possible.
If you think you have symptoms
of HSV-11,be checked as soon as
possible. HSV-11 has become in-
creasingly more prevalent on our
campus over the past few years and
is associated with the sexual
freedom and relaxed attitudes of to-
day.
We at the Student Health Center
feel that there is no cause for alarm
or hysteria if you have HSV-11.
There is cause for concern,
however.
All letters must be neatly typed or
written and brought by the East
Carolinian office in the Old South
Cafeteria building accross from the
library.
priority in the state
After being arrested
and sentenced to a
three month prison
term, O'Neill was com-
mitted first to
Cumberland county
jail.
He was later evicted
from the Sampson
County facility for
organizing inmates,
submitting an eighteen
point grievance list to
the sherrif, and author-
ing several letters to the
editor of the local
newspaper complaining
about the conditions at
the jail.
"I was appalled at
the conditions in the
Sampson County jail.
At Sampson County,
when I first got there, I
was refused linen,
towels, soap, a
toothbrush, and a
prison uniform. The
floor was constantly
wet becuase of faulty
plumbing and vermin
ran around on the
floor. People were be-
ing held there for up to
two months because
they culdn't make one
hundred dollars bail
Seventeen-year-old
boys were in the same
cells with murderers
and there were empty
cells not being used
while the prisoners
were kept in over-
crowded conditions
O'Neill also alleges
that when he and other
prisoners attempted to
make their plight
known to the public via
the local newspaper
they were deliberately
ignored. Instead, he
claims, the paper went
out of its way to get the
sherrif's side of the
dispute.
After being evicted
from the Sampson
County jail, O'Neill
eventually found
himself in Atlanta's
federal prison facility.
It was in Atlanta that
inmates first began to
warn him that because
of his outspokenness he
might be in danger. Ac-
cording to O'Neill,
several inmates in the
Atlanta prison re-
counted stories in
which other inmates
had been involuntarily
injected with Thorazine
for behavior control.
This happened, he says,
not necessarily because
they were violent, but
because they were tak-
ing positions that were
in opposition to the
prison administration.
"Too many people
told me these stories for
me to dismiss them as
lies or prison paranoia.
If this kind of thing is
actually happening and
I believe that it is, then
it is reminiscent of the
Soviet Union where we
hear that dissidents are
put in mental institu-
tions and injected with
tranquiliers to shut
them up
Because ot these
repeated warnings
O'Neill was particular-
ly alarmed when he
learned that he was be-
ing transferee! to a
higher security prison
in a western state. In a
moment of panic he
sent woid to friends
who, in turn, contacted
representative Walter
B. Jones.
The fact that Jones
got in touch with the
prison board about
O'Neill's case is a cer
tainty according to
members of the Green-
ville Peace Committee.
Instead of a max-
imum security prison
out west, he was moved
to a minimum security
prison in Florida.
In Florida he served
the remainder of his
time in prison until he
was granted an early
release by the judge
who first sentenced him
to prison for civil
disobedience at Fort
Bragg.
Talking to Patrick
O'Neill now it is evi-
dent that his experience
in prison has not
weakened his resolve,
but, instead, he has
made him feel that
prisons are just another
aspect of society that
need1- drastic improve-
ment
WELCOME
BACK, STUDENTS!
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t






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lgist. ws:
OPEN TONIGHT &
FRIDAY NIGHT UNTIL
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DISCOUNT COUPONS FROM
OVER 30 OF GREENVILLE'S
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$1,00
FREE!
Mc DONALDS
OVERTONS
CHEBERFORBES
TREE HOUSE
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ART & CAMERA
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BLUE MOON CAFE
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f
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!





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26, 1982
Review Of 1981 Schedule Shows Impact
Of Top Twenty Teams on Pirate Year
The ECU football team finished
the 1981 season with a record of 5-6,
and a look back shows that the
Pirates came up against some tough
opponents during the year. The
schedule included three teams �
North Carolina, Miami (Florida)
and West Virginia � that ended up
in the AP top-20 poll.
Sept. 5
Carolina 6
ECU 42, Western
In front of 24,873 fans, the
Pirates opened the season at home
with an impressive win over Western
Carolina, their seventh victory in a
row over the Catamounts. While
holding WCU to a pair of field
goal. ECU rolled up 499 total yards
and a season-high 25 first downs.
Quarterback Carlton Nelson ac-
counted for 229 yards and two
touchdowns. Cornerback Gerald
U-v tied the ECU single-game in-
terception record with three.
Vann and a two-yard plunge by
fullback Roy Wiley set up the
game's first score with 5:44 left in
the opening quarter. The two teams
went into halftime tied 10-10, but
the Wolfpack scored on three
unanswered touchdowns, including
a 64-yard punt return for a
touchdown in the fourth quarter.
Earnest Byner led the ECU backs
with 74 yards rushing.
Sept. 26 � ECU 28, Toledo 24
With Harold Blue scoring twice in
the first quarter, and with Carlton
Nelson and Kevin Ingram adding
touchdowns in the second quarter.
ECU had a seemingly comfortable
lead at the half 28-7. But Toledo
came back strong in the second half,
and a stubborn Pirate defense held
on for the win. ECU finished the
game with 348 yards rushing, as
Harold Blue led the way with 99
vards.
both Pirate touchdowns in the
fourth quarter with a 24-yard in-
terception return and a 26-yard
return of a field goal attempt block-
ed bv cornerback Gerald Sykes.
Carlton Nelson threw one
touchdown to tightend Norwood
Vann and ran 29 yards for the other
score after the two turnovers. The
Pirates also got a 43-yard field goal
from Chuck Bushbeck in the first
quarter.
Oct.
31
17 � ECU 35, SW Louisiana
sept. 12
0
North Carolina 56. ECU Oct. 3 � Duke 24. ECU 14
In the season opener for North
Carolina, the Tar Heels showed
everyone in the country how power-
ful they were going to be that year.
All-America runningback Kelvin
Brvant rushed for 211 yards and six
touchdowns as the Pirates were shut
out tor the first time in 110 games.
Jod Schulz showed his All-
America credentials as he led the
Pirates with eleven unassisted
tackles.
sep 19 � N.C. State 31. ECU 10
A 43-yard reception by Norwood
Duke used a balanced attack to
roll up 465 total yards as the BIik
Devils defeated the Pirates in
Durham. A three-yard TD run from
Harold Blue and a 14-yard scoring
scamper from Carlton Nelson
helped pull ECU to within the final
margin in the fourth quarter.
Quarterback Ron Sally accounted
for two touchdowns and kicker
Scott McKmney added three field
goals for the Blue Devils. ECU
senior linebacker Glenn Morris
recorded a career-high 21 tackles.
Oct. 10 � ECU 17. Richmond 13
Defensive end Jody Schulz set up
ECU travelled to Lafayette, Loui-
siana and came away with a hard-
fought victory over the Rajin Ca-
juns. The Pirates used a 77-yard
punt return from freshman Jimmy
Walden and a 27-yard run by
Harold Blue in the fourth quarter to
nail down the win. Leon Lawson led
the Pirates with 120 of their 358
total yards rushing.
Oct. 24 � Miami (Florida) 31, ECU
6
The Pirate players and fans were
looking forward to hosting the
nationally-ranked Hurricanes in
Eicklen Stadium. But the Pirates
could only muster two Chuck
Bushbeck field goals against power-
ful Miami, one of which was an
ECU record 49-yarder in the second
quarter. ECU's Tootie Robbins and
Jody Schulz gained national
recognition as they went up against
one of the toughest interior line
teams in the country.
Oct. 31 � West Virginia 20, ECU 3
The Mountaineers, who finished
the season ranked seventeenth in the
country and Peach Bowl cham-
pions, were led by their All-America
quarterback Oliver Luck. The
Pirates were able to outrush the
Mountaineers 208 to 157, but
Luck's 257 yards passing was the
difference. ECU got its only score
with a 23-yard field goal by Chuck
Bushbeck in the first quarter.
Nov. 7 � ECU 66, East Tennessee
State 23
In a game filled with individual
superlatives, ECU ran up its highest
point total since 1959. Nine dif-
ferent Pirates scored and Chuck
Bushbeck set a school record with 9
of 9 PATs. Included in the romp
was a 93-yard kickoff return by Jim-
my Walden in the fourth quarter.
Kevin Ingram had the longest run
from scrimmage of the year when he
ran for a 46-yard touchdown in the
third quarter. Leon Lawson, Harold
Blue, Mike Davis, Ricky Nichols,
Milt Corsey, and Marvin Cobb all
scored for the Pirates.
N0V 4 William and Mary 31,
ECU 21
The Pirates were denied a winning
season with an upset by William and
Mary in the final game.The main
enforcer was quarterback Chris
Garrity, who threw for four
touchdowns and 399 yards, while
CALL FOR
APPOINTMENT
756-9371
WGOODfYEARI
TIRE CENTEI
Wtt End Shopping C�nt�r Opwi � to � DaHy. Set 'M1
completing 34 of 44 passes. Garri-
ty's performance overshadowed a
333-yard rushing game by the
Pirates. ECU got two rushing
touchdowns from Leon Lawson and
one from Harold Blue.
Local and
Out of Town
Newspapers
Full line of Magazines,
Paperbacks & Greeting Cards
Central Book
&News
Greenville Sq. Shopping Ctr.
Open 7 days a Week
9:30-9:30
756-7177
Former Pro Star Pleads Guilty
To Charges Of Selling Cocaine
Classifieds
NEW ORLEANS
PD former Saints
running back Mike
Strachan pleaded guilty
Wednesday to selling
ica rtc to NFL rushing
eadei George Rogers
� New Orleans and
running back Chuck
Muncie of San Diego.
In exchange for his
guilty pleas for conspir-
ing to distribute co-
caine and selling the
drug, the government
dropped an additional
10 distribution charges
against Strachan.
Strachan, 29, was
released on bond pen-
ding a presentence in-
vestigation. He faced a
maximum 20 years in
prison, S35,000 in fines
and special minimum
3-year parole.
Strachan initially-
pleaded innocent to 11
counts of cocaine
distribution and one
charge of conspiracy.
During the hearing,
federal prosecutors told
U.S. District Judge
Veronica Wicker
Strachan sold cocaine
to Muncie, Rogers and
New Orleans defensive
end Frank Warren.
"Are you pleading
guilty becaus you are,
in fact, guilty of these
crimes " Wicker asked.
"Yes, your honor
replied Strachan,
whose wife, Loretta;
son, Michael Jr 5; and
daughter, Michelle, 3,
watched the pro-
ceedings.
Strachan told the
judge he did not agree
with each cocaine deal
the government said it
could prove if the case
went to court.
However, his attorneys
declined to detail the
objections in open
court, saying the ex-
planation would be
"fodder for the press
"1 pleaded guilty to
what 1 had to plead
guilty to Strachan
said outside the cour-
troom. "I don't aeree
with everything that
was said, but 1 agreed
to plead guilty
Strachan admitted
selling cocaine to Mun-
cie, a former New
Orleans player, on at
least four occasions
from Feb. 4, 1980, to
April 7, 1982. Pro-
secutors said he also
sold the drug three
times to Rogers, in-
cluding twice on the
day after games, and
dealt 1 gram of cocaine
to Warren Jan. 4, 1982.
Government at-
torneys said that, had
the case gone to trial,
those players would
have been among
several Saints to testify
they bought cocaine
from Strachan.
A federal investiga-
tion of drug use by-
Saints players was con-
tinuing, said U.S. At-
torney John Volz, and
prosecutors will inter-
view former New
Orleans player Don
Reese about his claims
of extensive drug use by
team members.
"There were some
Saints players purchas-
ing cocaine apparently
for their own use said
Robert Bryden of the
Drug Enforcement Ad-
ministration. "There is
no indication that co-
caine was resold, but
that's what our in-
vestigation is focusing
on at this point
Strachan, who
Bryden said was not
considered a major co-
caine dealer, admitted
drug use was a problem
among football
players, but said it was
no worse than in other
professions.
"I think it's a pro-
Mem all over he said.
"The NFL is just
another part of life,
just another business.
Cocaine is a problem
with everbody
Strachan, who left
the Saints last year and
went into real estate,
said some information
in his case did not come
out in court. He would
not elaborate on that
claim.
"1 figure when the
whole case is revealed,
the truth will be told
he said. "There's a lot
that didn't come out in
court today
Joselyn Bruno, a
former business partner
of Strachan, was con-
victed earlier this year
of cocaine distribution
and sentenced to 3
years in prison.
FAMOUS
PIZZA
321 E. 10th St. Across from ECU
FOR SALE
USED MATTRESS Si? call
748 466S
FOR SALE JVC JAS 77 Stereo
Amp 45 watts pc ISO or best offer
757 0449
SMALL REFRIGERATOR
758 7488
FOR SALE Nikon Lens 13Smm
AIF28 Very Good Cond JUS 00
call 5 00 to 7 30. 758 1744
1975 VEGA Hatchback, good con
dition. encellent mileage. iiOO
754 78�� or 752171. e�t 274.
SMALL REFRIGERATOR tor
sale, exc cond S. can 7 58 5903
ROOMMATE
TWO ROOMMATES needed
i bedroom house 2 blocks from
Campus $75 month call Bun Chad
wick 752 4941 309 E 13th St
ROOMMATE Needed tor nicely
furnished apartment, can 758 3894
tor more into
ROOMMATE wanted tor
partially turmshed apt at Strat
lord Arms Call 745 4906
WANTED
WANTED Bass player with
vocals tor working part time rock
band 7S 4972.
�SEE WHAT Mary Kay
Cosmetics can do for you " For a
free skin care demonstration, call
Terry Harrison at 754 7384
I
!
We welcome back ECU Students
with our 2nd A nnual
H e Love ECU Students' Party
to be held Tuesday, August 31st
from 4:00 p.m. until
MISC.
ROOMMATE NEEDED Female
to share nice, fully furnished apt
responsible person. Please call
758 4984 or 524 5339 and keep try
mg Rent only $112 SO a month plus
half utilities Ask for Cindy.
AUDITIONS FOR A new play
Need two females and one male
Come to Greenville Museum ot
Art Aug 31 at 7 p m or call
7S7-1378
TOGA TOGA TOGA ask a Pi
Kapp
25 Kegs & A D J.
Outdoors for only 99C
30 Discount on
all food served inside.
I
EZ
,aJWJJJJJJiJJJiirJJJJJJJJJ,JfJJJJ"JJJiJJWll,iJiJa,J
J
Rick's Guitar Shop
announces
Stock Liquidation Sale!
August 23rd to Sept. 30th
East
Carolina's
Party
Center
Tues Crazy Tuesday
Wed Pony Nite
Thurs College Nite
Fri "End of Week Party
Sat "Best in Dance Music
Sun "Ladies'Nite"
758-4591 417 Cotanche St. (Downtown)


T

i





12 1 HE EAST CAROl IN1AN AUGUST 26. 1982
YOUR ONE-STOP SHOPPING
HEADQUARTERS
2 BLOCKS
FROM ECU
211JARVISST.
Supermarket, Inc
CORNER
3rd AND
JARVIS ST
OVERTON'S SUPERMARKET, Inc.
OVERTON'S COMPETITION SKIS
WORLD'S LARGEST WATER SKI DEALER
UNIVERSITY ECONO WASH
(See Ad Pg. News-3)
. but �e ����,ike W
Kllcv now, "Ul
xv ecome Students. T oor time to �e" "ou Thir0 and Jar�s
e (e� mi��ws of ' ,pd at the corner ot ,lWe.
take a B "L-tfa located ai -town Green
lons we Pie nQ simmicWs,
stamps0 &a aVtrohome
yOUn�one' �
no earner "� �
lamps, "oft uv from home.
soumone. 'home aW ir first
to make Overton s o n
c .ii line oi pa1? overton c
VSehavealn8 shoppi�6 at �
. mote and mo" Pe�P
Come see M more
day-
Sincerely yours.
Supermarket, nc
Overton s Sop
PD�Sn'UorRettobr.ngtne
coupon to receive
,our 10 �isc
ounl
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"ff

Leo Jenkins,
Art Center
Jarvis
Han

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Uj
Summit
Jarvis
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Heavy Western Beef
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T-Bone Steaks
lb.
Fresh Whole
Maola
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49
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FULL LINE OF PARTY
SUPPLIES&KEGS
CHECK OUR DISCOUNT
PRICES ON OVER 300
HEALTH & BEAUTY
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98
Del Monte
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4 lbs.
wcto�c
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FREE m
PRESENT THIS COUPON
FOR A FREE 2 LITER
COCA-COLA WITH
A $10.00 GROCERY PURCHASE
LIMIT ONE COCA-COLA PER CUSTOMER.
ECU 10 DISCOUNT
ON ALL FOOD ORDERS
OVER $10.00
PRESENT COUPON
TO CASHIER FOR 10
DISCOUNT ON GROCERIES
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I.D. Number.
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?
. .
i





THl EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
M GUS1 2. IW2 I'aae 1
Blues Bros.
As Neighbors'
This Weekend
This 1 ndav and Saturdav night at
s. 7 and 9 p.m the Student Union
films Committee will present its
first film of fall semester,
eighbors, an eerie.
"end-of-t he-road" corned) starring
old S regulars Pan Aykroyd and
the late John Belushi.
I he film will be shown in
Mendenhall Student Center's Hen-
drix rheatre and admission is free
tor students with current ID and Ac-
tivity Card, lor faculty and staff.
MSC Membership will do the trick.
In what was to be his final motion
picture, Belushi plas perhaps his
most atypical role (with the possible
exception of Ernie Souchak in Con-
tinental Divide), an upper-middle-
class, bespectacled, suburbanite.
whose only form of wild entertain-
ment comes from eating Chinese
food
Almost as if right out of the pages
of one of Saturday Sight I ive's
lesser scripts, or perhaps even a
comic version o an episode from
Ihe Twilight one, eighhors
presents a new side to an old
Belushi
His life is Sisiiess, dull, drab, bor-
ing, routine and altogether unex-
citing That is. until the appearance
one Dan kykroyd, the il-
istriouos Captain Vic, who not on-
ly makes Italian food while listening
to the Doors, but who stands guard
-net "the end of the road " with a
shotgun in a nearby tower.
When Captain Vic and his volup-
tious, if not undersexed, wife,
Ramona. (both of w horn come from
God knows where) appear on the
scene, blue-suits Belushi is thrown
for the proverbial loop. Eerily, yet
somehow comically, their clashing
personalities blend.
The film came out in late 1981
and received mixed reviews �
radically mixed reviews � nation-
wide.
Unlike his first movies, where
Belushi played to-hell-with-the-rest-
of-the-world character roles (i.e
Animal House. 1941. etc.), his later
motion picture characters were
somewhat more shy, somewhat
more like the average Joe.
Following his tragic death in
March, his wife told reporters in-
terested in knowing what the "real"
John Belushi was like that her hus-
band was actually a very quiet,
reserved man, quite unlike his movie
characters.
It somehow seems ironic, then,
that his movie roles took such a
radical move to the right late in his
acting career.
However, in Neighbors, even the
comedy team seems to make a
switch in individual roles, Belushi
appearing the more intellectual of
the two. and Aykroyd appearing as
nothing but a monstrosity � in
looks, in actions and in antics.
The ECU Summer Theatre cast of Crease takes a bow. Auditions for next production of the play will he held tonight.
Auditions For Fall Semester Production Of 'Grease' Being Held
Auditions for singers and dancers for the East Carolina Play house
production o the musical comedy Crease are set for Thursday and Fri-
day, Aug. 2b and 27, at 7:30 p.m. in ECU's McGinnis Theatre.
Crease, which enjoyed a successful Summer Theatre run in July, will
be produced with an even larger cast by the ECU Plavhouse in late
September and early October
Crease holds the title ot "longest running" show in Broadway
history and satirizes the 1950s rock'n'roll era. It includes 15 musical
numbers and parts for 25 singers and dancers.
Auditioning singers should come prepared to sing a song o their own
choice that shows the voice to best advantage. An accompanist will be
provided. No acapella singing will he permitted.
Dancers should bring rehearsal clothes and shoes and will be given
steps and combinations bv the choreographer
Crease is slated to receive a lull main-stage production with orchestra
Sept. 29 and 30 and Oct. 1, 2. 4 and 5.
Further information about the production is available from the FCC
Department of Drama and Speech, telephone 757-6390.
Dentist-Eating Plant Gives Broadway Horrors
Bv Cl ENNECURRIE
! PI I irlv rts hdiior
Ni H)Kk 11 I'D � Even if you didn't freak out
ver Rogerorman's low-budget horror movie spoof
ittle Shop of Horrors, you should die laughing at the
mus :al tage vei sion.
It's tiniest and best staged shows around.
Little Shop oj Horrors moved July 2"1 from Off Off
Broadway's W PA Theater to a commercial run at the
Off Broadwayhrpheum Theater and has been packing
hem in ever since. Unless the producers move it to
Broadway - which would be a pity, though it would in-
crease their profit margin considerably � it'll be around
a long, long time at the Orpheum in the East Village.
The show is set in a New York Skid Row florist's after
a klutzy assistant, Seymour, finds an unknown fl-trap
plant which can survive only on human blood. He tries
to assuage it by pricking his finger, but as it grows it
needs something more substantial, demanding "FEED
ME in a basso profundo. He accommodatingly feeds
it � first a sadistic dentist, then his adoptive father.
The fantastic plant, which Seymour names Audrey II
after his girlfriend, magically brings a torrent o
business to the florist's, which even is asked to supply
all the tlowers for the Rose Bowl!
Seymour is acclaimed by the media and becomes a TV
personality. But when the plant swallows Audrey,
Seymour dives after her with a cleaver and is never seen
again.
Clippings from Audrey II are sent all over the nation,
and as the plants grow they begin to consume the entire
population. At play's end, Audrey II is as big as the
stage, and is moving out over the footlights into the au-
dience as its tendrils fall from the theater ceiling.
The music by Alan Menken is neat, unclutterd early
rock � a bit over-miked in the Orpheum � and the
lvrics bv Howard Ashman are the wittiest on or off
Broadway at the moment.
Ashman also wrote the book and directed I ittle Shop
of Horrors, and the staging is a triumph of imagination
and stagecraft. Audrey II starts off in a small pot, then
gradually gets larger and larger until at the end she"
fills the whole stage, with blooms containing the faces
of her victims.
Audrey 11 not only has a gaping, tooth-filled mouth
which can talk � and sing � but she moves and dances.
The various sized puppets of Audrey 11 were designed
and manipulated by Martin P. Robinson, with the voice
of Ron Taylor. The cast is fine, but none seems more
live than Audrey II.
'End Of An Era'
Music Industry Bottoming-Out
Established Pianist Serkin Coming To Hendrix
Critically acclaimed concert pianist Peter Serkin will be performing in Mendenhall Student Center's Hen-
drix Theatre on March 24 at 8 p.m. The program is being sponsored by the MSC Artists Series which also
boasts the Tokyo String Quartet (October 4), duo Bolcom and Morris (October 21), flutist Julius Baker
(November 15), The Gregg Smith Singers (January 17) and chamber group Orpheus (February 7). For
season ticket information call the Central Ticket Office, MSC at 757-6611 (extension 266).
By ROBERT PALMER
Sew irk Iimr Sew Nervier
NEW YORK � The worst summer in recent pop-
music history is drawing to a close, and some insiders in
the music business are saying that it appears to be the
end of an era.
CBS Records announced recently that it was discharg-
ing 300 employees � 15 percent of its professional staff
� including several vice presidents, and reducing its
original branch offices from 20 to 10.
Robert Altsehuler, the company's vice president of
press and public affairs, attributed the dismissals and
branch reorganization to "current and projected market
conditions
Another insider in the record business said that there
had been "an almost complete lack of business, a real
bottoming-out The CBS action is the latest and most
severe cutback in a wave that has swept the entire music
industry. The trend is expected to continue at other
companies.
Ironically, many of rock's top artists and critics
believe that artistically the music is stronger and fresher
than it has been in a long time. A number of established
artists have just made their best albums in years, and the
big-city rock-club circuit has been launching a succes-
sion of new bands. But these bands have been spec-
tacularly unsuccessful in attracting audiences.
Ever since the beginning of the 1970s, when pop
music surpassed motion pictures s America's biggest-
grossing entertainment medium, summer has meant big
outdoor concerts, big cross-country tours by rock's
most popular bands and a full schedule at such rock
concert halls as the Asbury Park (N. J.) Convention Hall
and the Palladium in New York.
The biggest groups used to time their album releases
to the beginning of summer vacation, hoping to come
up with one of those magical hits that blasts from every
radio and sells like hotcakes from June to September.
As soon as those summer albums hit the stores, the
groups would hit the road, where the immense seating
capacity of outdoor stadiums and summer rock festivals
virtually guaranteed that they would "clean up
But those days are over. "Of 14 shows at the Asbury
Park Convention Hall this summer, only four made
money said John Scher, New Jersey's major rock
concert promoter. "Five years ago, we would have call-
ed it a bad summer if we's had three or four un-
profitable shows. We also used to put on two or three
big outdoor shows every year in Giants Stadium; now
we're doing one or two of those shows every one or two
Music
years.
"The only groups that can fill a Giants Stadium now
are a small handful of very, very big acts � The Rolling
Stones, The Who and Bruce Springsteen
"It's the 1980s, and the cream is definitely off the top
of the business said Irving Azoff, manager of some of
rock's biggest stars. Back in the 70s, five of Azoff s
clients. The Eagles, sold 15 million copies of their Hotel
California album and broke attendance records across
the country. Azoff also manages members of Fleetwood
Mac, whose Rumours album almost matched The
Eagles' sales.
Now the Eagles have disbanded, and the band's
members are pursuing solo careers, with varying degrees
of success. Fleetwood Mac has another No. 1 album.
Mirage, but sales are in such a slump that it is unlikely
to achieve more than a fraction of the sales of Rumours.
While the group is going on the road this month, it will
not be raking in the money at stadium concerts and out-
door festivals.
"Fleetwood Mac only had offers to do two outdoor
show s in the whole country Azoff said. "One was in a
town that doesn't have a large indoor arena; the other
was the Us Festival, which is scheduled to take place
Labor Day weekend in San Bernardino County in
California and is going to be the summer's only really
big festival. There's a very good reason why groups like
Fleetwood Mac aren't doing more stadium shows � the
kids aren't buying tickets
"The kids" are not buying records, either. As recent-
ly as the mid70s, the record industry was still enjoying
the phenomenal growth that had carried it through the
previous 15 years, when record sales doubled six times.
Income from sales last year came to $3.6 billion, but the
handwriting was on the wall; the industry shipped 55
million fewer albums and singles than in 1980.
Performance on the best-seller charts no longer
means huge sales. CBS undertook its cutback even
though 24 of its albums are in the top 100.
See TAPING, Page 4
f
t
l





I HI EAST( AKOl IM N
l �. ,1 S I 26, IS�K2
A n Epic Tale Of Unrest In China
New Novel 'Jade' Follows Life Of Missionary's Daughter
B I nited Press
international
Jade. b Pal Barr
(St. Martin's Press.
$16.95)
One of the most in-
teresting novels about
China in the late 19th
and early 20th centuries
is Jade, by Pat Barr.
The novel follows the
life of Alice Green-
wood, daughter o a
British missionary who
is killed in Tientsin in
18-0. This is a period
of great unrest in
China, a time when
growing numbers of
Europeans and
Americans arrived and
aroused Chinese resent-
ment.
The Chinese � ho
killed Alice's father
kidnapped Alice and
her brother, Frank.
The children are kept
for ears with the Chu
famils in Hunan Pro-
vince. Prank becomes a
groom and Alice a
maid and companion,
then a mistress. It is the
(tins who name her
Jade.
The children's lives
are relatively pleasant.
The become tluent in
Chinese and live as
Chinese. Alice becomes
pregnant, however, and
escapes � promising to
return for Frank.
She suffers a miscar-
riage but reaches Hong
Kong and is reunited
with her mother, who
has remarried; her un-
cle, Robert, and elder
brother. William. A
reluctant Frank is
rescued and they go to
Shanghai.
After an unhappy
period with her mother
and stepfather, Alice
goes to stay with her
brother William and his
wife, Isabel, in Port
Arthur. There she
begins an affair with
I in Fu-wei, a Western-
educated revolu-
tionary.
This affair, suffering
numerous breakups, is
symbolic of Alice's
problems. Part of her is
Chinese, but the disap-
proving society she
lives in sees her only as
British. She is sym-
pathetic to Lin's cause,
his country and his
ways but must live with
a people who think of a
BOYD'S
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Mel H. Boyd, Jr.
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biodii
land she has never seen.
Alice also is a strong-
willed person, more
suited to today's
women's rights move-
ment than the Victorian
era. When she does
marry an Englishman,
Charles Grant, she
wants to be part of his
business life as well as
his home life. She
translates into Chinese
a manuscript about
women's rights and
upsets her husband
greatly. Charles dies
while on a trip with a
woman more befitting
the image of the times.
The novel then takes
the reader through the
Smo-Japanese war and
its massacres, and the
siege of Peking.
Throughout, Alice's af-
fair with Lin Fu-wei
continues as does her
struggle to reconcile her
Chinese and European
selves, and her struggle
against the disapproval
of her peers.
I in dies in exile after
an attempt to over-
throw the Manchus
tails Alice's hurt is
See NOVEL, Page 5
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and
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Sisters
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with purchase of any meal
Expires Sept. 30, 1982
FREE DRINK with any meal
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Two current locations to serve you better!
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Current movies (PG) � Sat. 7-9 p.m.
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Wednesday
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Open daily 11 a.ml 1 p.m.
Corner - 10th & Charles
758-6121





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Orig. 7.99. Junior dorm shirts in
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?
t





f
i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26, 1982
Taping Thwarts Industry
THE MSC THEATRE ARTS SERIES
offers an entire season of drama 8, dance at discounts to season ticket buyers
Tickets are $12 for ECU students, $15 for anyone 14 years of a or underand J4
for ECU faculty and staff or general public. Pick yours up at the Central Tickei� ut
fice in.AAendenhall Student Center or call 757 6611, extens.on 266. Do it toaay.
Continued From Page 1
The popular-music
industry has singled out
several villains to blame
for its ills. The record
industry's No. 1 villain
is home taping � the
youngster with a
cassette recorder who
tapes a friend's album
or tapes the album's
best songs off the radio
rather than buy the
album.
Record-industry
leaders are lobbying for
national legislation that
would require
manufacturers and im-
porters of blank casset-
tes and cassette
recorders to pay
royalties to the record
companies and artists
who are ostensibly los-
ing income because of
taping.
Another likely villain
is the sweeping
popularity of video
games.
"I go down to the
Asburv Park board-
walk now and see all
these kids putting $5 or
$10 worth of quarters
into a video game
Scher said. "There are
hundreds of those
games along the board-
walks now, and there's
no doubt in my mind
that an awful lot of
kids who would have
spent that money on
records or concert
tickets a couple of years
ago are now spending it
on the game arcades.
"Add to that the un-
precedented number of
popular youth-oriented
movies that are show-
ing this summer, and it
adds up to a lot of com-
petition for pop
music
Then there is radio.
CBS, Warner Brothers
and the other major
record companies have
not been falling over
one another to record
and promote fresh
young performers who
might capture the im-
agination of record
buyers and help reverse
the slump. The new
groups that do manage
to win recording con-
tracts get little play.
Album-oriented rock
stations (called AOR)
have become conser-
vative, resistant to new
sounds and new faces.
In recent months,
some of the leading
AOR stations �
WMET-FM in
Chicago, WCOZ-FM
in Boston and WLLZ-
FM in Detroit � have
seen their audience-
popularity ratings tum-
ble by as much as two-
thirds. These and most
other AOR stations
maintain limited lists of
what records disc
jockeys are allowed to
play, and in many cases
the contents of the play
lists are determined by
programming con-
sultants.
Even Lee Abrams,
the most successful
consultant � his
Superstars format is
heard on 80 AOR sta-
tions � concedes that
the standardization has
gotten out of hand.
"Consultants have
taken away the spon-
taneity and magic of
AOR he said.
(Abrams developed the
nations first AOR for-
mat at Raleigh, N.Cs
WQDR-FM in 1972.)
Rock critics think
many of the fans who
seem bored with the
latest superstar product
would take to the music
of the younger per-
' formers if the fans were
exposed to it. But AOR
stations do not play the
new material, and only
record stores that sell
imports and indepen-
dent releases to a
relatively small au-
dience stock it.
Sj 512 E. Mtm Street
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113 Grande Ave
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Gandalr's
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Come in and check out our
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unique items.
Open 10a.m9p.m MonSat
756-7235
SB c j SB
ST JAMES UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
UNIVERSITY STUDENT PICK-UP SCHEDULE
Students who wish to attend Sunday morning worship ser
vices, but do no' have a ride, may attend the worship service
at Si James United Methodist Church by observing the
following schedule The Chureh van wili be used to transport
students to anc from 'he Church.
ID 1(j Methodei Student Center
10 12 Garrett Resident Hall
10' 15 Jarvis Resident Hall
10.17 Fleming Resident Hall
10:20 Cotton Resident Hall
10 25 White Resident Hall
10 30 Tyler Resident Hall
10 40 St James United Methodist Church
Coffee and doughnuts will be served in the fellowship hall, for
University students, from 10:30 a.m. until 1100 a.m.
Students will be returned to the dorms following 'he conclu
sion of the morning worship service
i
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All Tennis Balls$2.50 per can of 3
Large Box of Goff GlovesOnly $5.00 each
PGA Vardon Cup & First Flight Sand Wedges & CO OR
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All Golf Hats, Caps & Visors for Summer12
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513 COTANCHE ST. ACROSS FROM U.B.E.





Novel Explores Heroism
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26.19S2
Continued From Page 2
assuaged only when she
discovers that a friend
and lover. James
Cialbraith, whom she
met in the Peking siege,
can accept all parts of
her life.
Jade is a long and in-
volved novel. It is,
however, fascinating
for its historical detail,
its deep portrayal of
Alice, and the issues it
deals with. Despite its
length and sometimes
stilted dialogue � par-
ticularly when one par
ty is Chinese � Jade is
enthralling from begin-
ning to end.
� Jill Lai (i PI)
Martin's Hundred,
b Ivor Noel Hume
(Knopf, $17.95)
Ivor Noel Hume has
directed the ar-
chaeological research
program at Colonial
Williamsburg since
W57. This book is his
account of the
discovery of Martin's
Hundred, a plantation
town established near
Jamestown in 1619 and
ravaged during an In-
dian massacre on
March 22, 1622.
Hume and his crew
discovered Martin's
Hundred through
serendipity. In 1970
Hume was directing an
excavation on the
James River in con-
junction with the
restoration of Carter's
Grove, an 18th century
plantation near
Williamsburg, Va
when he stumbled into
the wrong century.
In 1618, the ship Gift
of God, belonging to
the Martin's Hundred
Society, left England
carrying 220 settlers to
populate a 20,000-acre
tract, 100 acres for each
share purchased by the
London investors.
Upon their arrival,
the new Virginians
began to build
themselves an ad-
ministrative center to
be named
Wolstenholme Towne,
after the society's most
prominent shareholder.
Sir John
Woistt . lme.
The Indian uprising
of 1622 destroyed
everything in the town
except two houses and
"a piece of a church
and reduced Martin's
Hundred from about
140 to around 62 who
may have temporarily
abandoned the planta-
tion and sought shelter
at Jamestown.
Since the remains of
Jamestown (established
in 1607) have never
been found. the
discovery and excava-
tion of Martin's Hun-
dred provides
historians with the
strongest evidence of
what life was like in
Colonial Virginia.
The book, illustrated
with 147 photographs
and diagrams, is must
reading for archeologv
and history buffs.
� Stan Darden (UP!)
Marshall: A Hero
For Our Times,
b Leonard Mosley
(Hearst Books. $18.95)
George Catlett Mar-
shall probably should
have been fired as Ar-
my chief of staff
because of the inep-
titude displayed by the
U.S. military high com-
mand when Japan all
but destroyed the na-
tion's Pacific fleet in
the Dec. 7, 1941, attack
on Pearl Harbor.
But, journalist
Leonard Mosley
observes in Marshall: A
Hero For Our Times
that President
Roosevelt simply
couldn't fire everybody
because of the fiasco.
And according to the
author in this
biography of the
soldier-statesman, U
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was a good thing for
America that he didn't.
Marshall (1880-1959)
experienced a
childhood marked by
jealousy of his older
brother, whom their
father favored. The
younger Marshall
displayed none of the
brilliance that was to
mark his career as
chairman of the joint
chiefs of staff during
World War II and later
as secretary of state and
defense. Marshall final-
ly became serious about
his life, according to
the author, when his
older brother told him
he would never make it
through Virginia
Military Institute.
Following his
graduation from VM1,
Marshall got a commis-
sion in the Army and
served under General
Pershing in World War
1. His hard work and
friendship with Per-
shing eventually landed
him in the top spot of
the U.S. Army, chief of
staff.
Mosley captures the
man believed by many
in the post-war years as
one of the greatest
Americans who ever
lived.
� Jim Lewis (UPI)
�fvX NEW
O 0USED
Vr �v 321 Evans St
301 Evans St. Mall In the Minges Building
752-5476
INTRODUCING OUR
All you can eat
BUFFET from 5-9 p.m.
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AND
BOOKS
Mall 752 3333
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1000's of
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Buffet will include:
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A





1 AKOI IMAN
M GUST 26, 1982
PIGGLY WIGGLY GREENVILLE h 264 Bus
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NOW OPEN FOR YOUR SHOPPING
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i






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
AUGUST 26. 19K2
Page 7
Coach Cathy Andruzzi: Academics Come First
- '
B CINDY PI EASANTS
"sports tdilor
Head basketball coach Cathy An-
druzzi is different than a lot of
coaches, and it's not because of her
coaching methods.
Andruzzi is a firm believer in the
importance oi having a credible
education True, most coaches
want their players to put academics
tirst. But Andruzzi is continually
emphasizing how essential academic
success is and makes sure her
players are doing their best.
"I control my program like a
Catholic school she said. Andruz-
zi. who attended a Catholic school
white growing up. said her father
cae the nuns a stick and said,
"You see this? If she gets out of
line, be sure to straighten her out
Although Andruzzi doesn't give out
sticks to the teachers, she does tell
them to contact her if any of the
players are not performing up to
their potential. "They (teachers)
know how 1 am personally she
said.
Two players that will be returning
this season have already
demonstrated their desire to do well
in the classroom. Two seniors,
Mary Denkler and Fran Hooks,
both obtained a 3.0 grade point
average during last season. And
just like in previous years, the
players will attend a study hall
everyday for two hours before at-
tending practice.
With five freshman recruits join-
ing this year's team, Andruzzi will
especially be concerned with the
plavers' first academic year here at
ECU.
"We want them to take their first
year and concentrate on academic
work she said. "1 don't believe in
that dumb jock syndrome
Andruzzi said she knows how dif-
ficult their schedules will be, and
this is one area where she does have
patience. "You live in a dorm,
clean up and have practice three
times a day she said. "We feel
they need to take things step by
step
Being good students is one of the
first credentials listed on Andruzzi's
recruiting list. "We look to see if
our prospects are college material
she said. "We want the type of
recruits that can handle things both
academically and athletically
And what about this year's
newest additions? "They have pro-
ven that they are academically
responsible she said, " as well as
being good athletes
"We feel they have a great deal of
potential and the type of experience
we want
Known for her recuiting talents,
Andruzzi landed three high school
all-Americas�Bridget Jenkins,
Svhia Bragg and Lisa Squirewell.
Powerful center Rita Simmons of
Miami Central High School and
Eunice Hargett, an honor student
from West Haven High School will
also be on the Lady Pirates squad
this season. Hargett was an "A"
student and a class leader while
making all-conference in basketball
four times.
How did Andruzzi obtain such
outstanding players? Her answer
was very clear. "We worked our
asses off she said, "We knew the
kind of athlete we wanted and work-
ed very hard to get each one An-
druzzi said her assistant, Beth
Burns, as well as others in the com-
munity helped in making the
recuiting year so successful.
As athletes, Andruzzi said the
plavers will fit in perfectly with the
ladv Pirates' style of play. "We like
to plav a fast-break defense she
said, "one that displays overall hus-
tle
While Andruzzi characterizes this
year's squad as being the youngest
team she's ever coached, she said
how good they will become will be
determined on how quickly the
freshman players catch on.
Andruzzi said there will be dif-
ferences from last year's team, and
there is one difference she would
particularly like to see. "This year,
I hope we have 12 players instead of
eight she said. And with 18 away
games scheduled, Andruzzi would
feel a little more relieved if she had a
few substitutes in case of injuries.
The lady Bucs' schedule includes
some of the toughest teams in the
country. In the Lady Pirate Classic,
for instance, Cheyney State, Detroit
and Clemson will be ECU's guests
Andruzzi said most teams that host
their own tourneys usually try to in-
vite teams that will not be too com-
petitive, but that wasn't her idea at
all. "Our main goals is to bring the
best in basketball to Greenville
Andruzzi said she has a tough
time scheduling because ECU does
not belong in a conference. "There
are very few independent schools, so
we have to spend time scheduling
against people that are not very
close by
The head coach also had to go
outside of the state more this year
because the ACC teams would not
include the Lady Pirates on their
schedules. "I think it hurts
women's basketball Andruzzi
said, "but they're not the only
teams around And Andruzzi
definitely found some schools
around. The lady Pirates will be
playing such teams as Old Domi-
nion, Notre Dame and South
Carolina.
Meanwhile, Andruzzi will begin
pre-season practices on Monday
after study hall, of course. But then
it's all basketball after that.
"Athletics is a business she said.
"When they have signed a contract,
they have a job todo. But you have
to have some humanity
After last year's success story,
Andruzzi is anxious to begin the '82
season. The '81 team brought a
great deal of enthusiasm to Minges
Coliseum, but Andruzzi feels this
team has just as much to offer as its
predecessors did. "We want to get
more students out there, and there's
no reason why we can't fill that
place (Minges) she said. "We
have a good product that's exciting
to watch.
Andruzzi added that no program
is successful without backing.
"We're an extension of ECU she
said. "When we're successful, ECU
is successful
According to Andruzzi, the fans
attributed to the team's 17-10
season and have always had a large
impact on the lady Pirates. "When
we walk out and see a big crowd and
people cheering and waving their
arms, it makes us feel great she
said.
Coach Andruzzi is working hard
to make the ECU basketball team
one of the most respected clubs in
the country and wants to put East
Carolina on the map. "When they
think of ECU she said, "We want
the lady Pirates basketball team to
be one of the things they think of
Andruzzi knows that the lights
and cameras will soon begin to roll,
but the glitter and excitement will
probably be gone for many of the
players after a four-year span.
That's when she wants her players
to be ready and able to say: "When
I leave ECU, I'm ready to challenge
the world because I have confidence
in m vse 1 f. "
McGuigan Travels Statewide To Bnn
Home An All-Star Trackster Line-Up
B CINDY PLEASANTS
sport t'dttor
"All the work paid off That's
what ECU track coach Pat
McGuigan had to say after
recruiting 14 of the best track and
field stars in the country.
McGuigan travelled all over
North Carolina this summer to
watch her recruiting prospects par-
ticipate in various meets. "I went to
almost every high school track meet
in the state she said. "I consider
myself an expert on track and field
in the state of North Carolina she
said with a smile.
McGuigan described her young
team as being the best group of girls
she has ever coached. "They're do-
ing things I've never had athletes
do she said. McGuigan explained
that she could never get last year's
team to run up the hill on 14th street
to get back to their dorms, so she
was a little surprised when she saw
this year's runners already running
up the hill on their own. "These
girls are dedicated and track-
minded she said. "I think some
of these girls will make national
rankings
Two girls from last year's team
will be returning. Two walk-ons,
ECU tracksters at starting block
Davena Cherry and Liz Graham,
were outstanding runners during the
81 season. Cherry had the best
season of any track member, tying a
school record in the 100-meter dash
and making the finals in every meet
she competed in.
As far as achieved ac-
complishments go for the incoming
recruits, the list is phenomenal. For
instance, McGuigan's top recuit,
Delphine Mabry, is the first girl in
the state of North Carolina to run
under five minutes in the 1600-meter
run. She is a second-time state
champion in the 800-meter event
and placed second in the 800-meter
race twice. In the long jump, Mabry
finished fourth.
"This girl has strong potential
she said. "I think she can definitely
make it to the '84 Olympics
McGuigan coached a runner who at-
tended the 1980 Olympics and
believes this recruit has shown more
potential than her earlier candidate.
Regina Kent is a New York City
champion, holding records in the
100-and 200-meter events during her
junior year. She finished third in
the 100-meter race in New York Ci-
ty. In 1982, Kent participated in the
Colgate Women's games, a national
track and field meet, in Madison
Square Garden. She was the winner
of the 55-meter race.
? Robin Cremedy, a Winston-
Salem native, placed second in the
state in the 100-meter race, and was
a member of the 440-relay team that
was first in the state and set a state
record. At the junior Olympics,
Cremedy finished second in the na-
tion in the 440-relay team. She was
an outstanding hurdler and placed
third in the 200-meter event at the
state meet.
Jamie Cathcart, another
Winston-Salem resident, was also a
member of the same 440-relay team.
As a junior, she placed fourth in the
800-meter race. At the Nebraska
Junior Olympics, she placed second
in the nation with the mile-relay
team and another second finish in
the 800-meter event.
Tricia Fowler, who is from Spr-
ingfield, Va was a finalist in the
state in the 800-meter race and was a
member of the state-qualifying mile-
relay team.
High point native Kathy Leeper
anchored the 800-meter relay and
finished second in the state in high
school meet. She finished first in
1981 in the same relay, which holds
the state record. On the 1600-meter
relay team, Leeper anchored the
team that finished first and holds
the state record for the 1982 year.
She was an all-conference runner in
the 440 200- and long jump events.
Cremedy will anchor this year's
mile-relay team.
Carolyn Carr, another Virginia
native, was a state finalist in the in-
door 60-meter and 4 by one-lap
relay. She also qualified in indoor
state championships in the 400- and
880-meter relays in the state. She
could not participate, however,
because of injuries.
Renee Felder, a Fayetteville resi-
dent, was second in the district
meet, third in the 800 and fourth in
region in the 1600.
Amy Bowden from Pennacle,
N.C was an all-district finisher in
the shotput and all-conference in the
discus-throw. She was also an
honor student.
Salisbury native Teresa Hudson
was the most valuable player on her
high school team. She finished
fourth in the 100-meter race in the
conference meet, second in the
200-meter and ran anchor-leg in the
440-meter and 800-meter relays.
Elaine Perry from Suffolk, Va
was a 100-meter hurdler and a state
qualifier. She will compete in the
400-meter hurdles.
With all the talent coming in,
McGuigan also thought she should
"beef" the schedule up a bit. The
lady Pirates will be participating in
two national meets this year�the
prestigious Penn relays and the
Eastman Kodak Invitational. The
Bucs will also compete against such
teams as Chapel Hill and Virginia
Tech.
McGuigan believes the girls will
be right up there with the best of the
tracksters and also thinks the na-
tional exposure will be good for the
team and ECU. According to
McGuigan, both of the meets will
more than likely be televised.
"When you see a girl with an ECU
jersey on the screen she said,
"that will be enough. I don't think
1 need to say anymore about that
McGuigan has high hopes for the
upcoming season and has already
set some goals. "I want to set all
new school records in every event,
and I want to run relays this year
she said. "I also would like to
qualify for the nationals in both the
indoor and outdoor events
Can McGuigan's star-studded
?earn obtain such goals? McGuigan
thinks so. "They know what they
want and what they have to do to
get it she said. "Many are state-
champions and they know what has
to be done she said. "This is just
another step up from high school
Cathv Andruzzi in coaching action
Harrison Stresses Hard
Work and Participation
By KEN BOITON
Assistant �spori tditor
With four starters gone from last
year's men's basketball team, new
head coach Charlie Harrison will
have his work cut out for him this
season. But Harrison is looking for-
ward to the opportunity.
"Hard work breeds success he
said. "When we play a game, the
opposing team will say we were well-
prepared and fun to watch
This season's schedule opens at
Duke on November 27. and includes
road trips to N.C. State and UNC-
Charlotte.
Harrison's straightforward
character will have an effect on the
play of this year's team. "I would
like my team to be a product of m
personality � aggressive and com-
peting Harrison stated
The Pirates will play an aggressn e
type of game this season, both oi
fensively and defensively. Harrison
feels that this type of game is better
I for the players and the fans.
Student-body support is one or
Harrison's concerns, as he feels that
the students are missing out on a
good thing. "People can really hae
a good time at a basketball game if
they will come out he said. "I
hope students will take pride in our
program and have identity with the
team
Harrison's main goal for the
season is twofold. "I want our
players to be on a disciplined or
een keel academically and to put a
team on the floor that will play as
hard as within their God-given
abilities
Hard work will be the keynote for
this year's team. Hard work won't
be expected from the players, it will
be demanded. According to Har-
rison, "Hard work goes with an
athletic scholarship. There are a lot
of people in this state with the abili-
ty that would love the opportuni-
ty
Harrison is concerned with the
negative image that students get
when comparing the ECU basket-
ball program with some of the ACC
schools in the area. "I will respect
the ACC, but their image is their
own business he said. "All 1 want
is what's good for ECU
Starting Monday, the players will
begin a very strenuous conditioning
program with the help of strength
coach Mike Gentry. The first day of
practice is scheduled for October 15.
Anyone interested in trying out as
a walk-on should contact the
basketball office before September
3.
OPPONENT
Duke
CHRISTOPHER NEW PORT
Samford
N.C. State
Bavou Classic
NEW HAMPSHIRE
George Mason
Virginia Tech
JAMES MADISON
Campbell
WILLIAM AND MARY
Richmond
BAPTIST
SOUTH CAROLINA
CAMPBELL
UNC-Wilmington
Navy
UNC-Charlotte
GEORGE MASON
William and Mary
Baptist
RICHMOND
NAVY
James Madison
UNC-WILMINGTON
PENN STATE BEHREND
SKETBA1L DATESCHEDULE LOCATION
No. 27Durham, N.C.
Dec. 1HOME
Dec. 4Birmingham, Ala.
Dec. 8Raleigh. N.C.
Dec. 17Lafayette, La.
Dec. 28HOME
Dec. 30Fairfax, Va.
Jan. 4Blacksburg. Va.
Jan. 8HOME
Jan. 10Favetteville, N.C.
Jan. 12HOME
Jan. 15Richmond
Jan. 17HOME
Jan. 19HOME
Jan. 22HOME
Jan. 24Wilmington, N.C.
Jan. 29Annapolis, Md.
Jan. 31Charlotte, N.C.
Feb. 5HOME
Feb. 9Williamsburg, Va.
Feb. 12Charleston, S.C.
Feb. 16HOME
Feb. 19HOME
Feb. 23Harrisonburg, Va.
Feb. 26HOME
Mar. 3HOME
1
?
f
T





The East Carolina University varsity
cheerleaders attended a National
t heerleaders Association's clinic at the
University of Tennessee and won several
awards.
The NCA staff trained and evaluated ap-
proximately 1,100 cheerleaders from 107
colleges and universities from across the
nation.
Of the three required competitive perfor-
mances, the ECU Pirate squad received one
outstanding and two superlative ratings.
Thev were also awarded a "spirit stick
designating spirit leadership.
The East Carolina cheerleaders attending
were: head cheerleader Kim Blevins, Cindy
Batson. Jennifer Cooper. Susan Dunn,
Patu Harrel, and Renee Meyers.
The male cheerleaders were Keith
Dubois, Brian Foye, Chuck King, Scott
Perry and Roslyn Singleton.
The squad was accompanied by their ad-
visors, Frank and Jo Saunders.
Photo By G�ry P�ntr�on
WELCOME
BACKTO
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Discount on any
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r





rHE EAST CAROLINIAN MJGUST 26 1982
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Pizza Transit Authority, lnc.@
when it comes to pizza, PTA comes to you.
Now at ECU

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FREE DELIVERY
anywhere in our
service zone.
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Collect
the cut slice
in the PTA logo
from the top of any
12 PTA boxes and we'll deliver
your favorite 12-inch one
topping pizza, fast and free! Or.
collect the 12 slices and save $5
on any pizza of your choice.
Start collecting today!
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10
THE EAST CAROL INI AN
AUGUST 26. 1982
Pirates To Conduct
Mini-Clinics In Area
GREENVILLE, NC
� Members of the 1982
East Carolina Universi-
ty football team and
varsity cheerleaders will
be touring eastern
North Carolina Univer-
sity over the next three
weeks with visits to
various shopping malls.
The players will con-
duct mini-clinics for
youngsters, while the
cheerleaders will have
mini-clinics for the
young girls. Those at-
tending are welcomed
to seek autographs and
bring cameras for pic-
tures.
The first 500
youngsters in atten-
dance will receive free
commemorative color
posters for East
Carolina's 50th year of
football. The poster
features all-America
candidate Jody Schulz,
the 1982 schedule and
various memorabilia of
ECU football since
1932.
Schedules, ticket in-
formation, a highlight
film and other exciting
items will be a part of
the visits the Pirates
will make.
This Friday, the
squads will be at the
Twin Rivers Mall in
New Bern. On Satur-
day, Aug. 28, they will
be at Greenville's
Carolina East Mall,
and the touring season
ends on Sept. 4, when
the team travels to
Morehead City Plaza in
Morehead City.
Pentd
$3.98 Sharp Automatic
Drafting Pencils
The Classic Automatic Drafting Pencils.
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Now Being Delivered!
Most delivery pizzas lack in
true quality and have 'hidden9
delivery costs in the price �
PIZZA INN has changed all that!
We sell our delivery
pizzas at Menu Prices!
No Surcharge. We also
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our large and giant
pizzas. TRY US TODAY!
CALL 758 6266 Greenville Blvd.
I


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of professional architects, designers, and draftsmen, as well
as general writing needs
� Four quality pencils with a variety of lead diameters (0 3mm.
0 5mm, 0.7mm, 0 9mm) to suit every need
� 4 0mm fixed sleeve for lead protection
� Quick-Click" Automatic Lead Advance feeds up to a dozen
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� Precision built, well-balanced barrel
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� Variety of colored barrels:
P203�Brown
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P209-Yellow
� Adjustable eraser
� Backed by Pentel's standards of unsurpassed quality
� Pentel products offer more value per retail dollar spent
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
Wright Building
Owned and operated by East Carolina University
THURSDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY
ALL NIKE SHOES DISCOUNTED
SAVE UP TO 25
SALE
MEN'S RUNNING PRICE
Sugg. Retail $2�95
DAYBREAK��?? ��
YANKEE - TANNAVY BLUE34? 26
INTREPIOP9S 25
DIABLO22.95. .1895
CARIB??�??. . . 2395
SALE
LADIES' RUNNING sugg R.t.ii price
34.95 $OJt95
YANKEE LADY - COBALT BLUEPOWDER BLACK. . O
LADY CARIB27 95 23
LADY OCEANIA - TEAL BLUEROYAL. .��. . . .1 8
SPIRIT29-95 24
22 95 1795
LADY DIABLO � � �
MEN'S BASKETBALL , ptl PRICE
1 T T Sugg. Retail SIX. 95
3-POINTER1?95 � &
24 95 2195
BRUIN CANVAS� � � Al
26 95 2295
BLAZER CANVAS (HI TOP)?� �
34 95 2995
DYNASTY LO � XX
39 95 3495
BRUIN LEATHER� � � � �"�
A3 95 3795
BLAZER LEATHER (HI TOP)� � � � '
TENNff price
Sugg Retail $1095
MEN'S ALL COURT24.95 I y
PLAYER32.95 2495
LADY ALL COURT2.495 1 995
RACOUETBALL pre
Sugg Retail eiifjge
KILLSHOT?? ,95 2895
LADY KILLSHOT32,95 2895
Free Nike T-Shirts to be
given away with each
purchase of shoes.
Our Nike sales represen-
tative will be here Friday
(Bond's) and Saturday
(Hodge's) to answer any
questions you may have.
SPORTING GOODS
Downtown 218 Arlington Blvd.
752-4156 756-6001
? '





Title
The East Carolinian, August 26, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 26, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.209
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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