The East Carolinian, July 21, 1982






Wat lEaat darulmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No.70
Wednesday, July 21, 1982
Greenville, N.C.
8 Pages
SGA To Award
Senior Scholarships
Sexual Assaults
Often Unreported
By SPENCER STEPHENS
Mill Wnitr
Congratulations rising seniors,
the class oi 1982 has a scholarship
for you.
At the request of senioi class
president Russell Overman, the Stu-
dent Government Association
(SGA) has approved $3,000 for an
interest bearing trust fund. The in-
terest from the fund, which should
accrue to at least S500 each year,
will be given th the rising senior(i.e
a student who has 96 credit hours oi
mores) who has at least a 2.5 grade
point average and demonstrates the
highest degree of financial need
Other, but less important criteria
are citizenship and leadership.
According to Overman, "I
figured that with all the Reagan
budget cuts we really needed
something like this. Also, to mv
knowledge, this is the first senioi
class gift that has been set up for
perpetual use Overman went on
to sa that due to the myriad ot
academic scholarships, he thought
this one should be given away main-
ly on the basis of need.
The scholarship fund has been set
up under the joint supervision ot
East Carolina's financial aid office
and business office.
The financial aid office has been
given the responsibilities of accep-
ting applications for the scholar-
ship, choosing recipients and
publicizing the scholarship. Ihe
business office has been fiiven the
responsibility of investing the
money so that it will draw at least
ten percent annual interest.
None of these responsibilities will
be put into effect, however, until the
SGA lives up to us responsibility by
providing the $5,000. Due to finan-
cial trouble, the SGA is having trou-
ble providing the money. And, ac-
cording to SGA treasurer Beckey
lallev, "the SGA was aware of its
financial troubles when it voted on
the scholarship, but we didn't
realize thai things were going to be
this severe
This realization is doubly serious
in light oi the relative sie of the
scholarship fund. The $5,(XX) is
nearly double the previous record
amount for a senior class gift of
$3,000 received by the class of 1977.
5 Will the size oi this year's gift be
cut? The option seems very possible
when one considers the $23,000
worth of red ink that the SGA is fac-
ing.
According to SGA president T ;c
Henderson, cuts are being con-
sidered, but a final decision may not
be made until the end of August
when campus organizations start
wanting their money
One option that is being con-
sidered is a fifty percent across-the-
board cut and subsequent reapplica-
tion for funds. Other options are
also being considered but, clearly,
not much is definite.
It the SGA waits until late August
to decide then course of action,
however, it is definite that the first
scholarship will not be given until
late in the tall ol 1983.
ByTAMIJ. HARKEY
Stefl nler
Some read it in the newspaper,
others hear about it on the television
and still others experience the
misfortune of it.
Rape is something that is getting
more headlines as the years go on.
Not only is it heard of much more
often, but the age ot it seems often
seems to be dropping and increas-
ing.
There have been cases of 70-year-
old women being raped and then
beaten to death, .lust last week's
paper had a storv of an attempted
rape on a 12-year-old girl.
Rapes don't always fit into its
commonly perceived character
sketch. Normally, the stereotype of
rapes have it happening to a girl bet-
ween IS and 2s. and usual!) to
"someone who was asking for it
but this isn't always the case.
So often it happens to someone
least expected, such as the older
ladies and young children. And
homosexuals are now included in
these acts.
Greenville has its share of rapes.
On June 22, an East Carolina stu-
dent and part time worker at the At-
tic was heading for her car at 2
o'clock that morning when a truck
slowed down beside her and a black
male grabbed her and carried her
out to the country where she was
sexuallv assualted.
I ater when the victim was driven
back into town and while the rapist
was driving at a slow speed, the vic-
tim jumped from the truck and
sought help from the police.
The number of rapes for Green-
ville according to Greenville Police
Department records shows that for
the year from June 1981 to June
1982 there were nine reported rapes
and attempted rapes.
Out of the nine, close to half were
ECU students. Of these students,
most knew the rapist.
These numbers might not seem
too large, but these are only the
reported rapes. The Real C risis
Center, which handles all types ot
problems including suicide,
loneliness, depression or rapes, said
there have been a total of 38
unreported rapes in Greenville and
one third of these were ot I C I
students.
There are two degrees ol rape.
first degree is when rape is forced
using a weapon ol some sort or with
a child 12 years of age or younger. It
can result in life imprisonment.
Second degree is when rape is
forced on someone other than a
spouse and involves no serious bodi-
ly harm. It can lesult in up to 40
years in prison.
Chief Glenn Cannon of the
Greenville Police claims that most
rapes occur in late night to earl)
morning hours and, normally, when
a girl is walking alone.
His suggestion to help prevent
this crime is to nevei walk alone,
and he stiesses that it you go to
downtown clubs, leave direct I) aftei
they close because this is when most
ot the trouble occurs.
Walking Alone
Photo By SCOTT LARSON
Ihe practice of females walking unescorted on campus is frowned
upon b Greenvilleity and university police. They suggest a
companion during night-time excursions. C ampus securitv will
provide an escort.
Disarmament Proponents Angered
U.N. Talks Abandoned
&
r �w . � .v
First Street Caves In
Photo By SCOTT LARSON
Greenville utilitv crews are now fixing a hole in Eirst Street caused by last Tuesday's rain. The incident
necessitated closing the street between Hollv and Reade roads. Over three inches were reported in the area.
Greenville Courted By Nazis
By JOHN VVEY1 ER
Miff Writer
Editor's note: This art nit' is the
last installment oj a series examin-
ing fascist groups and their activities
in the United States, North Carolina
and Greenville.
Greenville is mentioned twice in
the spring 1981 issue of the National
Socialist (Nazi) Mobiliet. One
notice states that 700 mobilizers,
plus various other materials have
been distributed in Greenville. The
other mention of this town is in a
classified ad placed by Greenville
resident Richard F. Becker, pro-
moting his book ot Nai
philosophy. In Dejense oj Liberty.
Becker, an East Carolina
graduate student, said in an inter-
view conducted last spring that he
tries to "speak out when I have the
freedom to do so. 1 find it difficult
to speak out, say on a campus where
you have so many liberal viewpoints
and a hodge-podge of people who
are going to be violently opposed to
what you have to say
Becker has indeed found difficul-
ty spreading his viewpoints on the
ECU campus. In 1978, before he
was a student here, Becker was pick-
ed up by campus security for
distributing copies of his book,
Communist Brainwashing Techni-
ques Used in N.C, a forerunner ot
In Dejense oj liberty.
When asked if he has distributed
copies of his books or other far right
wing material at ECU since 1978,
Becker was unclear.
1 here were unconfirmed reports
last spring that fascist literature was
seen on campus, and that some
students' cars had rascist slickers
put on them. When asked if he had
any knowledge of this activity,
Becker refused comment.
Chief Francis Edding of campus
security points out that Becker did
not get in trouble with them for
passing out Nazi literature, but
because of campus rules banning
any unauthorized materials.
Edding says that distribution of
facsist material in this area is very
rare and believes that no radial right
groups exist locally. "I don't think
there's any organization operating
like this anywhere around here. If
there were any of these movements
on campus or in Greenville thai was
that he knows of no nais ever being
active in Greenville, and he hasn't
noticed any Ku Klux Klan
movements since the late sixties or
early seventies.
Becker says there are no active far
right organizations or members in
Greenville, but there are "quite a
few sympathizers here. You have
people who sit on the sidelines and
cheer them on but who don't want
to actively become involve. I'm sure
you've got sympathizers right here
on campus and in the community,
too
Becker says he no longer shares
some of the beliefs of the National
Socialist Party of America, the Na-
tional States Rights Party or any
other similar outfit, and is no longer
a member of any of them. He says
he broke his ties with these groups
because they are disorganized and
ineffective.
Norman Olshansky of the Anti-
Defamation Eeague of B'nai B'rith,
Bv PATRICK O'NEILL
Muff Wnltr
With the hopes for a comprehen-
sive disarmament plan seemingly in
question, the adjournment ol the
United Nations Second Special Ses
sion Devoted to Disarmament left
feelings o anger, doubt and dispair
among many oi the delegates in Ihe
157-ni ember U.N. General
Assemble).
Many blamed the high level ol
East-Wesi tension, the world's
preoccupation with the Falkland
crisis and the Middle last fighting
for the ineffectiveness of the second
session oi the international
organization devoted to world
peace.
"Washington prefers to continue
to escalate the arms race said
Soviet ambassador Oleg Troyanov-
skv. "The United States is proud of
its record on disarmament
declared Edwin Feuler, Jr an
American U.N. representative, who
chose to attack the Soviets verbally
for their military aggressiveness in
other parts of the world.
Swedish undersecretary oi state,
Inga Thorsson expressed the
frustration felt be many of the
delegates when she said it was
'�regrettable that most of the
leading powers and especially the
superpowers, again have not shown
themselves prepared to make use of
the United Nations as an instrument
for genuine disarmament efforts
" This is a tact which the over-
whelming majorit) of countries
deplore todav added rhorsson
who was head ot her country's
delegation,
powers vv i
Ihe leading military
hemselves deplore it
tomorrow she concluded.
A month ago the moods oi the
participants and oi the citizens of
main nations appeared optimistic.
On June 12. 50.(MM) people had
converged on New York City from
all parts of the globe to show their
support lor the United Nations
gathering.
North Carolina's delegation at
the "Protest and Survive" rally
numbered around 5(H). The mood of
the group upon return was buoyant
and excitedl) optimistic. The peace
rally was the largest o its kind ever
held.
A contingent oi Easi Carolina
students and (acuity, along with
other Greenville residents joined
together in car and van pools to
make the weekend trip.
Among the local group were four
� Dr. Carroll Webber, East
Carolina faculty member, Edith
Webber, Helsinki's Ylva I indholm
and hei husband nucrobiologist
Martin Romanschuk � who made
ihe 600-mile trek by bicycle, taking
eight days.
Dr. Webber also coordinated a
local task force which began two
mouths before the U.N. session to
explore and studv its history and
propects. This preparatorv group
had worked weekly on various pro-
jects, including transporation and
housing arrangements in New York
City and enroute.
"The test for success or failure of
the U.N. special session was said to
be whether agreement on the pro-
posed Comprehensive Program on
Disarmament was or was not reach-
ed said Dr. Webber. "It was not
reached, but 1 think this gives addi-
tional grounds for a different kind
of hope continued Webber.
He explained that, "the world's
governments met. Their peoples' at-
tention was focussed on the meeting
and great moral support was given.
The governments failed in full view.
The hope is that this failure makes
plain to many more of us that or-
dinary intergovernmental channels
are not adequate or that present
foreign policy makers are not com-
petent to permit the working out of
a disarmament scheme which is
needed desperately by all.
Despite such optimism, Assemblv
President, Ismat T. Kitani of Iraq
told the final meeting that "we must
admit the session has not been a suc-
cess
He cited mistrust, conflict, a
growing sense of insecurity and
resort to force as the prevailing
reasons for the "sad state of the
world in which we live
See PUBLIC, Page 3
Finding Quarters Troubles Students
doing this, I think we would know agrees with Becker's evaluation of
about it
Captain J.A. Briley of the Green-
ville Police Department, when ques-
tioned whether any fascist groups or
individuals operate in town, said
that there are "probably some
around, but we haven't heard any
instances of it
Captain Alexander Whitaker says
these groups. Despite such dramatic
incidents as the 1979 Greensboro
shoot-out between black com-
munists and K.K.K. Nazi members,
such instances are rare.
Most of these organizations have
few members, almost no money and
little influence, he says.
See, RADICAL, Page 3
By JEAN E. MILLS
sinfl Wrilrr
Locating suitable housing is an
ever growing problem for all Green-
ville area residents and especially
East Carolina Unversity students.
According to the 1980 Census-
Advanced Report of housing status,
"the housing vacancy rate is a vital
factor in the consideration of hous-
ing needs, particularly in the deter-
mination of the need for new con-
struction housing
A housing vacancy rate of five
percent or less is considered critical.
The Greenville vacancy rate has
averaged from 1.5 percent to 2.5 per-
cent for standard units.
There are 13,335 total housing
units in the city of Greenville,
11,450 total standard units, 1,885
substandard units; 1,638 substan-
dard units capable of economic
renovation, 247 substandard units
beyond enonomkal repair and 293
vacant standard units.
However, according to the census
report, the majority of these vacant
standard units "are in the high rent
category or are single family dwell-
ing units for sale far above the
economic capability of low and
moderate income families. The re-
maining units require rehabilitation,
which is difficult to achieve on the
private market due to the current
high interest rates
A student should begin his or her
search for off-campus housing at
the Off-Campus Housing Officed
located at 211 Wichard Building.
They have such material available
as the recently published brochure
entitled, OJJ-Campus Housing at
East Carolina; a listing of apart-
ments and complexes in and around
Greenville (which include such in-
formation as the number of units,
rent per month, lease, number of
bedroom, etc); a periodic listing of
persons looking for roommates,
rooms for rent in private homes,
apartments to share, apartments to
sublet, houses to share, mobile
homes to sale, rent and share, and a
book called The ECU Survival Kit.
The survival kit includes informa-
tion on the types of off-campus
housing in Greenville along with in-
formation on the good neighbor
policy, leases, security deposits and
other items to aid in living off-
campus.
According to Mrs. Lucy Wright
at the Off-Campus Housing Office,
the survival kit as well as the other
material available in her office
could save students a lot of time in
their search for off-campus hous-
ing.
��. ifHn Hnf' l
t
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 21. 1982
Announcements
CLASSIFIED ADS
ou may use the form at right or
use a separate sheet of paper it
oo need more lines I tiere are 33
units per line Each letter, punc
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit Capitalize and
hyphenate woros properly Leave
space at end ot line if word
doesn't tit No ads will be ac
cepted over tne phone Wf
reserve the right to reject any ad
All ads must be prepaid, t iKk
c pi-r ime hi traction oi ,i hot
Please print legibh' I c capital jiM
lowei �a"c If11ers
Kflurn to THt rAMAMN.IWAN
office n 3:00 Tutsdax blor�-
Wrdnfsdat publications.
Name
Address.
CityState.
No hnes
.Zip,
Phone.
ai 75� pci line $.
No. insertion
. enclose J
I -
H
n
l 1
� �y.
I
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available tor
I below the advertised price in each A&P Store except as specifically
in this ad
iale at o�
noted J
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT. JULY 24 AT A&P IN GREENVILLE, NC
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
GREAT CANOE RACE
The Dppartment pi Intramural
Hi nal Services 'S sponsor
io Ihe ' Second Summer GreaT
Race on tne rrngnty Tar
Rivei T "s exciting even I will oe
T'njrsaav Jolv 22 at 6 00
p m Canoes lite iacKets ana pad
ales win be lurnisned Additional
� r ma'i on come by 204
, Gym or call 7S7 6387
APPLY NOW
Students wnc intend to apply 10
��naiOr .n Social Work or Correc
'ne Fan ot 1982 snould re
quest an application and an ap
� � tor an interview trom
tne Department Office 312 Carol
- Allied Heaito Build'og'
� call Mrs
. � - 757 696! Ex! 218
Deadline tor fall applications
S'jdents are en
led ' apply during sun"t �
GRADUATES
- � � ' p � x up your cap
� ; �� �� ' " � s'uden Suppi.
� � � � caving s "
I � � k - . � � � .a ire yours
- . II � qi aduat'on
i :�� paid For those
� � Masters Degree tne
tee pavs I � pour cap a"0 gown
ri extra fee ot SI! 25
SPORTS EDITOR
WANTED
Tne Department of intramural
Recreational Services is lookng
for an Editor tor the Intramural
Newspaper TENNIS SHOE TID
BITS Experience in wri' g
layout ana design reoupo Con
tad Nance Mire 204 Memorial
Gym call 757 6387
PSI CHI
Are you interested in self
actualization. educational
psycnology intellectual develope
ment sexual behavior or
statistical mterpetation" Come to
the Psi Ctii Lbrary Book Sale Held
spe qnt 202 Books pried from
05 to 85 PS: Chi ttWOHHI in a
bonus guiet atmosphere for stu
�. vg � 'nfortabie coucn to
relax in Hours Irom 8 10 1 Come
6 � Sale to understand
� mart beftav � and be a better
pers i � '
OFF CAMPUS
HOUSING
It you will be needing a room
mat or would like to find and
share an apartment tor Fall, con
'act the Off Campus Housing Of
lice, 21) Wiictiard Building
757 688! before June 14 Orienta
lion WD begin at thai time and
many students will be seeking ac
commodations We need your
listing
CATHOLIC NEWMAN
CENTER
The Catholic Newman Center
would like to invite everyone to
join in with us for celebrating
Mass every Sunday in the Bioli gy
Lecture Hall starting at 12 30 and
5 00 every Wednsday at the
Catholic Newman Center Dinner
and good friendship follows Mass
every Wednsday, so come out and
bring a friend
Classifieds
Professional TV PING service ex
perience quality work IBMSelec
trie typewriter Call Lanie Shive.
758 5301 or Gail Joyner, 756 106:
TYPING Term thesis resumes,
dissertations etc Professional
quality at lowest rates Call Kern
pie Dunn anytime 752 6733
TYPING TERM PAPERS ALL
SIZES Proofreading offered
Dependable typist Call Mary.
355 2460
FOR SALE 76 Sutuki GT500 good
condition S5S0 Can 752 1714
SALE Man s bike with basket,
desk clarinet space heater call
after 5 00 p m Anytime weekend
752 2601
ROOMMATE WANTED lurn Apt
104 B Woodlawn S80 Deposit 183
Rent one third utilities Call
752 2420
1978 Buick Regal LTD Power
steering power brakes AM FM
6 track, velvet interior white with
vinyl top New transmission, pne
ed to sell Call 752 3996
HORSE SHOW Aug at 11 a m at
Fmney s Plata hwy 101,
Havelock N C Everyone
welcome to come and watch Peo
pie who wish to enter, bring
horses None will be for sale at the
show Entry lee S2 Sponsored by
Town and Country 4 H Saddle
Club
CARICATURES by Weyler Have
a full color. 8 by 10 cartoon por
trait done of yourself or a loved
one A unique gift idea Call
752 5775
ROOMS FOR RENT West Sth
Street Single. Si 25 00. double
580 00 utilities included, call
756 6336
NEED A PAPER TYPED l�M A
HURRY? Call Mary at 355 2460 for
quick, dependable service Pro
ofreading offered Will be glad to
type papers ot all sues Inexpen
sive but professional
NEED PROFESSIONAL Typist
for your term paper, thesis,
manuscript, etc & Call Susan
Byers - 758 5488 or 758 8241
COLLEGE REP WANTED to
distribute "Student Rate subscrip-
tion cards at this campus Good in
come, no selling involved For in
formation and application write
to: Allen Lowrance. Director, 251
Glenwood Drive Mooresville. NC
28115
FOR SALE desk and chair going
cheap m good condition 757 3107
FOR SALE A new mattress with
i bedroom set Call 758 5697.
I
I he lastarolinian
en � esday ano
� ig the academic
� .� �. Wi dnesday ou'
IS! Carolin,an .s the of
ewspaper ol East
univers t, owned
and published tor and
idents of East Carolina
Subscription Rate $20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus ol ECU,
Greenville, N C
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carolinian
Old South Bu'k: n . � Veen
vide. NC 27834
Telephone 757 6366. 6367 6309
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 16
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
5185 00 Pregnancy Test, airth
Control. and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling For fur
ther information call 832 0535
(Toll Free Number
800 221 25681 between 9 AM
and 5 P M Weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
917 West Morgan St
Raleigh, NC.
A
� -6 f 4-0 oe
P" .0�
� &
4 ,p
�p� r c .xc kh j v.
r,
$j
rs.6
o
�f
�e ��fc
'
&.
,c
- S1
PERSONAL CARE
ATTENDANTS
Applications are needed trom
those interested in becoming Per
so nal Care Attendants to
wheelchair students We are par
i.rularly interested in anyone �rfi
ans a background of assisting m
dividuals whith their activities ot
da'iy living For futher details
contact Office of Handicapped
Student Set vices. 212 Wichard
Building 757 6799
THURSl JULY 22
with 50 cents
H.H. till 10.30
Pizza Iqii
Greenville's Best Pizzas Are
Now Being Delivered!
Most delivery pizzas lack in
true quality and have 'hidden'
ckliver)' costs in the price
PIZZA INN has changed all flint
V sell our deliverv
pizzas ;� ienu Prices!
No Sure �. � also
give FREE P uilli
our lai .iul iaiit
pizzas. TRY US TODAY!
i
tf
CALL 758 6266
GRthNVILLt BLVD
y
"A VOYAGE OP TOTAL LUGANCE "
npfm clippbz arm TomtAW women
CCmhlZlM Of CEMCEQ
� MW� UlfflVlIS r�? QVMM&
. A CQMPl&E VARIETY OF MIP3TS
&!? &LDPW6 AW PERMAht&tT WAVtA6
� TUCCRiGiK'AL SOPywRAP. CivcugQ, QM&! )
CALL FT? W JWDWXaT :
1005-A tfAMtL-KW ST.
ITALIAN NITE
LASAGNA
AND
SPAGHETTI
EVERY WEDS.
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT with .11 you
Plus Garlic Bread COQ can eat SOuP
2 and sad
$3.99
FRIDAY ONLY
ALL YOU CAN EAT?
FLOUNDER DINNER
INCIUCHES FRENCH FRIES. COLE SLAW. TARTAR
SAUCE A HUSHPUPPIES
SH0NEY&
703 Greeivllk Blvd.
Greenville Square Shopping Center
GremiMe, NC
ANHEUSER BUSCH
P&Q BRAND
Natural Light sandwich
Beer ISIiced White
049
16oz.
cans
1
nil
:
en
I
264 By-Pass
Greenville, N.C.
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED FRESH
WIIQI8 Limjt 2 Bs'
Fryers
Please
lb.
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN
GRAIN FED BEEF
New York Strips
048
Whole or Half
Bone-In
Cut Free!
lb.
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN
GRAIN FED BEEF-FRESHLY
Ground Chuck
3 lbs or
V more
lb.
EXTRA LEAN SPECIAL TRIM
COUNTRY FARM
Pork Roast
89
Fresh
Picnic
lb.
BLUE RIDGE BRAND
Sliced Bacon
. 139
Pkq.
M
a Not This Not This Butthi
CALIFORNIA SWEET JUICY
is
23 Size 18 Size 15 Size
each
only
1
CALIFORNIA RED SEEDED
OR THOMPSON WHITE
Seedless Grapes Bing Cherries
1 �
lb.
WASHINGTON STATE SWEET JUICY
lb.
FROZEN
tef Orp
Ann Page Pizzas
Savings coca cola
� Pepperoni
�Sausage 10oz
Cheese �L�
MELLOW YELLOW
TAB
SPRITE y
2 Liter Bottle
i
i
ANN PAGE
Margarine
1 lb.
pkgs.
ASSORTED
i Dri Towels
bi
ro
I
SUPER SAVER COUPON
AP
A&P OR ANN PAGE GRADE "A" do2en M ffcf !
Large Eggs tHv
��.� 651 ,
LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON AND 7.50 ORDER
GOOD THRU SAT, JULY 24 AT A&P
SUPER SAVER COUPON )
A PURE VEGETABLE
APP
Wesson Oil
LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON AND 7.50 ORDER
GOOD THRU SAT, JULY 24 AT A&P
48 02.
bottle
-OT
SUPER SAVER COUPON
9
JIFFY�CHIC, TURKEY, MAC. & CHEESE
Pot Pies
1
LIMIT FIVE WITH COUPON ANO 7.50 ORDER
OOOD THRU SAT, JULY 24 AT A&P
?
t
'&�fm





THE FAST CAROI INIAN
JULY2J.1982�
I
i
i
i
I
M
i
i
I
I
I
1
i
i
i
i

i
i

Scientists Predicted Scarce
NEW YORK (UPI)
� Young scientists
may be scarce on the
American scene by the
year 2,000, and the
same for young
mathematicians.
Numerous studies
and experts point in
that direction. Not
enough scientists and
mathematicians, they
say, are in the college
and high school
pipelines right now.
The forecasters see
this as an ominous
trend for the United
States, coming at a time
when the nation and
the world are rocketing
into a technological
society. The experts say
that even to survive in
such a society, people
who don't make their
living at science or
mathematics will need
enough knowledge in
those fields to make in-
telligent decisions
about everyday life.
The National Society
tor Teachers of
Mathematics, the Na-
tional Academy of
Sciences and National
Science Teachers
Association are among
those signaling S.O.S.
over the crisis in science
and math.
The latest report is in
"Chemical ' Engineer-
ing News an
American Chemical
Society publication.
a pair of long-
brewing problems in
U.S. education recently
have achieved bona
fide crisis status the
report said. "One is
that the public, by most
objective measures, is
becoming increasingly
ignorant of things
mathematical, scien-
tific and technological.
"The other, related
to the first, is a current
and worsening shortage
of persons competent
and willing to teach
those subjects to
students in elementary
and secondary schools.
the two have
been lumped into one
official crisis � the
crisis in pre-college
education in science
and mathematics
At a National
Academy of Sciences
conference on the sub-
ject, Paul DeHart,
emeritus professor of
education, Stanford
Unviersity, California,
said:
Only 34 percent of
U.S. high school
graduates have finished
3 years of mathematics.
Of those, only 8 per-
cent have taken
calculus, which is
taught in only 31 per-
cent of the high
schools.
Fewer than 20 per-
cent of the graduates
have had 3 years of
science. Most seniors
have had a course in
biology and 37 percent
have had chemistry.
But only 19 percent
have had physics.
If you narrow the
study to only those
students in pre-college
courses, who comprise
about 40 percent of the
high school population,
the figures are only
somewhat higher.
DeHart said 55 percent
had had 3 or more
years of math; 41 per-
cent have had 3 or more
years of science.
Among the 60 per-
cent of high school
students who pursue
general or vocational
courses, only 20 per-
cent have had 3 years of
math and just about 10
percent have had 3
years of science.
There are other signs
pointing to a lessening
of the quality of science
and math education in
high schools. Mean
scores in math on the
Scholastic Achievement
Test (SAT) declined
from 502 in 1963 to 466
in 1980. The top score
on the test is 800, the
lowest possible, 200.
Another sign: the
proportion of students
scoring more than 700
points on the SAT
math test skidded 15
percent between 1967
and 1975. The propor-
tion scoring fewer than
300 increased 38 per-
cent .
Still another: na-
tional assessments of
science achievement �
made in 1969, 1972,
and 1976 and measur-
ing 9 13 and 17-year-
olds � showed conti-
nuing drops in achiev-
ment with the biggest
declines among
17-year-olds.
"Although there's
room for debate about
how much science-
math education is
enough or about how
good it should be,
there's hardly any argu-
ment that the science
and math sub-
structures of U.S.
elementary and secon-
dary education are
crumbling Ward
Worthy, of Chemical
Engineering News'
Chicago bureau, says.
More proof came
when Sarah E. Klein,
retiring president of the
National Science
Teachers Association,
put some facts before
the Science,
Mathematics and
Technology Subcom-
mittee of the National
Commission on Ex-
cellence in Education.
She said a 1981
survey of state science
supervisors showed a
critical shortage of
chemistry teachers in 10
states and a shortage in
27. For physics and
math teachers, the
situation was even
worse.
The survey Klein
cited was done by
Trevor G. Howe and
Jack A. Gerlovich of
the University of
Iowa's Science Educa-
tion center. It was bas-
ed on response from
science supervisors in
43 states.
High school prin-
cipals in another Na-
tional Science Teachers
Association survey said
more than half the new-
ly employed science
and math teachers,
measured against state
standards, were un-
qualified to teach their
subjects.
Radical Group Small
Public Pressure Alters
Reagan's Military Policy
Continued From Page 1
In the past two years, the issue ot
proliferation of nuclear weapons
has moved to the forefront on inter-
national issues.
in the United States, President
Ronald Reagan's previous "cold
war" attitude of military buildup
before negotiation, no longer
prevails. As a result of public
pressure, the United States has now
begun a series of bilateral talks with
the Soviet Union in Geneva.
Troyanovsky claimed that the
U.S. and its NATO allies came to
the special session "virtually empty
handed He in contrast, recounted
the pledge of no first use of nuclear
weapons, made by the Soviet Union
to resounding applause during the
special session.
Feulner, who is president of the-
Heritage Foundation, a conser-
vative "think tank" in Washington
D.C countered Irovanovskv 's
remarks by reminding the assembly
that Reagan had made a number of
disarmament proposals, including a
one-third reduction in nuclear
warheads on strategic missiles.
Continued From Page 1
Olshansky estimates
the number of active
radical right wingers in
N.C. to be no more
than a thousand. "The
average North Caroli-
nian does not support
either the groups or
what they stand for,
even those (citizens)
who have political lean-
ings on the far right
he says.
Despite these
organizations' inept-
ness, Olshansky still
feels that they should
be closely watched. The
Anti-Defamation
league and he ad-
vocate that the fascists
should be forced to
comply with the
strictest extent of the
law.
ECU professor Dr.
Bramy Resnik, a Nazi
concentration camp
survivor and member
of the N.C. Council of
the Holocaust, says
that "someone has to
be in authority to check
the spread of hate
literature. Even though
we have a democracy
and we have the right to
express oneself, there is
a limit to democracy
Becker, Olshansky,
Resnik and other
sources all agree on one
thing. That is, while
these groups are now
small and inefficient,
they could rise to pro-
minence under certain
conditions, principally
an extremely bad
economic forecast.
As Becker put it,
"When things get really
tough and they pro-
bably can do that, I
think, in the future,
you're going to see a lot
more of this type of
thing. The right wing
people are all going to
come crawling out of
the woodwork. And the
left wing too. And
there's going to be hell
to pay in the streets
Resnik believes the
best way to ward off
the possible dangers
posed by the extreme
right is through educa-
tion. "And I don't
mean just the three R's.
I mean educating peo
pie about atrocities
committed in various
parts of the world that
still go on, atrocities by
the Nazis, teaching of
the Holocaust, what
can happen to a people
who lose track of reali-
ty-
"1 think this is im-
portant, because the
Holocaust is a model of
not only what happen-
ed to the Jews,
remember that it can
happen to mankind. It
points out and un-
covers what man is
capable of committing
against his fellow
human being. It's in-
humanity to man
Every Thursday
COLLEGE N1TE
Women's Guide A dded To Collection
"They lived, worked
or traveled in places as
different as Crisp, N.C.
and China.
"They wrote novels,
fostered convert to
Christianty, ad-
ministered museums
and gevernmental agen-
cies, practiced politics,
taught in schools and
colleges, participated in
bookclubs and civic
groups, nursed the sick,
painted portraits,
helped managed
households and courted
chivalrous gentlemen
So begins the in-
troduction to a new
East Carolina Universi-
ty publication, A Guide
to Women's History
Resources in the East
Carolina Manuscipi
( ollection.
The 40-page indexed
guide outlines and gives
details about dozens of
oral histories, diaries,
correspondence and
other papers concern-
ing the lives of a variety
of women, many dating
from the 19th century.
Maurice York,
curator of the ECU
manuscript collection
and editor of the guide,
noted that the profes-
sional women
represented in the book
� writers, journalists,
nurses, teachers, ar-
tists, missionaries,
politicians and ad-
minstrators � are
generally connected in
some way with North
Carolina although they
"persued their careers
all over the globe
Their papers con-
stitute a valuable
resource for researcher
interested in women's
history he said.
Additional collec-
tions, especially those
of 19th century farming
or plantation families,
contain significant
items or groups of
paper that reflect the
activities of women or
others' attitude toward
them he added.
The guide cites
numerous collection of
papers regarding
women who became
Protestant missionaries
in distant places
China, Japan, the Con-
go, Rhodesia, Nigeria,
South Africe, Brazil
and Mexico�enduring
war, famine, and
political upheaval in
their chruches, schools,
refugee camps,
hospitals, orphanages
and leper colonies.
Letters written by
these women mis-
sionaries give
eyewitness descriptions
of events of the day.
Documents, tapes
and microfilm in the
ECU Manuscript Col-
lection are available to
students and other in-
terested in research
from primary sources.
In addition to the
women's history items.
the collection includes a
considerable number of
groups ot papers
relating to Ninth
Carolina history,
militai history and the
history of the tobacco
industry.
The collection open
each weekday from 8
a.m. until 5 p.m. is
located in the easi wing
of Joyner 1 ibrarv.
the best in
ROCK'N'ROLL
7r.7. pony bottles on
Special All Summer
Bring Your Quarters
I) r Opci AI 9pm
SAMMY'S
Country
Cooking
DAILY SPECIALS $1.99
LARGE PLATE � $3.75
with all ou can eat vegetables
REGULAR PLATES � $2.98
LUNCH & SUPPER
ll:00a.m8p.m. Mon-Sat
closed Sundays
PLUS TAX, TEA
Take Out
Orders Welcome
512 E. 14th St.
(2 blocks down from Belk dorm)
Tar Landing Seafood Restaurant
fTar Landing Seafood
Restaurant
M
v
Mk;
i
u
Airport Rotd
Greenville, Forth Cirolina
All You
Can Eat
Popcorn
Shrimp
$499
Special Good
Tuesday,
Wednesday
This Week
Bob Hearing � Manager
Crot$ Green Strict Br id�e
Take lett at lit Liaht
Located one block oown on lot
Phone 758-0327
FRIDAY NIGHT ONLY 11:30 PM
UNIVERSITY MALL � FREEFREEFREE
-�mM
f
i�
I





Stye taat (Earnliman
Serving the East Caroline campus community since 1925
Fielding Millek. w
MlKfc HUCiHLS, Hjwiumfiffr
WAVI RI V MfcRRHT. �� i,r niirtu ClNDY Pl.EASANTS, y t,wr
Robert Rucks, ���,�.� MUuWr Ernest Conner. r�sMt�,
Pllll I IP MANISS, (�,� ifcnftw STEVE BACHNER, ttummmmmt�
Chris Lichok, . ������ hmm� Mike Davis, NihmwMni�i
Julv 2 1 , 1912
Opinion
Page 4
SGA Budget
Accusation Not Solving Problems
Perhaps I'm naive, but I was
under the impression that
something as important as the pro-
posed SGA budget allocations for
1982-83 would receive a little more
attention than the usual nonchalant
legislative action. But apparently,
this is not the case.
It was recently discovered that the
SGA appropriated nearly $29,000
more than it has to offer for next
year. Unfortunately, their guise of
generosity will cause numerous pro-
blems for those campus organiza-
tions and projects which will now be
depending on money that doesn't
exist.
For a legislative body with
billions of dollars to work with,
$29,000 is next to nothing. But
when $29,000 represents nearly one-
third of the entire budget, it seems
that a bit more care should be taken
in the distribution and
mathematical operations concern-
ing those funds.
Naturally, the i4financial crisis"
has led to the usual passing-of-the-
buck among present and past SGA
executive councils. Eric Henderson
claims that Kirk Little (last year's
treasurer) failed to keep the SGA in-
formed on how much money was
available for appropriation. Little
denies the allegations, saying that
Henderson doesn't understand the
primary function of the SGA
treasurer.
And finally, perhaps, a bit of
honesty sparkles through the dark
cloud of accusation. This year's
treasurer, Becky Talley, says she
believes that the budget discrepancy
may have been an oversight on all
the legislators' parts. Now, that has
possibilities.
I wonder what makes it so dif-
ficult for our student "ieaders" to
admit even the most remote
possibility of being wrong? It just
doesn't make sense. Being honest
won't damage your prescious
political careers, fellas. Don't try so
hard to emulate the pros. It really
isn't worth it.
However, 1 must admit that as an
employee of The East Carolinian,
and especially as a student, I was
glad to hear (a few weeks ago) that
the financial crisis was made public.
At least that showed some character
on the parts of our SGA council
members.
And hopefully, this will set the
vogue for future relations between
the student government and the stu-
dent body, because there sure hasn't
been a whole lot of unrestrained
honesty in the past.
Admittedly, I don't know who is
at fault in the "budget crisis
Perhaps no single person is to
blame. But we here at The East
Carolinian just hope this year will
mark the beginning of a new trend.
After all, the students do have a
right to know.
M.H.
In The Name Of Religion?
Iran v. Iraq
It's interesting to look around
and see what's being done in the
name of religion these days.
Disgusting, yes; appalling, admit-
tedly; but still somehow interesting.
Take the resurgent war between
Iraq and Iran, for instance.
Granted, the original dispute bet-
ween the two Moslem nations was
over border disagreements. And
several high Iranian officials still
maintain that their aggression is in
hopes of creating a security belt
around the border. But the long-
standing haired between the two
countries, which has been spurred
on by religious differences, is at
least as much to blame as any other
factor. The killing and destruction
goes on in the name of religion.
In fact the Ayatollah Khomeini
has termed the recent invasion of
Iraq just one part of a "sacred mis-
sion of all things, a mission to
obliterate Hussein's regime and to
"liberate" Moslem holy lands all
the way to Jerusalem. Of all the
terms one has at his disposal for
describing killing and mutillation,
"sacred mission" seems an odd
choice.
And, of course, the Ayatollah's
use of the term "liberate" must also
be given some semblance of ex-
planation, because he obviously at-
taches some "foreign" meaning to
the word.
What Khomeini intends to do, in
other words, is to attempt to impose
his violent fundamentalist Moslem
revolution on whomever he pleases.
And it doesn't look good.
But if nothing else, the resurgent
battling in the Arab region typefies
and exemplifies the inherent futility
of war. Both sides are suffering
outrageous losses � both in men
and machinery � and both sides
claim daily victories, which leads
the rest of the world to believe that
the fighting is at a virtual stalemate.
� � �
The United States has not, as yet,
taken a side in the war and has vow-
ed to stay out of the conflict if
possible. Let's hear it for the United
States! It's about time.
But even if the U.S. wanted to
take sides in the war, neither coun-
try is exactly begging for American
support. And furthermore, it would
be incredibly difficult to determine
which of the two nations is the lesser
evil (as far as U.S. policy is concern-
ed). Just think about it.
Sure, Iran is a popular enemy, or
perhaps more properly, an emo-
tional enemy, of the United States.
Ever since the takeover of the
American embassy in Tehran back
in 1979, the dominant sentiment
toward Iran has been hatred. And it
is not probable that the U.S. opi-
nion toward the country has chang-
ed very much since then.
But by the same token, Iraq is
supported and militarily equipped
by the Soviet Union. Simply by vir-
tue of the way our world is struc-
tured (with its two "superpowers"
on opposite poles), supporting Iraq
in the current war is impossible. So,
what do we do? Good question.
To take the attitude of just sitting
back and letting the nations wipe
each other out "peacefully is,
perhaps, an inhumane alternative.
Nonetheless, this is the only viable
stand the U.S. can take. And again,
it just goes to show the futility, the
absolute senselessness, behind war.
There are reportedly more than
200,000 troops involved in the
fighting, approximately 100,000 on
each side. Thousands have already
been killed; thousands more will in-
evitably die. And no end is in sight.
MORE OAMN REFUGEES COMING IN
TO TAKE OV�R O0R JOBS"
What Does Robert Young Know About Caffeine?
TV Ads: Real Life Drama
Did you ever slop and pay attention � 1
mean really pay attention � to the ads on
television? I don't mean those network
plugs (although they're definitely bad
enough). What I'm talking about are those
asinine commercials that portray
"real-lite" American drama and try to
convince us that we need to buy their
brand of broad-leaf herbicides or their
cold-sore ointment if we want to be suc-
cessful in life.
I mean, isn't it a bit farfetched that an
ex-pro football star would be out on the
street (microphone in hand) asking people
about how they handle problem heart-
burn?
Or how about the woman who asks the
local librarian � the librarian, of all peo-
ple � which hemmorhoid medication is
best suited for her needs. Naturally, the
librarian has just recently catalogued a
fie-year study on painful itching and
knows exactly what "doctors recommend
most After all. it only makes sense.
And did you ever notice how Robert
Young seems to know just when tragedy is
about to strike? Everytime some poor sod
gets angry, Young is nearby to lend a
hand. And inevitably, the problem rests in
the troubled one's poor choice of coffee,
never anything else.
"Gee, Rodney Young exclaims with a
puzzled face, "why so uptight?"
"Oh, I don't know the drowsy victim
laments. "My wife and kids were kidnap-
ped last week just after the house burned
down. 1 lost my job; my secretary is filing a
paternity suit against me, and to top it all
off, my doctor says I'm getting too much
caffeine
"Oh, that's terrible Young consoles.
"But have you tried Sanka brand? It's 100
percent real coffee
Or how about Cathy Rigby, who's done
nothing for the past five years but give
feminine advice to the same bunch of slow-
learning friends. Maybe she and Robert
Young should switch commercials!
And another thing, how come adver-
tisers never show fat people drinking diet
soft drinks? (Just thought I'd throw that
one in. I'm sure there's a perfectly good
reason. Isn't there?)
But how about Peggy Hemming. What
in the hell does an ex-skater know about
sugarless gum? And what kind of moron
throws gum into a pool to prove a point?
And what in the world could a bull
possibly have to do with an investment
firm? 1 guess that by watching the half-ton
beast wind his way through a shrubbery
maze we're supposed to make some con-
nection with successful financing, or
something like that. I guess 1 understand.
(1 do if vou do.)
Oh. something else: .lust exactly what
does a "sexy" sports car look like? Am I
missing something? I must be, because I've
certainly never had the pleasure of owning
one. Slow, yes; thirsty, maybe. But never
"sexy
Then, of course, there are those "hiduen
camera" ads. it always struck me funny
that those people never catch on. They're
never .the slightest bit leery about being ac-
costed by some strange man and asked
which brand of tuna fish they prefer and
why.
And the one with the man outside the
grocery store timing the woman while she's
busy inside. Simply because she spends a
half hour in the store, he dubs her a
"choosy mother Little does he know
that she spent 10 minutes actually shopp-
ing and 20 minutes waiting in the checkout
line.
Or how about those people who just
happen to have severe tension headaches
when the Tylenol interviewer asks them
how they feel. "Would you like a
Tylenol?" he asks. And "minutes later
following a miraculous recovery, the over-
joyed headache victim is ready to buy out
the entire company. Ah, the marvels ot
modern medicine.
And along those same lines, there's the
old woman who can't even lift the let Ion
frying pan in the morning. She'd like to
cook breakfast for the family (the same
way she's done "for 27 years"), hut she
just can't muster the strength. Then, aftei
applying her wonder-cure ointment, and
taking her cure-all pills, she's not only tee!
ing good, but she's ready for a game ot
touch football with the grandchildren
Or how about the guy who gets on the
crowded elevator and starts braggme
about his extremely comfortable
underwear. Isn't there some place w;
they put people like him? Maybe he'd en-
joy a nice, "comfortably padded" cell tin
a change of pace.
And those 18-hour girdles lane Russ
rants about: what happens it. by some ter-
ribly unfortunate stroke of bad luck, a
woman leaves her's on for more than the
allotted time? Does the girdle decompose,
or does the "full-figured gal" jusl fill out a
little bit more?
Speaking ot filling out, those diei-
suppressing tablet commercials have to
take the proverbial cake for asminity. I :oui
or five reborn twigs proclaim the vsonder
o' the new miracle drug, showing
"before" and "after" pictures. What they
don't mention is that they each spent eight
weeks in the hospital recovering from
chronic anemia. And have you ever seen
someone who's lost 100 pounds? At icasi
when they were fat, their skin had
something to do other than just hang
there.
I could go on and on. As a matter ot
fact, I usually do. But 1 think you probably
gel the picture.
By the way, don't blame advertisers for
the stupidity on TV nowadays. After all.
they're only catering to "what we want
And even if we did want TV advertising
to change, there wouldn't be much we
could do. Of course we could boycott all
the companies with dimented commercials.
But then again, how long could we live on
Lite Beer and Life Cereal?
"Campus Forum"
Would-Be Jock's Illness Saves Face
As an avid music fan, I feel 1 must ad-
dress the problem of our "student radio
station WZMB. I know WZMB is still
in its adolescence, -but some changes
need to be made. These changes need to
be made because most of the people I
have talked to about WZMB agree with
me. We think it "sucks
1 was almost a disc jockey at our cam-
pus station. Luckily, 1 contracted men-
ingitis the day I was to debut. My illness
saved me from being embarrassed at be-
ing associated with that station. The
main reason 1 don't want my name
associated with WZMB is simply that I
would not enjoy working there, i would
dislike working for WZMB because 1
would be forced to play music I have a
strong aversion to. Jocks are not paid at
WZMB, so why should someone be
forced to do something they dislike for
free?
One change that could be made is not
using Billboard magazine as a
"know-all, tell-all" source for the music
play list. There are many other excellent
magazines with information regarding
new music. Billboard is only a small
representation. What about album and
artist reviews? Billboard doesn't do it.
There are many other magazines that
have excellent review sections. Rolling
Stone, International Musician and
Recording World, Music Sound Output,
Musician Player and Listener, Trouser
Press and Guitar Player magazines all
have competent reviewers. Rolling Stone
even has a top-100 listing. There are
"These changes need to he
made because most of the people
I have talked to about W.MH
agree with me. Me think it
'sucks
many other music and broadcast in-
dustry periodicals that are good sources
for up-and-coming artists and albums.
WZMB should exert most of its
energy on up-and-coming artists
anyway. New artists are music's future.
Music is a growing process. The past is
fine; when 1 want to hear past music I
play my records. I should be able to turn
on the radio for new music, not "then"
music. A college station should pro-
gress, not regress.
John Cam
Junior, Communications
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted.
I
H
thj
M
s
setting,
bes !
1977
des
ter spej
hiK
filn I

que
j

transf
place
( a bin
War
arise
somei
Brad-
ter I
p re el
musiJ
CM I
sCv f
rw
outsd
I ocs
in th(
and
costu
enjoi
supej
N I
has
proti
danct
prodl
be a I
sha
but
the
mini
his
beatl
ly pj
picts
few
oth(
ever
or
M
the!
wh
ton
giv
'


fy 1 i
"





!
h ol
I
I
I
and
teel-
ll

I'
i
I
seen
least
had
hang
Ibabiv
Irs for
?r all.
int
Rising
rh w e
ti ail
teials.
je on
r$
tor
uh
rs
id
fer
irs
VI,
fy,
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JULY2I. 1982
Page 5
Belushi Sings
Blues Again
This Evening
Acting Company's 'Twelfth Night' Slated For Theatre Arts Series
The prestigious Acting Company, under the direction of John
Houseman, will perform Shakespeare's Twelfth Sight this March in
the McGinnis Theatre. Also in March, The Company will perform
Moliere's classic comedy Tartuffe. The productions are being spon-
sored b the MSC Theatre Arts Committee. In addition, the series
boasts performances by the North Carolina Dance Theatre and the
American Ballet Theatre II. For season ticket information and more
information about the '82'83 Theatre Artists Series call the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student Center at 757-6611 (ext. 266) or
the MSC Program Office (ext. 233).
By JOHN WEYLKR
Mall VMM
As a grand finale to the 1982 sum-
mer cinema season, the Student
Union Films Committee will present
a classic modern comedy and a
tragic, brutal thriller. Which is
which is anyone's guess, but the
films in question are The Hlues
Brothers, to be shown tonight, July
21 at 8 p.m and The French Con-
nection. As to where they're play-
ing, and what you need to get in,
surely you should know by now.
Next Monday's movie, � The
trench Connection stole all the
Oscars in 1971, grabbing Best Pic-
ture, Best Director: William
(Exorcist) Friedkin, and Best Actor:
Gene (Superman) Hackman. Roy
(All That Jazz) Scheider stars with
Hackman as the team of New York
City narcotics policement who made
the world's biggest heroin bust.
Based on a true case (the real cops
appear in small roles in the film),
the exciting and labyrinthian
storyline involves a dope-stuffed
Lincoln Continental, a dumpy can-
dy store, murders in Marseilles,
feet-picking in Pough-keepsie and
some sensational stunt work.
"The Hackman characterization,
one of the most successful in his
career, and the only one that is
allowed to emerge in much detail,
viratually defines the attitude of The
French Connection says the en
ork Times Roger Greenspun.
"The French Connection is a film
of almost incredible suspense he
continues, "and it includes, among
a great many chilly delights, the
most brilliantly executed chase se-
quence I have ever seen. But the
conditions for the suspense (indeed,
the conditions of the chase � to in-
tercept a hijacked elevated train)
carry with them the potential for
failure not of this particular action,
but of all action in the great doomed
city that is the film's real subject
"From the moment, very early
on, when Hackman first pistol-
whips a black pusher, you know
that the world is cursed and that
everybody playing out his allotted
role is cursed along with it
Jon Landis' epic comedy musical
Blues Brothers is similar to The
trench Connection is some respects.
It too has a great many chilly
delights and exciting chase se-
quences. Lots of chase sequences.
Interminable chase sequences. The
number of cars destroyed in this
film is equal to the number
demolished in any three Burt
Reynolds pictures put together. At
least the Blues Brothers has the late,
great, overweight John Belushi,
dynamite Danny Ackroyd, big and
stupid John Candy and some of the
greatest living legends of the bluev
Well, even Steven Spielburg, the
director of 7, had his 1941. The
Blues Brothers is the 1941 from the
director of Animal House.
Special Effects Dominate The Current Cinema
By JOHNCT LHANF
I he Ne� ��rW 1 imr.
NI W YORK � When Star Wars, with its futuristic
soiling, android and computerized space warfare,
became the first film in history to make $100 million in
197" (it has now grossed four times that), Hollywood
decided that what the public wanted was more and bet-
ter special effects. In the next five years, armed with
huge budgets and increasingly sophisticated technology,
filmmakers rewrote the book on creating illusions of
reality.
Wirework combined with optical effects made Super-
man fly more realistically than man had ever "flown"
before. The animation of models in The Umpire Strikes
Back gae such deiees as its friendly space beast, the
Tauntaun, a fluidity of movement (of not a personality)
to top Willis O'Brien's original King Kong. A hand pup-
pet of rubber, spewing gore as it burst through a fake
human chest in Alien, made old-time monsters such as
Frankenstein seem tame. And the top-grossing film of
last year, Haiders of the Tost Ark, orchestrated its stunt
work and its mechanical effects with an attention to ex-
pensive detail unknown in ihe adventure pictures of
earlier eras.
Without a doubt, technical wizardry is changing the
face of the films c see. And the flood is just beginning.
Special-effects pictures now dominate the nation's
screens. The first month of summer witnessed the
release not only of E. T. but Poltergeist, Star Trek II:
The Wrath of khan. Blade Runner, Hrefttx and The
Thing.
In their preoccupation with exploring the outer limits
of special effects, however, some moviemakers are
clearly stinting the narrative art. As a result, critics have
See OPTICALS, Page 6
Come In OF Chum
Life A Cabaret At McGinnis
By kATH WEYLFR
sun Wniir
A little sex, a little politics, and a lot of almost burles-
que stvle singing and dancing-( abaret, presented b
the Last Carolina Summer Theatre this week at McGin-
nis Theatre, has something for everyone.
With the flash of a brightly lit sign, the audience is
transported to the Berlin of the early 1930's, a time and
place teeming with sexual and political turmoil. If
( aharet presents an accurate view of this pre-World
War II society, one movement must certainly have
arisen to escape the other. Which came first, however, is
something of an unanswerable "chicken and egg' ques-
tion.
Enter into this decadence an American, Clitford
Bradshaw, reeking of innocence and idealism. The shat-
tering of Cliff's rosy world view is the meat ol(Cabaret,
preventing this musical from becoming a syrupy, slick
musical comedy. Through Cliff and the mindless
escapism of the Kit Kat Klub patrons and employees we
see the sick horror of a world on the verge of collapse.
The ECU Summer Theatre treats its audience to an
outstanding presentation of Cabaret. Director Edgar
Loessin once again proves his creativity and capability
in the staging of this musical. The remarkably authentic
and evocative sets by Gregory Buch and colorful, flashy-
costumes by Patrice Alexander add tremendously to the
enjoyment of this production. But, above all, it is the
superb cast of Cabaret that truly brings it to life.
No other recent ECU production that this reviewer
has seen has offered such a magnificently talented and
professional cast. Rodney Freeze, whose singing and
dancing talents have been enjoyed in such previous ECU
productions as Showboat and Grease, proves himself to
be a fine actor as well. Mr. Freeze portrays Cliff Brad-
shaw as a charming alt-American young man, innocent
but not naive. In the last scene of Act I, as Clilf realizes
the growing number and influence of the Nazis and the
miniscule part he has played in bringing them to power,
his disillusionment, as portrayed by Mr. Freeze is
beautiful to behold. In fact, the entire scene is beautiful-
ly portrayed by the entire cast and gives an insightful
picture of how the Nazis did indeed come to power. A
few faces only are lit by true belief and fervor. The
others join in because it is a pretty song, because
everyone else is singing, or because they are too drunk
or out of touch to realize what is happening.
Maureen Kerrigan, a veteran of the professional
theatre, portrays Sally Bowles, the nightclub performer
whose wild extravagence and flamboyance win Clif-
ford's heart. Ms. Kerrigan - thankfully - does not
give us a Liza Minelli imitation but builds the lole from
her own strengths, which are considerable. She excells
as a singer and dancer, and demonstrates her skill as an
actress as well. Her Sally has a tough shell to hide her
vulnerability as she pursues life at a frantic pace, re-
maining unaware of a world outside the nightclub or
Cliff's room.
Hovering over all like a masked angel of death or pro-
phet of doom with a macabre sense of humor is the
Master of Ceremonies, well portrayed by Jay Fox.
Perhaps "portrayed" is not the right word. Fox's
Master of Ceremonies doesn't seem to be a real person
or to have a character of his own, despite the fact that
he is the host of the Kit Kat Klub. Rather, he is a sort of
all-knowing presence, a commentator on and foresseer
of events. He is removed from life and seems to find
grim, ironic humor in the crumbling of the world out-
side the club.
The entire supporting cast of Cabaret is excellent,
thereby creating difficulty in singling out individual per-
formers for a job more than well done. However, a few
performers must be mentioned. Michael W. Hill, as
Ernest Ludwig. gives a fine performance as the Nazi
who befriends Clifford. It must be noted that he also
mnages a tolerably decent German accent. Catherine
Rhea overwhelms the stage in the small role of Fraulein
Kost, the voluptuously attractive, slightly blowzy
boarder at Frauloein Schneider's with a penchant for
well-paying sailors. Her voice is rich and magnificent;
hopefully she will grace the ECU stage in a larger role in
the future.
Among the shining stars in the Cabaret constellation
there are, in fact, only patches of dullness. One is in the
voice of Katerine Whitley who portrays Fraulein
Schneider, owner of the Berlin boarding house where
much of the action takes place. Ms. Whitley is a fine ac-
tress, but it is doubtful if anyone past the first few rows
could hear her when she sang. Also, her German accent
was just a little short of atrocious. Portraying the
fraulein's elderly suitor is Dick St. George is effective in
his performance as Herr Schultz, but one can't help but
feel this Yiddish grocer is a bit over-stereotyped and a
touch too comical.
The ECU Summer Theatre has really outdone itself
with their production of Cabaret, playing nightly
through July 24. With the stage virtually packed with
excellent performers, one feels a little like the show is a
three-ring circus. So much is going on, and it's all so ter-
rific, you just don't know where to look first.
For ticket information regarding Cabaret or the final
show of the ECU Summer Theatre season. She loves
Me, contact the Central Ticket Office at 757-6611, ext.
266.
Kerrigan Adds 'Cabaret9 Lead To Long List Of Credits
Theatregoers who catch the ECU Summer Theatre production of Cabaret, running through July 24, will be
treated to the tour de force performance of Maureen Kerrigan. Kerrigan has the lead role of Sally Bowles, aa
English girl who has fled her family's stuffiness to become a chanteuse in the Kit Kat Klub. Kerrigan has ap-
peared in several New York productions including Harold Pinter's SUence. She has also performed leading
roles at the Kennedy Center in Washington, the Loeb Drama Center la Boston, numerous dinner theatres
across the country, and her film and television credits include The Miracle Worker and new MGMU A movie
Diner.
f






THE FAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 21, 1982
New Film
( ontinued From Page S
praised the special ef-
fects in such films as
Blade Runner and The
thing, while damning
ihe quality of the
storytelling. All too
often, it seems, special
effects are becoming
the end as well as the
means ot making a cer-
tain kind of film. The
results can range from
the brutally
dehumanizing to the
merely boring.
"Speaai effects rare-
1 save a movie' said
Nicholas Meyer, direc
tor of Star Trek II: The
M rath oj Khan which
has been praised for its
story as well as its ef-
fects and is one of the
summer's solid boxof-
fice hits. "A case in
point was the first Star
Trek movie, which was
all special effects �
and the) were spec-
tacular, they were
wonderful � but there
was no story.
"On the other hand.
television has eroded
the audience's patience
with exposition and the
groundwork that nar-
rative requires, so that
now you have movies
and television shows
where there's no plot at
all. just stunts or star
ims. It's a new form
o pornoeraphv. Who"s
dome it or why they're
doing it is no longer im-
portant, but if you
want to see a guv jump
through ten hundred
hoops of fire and
maybe get burned to
death, tune in � never
mind making it a part
of the story. Forget the
story
Meyer sees a very
real problem for to-
day's filmmakers.
"The question is he
asked, "can you make
a good story now about
two people falling in
love or out of love that
is not laced with stunts
and special effects and
get the big audience for
it?"
Creating characters
that people will identify
with and root for has
always been one of the
most difficult parts of
storytelling. Carlo
Rambaldi, who
tashioned the
mechanical creatures in
the 1976 remake of
king Kong and the
unearthly visitors in
( lose Encounters of
the Third hind, created
an extraterrestrial for
Steven Spielberg's suc-
cessful E. T. out of steel
and rubber and
hydraulic and elec-
tronic controls.
Rambaldi believes
that E. T. proves a
special effect can per-
form an artistic func-
tion as effectively as an
actor. "The success of
E.T. means that it no
longer is important that
you have Marlon Bran-
do or John Travolta
he said. "If the special
effect is created well,
people don't think
whether it's mechanical
or not � they're think
ing about the story. In
E. T. we have three
children and one elec-
tronic creature. When 1
finally saw the finished
movie, even 1 cried a
little
Against that
background, two new
features � both with
elaborate special effects
� are making their
debuts. In Walt Disney
Productions' futuristic
adventure TRON, the
hero, played by Jeff
Bridges, is sucked into
a micro-civilization in-
side a computer. This is
accomplished by a
state-of-the-art com-
bination of live-action
with computer-
generated imagery.
The Secret of NIMH
the first feature from
Don Bluth Produc-
tions, a new studio
founded by former
Disney animators,
builds its story around
a pack of rats who have
developed high in-
telligence in ex-
periments conducted
on them at the National
Institute of Mental
Health (NIMH). While
TRON represents
dramatic leap forward
into the era oi com-
puter technology,
NIMH takes a
calculated step
backward into the era
of classical animation
pioneered by Walt
Disney in classics such
as Ham hi. TROS
opened Friday at the
Buccaneer Theatre in
Greenville. The Secret
oj NIMH is currently
playing at the Plaa
Cinema located at Pitt
Plaa Shopping Center
here in Greenville.)
TRON, a S20 million
ci nemat ic jou t nev
through the mind of a
computer, frequently
looks like the ultimate
video game, played by
� and with � huniai
bonus on a screen 70
feet wide and 30 feet
high. The film has
more than 800 shots in
which such actors as
Jeff Bridges, David
Warner and Cindy
Morgan are put into
computer-generated en-
v ironments.
Disney is the first to
tell a story with the
computer-generated
imagery that
Hollywood is looking
at as the herald of a
major change in its way
of making movies.
Thomas I . Wilhite.
Disney's 29-year-old
head of production,
said the studio decided
to produce TRt no'
only because it for a
new technology but
because it used that
technology to tell a
story that would call
forth "a new
mythology" of
characters.
"We invested $20
million in our belief
that the characters in
this computer world,
invented by man in his
own image, would ap-
peal to people he
said.
????????
V WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH &
� S? FOR:
VS CLASS RINGS
WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS
nGOLD& SILVER
LVER COINS
CHINA & CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
l&RINC
0p HEY SAIES CO ,Nc
401 S.EVANS ST
OHti
HfiMMONV H
PHONE 752-3866
T Shirts SI e e p i n 9 Bjqs
B.ickpacks Campmq Equip
mi ni Steel T oecl Srio s
DisM. .i�ci O.i � ? Diftei "i'
tv and Used Iteim Cotjoy
Boots Mb ��
ARMY-NAVY
STORE
S Eva"
Sli-iut
ATTIC
1'
i
St(v�t
TUES. JULY 27
LIGHTNING
WELLES
BLUES
BAND
����
Not all clinics are the samel
ABORTION is a difficult decision that's made
easier by the women of the Fleming Center.
Counselors are available day and rnght to
support and understand you Comfort, safety,
privacy, and a friendly staff that's what the
Fleming Center is all about.
Insurance accepted Free pregnancy testing
All inclusive fees Saturday appointments
Up to 18 Week Very early pregnancy tests
Call 781-5580 day or niht
The Fleming Center makes the difference.
IN FIRSTPRIAAARY RECE I VED205,120,VOTES TOOPPONE NT'S 97, 744
GENE PHILLIPS
FOR JUDGE, N.C. COURT OF APPEALS
IN THE DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY RUNOFF JULY 27, 1982
QUALIFIED BY ABILITY CHARACTER LEARNING LEADERSHIP AND uONG EXPERIENCE AN ABLE SCHOlA-
WINSTON-SALEM TRIAL LAWER - AND RESPECTED COMMUNITv AND PROFESSIONAL LEADER - C0R 35 YEARS
Bachel� t Lds Wake
Master cif Laws Duke University ect M m �
Past Presiaen: ���� mty Bar Association The fion
University Alumni AssocuV -
A-nenca Cancer Society anc se.
Many vetran Norm Carolina lawyers, including Allen
Bailev. Charlotte. John Burnev. Wilmington, Robert
Morgan, Lillmgton, Bill Thorp, Rocky Mount and
Raleigh, ana Bill Holdford.Wilson, say that Gene Philh
is superbly Qualified tor the Court of Appeals ana
recommend that you vote for him.
end �� 11 �
rheN "r it i A � � � �
� The Cnanotte� �����.�
Mew; & Observt � �'�
'�� item ���
�� �� - . �. �
� Thousand f other �
pe ��: � � doci
. etired �.� '�' � � ��
��� � .
f'a-l tor By � "�� PHI! Ill' AMPAIGN MM E. M '
.� wvwwa
I
j
i
i
i
J.A. UNIFORMS
SHOP
All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes,
shoes, and hose. Also � used ECU
nurses uniforms. Trade ins allowed.
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive.
Near Hollowell's Drug and old hospiial.
?i
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re-
quired to be readily available for
sale in each Kroger Savon, except
as specifically noted in this ad If we
do run out of an item we will offer
you your choice of a comparable
item when available, reflecting the
same savings or a ramcheck which
will entitle you to purchase the
advertised item at the advertised
price within 30 days
Copynghl 1982
Kroger Sa on
Quantity Rights Reser�ed
None Sold To Dea'ers
I 600 Greenville Blvd Greenville
Open 8 a.m. to Midnight
Open Sunday 9am to 9 p rn
Steak'Umm
ALL BEEF
SANDWICH STEAK
Steak-Umm
$4)98
t
Reg
$2.99
INSULATED PLASTIC
Pac Man
Mugs
$449
SAVE
50c
77Z71
?.��.�.��.�-?�.�.��:�.
�w�S�S�t�SS. .S. MM&MM&JBb&&'ffL
i
Veranda Room f
Ramada Inn 9
I Featuring This Week: �
"GoldRush" featuring
AI WilliamsI
SAVE
'& DIET PEPS' � 40�
Pepsi-Cola
N.R
B�.
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Breyers
Ice Cream
L
SWEET RIPE
Lb.
1
I
i
I
LUNCHEON MEAT
Spam
The Arbor Room Restaurant
All You Can Eat & Drink Specials
Wed & Fri nights-Shrimp & Chablis-$7.95
12-Oz �
Can
&M KROGER
S� ' REG OR LOWFAT
SPR.NGDALE L �jtta9e
SSORTED VARIETY Cl)66S6
240z.
Cup
I Thurs night-Ribs & Rose- $6.95
$ Sat night-Prime Rib & Burgandy-$9.95
Both located on 264 Bypass at Ramuda Inn
L
MuWgram
Bread
SERVE N SAVE
Wieners
12-Oz.
Pkg.
dJ
240Z-
Loa
�I'

J





IHl KAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
II 1 Y 21, IVH2 Page?
Pirates End Season
With Heartbreak Loss
B kFN BOl ION
lttttMl Nporu f t1iti
I .in; t arolina was eliminated
from the North State I eague
double-elimination baseball tourna-
Saturday by I t
W ilmingi on, 4 -2
Bui the real heartbreakei took
ay night in the first round
Pii.tics Ion! to ;he
league-leading Campbell Camels.
1
in a
na ' illed eame
!
taee a
!I led 2
i i an upset as
- nto the seventh
al inning Bui with one out,
pbell top Bobby Spi
a two i ur. !n nei un ovei the left
give the i amels a 3-2
Before N, mei, hi
Bob D,w d had only gi en
hits and one run. I he
seve .�II for
Davidson as h ick out leading
Mickey Kradel Bui Mee
Regner, the numbei nine batter,
v a otik vitt ol Dav idson, lea
ing the Campbell shortstop up next.
Aftei working to a full count,
Spieei hit the next pitch deep
towards left field. I eft fielder Mark
Shank and centei fielder Robert
ells collided with each other while
trying to make a game-saving catch.
hile the two players lie stunned in
the outfield, Spieei was mobbed bv
his teammates and tans as he cross
ed home plate.
1 he loss was especially
disheartening tor ECl since the
Pirates had not been able to beat the
Fighting Camels once during the
summei league season.
"It was a hard loss because our
guys played exceptionally well and 1
quite honestly feel that we deserved
to win head coach Gars Overton
said.
1 he Pirates played an outstanding
defensive eame. including double
plays in the first and fifth inning.
I he double play in the first came
with the bases loaded as Kevin
Bargei hii a groundball to first
baseman 1 odd Evans, who then
threw to catcher Jack Curlings.
Curlings relayed back to Evans to
double up Barger at first.
ECU did its scoring in the fourth
and sixth innings. In the top of the
fourth. Curlings hit a lead-off single
through the middle. After Mike
Williams sacrificed Curlings to se-
cond, Robert Wells singled to right.
With men on first and third,
Mark Shank hit into a fielder's
choice which allowed Curlings to
score the game's first run. In the
sixth inning, two errors by Camp-
bell and an RBI single bv Shank
scored the Pirates' second run.
Overton couldn't have been more
pleased with the performance ol the
Pirates despite his disappointment.
"That was a great college baseball
game, and credit should be given to
bothteams he said.
In Saturday night's season-ending
game with UNC-W . solo-homers bv
Johnny Slaughter and Don Steven-
son put the Seahawks ahead.
The Pirates tied the score 2-2 with
tuns bv Wells and Evans in the third
Pirates Ousted Farly In Post-Season Tourney
Pfcotoby JCOTT UllW
and fourth innings respectively, bin
Slaughter's homerun and RBI single
prov ided the difference
The loss to the Seahawks ended
the summer league season, and a
tew Pirates were among the leaders
in the North State league statistics.
ECU leftfielder David Wells, who
did not play in the tournament
because oi an injured hand, led the
league in batting with a 42.1
average. I��dd Ivans (.352) and
Rick Nichols (.303) also ended up
in the top 10.
David WelU was fourth in the
league with 33 hits, followed by
Ivans with 31.
Nichols placed second in the
league in stolen bases with 11, and
Bob Davidson was the second
leading piteher with six wins.
Ihree ECU plavers made the
North State All-Star (earn. Infielder
Todd Ivans and outfielder David
WelU and utility man John Hallow
a ere selected.
Richmond Highlights '82 Home Schedule
Spiders, Bucs Continue Fierce Football Rivalry
� aK
. uti-
� ible evt nt Oh sure,
a it h t he r
� i t h t
.ii all boils

1 �j
.aking
� e bit

Cindy
Pleasants
' ook Inside
(
rivalries will
Ficklen S on
I � 1 i i ai 'Una
i the I niv ei sity ol
ill once
Richmoi a
again den
;vel.
In last yea v
ts defensive line nary
weapon to beat the Spiders, 17-13.
ECl was down by foui points al
the end of the third period, bul an
interception bv Pirate defensive end
lody Schulz turned the game
around
Two plays later, tight end Nor-
wood V'ann connected with a
c arlton Nelson pass to run six vards
tor a touchdown. ECU scored its
last II) when Nelson faked and
sprinted 2 yards to add six more
points to the scoreboard, putting the
Pirates ahead. 17-7.
Richmond's Steve Krainock hit
wide receiver Kevin Jackson tor a
two-yard 11) pass. After trying for
extra points, the Spiders only
eul the lead to 17-13, the tinal score
ol he game.
1 he loss was a disappointing one
foi Richmond, especially after los-
to ECl , 24-22, the previous year
and 'winning its last two games
betoie meeting the Pirates.
1 ike the Pirates, Richmond will
be facing a trying schedule this fall.
1 he young Richmond squad will
play its opening game at home and
will then be on the mad tor the next
live weeks.
Head coach Dal Shealy said Rich-
mond is famous for opening up with
a tremendously hard schedule and
this year will be no different.
Shealy added that the players
Photo by DAVE WILLIAMS
Jod Schulz In last Year's (iame At Richmond
have gotten accustomed to playing a
rigorous schedule and are aware of
the work ahead ot them.
"Foi us to gel through that
stretch alright, we are going to have
to stay healihy he said. "If we do
that, we can have some good things
happen
Shealy would have to be worried
about injuries alter last year's bout
at ECU. Richmond's QB Sieve
Krainock suffered form a slow-
healing shoulder seapration and was
10 for 25, throwing two intercep-
tions. Heisman Trophy candidate
Barry Redden played with a strained
knee but still rushed foi 131 vards.
The two standouts, known as
Richmond's best offensive players
ever, will be the Spiders most
noticeable losses. And according to
Shealy, a change in offensive plav is
inev liable
"I'm not sure that people will
recognie us on offense he said.
"We have changed it greatly to
adapt to out personnel, and I think
we are going to sin prise some people
wiih w hat we are going to at tempt to
do "
Shealy w ill run an option-oi ienied
attack with a strong passing game
and will possibly till theQB position
with sophomore Napoleon DuBois.
Dunne his freshman year, Dubois
plaved in six games, including the
E I Richmond contest. He com-
pleted 17 oi 37 parses foi 251 vards
and one touchdown. He rushed tor
11 vards on 26 canies.
Defensively, Shealy said collision
will be emphasized rathei than reac-
tion. He furthei explained that in
the past, the team has worked hard
to react to certain situations instead
ol being an aggressive force. I he
head coach is looking tor an even
stronger secondary team this year,
however, and will also count on a
good passing defense.
Alter a 4 season last year, Shea-
ly is anxious to improve the (cam's
record. I he Spiders have 37 Ict-
termen returning, including nine of-
fensive and six defensive staners.
FLORIDA MATE The
Seminoles are another hard-nosed
team the Pirates will be up against.
Head coach Bobbv Bow den has
led Florida to 50 wins and only 19
losses in seven seasons and ended up
ith a 6-5 record last year. A mark
Bow den is not ashamed of.
"Betcha if you check, vou would
find about 30 other teams that went
6-5 last veai, besides Florida State
he said. "It shows how even
everybody has become in college
football
I he Seminoles have a vacancy
spot in the QB position with five
candidates in the running. Senior
Blair Williams has the most ex-
perience, although he has just 80
passes in varsity competition over a
three-year span.
"We need to solve the quarter-
back situation Shealv said. "In
mv opinion we're going in without a
number one quarterback
Florida State will have three wide
receivers returning, along with 28
Dther lettermen.
Jt,
4
Committee Begins Interviews
BS) PI I N Is
I
rheE l Basketbal tch Selec-
immittee will begin interview-
. potential candidates al th end
this wee! to the
athletic director's office.
Dr. Kenneth karr could not be
teaehed tor comment but has an-
nounced thai at least 12 candidates
are being considered for the head
coaching post.
Other members ot the committee,
has been reduced to five and
another member said no more than
ten and perhaps less than five will be
interviewed later on.
Karr said the committee w ill name
the next head coach by August 1 as
however, have stated that the list it had originally planned
Karr and the other committee
members have chosen to remain
silent throughout the search because
of the people involved and their
right to privacy.
Rick Scoppe of The Daily Reflec-
tor reported that Iowa State assis-
tant Charlie Harrison, Richmond
assistant Joe Gallagher, Tennessee
assistant Jack Fertig and Pensacola
Junior College coach Chip Boes are
among the candidates to be inter-
viewed.
Others mentioned who are believ-
ed to have applied for the coaching
position are UNC-Charlotte coach
Mike Pratt, U.S. Naval Academy
coach Paul Evans and Wiscon-
sin�Green Bay coach Dave Buss.
Harrison has been an assistant at
Iowa State for two years and was
also an interim head coach at New
Mexico in 1979�80. Harrison sen
ed as an assistant at Oaklahoma in
1975 and 1979 when the Sooners
won the Big Fight title. From
1972�73, Harrison was an assistant
to Indiana coach Bobby Knight
when the Hoosiers placed third in
the NCAA toucney. Harrison was
an assistant at Clemson in 1974.
Gallagher accumulated a 42�38
record during his three-year stay at
Pembroke State. The Philadelphia
native graduated at Pembroke and
also coached at Methodist College
in Fayetteville before moving on to
Richmond. Gallagher obtained a
37-13 record at Methodist and a trip
to the NCAA South Atlantic
Regionals in 1975.
Sherman Named as Pirates'
New Head Tennis Coach
Patricia Ann Sherman, an assis-
tant professor of physical education
at Winona State University in
Winona, Minn has been named as
ECU'S head women's and men's
tennis coach.
Sherman served as tennis and
basketball coach for eight years at
Winona Slate. She will be replacing
former coach Caroline Brown, who
is now the head tennis coach at
Dav idson.
Sherman earned a B.S. degree in
physical education from Winona
State in 1964 and later received a
MA. and Ph.D. in the same field at
the University oi Iowa. She has
taught and coached physical educa-
tion and tennis on the collegiate,
high school and recreational depart-
ment lev els since 1957.
1 he 41-vear-old Minnesota native
has plaved both left-handed and
ight-handed during hei career.
As a iight-handed player from
1956 to 1970, Sherman was the
Iowa. South Dakota and Wisconsin
Slate Open Women's Singles cham-
pion, the Iowa and South Dakota
State Open Women's Doubles
champion, and was champion or
runner-up in every collegiate tennis
tournament that Winona State
entered during hei college career.
She was defeated in all Women's
Open singles and doubles tour-
naments in the city ol Winona from
1957 to 1970 and was tanked
number two in Women's Open
singles and doubles in the NW TA in
l8-69.
As a left-handed player from 1973
to the present, Sherman was a
NW IA ranked player foi 19 .
1978 and 1980. She was undefeated
in all NW FA 35 Women's singles in
the NWTA in 1978 and 1980 and
was a quarterfinalist in the
Women's 30's singles of the Na-
tional Public Parks Championship
in 1979.
Sherman is a veteran of tennis
workshops and clinics as well as a
teacher and author of several
published articles. Sherman is also a
membei of the USTA.
Kobe Signs Star Swimmers
Athletic Director Ken Karr
ByCINin PLEASANTS
Sports t rtH'T
First-year ECU swim coach Rick
Kobe has signed six star athletes to
lop off his recruiting efforts. Kobe
took over the head coaching posi-
tion following Ray Scharf's resigna-
tion after 15 years at the Pirate
helm.
Dan Booth of Elkton, Md. will be
ECU's most talented multi-event
swimmer in history, according to
Kobe. The 6-1, 170-pound
breaststroke specialist also swims
the individual medley events.
Also joining the men's team are
Chris Pittelli of Cranbury, NI. and
EricSebmck �� lake City, S.C. Pit-
telli, a 6-0, 155-pound sprinter will
be the top freshman sprinter and has
the potential to serve on all three
relays. Sebnick, a transfer from
Appalachian State University, is the
reigning Southern Conference
champion in the 100-yard
breaststroke. Kobe said Sebnick
will be the best Pirate breaststroker
next season.
Texas native Michele Joy net
heads the three women's recruits.
Joyner has six personal bests under
existing ECU varsity records for
women.
Kobe calls Joyner, "a sure bet to
score at the nationals
Sandra Schneider, a transfer from
Daytona Beach Community College
and Joanne McCulley of Adelphi,
Md. round out the list of recruits.
Schneider is a junior college all-
America whose Daytona Beach
team won the National Junior Col-
lege tournament last season. She
has times already under six existing
varsity records in the freestyle and
backstroke events. McCulley, a
breaststroker, holds two personal
bests better than ECU marks.






f
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 21, 1982

1
I
Bryant Becomes
UNC's Latest
Gridiron Star
CHAPEL HILL (UPI)
� It may be a touch of
heresy so far as old Tar
Heels grads are con-
cerned, but North
Carolina is ballyhooing
Kelvin Bryant as a bet-
ter runner than its
legendary Charlie
"Choo Choo" Justice.
The Carolina publici-
ty department is even
going so far as to
predict that the
195-pound senior
tailback might beat out
Georgia's more-famed
Herschel Walker for
this year's Heisman
Trophy.
"We are aware no
Atlantic Coast Con-
ference player has ever
won the Heisman
said Carolina publicist
Rick Brewer. "But
there has never been a
player like Kelvin
Bryant in the ACC
(founded four years
after Justice completed
his college career).
"For that matter
continued Brewer,
"there haven't been
many players like
Kelvin Bryant
anywhere. He is uni-
que
The Tar Heels are
ecstatic when they pro-
ject Bryant's 1982 per-
formance on the basis
of what he accomplish-
ed in only a half season
in 1981.
The prospect is stag-
gering. In Carolina's
first three games last
fall, Bryant scored 15
touchdowns � six
against East Carolina,
five against Miami of
Ohio, and four against
Boston College � and
rushed for 520 yards,
without playing in the
fourth quarter of any
of those contests.
At that point, it ap-
peared he had an ex-
cellent shot at the
NCAA single season
touchdown record held
by Lydell Mitchell who
scored 29 for Penn
State 10 years before.
But in game No. 4,
against Georgia Tech in
Atlanta. Bryant, at the
tail end of a 27-yard
run, went down under a
pile of Tech tacklers.
The injury, which
didn't appear that
serious at the moment,
sidelined Bryant until
five games later. He
underwent arthroscopic
surgery the following
day for removal of torn
cartilage from his knee
which also had a
sprained ligament.
Doctors didn't ex-
pect Bryant to return
the rest of the season.
But even though he was
still hobbling, he car-
ried the ball 13 u.nes in
a crucial game with na-
tional champion Clem-
son, a game Gator
Bowl champion
Carolina lost, 10-8, and
two weeks later he was
well enough to gain a
career-high 247 yards in
the Tar Heels' regular-
season finale at Duke.
Used only sparingly
as a freshman and play-
ing behind "Famous"
Amos Lawrence as a
sophomore, Bryant has
rushed for 2,203 yards,
431 less than Justice
gained in
1946-47-48-49, and
scored 29 touchdowns,
10 less than the "Choo
Choo
"There isn't much I
can say about Kelvin
Bryant that hasn't
already been said
says North Carolina
Coach Dick Crum.
"He's one of the great
players in America, a
premier runner with
tremendous accelera-
tion. He's a complete
back in that he also is a
good blocker and cat-
ches the ball well
Crum says, unlike
the 225-pound Walker
who carries the ball
35-40 times per game,
Bryant needs a rest
from time to time dur-
ing a game.
"He appears to tire
some at times, but he's
going full speed on
every play says
Crum. "That's why wc
like to rest him. If se
leave him in the game
and give the ball to
somebody else, he's not
going to get a breather
because he's going to
be looking for
somebody to block
While boosting
Bryant's chances for
All-America and the
Heisman Trophy,
present-day North
Carolina boosters con-
cede that Justice was
probably a better
"all-around" football
player.
After all, the
170-pound Justice still
holds the Carolina total
offense record of 4,883
yards despite playing in
an era before college
football went to the
wide-open passing-tvpc
offenses which rolled
up so much yardage a
generation later.
In addiition to being
a tricky runner
("Justice said former
teammate Jack Fitch,
"had the ability to be
running at full speed,
stop suddenly, then be
back at full speed
almost instantly") and
a competent passer
(2.249 yards and 25
touchdowns). "Choo
Choo a tuple-threat
in Carl S n a v e 1 y' s
single-wing, was aUo
an outstanding punter
� leading the nation in
1948 with a 44-yard
average.
Justice, runnerup to
Doak Walker of SML)
for the 1949 Heisman
Trophy, led North
Carolina in scoring,
total offense, passing
and punting all four
years he played for the
Tar Heels and only an
injury his senior year
kept him from also
leading in rushing all
for years.
Legends have a way
of expanding with pass-
ing time, so even if
Bryant does eclipse
Justice's rushing and
scoring marks he pro-
bably won't supplant
the "Choo Choo" in
the minds of the old
grads.
But if he picks up
where he was before
last fall's injury, Kelvin
Bryant could very well
become a North
Carolina legend in his
own right.
WANTED
The East Carolinian is looking tor
writers and cartoonists for the fall
semester. Anyone interested should
apply at our office in the Old South
Building.
FOOD TOWN
SZEZEBmSte
irloin
USDA Choice Beef Round Whole
LFPINCSCVAGA
10-12
Avg. Wt.
Sliced Free Ichchce
Lb.
USDA Choice Beef Round Fill Cat Boneiett
Round
USDA ,
XHOtCEJ
Steak
Lb.
USDA ,
CHOICE,
USDA Choice Family Pick
Cube
Steak
USDA Choice Beef Roitd
Sirloin Tip Roast
USDA Choice Beef Loin 7-9 Lb. Ag. Sliced Fiat
ik 238 Whole Beef Tenderloin 39�
Half Gallon - Sealtest
Orange
Juice
Why Pay M.19
Pk�. of 6 12 0. HR Bottle Ceei
Miller
Paeka�e of 12 12 0: Cam
Miller
3 Liter � Hearty Berated
Rhine Chahlit Blanc Red R
oie
16 Of. - I Bertie Cirten Hj H Hj fa
22 Ounce
32 Ounce
725 0i. Food Toern
Del Macaroni
Monte �9 &
Catsup S3 Cheese
Why Pay M.19
Why Pay 2 61
mJSL
60 Ct. - Designer
t
Towels
�fry Pay 97
-
399

10.5 Ounce
49 0. - W Softener
Texas Pete Chili Uajjj Fab Detergent
2"
12 Oi. Borden i American Sliced Singles
Cheese Food
489

J8,
6 or 6 5 Or Tuna Tuna & Chicken Beef &
lier Turkey & Giblets Cat Food
Purina 100
4 loo
IS Or Can Dog Food
Ken-L Ration Stew

Half Gallon 50 Off
64 Oi. � Welletley Farm
32 Ounce
liquid Wisk Igg Apple Juice to? JFC Mayonnaise
A StarKist
O
CHUHH HCMl
1 Lb. � Margarine Quarters
Shedd's
Spread
Why Pay 39 Each
-i
e�' � �- I�
400 Sheets - 4 Roll Pk. - Coronet
Toilet
Tissue
aatOmu
(-OIUlU'l
Prints
65 0i. Light Chunk In Oil
Star Kist
'40orw6-y. v , i.
Why Pay M.09
Why Pay 99
Prices good at Creenville Food Toun Store only thru Si July 24,1982





Title
The East Carolinian, July 21, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 21, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.206
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57488
Preferred Citation
Cite this item
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of ECU Libraries. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy