The East Carolinian, July 14, 1982






�he ISaBt (Earnlinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No.69
Wednesday, July 14,1982
Greenville, N.C
8 Pages
SGA Executive Council Still
Undecided On 82-83 Budget
By ERNEST CONNER
In the financial crisis which con-
fronts the executive council of East
Carolina's Student Government
Association, the council still has not
made a final decision,according to
Eric Henderson, SGA president.
The executive council was caught
in this financial crisis when SGA
Treasurer Becky Talley discovered
that the SGA legislature had ap-
propriated up to $29,000 over the
expected revenue for the upcoming
school year.
Incoming revenue from which the
SGA appropriates money is
estimated to be around $90,000 to
96,000. However, during last
semester the SGA legislature ap-
propriated $119,000 for various
organizations, putting the budget
$23,000 to $29,000 in the red.
This financial problem was made
public two weeks ago. Henderson
then said that the council would
make a decision by last Tuesday on
w hat action to take as a result of the
situation.
Henderson now explains that
there is no reason for the executive
counsel to rush into a decision,
since one is not needed until the end
of August.
The SGA president said that the
council is currently researching the
problem so that a decision could be
made, but he would not give a date
for proposing action, saying only
that a decision would be made
before the end of August.
Henderson did say that whatever
action the council took would in-
volve having the affected groups
return to the fall SGA legislature to
reapply for more money if needed.
For example, Henderson explain-
ed that one option the council could
take would be to cut every group by
50 percent. If this choice is taken,
then any group needing more money
would have to go before the SGA
legislature in the fall and reapply for
the additional funding.
This, however, is only one of the
options available to the council and
is not necessarily the one that will be
taken.
No one is exactly sure how the
financial crises came about.
Henderson, in an interview con-
ducted two weeks ago tated that
last year's SGA treasurer. Kirk Lit-
tle, failed to kep the SGA informed
of how much money was available
for appropriation.
Little, who was not available for
comment before the story appeared
in the June 30 issue of The East
Carolinian, claimed that it wasn't
his fault that too much money was
appropriated.
In a letter to the editor, Little
stated that the "SGA treasurer's job
is primarily an administrative one
The treasurer, according to Little,
merely accurately records the ap-
propriations made by the SGA
legislature.
This view reflects Talley's belief
that no one person was at fault in
the over-appropriations. According
to her all the students were in a
hurry toward the end of semester,
and nobody noticed how much
money was left to appropriate.
In other action, the executive
council approved a resolution call-
ing for the SGA to fund groups bas-
ed on a zero based budget. This
would mean that a group's funding
for the current year would not be
based on their previous year's
budget. They would have to justify
everything starting from scratch
each year.
One Yard
W�oto By OAVE WILLIAMS
These three feet embark on a search for their missing companion. They are confident the private podiatrist
they hired will find their friend and bring her safely back to her shoe.
Basketball Camper Assaulted
By GREG RIDEOLT
frwillill Nf Vditor
A Greenville girl attending
basketball camp at East Carolina
University last Wednesday was the
victim of an assault and attempted
rape.
The 12 year-old girl, was outside
Minges Coliseum directly across
from Ficklen Stadium when, accor-
ding to police records, two black
male juvenilles approached her.
Then, according to the girl's
statements, the older male grabbed
her arm and pulled out a knife. He
then told the girl he intended to have
sex with her.
According to Detective Lt. Gene
McAbee of the university police, the
incident was observed by an uniden-
tified adult female. The witness ran
towards the girl scaring the
assailants away.
The unidentified woman then
took the girl to ECU basketball staff
member Beth Burns' office. She was
calmed down and her parents were
notified.
McAbee said that the girl and the
witness left before the police arriv-
ed. He added that the girl was subse-
quently reached, but the observer
was never identified.
McAbee said that there are no
suspects in the case, but urges
anyone with knowledge of the situa-
tion to contact the university police.
"For the remainder of basketball
camp the reserve officers are work-
ing in plain clothes over at Minges
McAbee stated.
Photo By SCOTT LARSON
Photo
Think We Can Make It Back To Campus:
These students enjoy a bud and wagon ride at Moser's Farm. They undoubtedly wish the going wasn't as
rough, but a cold beer makes it much smoother.
University Earns Respect
Degrees Now Competitive In Market
By CHARLES ROADMAN
M�ff Wnlrr
East Carolina University, once
dubbed through out the state as
EZU, has grown into a university
that is respected.
No longer is E.C.U. considered
an alternate or second choice to
North Carolina State University or
the Univeristy of North Carolina,
for according to Howes Com-
prehensive Guide to Coleges,
degrees from ECU in art, business,
medical records, medical technology
and nursing can compete with
similar programs in any other
university in the state. And ECU'S
occupational therapy program is
considered the best in North
Carolina.
ECU's reputation has caught the
eye of prospective freshmen not on-
ly from North Carolina but also
from as far away as Illinois. Con-
necticut and Brazil.
Freshman applications are up b)
18 percent over last year, while
freshman enrollment is predicted to
increase by approximately three per-
cent.
Dr. Susan McDaniel, acting direc-
tor of admissions, feels that the ma-
jor factoi influencing the increasing
enrollment is the enthusiastic
reports that current students carry
with them to all parts of the state.
According to Chancellor John M.
Howell, barring an economical
disaster, enrollment at E.C.U. will
continue to increase at approximate-
ly 1 percent for the next ten years
Howell credits the increasing enroll-
ment to the advantagous location of
the university and the continual ef-
fort oi the university to maintain a
working relationship with the sur-
rounding community.
�Mont' with an increasing student
body arc plans for physical growth
ot the university. Plans have been
drawn up for a new 13 million dollar
classroom building which would
become the largest building on cam-
pus.
Appropriations tor the building
are expected in the 1982-83 budget,
and work on the building could
begin as early as the summer of
1983.
Two locations are currently being
considered for the building. The
first and least desirable is behind the
library which presently is the second
largest parking area on campus. The
second place under consideration is
the area between the steam plant
and science complex.
ECU Student Fasts
By JOHN WEYLER
Sliff Wrilrr
The bright blue tent on the mall
across from Flanagan building is
not there because a squatter is tak-
ing over the East Carolina campus.
It is there because student Glenn
Maughan is publicly fasting all this
week and, along with other
members of the ECU peace commit-
tee, using the area to voice his view-
points.
"Are you interested in helping
prevent world hunger, racism, pre-
judice, sexism, the arms race?" are
the questions being asked by the
peace committee.
They will be on the mall every day
this week from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. to
engage in informal discussions with
passers-by, distribute literature and
engage in various other activities.
One of the committee's activities
is taking a survey of people's at-
titudes about the threat of nuclear
war. They are also asking people to
sign a petition addressed to F.
Stewart Clark, the magistrate who
on June 7 sentenced ECU student
Patrick O'Neill to 90 days imprison-
ment.
O'Neill, a peace committee
member and East Carolinian staff
writer, was arrested for "willfully,
knowingly and unlawfully blocking
traffic while demonstrating
against the training of El
Salvadoran soldiers at Fort Bragg.
O'Neill has ccontinued his
political activism in prison by
organizing the other inmates and
protesting prison conditions.
Maughan hopes his fast will re-
mind people of the bad treatment he
believes O'Neill is receiving and
serve to symbolize the world hunger
situation.
He quoted a United Nations
estimate that 12,000 people die from
starvation daily and said, "Basically
I'm fasting as a symbol of how most
of the population of the world ex-
ists. That is, they don't have food,
thev wake up hungry, go to bed
hungry, spend their whole day
hungry
When asked why he was par-
ticipating in the ECU peace commit-
tee's activities. Jay Stone answered:
"Because I think the arms race is a
parasite sucking the material and
spiritual well-being out of the
planetary community
Environmentalists Oppose Helm's Bill On Pesticide Labeling
ByMlKEHAMER
NUff Wriler
Senate hearings began June 21 on
a proposal by Senator Jesse Helms,
R-N.C to limit public access to in-
formation on the content and
manufacturers of pesticides.
In introducing his bill to revise the
Federal Insecticide and Rodenticide
Act 1978, Helms stated that two
main problems have been causing
concern to the pesticide industry.
One problem is the amount of
data that must be provided to the
Environment Protection Agency for
registration of pesticides and other
purposes.
The other problem as presented
by Helms is in public access to
health and safety data. Helms said,
"the extensive test data submitted to
the EPA is not adquately protected
under the present law to prevent
competitors from gaining access to
it, and prevent the orginal
developers from recovering its in-
vestment and making a profit
Another Senate bill, introduced
by Senator S.I. Hayakawa,
R-Calif would keep state and local
governments from being tougher
than the federal government on
pesticide manufacture and use.
Environmentalist and public in-
terest groups have foimed a coali-
tion called the National Coalition
Against the Misuse of Pesticides,
and have spoken out against both
bills.
Jay Feldman, spokesman for the
national coalition, stated on July
12, that certain states would want
more data on pesticide than is cur-
rently available from the EPA. He
also stated that these states should
be free to research and legislate on
long-term effects of pesticides.
"The crux of the matter is that
states have a constitutional right to
deal with matter in the state and
there is no reason for the United
States Congress to impose restraints
on the states Feldman said.
Dr. Frank Guthrie, chairman of
the entomology department at
North Carolina State University,
testified before the Senate
Agriculture Commettiee in late June
on behalf of the March of Dimes
Birth Defect Foundation. He
reacted against the assertion pro-
duct secrecy is of paramount impor-
tance.
5 Contacted at his office on Mon-
day, Guthrie said that he felt that
there should be no secrecy involved
when pesticide may have the
possibility of causing birth defects.
"When it comes to the safety of
persons, this is more important than
company secerts Guthrie said.
Ms. Susanne Harker, chief of
policy and liaison staff with the
pesticide registration division of the
EPA was questioned on Monday
about the problem that Helms refer-
red to regarding the ammount of
data required of a pesticide
manufacturer in order to register a
new pesticide. She stated that the
amount of information required by
the EPA is, "very extensive, more
than you could fit in a briefcase
She explained that a product
registration may require up to 1,000
pages of data.
When asked about who perform-
ed toxology tests on new pesticides,
Harker explained that the pesticide
companies provide all the data con-
cerning the effect of new pesticides
and these results are then examined
by EPA scientists.
Feldman critized the EPA
because of its methodology in
testing pesticides. He said that the
coalition felt that too much testing
was conducted in secrecy without
the benefit of peer criticism in the
scientific community and through
scientific journals.
He stated that because of a
backlog, the EPA has not released
data on several new pesticides and
because of thisthe EPA is being
sued by the AFL-CIO and the Na-
tional Coalition Against the Misuse
of Pesticides.
In reply to this, Harker admitted
that there does exist a backlog at the
EPA but claimed that since the
Reagan adminstration has been in
office, strong emphasis has been put
on reducing the backlog of new
pesticide products.
Feldman mentioned that a bill
will be introduced on the House
floor in September by Leon Panetta
of California and Dan Glickman of
Kansas which will insure victims of
pesticides poisonings access to the
federal courts. "This is because the
laws in the separate states are so
unclear Feldman said.
Thomas R. Clark, deputy counsel
to the Senate Agriculture Commit-
tee which Helms chairs, spoke about
Helms' bill recently. "It is not in-
tended to deny or squelch people
with a legitimate interest in over-
sight over the EPA's activities
He also said, "you've got groups
like the March of Dimes and
migrant labor advocates who want
to keep a pretty close eye on
pesticides and their effects. But we
think the industry has come a long
way toward compromise, consider-
ing that at first they wanted the in-
formation restricted to everybody
On the pesticide front here in
North Carolina, Farmworkers Legal
Services has been lobbying in
Raleigh for a rule which would re-
quire farmers with labor camps and
10 or more agricultural employees
to provide portable drinking water
and handwashing facilities close to
the fields.
A public hearing was held two
weeks ago, attracting more than 100
people on both sides of the issue.
Several North Carolina facilities
are receiving federal funds for
seasonal and migrant farm workers
and are covered by a recent EPA re-
quirement to develop a pesticide
hazard management program.
According to a News and
Observer editorial on June 24, there
are 45,000 commercial products
containing 1,200 pesticides ingre-
dients available to American con-
sumer, and neither EPA or the N.C.
Department of Agriculture has a
. good handle on dangers faced by
chemical industry workers, farmers,
homeowners, migrant workers and
consumers.
'





?
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JULY 14, 1982
r
Announcements
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if you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
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The deadline for announcements
is 5 p m Friday tor the Tuesday
paper and 5pm Tuesday tor the
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nouncements received at'er these
deadlines will be printed
This space s available to ail
campus organizations and depart
ments
SOFTBALL
TOURNAMENT
The Second Summer Recreation
Slow Pitch Softball Tournament
will be held July 20 24 This will be
a double elimination tournament
With no entry fee open tc all ECU
faculty, students and staff Entry
deadline is Friday July '6 a' 5 00
p m For additional information
come by 204 Memorial Gym or call
757 AM?
CHAIRPERSON
The SGA is new accepting ap
plications for Fall Election
Chairperson ' MercVed persons
should appiy in person a'
Mendenhall Boom 228
APPLY NOW
Students who intend to apply to
maior in Social Work or Correc
tions m the Fall of 1982 should re
guest an application and an ap
pomtment for an interview from
the Department Office. 312 Carol
Belk (Allied Health Bunding)
For more information call Mrs
Joyner. 7576V61, Ext 218
Deadline for fall app:ica'ions
September 7. Students are en
couraged to apply during summer
school
ARE YOU
INTERESTED0
Are you interested in helping
prevent world hunoer. racism
preiucicc sexism, or the arms
race Are you interested in peace
and lustice issues and human
rights0 The ECU Peace Ccmmit
tee is sponsoring a display on tne
campus man across form
Flanagan Bu'ldmg The display
will be there all week, sc come out
and discuss these mportant topics
with us!
PERSONAL CARE
ATTENDANTS
Applications are needed from
those interested in becoming Per
sonal Care Attendants to
wheelchair students. We are par
ticularly interested in anyone who
ahs a background of assisting in
divduais whim their activities of
daily living. For futher details,
contact: Office of Handicapped
Student Services, 212 Wichard
Building, 752 6799
OFF-CAMPUS
HOUSING
"If you will be needing a room
mate or would like to find and
share an apartment for Fall, con
tact the OH Campus Housing Of
fice, 211 Whichard Building
757 6881, before June 14 Orienta
tion will begin at that time and
many students will be seeking ac
commodations We need your
listing
CATHOLIC NEWMAN
CENTER
The Catholic Newman Center
would like to invite everyone to
join in with us for celebrating
Mass every Sunday in the Biology
Lecture Hall starting at 12 30 and
5 00 every Wednsday at the
Catholic Newman Center Dinner
and good friendship follows Mass
every Wednsday, so come out and
bring a friend
TENNIS
First Annual Colonial Invita
'ional Doubles Tournament, Mens.
Ladies, and Mixed Doubles m
Edenton NC at the City C urts on
July 23 25 Pick uo entry terms at
H L Hodges o' Bonos i-oorting
Goods Entry deadl.ne is Mcnday,
July 19 a1 noon
PERSONAL CARE
ATTENDANTS
Applications are needed from
those interested m becom.ng Per
�sonal Care Attendan's fe
wheelchair studf rts We art: par
ticularly interes'ec in anyone who
ahs a backyrour-rt of assisting in
dividuais whith 'heir activities of
da'ly living For fu'her details.
contact Office of Hanaicappec
Student Services 212 Wichard
Building. 757 67W
Classifieds
Pizza inn
Greenville's Best Pizzas Are
Now Being Delivered!
Most delivery pizzas lack in
true qualtty and have 'hidden'
delivery costs in the price
PIZZA INN has changed all that.
We sell our delivery
pizzas at vlenu Prices!
No Surcharge. We also
give FREE Drinks with
our large and giant
pizzas. TRY US TODAY!
tf
CARICATURES bv Weyler Have
� fultcolor. 8 by 10 cartoon por
trait done of yourself or a loved
one. A unique gift idea Can
752 5775
COTTAGE for Rent at N Myrtle
Beach Sleeps 6 Rent by
week weekend Call 75 020
ROOMS FOR RENT West 5th
Street Single. $125.00, double
580 00 Utilities included, call
7s 6336
NEED A PAPER TYPED IN A
HURRY? Call Mary at 355 2460 for
quick, dependable service Pro-
ofreading offered Will be glad to
type papers of all sues Inexpen
sive. but professional
MALE ROOMMATE needed to
share energy efficient duplex. 3
blocks from campus Half ex
penses. Call Jimmy at 752 3895 or
Ml Mil. Ready Aug. I
NEED PROFESSIONAL Typist
for your term paper, thesis,
manuscript, etc & Call Susan
Byers � 758 5488 or 758 8241.
COLLEGE REP WANTED to
distribute "Student Rate subscrip
tion cards at this campus. Good in
come, no selling involved For in
formation and application write
to: Allen Lowrance. Director, 2S1
Glenwood Drive. Mooresville, NC
2115
SHARE TRAILER IS White s
Trailer park near Pitt Plaza on
ECU bus route S30 month plus
half utility
FOR SALE Good used furniture
Sofa 535. club chair JIG All in good
shape clean Call 752 5775
DESK CHAIR and TV for sale in
good condition Can 757 3107.
FOR SALE A new mattress with
a bedroom set Call 758 5697
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
beginning in August for fall
semester Completely furnished 2
bedroom half rent and utilities.
On bus route, call now 758 2799
Professional TYPING service ex
perience. quality work, IBM Selec
trie typewriter Call Lanie Shive.
758 5301 or Gail Joyner. 756 1062
TYPING: Term, thesis, resumes
dissertations, etc Professional
quality at lowest rates Call Kem
pie Dunn anytime 752 6733
TYPING TERM PAPERS ALL
SIZES Proofreading ottered
Dependable typist Call Mary.
355 2460
BASS Guitarist Top 40 Country
Band based n Greenville. NC Sue
cessful recording act with steady
bookings Serious inquiries only
(919) 758 8772 night '56 8878 day
CALL 758 6266
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IHt EASTCAROl IN1AN
JU1 Y 14.1982
Cocaine Seized
In Drug Bust
i
R.J. Reynolds To Pay Advertisement Penalty
( MM 1 NOOGA,
(UPI) A van
aded with 2t duffle
filled with the
inland seizure of
U.S history
as moved to An un-
�sed loc ai
and one ol
s in i he case
d on bond.
. ount)
ie I 11in
d county
led to the
tuent d-
to move
mnds of
. aine,
.n guard-
armed
a nd
deputie
. t v" 11
' 111 li
thai
mond.

v 1 i
ty by "backwoods
criminals" for the past
six months.
One of those ar-
rested, 19-year-old
Mark Scarborough,
was released on $50,000
bond today after
relatives put up two
pieces ol property.
Dickson warned the
idatives would forfeit
the property if Scar-
boiough jumped bond.
�Ml nine were ar-
raigned Monday before
Dickson and face a
preliminary hearing Ju-
ts 20 on conspiracy to
violate federal drug
laws If convicted, each
faces a maximum 15
years in prison and a
v:o.iXX) tine.
One ot the nine,
Robert George, 59. of
Atlanta, was being held
under $5(X).000 bond.
Court officials said a
bond hearing tor him
was scheduled for to-
day
No bond was set tor
Scarborough's father.
lackie Wayne Scar-
borough, 40. ot Pon-
ic, Mich . because he
has no: begun serving a
5 yeai contempt of
court sentence.
WASHINGTON
(UPI) � RJ. Reynolds
Tobacco Co. Inc. has
agreed to pay a penalty
and alter its cigarette
advertisements to settle
charges that it did not
�'clearly and con-
spicuously" display the
surgeon general's
health warning, the
federal Trade Commis-
sion said Tuesday.
The FTC said the
penalties result from
alleged violations of a
1972 consent order re-
quiring the six major
icigarette companies to
include a boxed state-
ment with the warning
in clear and con-
spicuous lettering on all
cigarette ads.
The required letter-
ing says, "Warning:
The Surgeon General
has Determined That
Cigarette Smoking Is
Dangerous to Your
Health
The five other com-
panies, who already
have settled identical
charges, are Philip
Morris Inc Lorillard
Division of Loew's
Theaters Inc Brown
and Williamson Tobac-
co Corp American
Brands Inc. and Liggett
and Myers Inc.
The Justice Depart-
ment filed the case at
the request of the FTC
in the U.S. District
Court for the Southern
District of New York.
Consent judgments
have the force of law,
but are for settlement
purposes only and do
not constitute admis-
sion by the company
that it violated the law.
"Reynolds has
agreed to pay $100,000
in civil penalties to set-
tle charges that it did
not clearly and con-
spicuously disclose the
surgeon general's
health warning in all
cigarette adver-
tisements FTC said.
It said the company,
which produces
Camels, Winstons,
Salems and other
cigarettes, has agreed
to display the warning
in all advertising, use
larger lettering for
billboard ads and put
the warning on vending
machines.
"The company also
agreed to print the war-
ning in a single line
across the bottom of
the billboard, rather
than in a box; carry the
warning in ads appear-
ing in the United States
and all American ter-
ritories; and, in
foreign-language ads,
disclose the message in
the same language as in
the ads the FTC said.
David Fishel, public
relations director for
R.J. Reynolds, in
Winston-Salem, N.C
said the settlement
"involves no big
changes for us, because
we've been in com-
pliance with everything
else for going on three
years, and as far as the
billboards are concern-
ed we've been doing
this for six months
The 1975 complaint
against the six top com-
panies said they had
failed to display the
health warning on ven-
ding machines, had not
disclosed the warning
at all m other advertis-
ing, printed the warn-
ing in smaller-than
required lettering on
billboards, failed to
translate it in foreign-
language ads and im-
properly placed the
warning in some ads.
An agreement reach-
ed in 1979 covered all
six companies, but R.J
Reynolds objected to
the size of health warn
ing lettering on
billboards. H went to
court against the FTC
in the spring of 1981,
but lost.
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July 14, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
U.S. Congress
Can They Really Be Trusted?
The most recent episode in the
saga of U.S. politics � the current
investigation on Capitol Hill into
alleged drug use and sexual miscon-
duct � says it all.
What a tragic state of affairs it is
when a nation's leaders cannot
refrain from such conduct. And
they wonder why Americans don't
trust politicians.
Although the history of corrup-
tion in United States politics is prac-
tically as old as the U.S. itself, most
of us best remember the past decade
as a period of corruption explosion.
First came Watergate, with its
break-ins, investigations and subse-
quent arrests and resignations of
many of the country's top politi-
cians.
Next came the infamous
ABSCAM hearings. Our country's
leaders caught taking bribes.
Now, two former congressional
pages claim that several con-
gressmen have engaged in the illegal
use and marketing of cocaine as well
as in illicit sexual behavior.
Just when will this immoral,
decadent conduct come to an end?
How long will Americans have to
live with the fact that its govern-
ment cannot be trusted?
Of course, it may be "jumping
the gun" to condemn anyone at this
point. After all, no one has been
convicted of these crimes as yet. But
as has been the case with every other
"scandal" on Capitol Hill, so-
meone is guilty. You can bet on
that. Maybe not all of those accus-
ed, but someone. And even that is
"one too many
It is also wrong to characterize all
of Congress by the acts of
(presumably and hopefully) a few.
Granted, there are many highly-
moral congressmen and women in
Washington. Still, it is frightening
to realize that even a small percen-
tage of our legislators could be so
dimented, so immoral. With this
latest "scandal politics in the
United States has reached the very
depths of perversion.
The argument that lawbreakers
shouldn't be lawmakers is valid
though overused nowadays. But it is
also tragic that that argument has to
be used in the first place. One would
hope that honesty would be a
premise (as opposed to a rare quali-
ty) upon which political careers are
built. Unfortunately, many times,
one would be dead wrong.
Who do American youth have to
pattern their lives after when year
after year, their own government
sinks deeper and deeper into the
proverbial "jaws" of corruption?
How can the United States function
as a unified nation in light of this
and other scandalous affairs in
Washington?
We, as citizens, should be outrag-
ed by what has happened. The very
heart of our legislative system has
been perverted by criminals. And
despite the number who will emerge
from these investigations with clean
records, the reputation of the U.S.
Congress has, once again, been tar-
nished.
But what is, perhaps, more
disgusting is the fact that we, as
Americans, have become almost im-
mune to such a shock as this. News
of corruption on Capitol Hill has
become so commonplace that
nowadays it draws scarcely a second
glance.
Certainly, politicians should not
be expected to be without flaw.
Mistakes are as much a part of
humanity as is breathing. But the il-
legal use of cocaine and homosexual
acts with minors are not mere
mistakes. Rather, they are a reflec-
tion of a sad state of affairs, a state
of affairs that must not persist if
our government is to survive and
function in any meaningful form.
Expert Tells The 'Inside' Story
Shuttle Flight A Hoax!
"Space Shuttle Columbia, flight four
landing scene take one 10 nine
eight seven six five four three
two one Roll cameras action
Just when you thought you'd heard it
all; just when you thought the world had
run out of surprises, someone somewhere
does something to throw you off. It never
fails.
The newest surprise comes to us, of
course, from California. Lancaster,
California, to be exact. Something else
that never fails.
But what makes this latest discovery, er
"uncovery so magnificent is that it will
undoubtedly change the way each and
every American views the world. This
startling piece of information will shock
even the most stable mind. So, be advised.
Last week, in a startling, biting state-
ment, Charles K. Johnson, a resident of
Lancaster (a small city near Edwards Air
Force Base) revealed to the news media
that the latest flight of the Space Shuttle
Columbia was a mere hoax.
"This airpiane landed Johnson admit-
ted, "but it's just a simple, stupid old
airplane caried piggyback and dropped
over Lancaster It hasn't orbited the
Earth; that we know
Needless to say, Johnson's discovery
came as a sharp blow to NASA resear-
chers, engineers and astronauts, who had
carefully planned every detail of the hoax
to avoid such an embarrassment. But
thank goodness at least some Americans
weren't "taken in" by NASA's latest trick.
As Johnson boasted, "Nobody in the
whole Lancaster area believes it's for
real
Mike Hughes
Just The Way
It Is
It is also interesting to note that Johnson
is currently president of the Flat Earth
Society, a group which has disproved
many of today's accepted scientific
theories.
The group found out that not only was
the latest flight a fluke but that man has
never gone into space. Furthermore,
Johnson is certain that there are no
satellites orbiting the Earth, a fact that has
TV weathermen running frantic.
Johnson's Flat Earth Research Society
International currently stands at 1,600
members. No doubt, each is as highly-
trained in astronomy, astrology, physics
and the other sciences as is Johnson
himself, a janitor.
"Campus Forum"
And to think that all this time, we
thought the Earth was round. Almost
makes one wonder where r.he edges might
be.
Johnson's findings, as expected, have
caused mixed emotions among space ex-
perts nationwide, but as of Tuesday,
science textbook publishers were ignoring
the Johnson breakthroughs. "Hell ihey
contended, "we're never sure what's going
on anyway
Spokesmen for NASA, apparently cm
barrassed by Johnson's discovery, refused
to comment. Naturally then, the first
scheduled flight of the Challenger
spacecraft will be postponed until scientists
can figure out some way to get that
crazy thing to fly
Speculation has it that Johnson, inspired
by his instant fame, will now seek to
disprove Einstein's theory of relativity by
submitting that theory to the Flat Earth
Society for a club vote. Several of the
group's members have already vowed to
kill the damned thing, 'cause it never
made sense anyway
Future topics of consideration to go
before the Flat Earth Society's executive
council include: Do birds really migrate, or
is it just a hoax? Were Plato and Aristotle
actually from Brooklyn? And, did Elvis
take drugs because he had cancer?
Remember, you heard it here first.
Peace Movement Strives For Victory In Defeat
There is a need for clarifying, perhaps
redefining, Dennis Kilcoyne's letter on
"Imperialism This need arises from
what some readers may derive from
Dennis' description of the anti-nuclear
weapons movement. I prefer it to be
labeled a peace movement, for it encom-
passes much broader goals than just the
elimination of nuclear weapons.
Dennis' statement about the move-
ment being a defeatist one is correct, but
the negative connotations many readers
might associate with that term is not.
The movement is a defeatist one only in
the sense that it wishes to defeat the at-
titudes and practices of fear, hatred,
racism and exploitation.
Those involved in the movement will
eradicate these problems through educa-
tion. Already, such programs as Ground
Zero and Ground Swell are bringing
people from all walks of life to discuss
the reality of nuclear war. By sharing
ideas surrounding the use and produc-
tion of nuclear weapons as well as infor-
ming the public of the real threat to
humanity these weapons pose, the peace
movement will have help put an end to
the fear and hatred these weapons repre-
sent. Maybe a day will come soon when
no one need live in fear.
At the present time, however, the
threat is very real, and everyone is
justified in being afraid. As Dr. David
Goodc of the Bowman Gray School of
Medicine recently stated, "Most threats
we can turn off for the moment, but
they're still there people, particularly
young people feel they're not going to
make it or they're not sure Dr. Goode
sees many more people these days ex-
periencing the fear from nuclear
Weapons. He also feels strongly about
the peace movement, adding, "It's
healthy to say 'Look, I've got this
threat. I should do something about it
To deny that it (the nuclear threat) exists
is not in your long-term interests It's
a little nutty The peace movement
probably believes we're all a little nutty
for allowing the growth of nuclear
weapons to reach its current dimensions.
The ongoing START negotiations in
Geneva are encouraging, yet how nutty
is it not to include MX missiles, Trident
subs and B-l bombers in the discus-
sions? Do the Soviets and Americans
truly want arms reduction, or are we
hearing the usual "lip service" humanity
gets from its leaders these days?
The struggle for peace is an intense
one. As Kilcoyne points out in his letter,
the world suffers from warmongering
political creeps who deny people from
living in peace and equality. Fear,
hatred, racism and exploitation are
worldwide afflictions propagated by
those now in power. The peace move-
ment has grown because of these prac-
tices, and it will continue to grow with
the common belief that such practices
and attitudes must be stopped.
If Dennis had attended the anti-nuke
rally at N.Y. recently, he would have
realized as I did how much everyone
there recognized all to well that we are,
indeed, defeatists. To put an end to pre-
judice and racism were major topics at
the rally. Again, I believe the movement
will use education as its tool to defeat
the hatred of one or another due to skin
color, sex or religious practices.
The work to be done in this area is a
monumental task. We have elected a
U.S. senator who claims he cannot find
qualified minorities so he has none on
his staff. Senator Helms claims he is not
a bigot, yet the truth lies in one's own in-
terpretation. It is also disurbing that
Greenville fosters prejudice. 1 have
heard too often from too many people
that they have been denied the common
pleasures of living because of their skin
color. It is sickening to note such
behavior exists, and it will make it all the
harder to eliminate. Let those who prac-
tice racism be warned, for the peace
movement will not support you.
In another part of Kilcoyne's letter, he
mentions locating some nation that has
adopted totalitarian beliefs and govern-
ing systems. I am not interested in a
search for this political entity. 1 am not
so smug as to think that it doesn't exist
but believe if it did exist, the similarities
between it and other nations would be
more pronounced than the differences.
Such a system would probably pay "lip
service" to humanity while going about
its business of exploiting third-world na-
tions. It would also be similar to today's
nations in that it would provide token
support of human rights and needs, and
such support would be extended to a
limited, token, privileged few. Your
mythical nation, Dennis, would
manufacture and export weapons like
our own. But I seriously doubt it would
reach the level of horror America and
the Soviet Union find themselves in to-
day.
If this gets too "mumbojumbo" for
you, Dennis, perhaps you should stop
reading this letter, pick up any
newspaper, view any television to sec if
you can deal with the insanity presented
for all to see. World leadership is out of
control. Prejudicial attitudes, fear and
hatred are being fostered and
perpetuated, and, unfortunately, we on-
ly see a small picture of what goes on.
The small picture includes the college
students, faculty members, scientists,
doctors, nuns, priests, civilians from all
ways of life who are starved, beaten, ex-
iled and killed by the thousands every
day, while our democratic and not-so-
democratic governments reign over us.
The Statue of Liberty sits in N.Y. Har-
bor for all to see, and the words, "Give
me your tired, your poor, your huddled
masses yearning to breathe remain
the ultimate paradox for thousands of
foreign refugees rotting behind the barb-
ed wire of concentration camps here in
the "good old U.S. of A Patrick
O'Neill sits in federal prison as
testimony to the heinous crime of our
government's training of El Salvadoran
death squads. Pat cools his jets while the
civilian population of El Salvador lives
in fear. Thank you very much Uncle
Sam; thank you for sending more bullets
and the people with the know-how to
continue the civil war. Governments,
ours and others, continue their destruc-
tive means, locking up those who might
speak out against such treachery of
humanity.
Yes, the movement is a defeatist one,
and the price paid is expensive, it is the
cost of Martin Luther King, Jr lying in
his own blood on a Memphis balcony. It
is the loss of civilian life in South Africa
and Lebanon, where leaders have decid-
ed to answer the questions of freedom
with machine guns but not with words.
It is the cost of losing one's trust in
humanity when in Greenville, people are
denied the common pleasures of living
through the prejudice that exists. And
the beat goes on, and on
The defeatist attitude, the peace
movement, must be strong, unyielding
to those who make false promises and
deliver more of the same fear, hatred,
prejudice and exploitation that have
plagued humanity. Maybe all of this
"soapboxing" is best summed up by an
event at the N.Y. rally. Small children
led the hundreds of thousands of mar-
chers through the streets with signs bear-
ing the slogan "Help us save ourselves
from ourselves Perhaps if we realize
we are all part of these problems and can
be part of the solution, the struggle will
end soon.
Glenn Maughan
Inter. Ed.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JULY 14, 1982
Page 5
Disney's Most
Recent Blazes
Hi-Tech Trail
By JOHN WEYLER
SUM Writer
Wasn l it the desire to create life
that inspired Victor Frankenstein to
his greatest efforts? That's the in-
spiration of computer animation �
you can create a world" � com-
puter programmer Lance Williams,
quoted in Science Digest.
The creation of the world through
computers is exactly what occurs in
the new Walt Disney production
TROS, now playing at the Buc-
caneer Theatres in Greenville.
Writer-director Steven Lisberger,
aided by an immense crew of artists
and technicians, has used the latest
in computer technology to give form
to the fantastic universe that exists
inside a computer system. TRON is
flawed but visually dazzling and
thought-provoking film.
The storyline follows three com-
puter programmers, Flynn (Jeff
Bridges), Lora (Cindy), and Alan
(Bruce Boxleitner), in their fight
against Dillinger (David Warner),
an unscrupulous executive of EN-
COM, the communications con-
glomerate for which they all work.
While the trio toils away at their ter-
minals trying to break through the
Master Control (a program that
hides Dillinger's dark secrets and
has gotten out of control), Flynn is
zapped by a laser beam and
disintegrated.
Flynn finds himself reintegrated
in the world he and thousands of
other computer programmers
created but never knew existed: the
realm inside the computer. This
electrical land, the terrain of which
is constantly changing at the push of
a button, is inhabited by walking,
talking, humanoid programs, the
alter-egos and worshippers of the
programmers, or Users, who devis-
ed them.
As an User in a universe of pro-
grams, Flynn has incredible powers.
He joins up with the electronic war-
rior TRON, a security program con-
cocted by Flynn's friend Alan, and
the two continue their scheme to
destroy Dillinger and the Master
Control. In the computer world,
See'TRON Page 6
Two "light cycles" race across the video game grid in this scene from Walt Disney's state-of-the-art adventure TRON
Andy's 'Frankenstein' A Maximum Gross-Out
By JOHN WEYLER
Staff VMler
The next two installments of The Student Union
Films Committee's summer cinema series will honor one
of filmdom's most durable characters � Frankenstein.
Mel Brooks' modern comedy classic Young Frankens-
tein will be shown tonight, July 14, at 8 p.m. Next Mon-
day's presentation will be the X-rated cult film Andy
Warhols Frankenstein, to be shown at 9 p.m. Both
features will be screened in Mendenhall Student
Center's Hendrix Theatre. Admission is free with ECU
ID and Activity Card or MSC Membership.
When a nightmare inspired Mary Shelley to write her
1818 novel Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus,
she had little idea that her story about a man who made
a monster would become one of the predominant myths
of popular culture. A moral fable about man's in-
humanity to man and a prophecy of the coming
mechanization of mankind, as well as a masterpiece of
gothic horror, Frankenstein has mesmerized the world
in general and filmmakers in particular.
The innumerable filmic interpretations of Shelley's
story range from the sublime � the 1930's series with
Boris Karloff � to the ridiculous � Young Frankens-
tein, Mel Brooks' affectionate parody of that series.
Certainly the strangest version is Andy Warhol's
Frankenstein(914).
A worldwide poll considered H arhol's Frankenstein
to be one of the two hundred worst movies ever made,
prompting The Golden Turkey Awards authors Harry
and Michael Medved to describe the film as "an amaz-
ing 3-D retelling of the classic story that has little to do
with the original Gore abounds in the lab of the
necrophilic Dr. Frankenstein, as do terrible perfor-
mances. Listen for this line: "To know life, you first
must fuck death through the gall bladder
Unfortunately, Monday night's showing will not be in
the original 3-D (unlike the Films Committee's recent
presentation of It Came From Outer Space, complete
with glasses). Or perhaps we should say fortunately, for
few viewers can handle having bloody human entrails
flung in their faces in three dimensions.
Everything else remains intact for the July 19 screen-
ing: the flying guts, the kinky sex, the outrageous
humor, in short, everything that was conjured by the
twisted imaginations of writer-director Paul Morrissey
and producer Warhol. Andy, you will recall, is the apos-
tle of the avant garde, whose first major work was a
painted portrait of a Campbell's soup can, and whose
earlier cinematic efforts include a 24-hour long static
visualization of the Empire State Building.
"What does it all mean?" asked The Sew York
Times critic Paul Gardner in his review of Andy
Warhols Frankenstein. "Probably that today's
moviegoers, who can see all the hardcore fare they want
at the so-called skin flicks, prefer their sex spiked with
horror, and with humor. Audiences are laughing at
Frankenstein, his sexually repressed, bug-eyed assistant
and the doctor's sister-wife, who makes the fatal
mistake of seducing a zombie. They even giggle when
one victim's stitches pop open, spilling something that
looks like beet soup-and-knishes across the screen
Or, as Warhol himself said regarding his Frankstein:
"We're interested in making nice clean comedies. But
violence is what people want, so we're giving it to them.
That's the secret of my success � just give the people
what thev want
Rockabilly's Jerry Lee Lewis Winning A Long
Fight Against Illness And His Own Lifestyle
MEMPHIS, Tenn. (UP1) � Entertainer Jerry Lee
Lewis fought off death against worse than 50-50 odds
after major surgery last summer and has lived up to the
utterance he made as he left the hospital: "The Killer is
back
A year later, the 46-year-old musician who pioneered
the rockabilly style that was mastered by Elvis Presley is
following a full concert schedule. And, he's "singing
better than ever according to J. W. Whitten, his
manager in Memphis.
Returning last weekend from gigs in Flint, Mich and
Nashville, Ind the irrepressible performer will travel to
St. Clairsville and Salem, Ohio, this Saturday and Sun-
day.
Lewis' frenetic lifestyle quieted down after his critical
bout with death that started with a ruptured stomach
June 30, 1981, but his professional life continues to be
active, Whitten said.
On stage, the singer still entrances his audiences with
piano-pounding performances using fist and foot to
strike the ivories, but Lewis' associates try to temper the
master.
"He may not put out quite as much energy as before,
because we tell him not to said Whitten. "We want
him to stay around for a long time
Normally a 162-pounder, Lewis emerged Aug. 29
See LEWIS, Page 6
Now Batting 1,000
'Shenandoah' Another Success
Roos Recreates Lead From Broadway Experience
r�.r Boo leads a cast of some 20 singers and dancers in Shenandoah. For more than 30 theatrical years he has
SZl2 Broadway shows including Brigadoon, Mame, How to Succeed and Shenandoah, in which he
JE! En�role of Charlie Anderson. He recreates this role for the ECU Summer Theatre production of
2?!L JT3 and repertory credits include The Merchant of Venice at Lincoln Center, The Price Side by
Udey SoVdhZ Man of La Mane ha. Bloomer Girl, Feather Top, Street Scene and a six-month 77-c.ties tour of
Deathtrap.
By JOHN WEYLER
Staff Writer
Moving from the gregariousness of Grease, with its
raunch, rock 'n' roll and high school hi-jinx, to the
folksy country setting of the Shenandoah Valley, the
East Carolina Summer Theatre has produced another
professional, highly entertaining musical.
Shenandoah is a sentimental celebration of the simple
life and virtues, an often exhuberant yet also tragic
story, with musical numbers ranging from lusty hoe-
downs to love songs to hymnals. On opening night
(Monday) the Summer Theatre cast and crew were able
to create all these moods and styles with success.
The story takes place during the Civil War, and its
relation to one man, Charlie Anderson, who's determin-
ed that his family will stay out of it. He, his now-
deceased wife, and his daughter and six sons turned a
patch of Virginia wilderness into a prosperous farm
without the aid of a single slave, so Anderson sees no
reason why his sons should fight someone else's war.
But the conflict comes to them anyway when the
youngest boy is taken prisoner, sending the family in
pursuit and on a path leading to tragedy and despair,
until the final scenes of acceptance and healing.
Casper Roos stars as Charlie Anderson, repeating his
role in the original Broadway production. He is a
powerful stage prescence, with a fine voice capable of
handling both quiet communions with the spirit of his
wife and robust ballads. Roos also shows considerable
comedic talents in the show's funniest scene, a talk with
his fumbling future son-in-law (Paul Myers).
Regarding Roos' roost, the actors playing the five
older Anderson boys (Michael W. Hill, Mitch Nathan,
Rodger Baldwin, Chris Phillips, John Gibson) all give
professional performances, especially during the foot-
stomping, almost slapstick number, "Next To Lovin' (I
Like Fightin') However, none of them is especially
memorable, as none of them is very individualized ex-
cept for Mitch Nathan as James.
Nathan shares the spotlight with the excellent Patricia
Preston as his wife Anne, in the quiet sentimental song
"Violets and Silverbells Preston gets a chance to be
funny and lively in the humorous number "Freedom
accompanied by Eric Jennings. In his difficult role as
Gabriel, a slave from a nearby farm, Jennings is both
touching and quite comical. Usually paired with Aaron
Neimann as the littlest Anderson, Robert, Jennings
shows off his skills to Neimann's disadvantage, though
the young actor is talented.
The brightest star of Shenandoah is Babs Winn, as
the sweet but straight-shootin' Anderson daughter, Jen-
ny, a role contrasting with her slutly, streetwise Rizzo in
Grease. In a brawl with government agents, singing A
heartwarming songs like We Make A Beautiful Pair and
Papas Gonna Make It Alright, and clowning around in
the hilarious number Over The Hill, Winn has enough
zest and spark to light up the whole stage.
Another star of Shenandoah is the sets. With just a
few finely-detailed painted peices, accompanied by well-
timed, realistically-sounding effects and creative
lighting, enough atmosphere is created so that the au-
dience can easily imagine the rest. Gregory Buch's set
designs and David Downing's lighting, in union with
Mavis Ray's choreography and musical staging, Joe
Distefano's leading of the orchestra, and Edgar R.
Loessin's direction and the rest of the crew and cast
combine to make Shenandoah another triumph for the
East Carolina Summer Theatre. Shenandoah will be
presented each night this week, with curtain time at 8:15
p.m.
The next production to pack people into McGinnis
Theatre will be Cabaret, opening next Monday night
and running throught Saturday. She Loves Me will be
the final show of the summer season, running from July
26-31. Tickets may be purchased at the McGinnis Box
Office or reserved by calling 757-6390.
-�:�. . � ?��� �� -� ar s . ��





THE EAST CAROL INI AN
JULY 14, 1982
'TRON' Tech's Best
Continued From Page 5
Dillinger is a villianous warrior named SARK,
while the MC is a god-like force with a James
Earl Jonesian voice.
TRON, SARK and their fellow programs, are
portrayed by the same actors who play their
human counterparts. They are the only "real"
elements in the computer universe � everything
else is "played" by computer images, animation
and optical effects. While computer-generated
art is becoming increasingly commonplace today,
its extensive use and unique beauty and
dynamism in this film makes TRO a landmark.
POSITIONS
OPEN
FOR
SALES
PEOPLE
Apply In Person at I
(The East Carolinian"
Tues July 20 i
From 2 p.m4 p.m.
TROK's faults are found mostly in the "real"
world. The overall dramatic structure is weak
and predictable, the characterizations are
shallow and one-dimensional, the "reality"
scenes are unimaginatively directed. Once the ac-
tion enters the electronic wonderland, however,
the viewer is awed by a spectacular show of light,
color and motion.
Another possible flaw of TRO is that all the
high-tech jargon will fly right over the heads of
most "byte brains" such as this reviewer. This
does not mean that to most people TRON will
not be enjoyable, it's just that if one wants to
understand it, they sould take along a computer
programmer to the theatre with them.
Lewis Still In Race
Continued From Page 5
from a 61-day stay under intensive care at
Methodist Hospital South in Memphis weighing
128 pounds.
After Lewis' second stomach operation last
summer, the unstoppable entertainer battled to
stay alive with poorer than a 50-50 chance of sur-
vival, doctors said at the time.
Lewis has since worked his way back up to 162
pounds and adheres to doctors' orders to watch
his lifestyle and abstain from the superhuman
schedule of two shows a night, six or seven times
a week, which he followed before his collapse.
"He basically leads a quiet life now said
Whitten. "He socializes occasionally, but not
like he used to
That's a longshot from the old Jerry Lee.
"I'm the lonliest man in the business that's
made $15 million and spent $17 million, but the
thing about it, I've had a hell of a good time
Lewis once said.
Every Thursday
COLLEGE NITE
East Carolina
SUMMER THEATRE
the best in
ROCK'N'ROLL
7oz. pony bottles on
Special All Summer
Bring Your Quarters
Door Open Al 9pm
July 12 17
Singularly beautiful'
NY Times
jjjBM&ay
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Boston Globe
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NBC
'Clean as a whistle,
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Christian Science
Monitor
ECU Students $5.00
J.A. UNIFORMS
SHOP
All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes,
shoes, and hose. Also � used ECU
nurses uniforms. Trade ins allowed.
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive.
Near Hollowell's Drug and old hospital.
?�
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TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE AT
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Call 757-6391
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
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1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JULY 14, 1982
Page 7
One Was Magic Number
�� � � , � -f
Pirates Reach Tourney
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tft

By CINDY PLEASANTS
Sf�fU Utlor
One was the magic number for
the East Carolina Pirates Monday
night.
That's how many wins the Bucs
needed to edge out UNC-Chapel
Hill and earn a berth in the North
State Summer League Baseball
Tournament.
And ECU got it, shutting out the
UNC-Wilmington Seahawks, 10-0,
in the second game of a
doubleheader.
The Pirates may have gotten a lit-
tle worried after losing the first
game, 5-4.
But ECU pitcher Chubbie Butler
tossed a three-hitter in the second to
assure ECU of a win over the
Seahawks.
The nightcap win gave ECU an
11-20 record, while UNC-W is now
14-16.
Butler struck out five and walked
one, pitching his first shutout ever
at Harrington field.
In the second contest, ECU
scored their first run in the second
inning when Todd Evans hit a cou-
bk and was brought in by a single
from Mike Williams.
The next inning belonged to the
Pirates all the way. Williams hit a
three-run homer to boost ECU's
lead to 6-0.
Ricky Nichols led off the hitting
streak with a single, then stole se-
cond and scored on a triple by Kelly
Robinette. Robinette came in after
John Hallow singled, making it 3-0.
Williams was up next, hitting a
homer over the 350-yard fence, his
second of the year.
The Pirates scored four more runs
in the bottom of the fifth. Robert
Langston singled home Jack Curl-
ings and Nichols tripled to bring in
Mark Shank and Langston. Nichols
then scored on an error.
Nichols went three-for-three to
lead the Pirates and Williams was
two-for-four with four RBI's.
Williams had three hits and six
RBI's in two games.
In the first game, ECU retaliated
twice to tie the game going into the
fifth, but a homer from UNC-W's
centerfielder Don Stephenson gain-
ed the Seahawks a 5-4 lead.
ECU had the chance to score in
the sixth when Evans walked and
Curlings hit a single, but Williams
flew out and Art Barnhardt ground-
ed into a forceplay to end the inn-
ing.
The Pirates passed up another
chance for a win in the third when
the Pirates made two consecutive er-
rors just before a homer from
Seahawk John Slaughter.
The Pirates led in the first inning,
1-0, after Hallow's homer but UNC-
W came back �vith three runs.
ECU pitcher Charlie Smith, who
pitched a five-hitter, struck out two
batters in the third before Stephen-
son reached on an error by Evans.
Slaughter then hit a homer to give
the Seahawks a 3-1 lead.
ECU scored in the bottom of the
third when Nichols walked, stole se-
cond and scored on a single by
Robinette.
The Seahawks scored in the
fourth, however, when Brad
Walters doubled to score Robert
Hudson.
The Pirates tied the game again in
the bottom of the inning after
Williams hit a two run single.
Hallow singled and Evans walk-
ed, then both moved up a base on
Curlings' sacrifice. Both runners
came in when Williams hit a single
to center field.
"We really felt like we should
have won the first ballgame Over-
ton said. "We played hard enough
but not well enough
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Pirate Baseball Action Against The Tar Heels
'4
Phofo bv SCOTT LARSON
Bucs Split Doubleheader
With Cellar-Bound Tar Heels
By KENNETH BOLTON
East Carolina and UNC-Chapel
Hill swapped fine pitching perfor-
mances on July 6 to split a
doubleheader at Harrington field.
ECU downed the Tar Heels, 8-0
in the first game before being edged
out by Chapel Hill, 5-2 in the second
contest.
In the first game, ECU's Bob
Davidson won his fifth game of the
year, blanking out the Tar Heels.
Davidson's teammates gained a 4-0
lead, however, before he ever threw
his first pitch.
John Hallow opened the game
with an infield hit and then proceed-
ed to steal second. After Kelly
Robinette walked, David Wells beat
out a bunt down the third baseline
to fill the bases.
Todd Evans greeted Carolina
starter John Wilde with a single
through the middle, scoring both
Hallow and Robinette.
Two outs later, a wild pitch and
an infield single by Robert Wells
produced two more runs and chases
Wilde.
While Davidson was handcuffing
the Heels with five strikeouts and
allowing only six hits, the Pirates
scored four more runs in the sixth.
David Wells hit a triple and Todd
Evans's two-run homer highlighted
the inning.
In the second game, Carolina's
Greg karpuck kept the Pirate's bats
quiet. He limned ECU to only five
hits while striking out eight and
walking three. Evans, with a single
and a double, was the only person
able to hit Karpuck effectively.
And as if the loss wasn't bad
enough. David Wells injured his
hand while trying to make a diving
cat-h in left field, making his ability
to perform for the remainder of the
season uncertain.
Chips, Tigers Top Opponents
Tough '82 Schedule
Cathv Andruzi
Andruzzi Stresses Hard Work
By Kenneth Bolton
utt4ani Sports Milor
The Cathy Andruzzi Basketball
Camp is no picnic.
With over one-hundred and fifty
kids attending both sessions, hard
work and basketball fundamentals
are stressed rigidly. Basketball
players pour in from all over the
country, and the camp is soon
becoming one of the most successful
programs in this region.
One reason for the success is the
staff, which features a group of the
finest college and professional
basketball players in the United
States. Among the staff members
this year are assistant coach Beth
Burns and all twelve members of the
Lady Pirate basketball team.
According to Andruzzi, the staff
as well as the campers benefit from
the sessions. 44It gives the staff a
chance to learn. It is a great
teaching opportunity because it
gives them a chance to guide people
as well as increase their organizaa-
tional skills
With a ratio of one staff member
to every five campers, the instruc-
tors are able to give more individual
attention. "We want to have a lot
of personal contact with the
campers Andruzzi said, "We
have a major impact on their lives
because through athletics they build
self-confidence as well as a sense of
achievement
The camp consists of two ses-
sions. One was held last week, July
5-10, and the second one is being
held this week, July 11-16 .
The participants have to follow a
strict schedule every day, beginning
with wake-up calls at 7 a.m. Each
daily session lasts from 9 a.m. until
10 p.m. and includes teaching
basketball fundamentals, individual
help from all of the coaches, a lec-
ture by coach Andruzzi and league
games.
Andruzzi said, "We try to teach
the kids to work hard and develop a
good attitude
Among the members of this
year's camp were seven high school
seniors that Andruzzi is interested in
as future Lady Pirates, including
three top players from Virginia.
With another summer of the
Cathy Andruzzi Camp coming to an
end, the staff is already looking for-
ward to next year.
"I love working with and meeting
the kids Andruzzi said. "Our
camp is an extension of our basket-
ball program�it is just as intense as
our program. The kids really get
fired up and leave with a good feeli-
ing about ECU basketball
The East Carolina football team
has probably never had a schedule
with as many tough competitors on
the agenda as this year. And Cen-
tral Michigan and Missouri are two
such teams the Pirates will be facing
this coming fall.
The East Carolina football team
will play Central Michigan on
September 25 and then travel to
Missouri on October 2 for another
contest.
Both schools have about the same
enrollment of students�16000.
And both schools have very im-
pressive records, along with ac-
complished athletes.
Central Michigan University, led
by coach Herb Deromedi, had a 7-4
record last year and placed third in
the mid-American conference.
Deromedi has accumulated a
35-8-1 record during his four-year
stay at CMU and led the Chippewas
to their first two mid-American
titles. He has led them to 14 con-
secutive victories, a 10-0-1
undefeated season and a school
record of 23 consecutive wins by
mid-season of 1980.
52 percent of his 162 passes for 105
yards per game and five
touchdowns.
Brian Ballops. the starting wide-
side halfback had 13 pass deflec-
tions and two interceptions during
his sophomore year. A player who
possesses excellent speed, added
three more deflections and a fumble
recovery to his junior year totals.
Cheerleaders Attend East
Carolina Training Camp
By CINDY PLEASANTS
In case you're walking by
Memorial Gym, don't be alarmed if
you hear the rustle of pom-poms
and harmonious voices yelling
sideline chants.
East Carolina is hosting a tour-
day cheerleading camp for over 140
girls this week. The campers range
from eighth to twelth graders.
Mrs. Gay Blocker, ECU coor-
dinator for the camp, said eight
staff members are assisting the
twenty squads and a few indepen-
dent campers.
Brenda Moore, who is from
Memphis State, serves as chairper-
son for the camp. Moore is accom-
panied by college cheerleaders from
all over the United States, including
Ohio, Florida, Memphis and East
Tennessee State.
The staff will hold private
coaching sessions to help each squad
with particular difficulties and
special seminars to train the
cheerleaders in building pyramids,
tumbling, crowd control, giving pep
rallies and effective money-raising
projects.
Most of the cheerleading squads
are from Eastern North Carolina,
with the exception of one team from
Hartsfield, S.C. Three schools
from the Greenville area are atten-
ding the camp. They are: D. H.
Conley High School, Farmville Cen-
tral High and E. B. Aycock Junior
High School.
According to Blocker, awards are
given at the end of the camp for the
most improved, best cheering squad
and best pom-pom routine. She ad-
ded that each squad will be
evaluated and presented with a rib-
bon.
The camp is in session each day
from 8 a.m. until 8:30 p.m with
"pass out" breaks, Mrs. Blocker
said.
No experience is required to at-
tend the camp, Mrs Blocker said,
"only a willingness to learn
The cheerleading camp consists
only of girls but boys were not
restricted from attending the camp.
"We just didn't happen to have
any boys Blocker said, "but there
are boys at the other camps
East Carolina has a contract with
the Universal Cheerleading Associa-
tion to arrange for the camp's
facilities. The association, in turn,
hires the staff members for the four-
day session.

Cindy
Pleasants
A Look Inside
Missouri Star Randy Jostes
In 1981, the Chippewas averaged
365.7 yards and 20.3 points per
game. Their 5�2 defense was na-
tionally ranked last year, and
although CMU lost five starters, 17
lettermen will be returning on the
defensive end of the squad.
The Chippewas have some quality
players and certainly a few to watch
out for.
Ray Bentley, the 6-2, 220-pound
linebacker, has averaged 130 total
tackles during the past two years
and has a chance to become the first
Chippewa ever to record 400 career
tackles. His 13.3 t.p.g. last fall,
made Bentley the second leading
tackier in the mid-American con-
ference.
For his career, he has 19 tackles for
lost yardage, ten pass deflections
and one interception.
Junior quarterback Bob DeMarco
finished as the top-rated young
passer in the mid-American con-
ference. His 110.4 passing efficien-
cy ranked him fourth behind two
juniors and a senior. He completed
CMU Head Coach
Herb Deromedi
Coach Deromedi is counting on
his returning lettermen to lead the
Chippewas this year, especially after
losing eight starters who received
all-conference recognition. "Once
again we'll be looking for our retur-
ning sohpomores and juniors to
take up the slack, particularly along
the offensive line and at tailback
and wide receiver he said.
Deromedi said their offensive
play will be one of his main con-
cerns. "We led the league in total
offense last year he said, "but we
had trouble putting the ball in the
end zone and that's one of the
things we'll have to work on
The Chippewas' nationally-
ranked defense will also have some
quality people this year, even
though five starters and one punter
was lost, according to Deromedi.
"It will be a plus, also, having
five conference home games and six
home games in all he said.
The Pirates, on the other hand,
only have four games scheduled at
home, which may prove to take a
toll on the Bucs.
Missouri. The 8-4 squad that won
its third bowl game in four trips
under head coach Warren Powers
has 48 lettermen returning.
The Tigers made their fourth
straight bowl trip in December,
beating the University of Mississip-
pi, 19-17, in the Tangerine Bowl.
Powers has an overall coaching
record of 38 wins and 21 losses. He
is 31-17 at Missouri.
Powers said this year's team will
be more experienced offensively and
the quarterback position is more
solid than a year ago. Defense,
however, is another matter, accor-
ding to Powers.
Gone are two linebackers, two
tackles and two noseguards. That .
group included the team's four
leading tacklers, and Powers said,
"we lost people who gave us the big
plays
But Powers is depending on some
of his ace players to come through
this fall. One such player, for exam-
ple, is Randy Jostes. The senior
defensive tackle had 57 tackles, in-
cluding seven for 32 yards in losses, I
blocked a conversion and recovered I
two fumbles.
Cornerback Demetrious Johnson
will be relied on for his explosive
hitting ability. The senior had 60
tackles, including four for 20 yards
on losses, two interceptions and
broke up seven others, and
recovered two fumbles.
Without a doubt, both teams are
strong�very strong. Each possess
solid programs and will definitely
pose as two of the toughest con-
tenders the Pirates will be up
against this fall.
;






8
THE HAST CAROLINIAN JULY 14, 1982
Pftoto Bv SCOTT LAMO
Victorious Wolf pack
Wolfpack Blank
Struggling Bucs
B KENNETH
BOLTON
ss.iinn( Sports hdtftir
N.C. Slate, led by
Hugh Brinson's tour-
hit shutout, blanked
the Pirates, 3-0,
Wednesday night.
Brinson's t e n -
strikeout, three-walk
performance was so
strong, that ECU did
not get a runner past se-
cond base all night.
According to Pirate
coach Gary Overton,
Brinson ui the dif-
ference in the game.
"We played a good, er-
rorless ballgame he
said. "We executed
out gameplan just as
we wanted to against
State but we just
weren't able to hit Brin-
son
The Wolfpack sup-
posed Brinson with
runs in the first, filth
and seventh mings. In
the first, Artie Hall
opened the game with a
single through the mid-
dle After Chris Baird
walked. Tracy Black
singled hall home, with
proed to be the
il ran state would
need.
Doug Davis led off
fifth inning with a
mble to right and
after one out. Davis ad-
van ed to third on an
infield squibbler by
Hall. With runners on
first and third, Chris
Baird hit a sacrifice fly
to left field to score
Davis.
State added its final
run in the seventh with
a double down the left
field line on a 3-2 count
bv Davis, followed by a
triple by Hall. Hall
went three-for-four to
lead the Wolfpack.
ECU's biggest threat
came in the third inning
when Robert Langston
got his first of two
singles of the night.
With two outs, Kelly
Robinette coaxed a
walk on a full count but
Brinson got Hallow to
pop up to the catcher,
stranding two runners.
The outstanding per-
formance by Brinson
overshadowed an im-
pressive outing by ECU
pitcher Charlie Smith.
"The two pitchers
were the key to the
gameOverton said.
"Both teams hit the
ball well but it was just
a matter of both pit-
chers doing a good
job
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t





Title
The East Carolinian, July 14, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 14, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.205
Location of Original
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