The East Carolinian, June 9, 1982






She �a0t (Earnitntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
ol.58 No.64
Wednesday, June 9. 19K2
(Greenville, N (
M Panes
"Last-Ditch Effort' To Pass Amendment
ERA Proponents Abandon Referendum Bill
KM EIGH, . (UPI) Sup-
ers of the I qua! Rights mend
meni abandoned efforts ruesday to
set up a non-binding statewide
,t last-ditch effort to
pass the amendment in North
olina.
Rep l i Vdams, D w ake, said
tougl � otes in the
ERA referendum
to primary election
e measure would not
ntroduced because it would be
i I in the Senate on procedural
"We have explored even avenue
think � to have the
ns dered in the
� �! mined it is
impossible tic said "Our assess-
ment is n would be impossible to get
it past the Senate rules.
�� 1 his referendum bill will not be
introduced Adams told reporters
following a strategy meeting with
1 RA supporters, including House
Speaker List on Ramse) .
D-Madison.
I he ERA has been ratified by 35
states, but three more musl approve
it before it expires June 30. North
c arolina and three other states � Il-
linois, Florida and Oklahoma �
had been targeted in a national cam-
paign to pass the amendment.
1 he North Carolina Senate oted
27-23 Friday to table an ERA
ratification bill five minutes after it
was formally introduced. I he action
means ERA supporters need a two-
thirds majority, oi 34 votes, to
revive the amendment, but the
have no chance of changing that
many votes
After last week's Senate action,
Gov. James B Hunt Jr. began
pushing the referendum Undei the
proposal, voters in the June 29
primary would have been allowed to
express their sentiment tor or
against the General Assembly's
ratification o the amendment.
Although the results would not be
binding. Hunt was prepared to call a
special session oi the 1 egislature
June 30 for a vote on I R
A spokesman for Hunt. Brent
Hackney, said ttie governoi was
disappointed at the decision to
abandon the referendum, but ae
eepted the judgement of legislative
supporters.
The prospects oi a special session
June 30 are slim. Hackney said, but
Hunt would be willing to call one it
two other states pass ERA b then.
"It conditions change, we'll act
accordingly he said.
Adams and Sen. Robert Jordan.
D-Montgomery, said they determin-
ed the referendum bill would not be
eligible for consideration under the
Senate's rules, even it it passed the
House.
Jordan, whose ERA bill was tabl-
ed Iriday, said tie conferred with
Senate leaders, including It. Gov.
lames c . Green, about the referen-
dum idea
He said Green gave no indication
how he would rule on the matter,
but alter discussing the Senate rules,
I or dan reluctantly concluded the
bill could not be considered.
Jordan cited a rule that bars the
inclusion oi defeated k :i lat
any other measure Becau ERA
was ielected last wee!
be considered as pa
dum bill, tie said
He also pointed 1 R
referendum bill was introdu
year but never consider
Green had already ruled it m
"I don't think there are an
legislative i that we
with between now and Friday a
week" when th i egislatun an
finish u the session, Jordan aid
He said the only hope for
irendum bill was "a land; I
vote in the 120-membei House,
dams said he had only 63 votes I
the bill. Another 40 wen
ant a n creating ai
e prima which
slative � a
aanis ai r ERA sup
ducted ' te co
I uesday's House session V
m embers conducted i
nes 1 K A supporters cii
hout the chamb
commitments from lawmakei
Campus Community Random Survey
Shows Varying Opinions On ERA
Bv
JOHN VF I FK
�. d opponents oi the
dmendment seem to
ual in numbei on the
as thev are in
e

I K
ICMIg.
tmen or
oi ma-
law W!
hurt w omen
Others were specifically concern-
ed that the amendment as written is
too vague. "1 don't think it's ex-
plicit enough and leaves it too open
to interpretation was the opinion
1 a graduate student studying
administration who asked
. name not be used
Oeid re Davenport, a senior
mess management major,
agreed "II they pass it like it is
�. . what will the nidges make
S ne ERA nts seemed to
� eai i hang- would
ERA was passed.
ae Smith, ior physics ma-
"I think Ciod created in
and woman to re different tor a
it's the way n always has
n and always should be
The opponent group's viewpoint
can be summed up in one woman's
nment. "I'm satisfied with the
Id ways
On the othei side of the issue.
Mane I , I an, assistant dean o art
and sciences, ottered thai ERA,
"would make a statement, whether
or not it passes, in the nation as a
whole. A statement about North
Carolina's committment to equality
for all it citizens
"I think it would be symbolic in a
concrete wav of what we as a
democracy subscribe to echoed
Dr. Pan Dunn ot the health educa-
tion department.
Dr. Erwin Hester oi the English
department stated that, "so much
oi the opposition to it nas focused
on very trivial side issues and lr-
relevancies. Things like separate
bathrooms tor the sexes and things
like that, which 1 don't think ERA is
likely to have am impact on at all.
And it seems to me that there's real-
ly no reason not to be for an
admendment which is designed to
enhance equality, or give equality to
all citizens
Herb Carlton oi the political
science department is of the opinion
that whether or not the I RA is pass
ed will make little difference.
"Equal rights will happen he said.
Photo Courtesy ot DA1LV REFLECTOR
Marching For 1 Cause
The Southern Christian leadershiponference marched through Greenville on June third in protest ot President
Reagan's policies.
Hearings Unveil Drunk Driving Proposals
B SPENCER STEPHENS
Mali Wnirr
"In San Salvador, your first
drunk driving offense is your last.
They kill you. In Turkey, thev take-
drunk drivers twenty miles from
town, strip them naked, and force
them to walk home
"Alcohol related accidents are the
major cause of death for college
students
"Setting two age limits for drink-
ing is setting a double standard. You
5 are saying that drinking beei and
wine is not as serious as drinking li-
quor when they're both on the same
level
These are comments that were
made during the June 3 public hear-
ing on drunk driving. Thev come
from some of the approximately 100
North Carolinians who endured
hailstorms and highlights to attend
the testing.
This hearing and six others in
various North Carolina cities were
sponsored by the Governor's Task
Force on Drunk Driving.
The first purpose of the hearings,
according to task force analyst
David James, is to inform North
Carolinians of a seventeen point
propos1 made bv the Governor's
Crime Comission.
To combat drunken driving, the
proposal recommends stiffening
drunken driving laws, upping the
drinking age for beer and wine,
educating school children and
young adults about the danger ot
drunken driving and supporting
alcohol and drug rehabilitation
centers.
1 he second purpose oi the public
hearings is to listen to citizens' iews
and ideas about drunken driving
and to include some oi these ideas in
the final version of the proposal that
will be sub mittedto Governor Hunt
on October 1.
It is hoped that the proposal will
be approved by Hunt, then submit-
ted to and passed bv the North
Carolina State 1 egislature.
1 he Governor's Iask force on
Drunken Driving is under the direc-
tion o the Governor's Crime Com-
mission and was organized when the
commission realized several tacts;
That approximately 50 percent of all
traffic fatalities are alcohol related;
that North Carolina arrests more
people tor driving undei
fluence than any othe
1 exas and California; and I
North Carolina's arrest
driving under the influence is rr
than twice as high as the
average (14 per i .(MX) per yea
pared to 6 pel l,(KX per year).
About thirty of the KM) pe
that attended the hearing spoke.
Some of the speakers thought that
plea bargaining should not be allow-
ed m alcohol-related traffic ac-
cidents.Some thought that all
alcoholic beverges should be taxed
m order to establish a restitution
fund tor victims of drunken drb
All thought that a solution need- I i
be found.
ECU Scientists Study Mystery
Photo By SCOTT LARSON
Ringer
This ECU loel tries her hand at a favorite American pastime.
ECU Writer Sentenced
For Military Protest
B GEORGE THRFFWITTS
H l Nr� Rurmu
On Monday, Fast Carolina stu-
dent and Fast Carolinian staff
writer, Patrick O'Neill was sentenc-
ed to serve three months in jail plus
pay court cost of $4(X). following his
conviction on charges made while he-
was protesting United States
military policy.
O'Neill sentence is shared by
University of North Carolina
students Mark Beatty, Alex Charms
and Stephen Kahn.
On May 25, the group were found
guilty of "willfully, knowingly and
unlawfully blocking traffic" by
Magistrate F. Stewart Clark of the
District Court of the Fastern Region
of North Carolina in Fayetteville.
The four were arrested while
demonstrating against the training
ot Fl Salvadorian soldiers at Fort
Breagg.
In a written statement released
after the sentencing, O'Neill thank-
ed his supporters, then said, "I'm
still in shock. It seems as if the
judge hadn't heard a word we said.
I feel as if I have somehow been
cheated by the judge's unwillingness
to hear the truth. I now sit in jail
and the killing in El Salvador and
the death work of the Pentagon con-
tinues
A team of scientists and students
headed by geologist Dr. Stan Riggs
of East Carolina University is
gathering information to help
unravel one of the mysteries of
geology: the origin of rich deposits
of phosphate along the Atlantic-
seaboard from North Carolina to
Florida.
Believed to be the largest
phosphorites deposits in the world,
Riggs believes it originated 12 to 15
million years ago when "everything
went sort of haywire in the ocean
"We're trying to understand what
weird sets of conditions existed then
that produced this unique and
anomalous bed he said, explain-
ing that the conditions that formed
the phosphate beds are no longer ac-
tive in the oceans today.
In an effort to gather data on the
origin of these deposits, the ECU
researchers are spending 20 days at
sea on board the RV Cape Hat-
teras, a new, modern research vessel
operatd by the Duke-University of
North Carolina Oceanographic
Consortium.
Working along the Continental
Shelf region oi North and South
Carolina, the scientists use special
instruments that take seismic-
readings of the earth's formations
below the ocean floor. In addition,
a sophisticated vibrating drill
powered by compressed air, allows
them to punch through the sea floor
to collect 30 to 40 foot core samples
of bottom sediment.
"We can tell the nature of the
rock and the distribution of the
rocks (from the seismic readings)
and with our core sampling we can
tell what these rocks are says
Riggs.
"We want to understand how this
phosphate formed, why it formed
and where it formed he said.
Phosphate primarily develops
from old marine deposits that form-
ed on the ocean floor at various
times in the past. As one of life's
essential elements, it is also found in
small amounts almost everywhere
but it is extremeiv rare to find it in
significant abundance.
The large inland deposits of
phosphates in North Carolina and
Florida are currently being mind as
an ingredient for fertilizer, rhese
mines provide about 40 percent of
the world's supplv and 85 percent of
the fertilizer needs in the United
States. Other significant deposits
that formed at the same time as
those in the Southeastern U.S. are
found in Mexico, South America.
California, Africa and Peru.
Riggs said there is little need at
the present time to mine o shore
deposits o phosphate but this will
change in the future as the world's
population increases and the de-
mand for food becomes greater.
Scientists predict that b the end of
the 20th century, phosphate
resources in the U.S. will play a ma-
jor role in world, trade.
"Our primary purpose is to
understand the origins o these
sediments but one of the nice things
about it is we will probably be fin-
ding new deposits in the process of
doing that Riggs said.
On The Inside
Dave Odom, ECU's basketball
coach for the past three years, is
headed for IVA. For the com-
plete story, see Sports.
Inside Index
Announcements
Opinion
Campus Forum
Features
Sports
Classifieds
2
4
4
5
7
9
I





2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN JUNE 9, 1982
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
if you or your organization
would like to nave an item printed
In the announcement column,
please type it on an announcement
form and send it to The East
Carolinian in care of the produc
tion manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications Building.
Flyers and handwritten copy on
odd siied paper cannot be ac
cepted.
There is no charge for an
nouncements, but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you want
and suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column tor publicity
The deadline for announcements
is 5 P m Friday for the Tuesday
paper and 5 p.m Tuesday for the
Thursday paper No a
nouncements received after these
oeadlines will be printed.
This space is available to an
campus organizations and depart
ments.
TESTING
Three teats quaiifmg college
graduates tor advanced studies
will be given at ECU during June.
The tests are: Law School Admis
sion Test, to be given June 16, The
Graduate Record Examination,
June 12. and the Graduate
Management Admission Test,
June �
Persons interested in taking the
tests must register in advance.
Further information and ap
plication materials are available
from the Educational Testing Ser
vice. Box 966 R. Princeton, N.J.
08540 or from the ECU Testing
Center, 105 Speight, ECU, Green
vine, N C 27834
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
Personal Development pro
grams begin June 10, Darkroom
Photography l, June 12, Small
Computer, July 7, Aerobic
Exercse. July 8. Nutrition and
Weight Control For information
Call 757 6143
NIGHT CLASSES
Credit classes will be offered on
weekday nights for the Summer.
Monday and Wednesday course
include; ECON 2133. MATH 0045.
PSYC 1050. Tuesday and Thursday
nights courses Include; SOCI 2110.
SPCH 2080. FINA 2244, and ECON
2 2 23
Classis begin June 16 and end
August 5. Registration begins on
June 14 at Erwln Hall.For further
information call 757-6324
ATTENTION ECU
ORGANIZATIONS
The Buccaneer needs your help.
If you or a friend of yours was a
member of an organization either
Greek, Service oriented, or
academicaly or professional
oriented and your group had your
group picture made for the
1981 1982 Book, please call the
Buccaneer We need some
assistance in identifying the
members and find a little bit more
about your organization. Call
757 6501 between 2 5.
PSI CH!
Are you interested in self
actualization, educational
psychology. Intellectual develop
ment, sexual behavior or
statistical interpetation come to
the Psi Chi Library Book Sale held
in Speight 202. Books pried from
.05 to 85 Ptl Chi throws in a
bonus; quiet atmosphere for stu-
dying with a comfortable couch to
relax In. Hours from 8 to 1. Come
to our Book Sale to understand
human behavior and be a better
person for it.
What are you doing on June 22.
at 4:30 Psi Chi is having a cook
out in the wooded area between
the Biology Greenhouse and 10th
St. Advance tickets wilt be sold at
in the Psi Chi Library for 82 or
82.50 at the Door This includes
good food, drinks, and beer; plus a
chance to win a fifth of Jack
Daniels. Drawing will be at 600
This is good way to relieve post-
exam anxieties and start the se
cond Summer Session in style. For
more information come by the Psi
Chi Library. Hours: 8-1.
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines. There are 33
units per line. Each letter, punc
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end of line if word
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac
cepted over the phone. We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
75 per line or traction of a line.
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lower case letters.
Return to THE EAST CAROLINIAN
office by 3:00 Tuesday before
Wednesday publications.
Name
Address.
City State.
.Zip,
.Phone.
No lin� at 7Sc pr line No. insertionsenclosed. �-
� 1 T t 1 1��,




��-H
-��
�i�,


-i�
Foreign Language Exemption
Sought For ECU Hearing Impaired
Shorld an ECU stu-
dent who has a severe
hearing and speech im-
pairment be declared
exempt from the
university's foreign
language requirement?
This question is now
being considered by
Mike Ernest, director
of ECU's Program for
Hearing Impaired
Students, and Dr. Mar-
tin Schwarz, chairman
of ECU's Foreign
Language Depart-
ment.The result of
Ernest's and Schwarz's'
discussions will directly
affect a large majority
of ECU's hearing im-
paired population and
set precedents for other
handicapped students
who seek concessions
from the university.
Consideration of the
above question stems
from the recent lack of
successof one hearing-
impaired student who,
outside of the study of
foreign language, has
earned a respectable
grade point average.
This student endured
four semesters of
beginning level foreign
language before receiv-
ing a passing grade
The student's argu-
ment says that not be-
ing able to hear a
foreign language
severely impairs the
learning of it. Addi-
tionally, while many
hearing students can
passively sit back, listen
and understand a lec-
ture, a hearing-
impaired student must
actively watch an inter-
preter who, naturally,
is subject to error.
Another factor that
must be considered is
the limitation of sign
language. As one inter-
preter put it, "One can-
not adequately inter-
pret a foreign language
class with sign
language
The language forces
the interpreter to spell
all words on his fingers
which is extremely
hard. It is even harder
for the student to
understand the mass of
fingers that are fumbl-
ing around in front of
his eyes. It is also hard
to find an interpreter
who is both skilled in
sign and knows the
foreign language well
enough to interpret it.
The inability to hear
that hinders the learn-
ing of a foreign
language also hinders
the learning of English.
A hearing-impaired
person cannot "sound
ouf'words to
remember their spelling
or use things he has
heard as an example of
correct English.
Despite these facts,
there are several col-
leges that have 75 per-
cent to 100 percent suc-
cess rates among the
hearing-impaired
students they require to
study foreign language.
(Gardner-Webb,
Madonna College, Ten-
nessee Temple Univer-
sity). These success
rates are achieved with
tutors, classroom
notetakers and in-
dividualized instruc-
tion.
According to Dr.
Jose Baro of ECU's
Foreign Language
Department, these
methods are good and
may help hearing-
impaired students suc-
ceed at ECU, but they
are impractical. Baro
says that the number of
foreign language
students at ECU is very
high and that in-
dividualized instruction
of hearing-impaired
students would force
professors to spend an
unreasonably large
amount of time with a
very small group of
students.
Edward Burchette, a
profoundly deaf
graduate of ECU, pass-
ed German 1001 in his
senior year with flying
colors and without ex-
tensive tutoring or in-
dividualized instruc-
tion.
If he was able to suc-
ceed without the advan-
tage of partial abilities
of speech and hearing,
then all hearing-
impaired students
should be able to
right?
"Wrong says
Ernest. "Eddie had a
strong language
background and didn't
use his voice, so he
wasn't expected to suc-
ceed on an oral or aural
level. The other student
did have some abilities
at speech and hearing
and was expected to
speak and hear the
language when that
wasn't possible
This statement sup-
ports Ernest's proposed
solution. He has sug-
gested individualized
evaluation of hearing-
impaired student's
speech and hearing
abilities. He thinks that
then the decision to re-
quire language or an
alternative (i.e. foreign
history or literature)
can be properly made.
Schwarz says that
Ernest's plan is feasi-
ble, but that he does
not yet have enough in-
formation to make a
decision. He is also
waiting for the Foreign
Language Depart-
ment's Curriculum
Committee to
reconvene this fall
before going through
formal decision making
procedures
Abubakar Fada, a
hearing-impaired stu-
dent who may be af-
fected by the results of
the decision doesn't
think that hearing-
impaired students
should be required to
take foreign language.
Fada feels this way " . .
.because the deaf ear
can't hear when that
language is spoken and
English itself is not easy
for a person who can-
not hear.
RECREATION
RENTALS
An outdoor recreation equip
ment rental service has been pro
video througn the Department of
intramural Recreational Ser
vices Items available tor rent in
elude BacHpacKs, tents, canoes,
and tandem bicycle The outdoor
recreation center is located in the
equipment room 115 Memorial
Gym Hours of operation are
2 00 5 00 p.m Monday through
Friday information is available
on State and Federal Cam
pgrounds. backpacking Trails.
Day hiking Trails and Canoeing
Rivers
JOBS AND JUSTICE'
A march tor "Jobs and Justice"
sponsored by the Southern Chris
tian Leadership Conference will
be coming to Greenville on Thurs
day All students are invited to
participate The march will begin
at 401 Moyewood Drive, at 4 p.m
Everyone must get together to
"stop Reagans war on the poor"
and help to win extention of the
Voting Rights Act For more mfor
mat.on call 758 6820
OFF-CAMPUS
HOUSING
"if you will be needing a room
mate or would like to find and
share an apartment for Fall con
tact the Off Campus Housing Of
lice. 211 Whichard Building
757 6881. before June 14 Orients
tion will begm at that time and
many students will be seeking ac
commodations
listing "
We need your
KAPPA SIGMA
The Brothers of th� Kappa
Sigma Fraturnity would like to
Congratulate the ECU Baseball
Team tor their outstanding perfor
mance in the ECAC South Cham
pionships 'Congratulations' from
tne Brothers, Little Sisters. �"�
the Pledges
EDITOR
The East Carolinian has an
opening coming up for the news
edtors position Experience
necessary interested persons
should contact the East Carolinian
to apply tor the position For more
information call 757 6J66
Classifieds
FREE KITTENS t weeks old. Call
754-4317 for a precious pet.
TYPING: term, Thesis, resumes,
etc. 757 W42 before :00 p.m.
MEWLETT-paekard HP 97
calculator Built-in printer, card
programmable, ACDC Perfect
condition.(Retails for over S700)
$350. Call John 757 3744 after 5
p.m.
FEMALE roommate needed to
live at Georgetown Apts. Great
location to both downtown and
campus area. Pool privileges
Half utilities and rent. For infor-
mation, call 751-4427.
75-205 Macro-zoom for Nikon 5240
New-100irm 753-5581 after 5:30
RTofF OR RIDER needed to
Arkansas or along 1-40 West. Call
758-0204
BASS GUITARIST: top-40 country
band based in Greenville, N.C.
Successful recording act with
steady bookings Serious inquiries
only. (91�) 758-8772 night. 754-882$
day.
ATTN. 305 Meade is now officially
fair game tor a mass invasion We
supply the kegs. You supply the
nite Friday at It:00. See you there
SUMMER JOB: Need student
technical draftsman. Must have
working knowledge of electrical
schematics. Pay commensurate
with skill and productivity.
757-4711 D. Lunney, R. Morrison or
A. Salt.
Professional TYPING service- ex
perience, quality work, IBM Selec
trie typewriter. Call Lanie Shive,
758-5301 or Gail Joyner, 754-1042
TYPING: Term, thesis, resumes,
dissertations, etc Professional
quality at lowest rates. Call Kem-
pie Dunn anytime. 752-4733
ONE OR TWO female roommates
wanted. $230 a month plus utilities.
Village Green. Grad students
preferred Available in July,
752 7584
TYPING TERM PAPERS all
sues. Proofreading offered
Dependable typist Call Mary.
3552440
1974 DATSUN
Manual Shift
410 Stn Wgn
in good condition
($1400) call 758-4445 after 5 30 p.m
and before 10 am. weekdays
Anytime on weekends.
The East Carolinian
(MCY I92S
Published ever Tuesday ana
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
tng the summer
The Eas' Carolinian is the of
ficiai newspaper ot East
Carolina university, ownea.
operated and published for �no
oy the students ot Eas' Cr I
JriverS'ty
Subscription Rate $20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus ot ECU.
Greenville. N.C
POSTMASTER Seo addrivi
changes to The Eas- Car � �
Old Sou'n Building, � C jreer
vine. NC 27834
Telephone 757 4344. 4347 4309
Application to mail at second
class postage rattnpending at
Greenville, North Carolina
Industrial Tech Students Awarded
Nine studednts in the
East Carolina Universi-
ty School Of
Technology have been
announced as winners
of annual awards by
ECU's chapter of Pi
Omega Pi honor socie-
ty.
The winners are all
members of the campus
Beta Kappa chapter of
Pi Omega Pi, national
society for business
eduction.
Cedricia Wilson of
Kinston is the 1982 reci-
pient of the Thomas
Clay Williams
Memorial Scholarship,
given annually to the
senior business educa-
tion major at ECU with
the highest overall
academic grade point
average.
Lloyd Yancey
Garner of Williamston
received the Marjorie
Harrison Scholarship,
given to the freshman
business education ma-
jor with the highest
academic grade point
average. The Lena C.
Ellis Scholarship was
given to James R.
Smith Jr of Conway,
in recognition of
achieving the highest
academic grade point
average among ECU
business education
sophomores.
The Harold M.
McGrath Service
Award was presented
to Linda Hale of New
Bern. The McGrath
award recognizes an
outstanding senior Pi
Omega Pi member on
the basis of scholar-
ship, leadership and
service to the chapter
and the field of
business education.
Patricia Strum of
Henderson and
Lorianne Templeton of
Chesapeake, Va tied
for the 1982 Beta Kap-
pa Service Award,
given in recognition of
outstanding
undergradutes' service
to the chapter.
Becky Moody of
Mount Olive was given
the Audrey V. Demp-
sey Scholarship, in
recognition of having
achieved the highest
academic grade point
average among ECU's
junior business educa-
tion majors.
Sue Wiley of Pink
Hill was given the Na-
tional Business Educa-
tion Association Award
of Merit, presented
each year to a senior in
business education.
Sandra Faye Hum-
phrey of Jacksonville
was recognized as the
"Most Outstanding
Senior"of the ECU
Department of
Business Education and
Office Administration.
EXCEPTIONAL
CHILDREN
Children with learning
problems who will enter
grades three through nine
in the fall are eligible to
participate in a summer
clinic sponsored by the
ECU School of Education
and the Greenville City
Schools.
The clinic will run from
June 28 to July 28 at Wahl
Coates Elementary
School with two-hour
morning sessions. In-
dividual and small group
remedial sessions will be
conducted by graduate in-
terns in the Department
of Special Education's
Learning Disabilities
Master's Degree Pro-
gram.
Fee for the clinic is
$135. Further information
is available
call 752-4192 or
757-6181
SAMMY'
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'Cooking
naiLY specials $1.99
LARGE PLATE �$3.75
with all you can eat vegetables
REGULAR PLATES � $2.98
LUNCH & SUPPER
11:00 a.m8 p.m. Mon-Sat
closed Sundays
PLUS TAX, TEA
Take Out
Orders Welcome
512 E. 14th St.
2 blocks down from Bel dorm)
J.A. UNIFORMS
SHOP
All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, slethoscopes,
shoes, and hose. Also � used ECU
nurses uniforms. Trade-ins allowed.
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive.
Near Hollowell's Drug and old hospital.
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FOR-
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WEDDING BANDS
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Door Open 4:30
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Performing 7-11 p.m.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN JUNE 9, 1982
Toxic Shock Syndrome Reported
Doctors Still Search For Cause
ATLANTA (UPI) �
The National Center
for Disease Control
says about 50 cases of
toxic shock syndrome
(TSS) are being
reported each month,
but the specific
bacterial toxin that
causes the illness re-
mains unidentified.
1 he federal health
agency also gets fre-
quent telephone calls
from concerned women
about the sometimes
fatal disease that strikes
young menstruating
females more ofren
than any other group.
Ncarl 2,000 cases of
I SS hae been reported
to the center and there
hae been at least 88
deaths.
To help the public
become aware of toxic
shock syndrome, which
first came to public at-
tention in 1980. the
Center for Disease
recently issued the
following list of ques-
tions and answers
about the disease: '
Q. What is toxic-
shock sn drome?
V foxic shock syn-
drome is an illness that
occurs primarily in
young women during
or shortly after their
menstrual periods.
However, there have
been cases reported in
men, children and non-
mentsruating women.
Q. What are the
symptoms of toxic
shock syndrome&
A. Symptoms usually
come on suddenly with
fever, chills, vomiting
and diarrhea being
common. The
temperature is fre-
quently above 104
degrees Fahrenheit.
Other symptons include
a rapid drop in blood
pressure and accompa-
nying dizziness, fain-
ting or shock, sore
throat and a sunburn-
like rash. Most of these
symptoms are present
in severe toxic shock
syndrome, but the il-
lness also occurs in a
milder form.
Q. Are there early
warning signs?
A. If a woman is us-
ing tampons and
develops a high fever
and vomiting or diar-
rhea during her
menstrual period, she
should discontinue
tampon use and consult
a physician immediate-
ly.
Q. How common is
toxic shock syndrome?
A. It is not yet known
how common it is, but
available information
indicates it is relatively
rare. In 1980, during
the center's intensive
investigation of toxic
shock syndrome, mon-
thly case counts ran as
high as 133. By late
1981, the number of
casess reported to the
center each month had
declined to 50 or less.
Q. What is the fatali-
ty rate.?
A. Approximately 3
percent of cases
reported in 1981
resulted in death.
Q. Is there a risk of
toxic shock syndrome
associated with all
brands oftampons?
A. Studies to date
have not shown that
any specific brand is
without risk. Some in-
vestigators have sug-
gested that tampons
made with synthetic
superabsorbent
material pose a greater
risk.
Q. What advice does
the Center for Disease
Contral give in the use
of tampons?
A. The cewnter em-
phasizes that any
preventive measure a
woman chooses is an
individual decision.
Women can markedly
reduce their risk of
developing menstrual
toxic shock syndrome
by not using tampons.
Women who choose to
use tampons may
reduce their risk by
alternating them with
other sanitary aids dur-
ing their menstrual cy-
cle.
Q. Is it possible to
have toxic shock syn-
drome more than once?
A. Yes. The risk of
having a recurrence is
reduced, however, by
treatment of toxic
shock syndrome with
appropriate antibiotics
and by discontinuing
the use of tampons.
Q. Is there a treat-
ment for toxic shock
syndrome?
A. In the acute
phase, severely ill pa-
tients need to be
hospitalized and given
large volumes of in-
travenous fluids and
medications to help
raise the blood
pressure. Antibiotics
are also usually given to
the patient. It has not
been documented that
antibiotics cure the
disease or improve out-
come, but they do ap-
pear to prevent recur-
rences.

Q. What are some of
the characteristics of
cases in men, children
and non-menstruating
women?
A. A small number
of individuals have
developed toxic shock
syndrome from boils,
abscesses, infected
burns, infected abra-
sions and insect bites.
Other cases have occur-
red in persons who
have had recent
surgery. Toxic shock
syndrome has also been
identified among
women who have
recently undergone
childbirth.
Assembly Appropriation Committee
Stalls On Teacher Salary One-Year Freeze
R A 1 1-1G H, N . C.
(UPI) � The General
Assembly's Joint Ap-
propriations Commit-
tee has stalled oer a
proposed one-year
salary freeze for
teachers and state
employees.
The com mi nee
postponed a vote Tues-
day after some
members aid they
wanted to wait until
apoihei committee can
iisider a proposed in-
crease in liquor and
beer taxes to offset part
of the freeze.
The proposal, which
would raise $40
million, is part of the
highway- funding
package Cos. James B.
Hunt Jr. asked the
deneral Assembly to
approve last year. It
was never passed and
remains in the Senate
Finance Committee.
But its sponsor, Sen.
George Marion,
D-Surry, told the Ap-
propriations Commit-
tee the bill should be
brought up this year.
Instead of allocating
the increased revenues
to highways, Marion
said the money should
be applied to the salary
freeze. Because of sagg-
ing state revenues,
budget leaders'propos-
ed the pay freeze,
which would save the
state $90 million by
blocking all automatic-
pay increases for the
coming fiscal year.
Marion did not offer
any proposal to raise
the remaining $50
million needed to
cancel the freeze.
On a voice vote, the
Appropriations Com-
mittee apparently re-
jected a proposal to
delay action on the
freeze until the Senate
Finance Committee
meets Thursday, but
opponents of the freeze
called for a show of
hands and won a delay.
Budget leaders then
adjourned the Ap-
propriations Commit-
tee until Thursday.
Earlier Tuesday, the
committee conducted
public hearings on the
use of federal block
grant funds for pro-
grams in community
services; preventive
health; and alcohol,
drug abuse and mental
health.
In a related develop-
ment, a Senate member
Tuesday proposed a tax
on coin-operated video
games.
In a speech to the full
Senate, Sen. Robert
Swain, D-Buncombe,
called the games "time
wasters' and said the
state now receives a tax
of $13 per game.
But Swain said Penn-
sylvania collects an an-
nual tax of $200 per
game and he has
prepared legislation to
collect a similar tax in
North Carolina.
He did not propose a
use for the money, but
later said it could be us-
ed to help reduce the
impact of the pay
freeze.
In other legislative
action, the House
Finance Committee
killed a proposal to
grant a state income tax
exemption for all-
savers certificates after
members learned it
would cost the state
between $6 million and,
$7 million a year in
revenues.
Gi Camouflaged Fatigue and
T ShirH. Sleepmq Bags.
Backpacks. Camping Equip
ment. Steel Toed Shoes,
Dishes and Over 700 Different
New and Used Items Cowboy
Bouts ?�
ARMY-NAVY
1 SOI S Evans
Sited
STORE
T
00R SPECIAL LAD�K NlGtfT, LADIES P&�
WIN DRAFT SPCCUL WHILE THE UjTWKr
DOOR PRTX-CS -T 9�CUL3 ALL NIGHT UN&.
&m
Writers Needed
croSfwnow fCTY " cu� SAC SPtcHiS wm,
Twi B�T W fX 4tKU$DAWCt MSIC 4aWIGHT UNG
FR�tt)0RPRZ�ALLNIC
4n COTXA& sr W- 5'9
The East Carolinian
is seeking more writers
for the news section.
Anyone who can
write effectively and
meet deadlines is en-
couraged to apply for a
staff writer's position.
All interested per-
sons will be given an
opportunity to write
for the paper. In-
terested writers should
apply at the East
Carolinian office or
contact Ernest Conner
at 757-6366.
Tar Landing Seafood
P-estiurint
Not all clinics are IB sameT
ABORTXOV 1s a difficult decision that's made
easier by the women of the Fleming Center.
Counselors are available day and night to
support and understand you. Comfort, safety,
privacy, and a friendly staff that's what the
Fleming Center is all about.
Insurance aoc�ptd
All lnehjuiiv t�
UptolSWMk V�rr ��ly vrnmaaj
Call 781 -8850 day or nijUit
The Fleming Center mak� tlf diffwaoe.
S.r.i. Ziri
mrarsv.
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 1)U
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
$11 00 Pregnancy T�t. Sirt
Control, and Problam
Pregnancy Coum�lin� Far t�r
ttier information call U1-M3S
(Toll Frae Nvmkir
�00 Mi JSi batwaan t AM
and I P.M. WaafcSays.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S'
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
?17 Wtit Morgan St.
Ralaigh. N.C.
Popcorn
Shrimp
$C39
All you can eat
Bob Hearing �
Manager
Phone 758-0327
Cross Green Street Bridge
Take left at 1st Light
Locoed one block down on left
WED.&
THURS. ONLY
A
i
I
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily
I below the advertised price in each A&P Store except as
in this ad
available for sale at or
specifically noted j
prices effective thru Sat Junel2AT A&P in Greenville,NC
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
703 Greenville Blvd.
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville, NC
AN AifP EXCLUSIVE OFFER:
GENUINE
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A 20-Pc. Service
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A&PCOUPON
SAVE 50�
When You Purchase A
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SETTING PIECE: Pay Only �1
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THIS WEEKS
FEATURE ITEM
Bread and
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69
VBfFfaaaW PER PL
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Cut Whole
ICL" rVPT� 2 in a bag,limit 2 bags)
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69
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t





QUje �afit Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, o�����,�,
Mike Hughes, ������� ���-
WAVERLY MERRITT, Dirtaor of MMMq WILLIAM YELVERTON, sm ���
Robert Rucks, �,��� Mfl(MJf,f Ernest Conner, mm �d,(0,
Phillip Maness. emum� Steve Bachner. an .r . -�.or
Chris Lichok, cmmh Nr Mike Davis, production Manager
June 9, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Israeli Politics
l History Of Violence
Week after week, month after
month, year after year, generation
after generation, the same sad story
holds true. Violence breeds
violence. It never changes.
News of the Falkland Islands
crisis was still hot on the presses and
yet reports in the past few days have
revealed that still another war has
emerged in our troubled world. Yet
another nation has turned to
military siege rather than diplomatic
discussion. Israel, enraged by the at-
tempted assassination of its am-
bassador to Britain, Shlomo Argov,
invaded southern Lebanon Sunday
in what Israeli leaders called an ef-
fort to eliminate PLO strongholds.
Indeed, full-scale negotiations
with a terrorist organization are un-
thinkable at best. But the fault for
this newest fighting in the Middle
East lies not solely on the shoulders
of the PLO. Israel has quite an ex-
tensive history of aggression; the in-
vasion of Lebanon is merely the tip
of the iceberg. Remember, it was lit-
tle more than a year ago that Israeli
jets staged an unheralded attack on
an Iraqi nuclear plant. It would
seem the Israelis must have their
own sense of justice.
It is also somewhat ironic that a
nation so concerned with
eliminating terrorism has continual-
ly opted for military solutions to
each of its greater or lesser pro-
blems. How long are other nations
going to sit idle as Israel itself ter-
rorizes the entire Middle East? How
, � � Kp rnme
ui ireedom continue?
It will continue for as long as the
rest of the world lets it. The ter-
rorism will continue until the United
States and other nations decide to
take action to discourage Israeli ag-
gression.
U.S. presidential envoy Philip C.
Habib arrived in Israel late Sunday
in an attempt to halt the escalating
war. This is, indeed, an honorable
mission. But sadly, Habib's efforts
in the warmongering country may
all be in vain. Israel, as well as being
known for its violence, has a history
of shunning political solutions. And
even when diplomatic measures are
taken, the small nation is quick to
forget its own agreements. Former
President Carter's Middle East
Summit comes to mind. Begin's
historic embraces with Carter and
former Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat soon became mere memories
as the peaceful spirit of the summit
was fast forgotten.
As a nation whose leaders claim
they seek international peace,
justice and sovereignty, the United
States must take more tangible
measures against the aggressive
countries who continue to spread
the threat of war. Economic sanc-
tions of one form or another pro-
vide a strong deterrent. They've
worked in the past, and, if nothing
else, they serve to show that this
country will not condone terrorism
and counter violence.
Certainly, the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization has been at fault
on more than one occasion. Any
organization whose sole purpose is
to propagate and provoke violence
is at fault by virtue of its nature.
The elimination of the PLO and ter-
rorism worldwide is a necessary step
if the dream of international peace
is ever to be realized.
But countering terrorism with
violence only serves as fuel for the
fire. And with current alliances in
the Middle East and worldwide �
just as the SyrianLebanese pact �
an invasion like the Israeli raid has
definite international implications.
It's time to take action.
The Statistics Game �
Numbers Becoming A Part Of Life
By MIKE HUGHES
In what we like to call a
"highly-technological, highly-advanced"
world, statistics have, indeed, become as
much a part of our routine as eating and
drinking.
Just name a topic, and somewhere, at
some time, someone, for some ungodly
reason, has discovered all the pertinent in-
formation about it. Births, deaths, in-
vestments, sports, unemployment, infla-
tion: just name a topic.
What's that? You say you want to know
about energy consumption in
Czechoslovakia? Well, easy enough.
Czechs use an average 110 million metric
tons of coal or its equivalent annually as
opposed to 6.1 million tons, used yearly in
Nigeria.
So, energy doesn't tickle your fancy.
Then how's this for a statistic? Kerkira
Airport in Corfu, Greece, is the twelfth
most dangerous airport in the world. And
anyone planning to jet into Fiji this sum-
mer will be glad to hear that Nausori Air-
port in Suva is much safer.
But, believe it or not, stats aren't all
worthless. Some, in fact, can come in quite
handy. Just imagine what a great impres-
sion you could make on your English pro-
fessor if you knew that Hamlet's role in the
Shakespearean play spans 1,422 lines as
opposed to the part of lago in Othello with
1,097.
And imagine the fun you could have at
parties entertaining all your friends with
the above repertory. Why, you'd be the life
of any party.
Statistics can be interesting, too �
sometimes to the point of being madden-
ing. Take these numbers for example. In
1977, American Airlines, Eastern Airlines,
U.S. Steel and countless other of the na-
tion's largest corporations paid nary a pen-
ny in federal taxes, despite incomes of
more than $34 million each.
No doubt the all-time undisputed cham-
pion for statistics is the United States
government. If it's been spent, eaten,
thrown away or just conceived, the U.S.
government has statistics on it. But for
some reason, it has always struck me funny
that in the scores and scores of government
statistics volumes, there isn't one page of
figures on government wasteful spending.
l. t, nonetheless, our beloved
bureaucracy bombards us each month with
the grim statistics that, to many, have
become the sad reality of life. Consumer
price indexes, median incomes, prime in-
terest rates, unemployment, inflation and
a burrage of other sore topics work to the
same end time after time. They provide the
government with smiles and the citizen
with a headache.
And nowadays it is difficult to imagine
even the world of sports without using
statistics. Why, even a 7-year-old boy
knows the batting average and on-base
percentages of his favorite pro baseball
players. Announcers, too, are quick to re-
mind the fans about the lesser-known
stats. 1 heard one recently who ranted on
and on about a team's .729 winning
percentage when they were ahead in the
eighth inning with at least a two run lead
and a right-hander on the mound. It simp-
ly amazes me that 1 could ever have watch-
ed the game "intelligently" without know-
ing that figure.
Statistics can reveal the grim tales of life;
they can tell us a lot about a number of
things. They can reflect a sick society
preoccupied with trivia, or just a writer
who doesn't know when to sign off.
NO. 5:
HONOR THy
MOTHER AND
FATHER
V
NO.6:
THOU SHALT
NOT KILL
HMMMttM
o
o
NOTE-
COMMANDMENT NO. 6
DOES NCfTAPPLi TO
LEBANESE AND
PALESTINIANS
THE EA9T CAKOLIMAN
Imperialism A Worldwide Threat
By SAFARI MATHENGE
At the dawn of time, says a swahili
legend, the divider of the universe created
Mount Kenya as his dwelling place and
bestowed adjacent lands to my tribe. "I
give this land to you and to your posteri-
ty announced Murungu, the omnipotent
power that white men call "God
For generations, Murungu's command
remained -unquestioned, uncontested!
Fror the Indian Ocean to the shores of
what is called Lake Victoria in world
maps, the land was ours, and as the elders
said, "No one could tunya (take it away)
from us
But that had been before the British had
had a vision. Apparently, in the years that
followed, the European "God" had an an-
nouncement to make too; "Go unto the
world and take all the land in my name
Early this century, the British arrived ar-
rived in Kenya, indeed in all of Africa,
disguised as missionaries and claimed the
land that Murungu had bestowed upon my
tribe!
Of course, our resentment smouldered
as time went by, but at first, the elders had
been naive and trusting. "Let the
Muzungus (white wanderers) be But in a
few years, white men proceded to establish
themselves as the rulers and owners of that
land. For the African, the lesson was learn-
ed the hard way.
Finally, as life became unbearable, white
man's resentment flared into what was
called "the mau mau uprising" of the
1950s which claimed thousands of lives.
The "mau mau terrorists as branded by
the British, hid from the British in the
caves of the sacred mountain, and from
there bombarded the British troops until
they had no choice but to pack and go back
to England, small as it was.
Of course, I do not merely intend to
arouse by-gones here by retelling what is a
bitter tale for me. I have a purpose!
Campus
Spectrum
Neither do I intend to be simplistic in ad-
dressing the BritishArgentine crisis. I
realize that it is a matter more complicated
than I can justly evaluate, but I have ex-
plored numerous similaritiess between the
problems and developments that face the
Argentine people today and those that fac-
ed Kenya during those British Colonial
days and have found profound similarities.
Britain, and now with the support of big
brother � United States � is deter-
mined more than ever to retain her majes-
ty's kingdom intact. "We are fighting for a
just cause says Mrs. Thatcher. Now. just
what is a "just cause" for a war so
away from home? If any other countrv had
claimed land at that proximity, 1 assure
you the United States would have con-
demned it as "imperialistic
Judging from such U.S. policies,
especially during this period
"Reagan-double-standard I sup;
East Carolinian staff writer Patrick
O'Neill in his assertion that it is not un-
patriotic to protest inhuman policies divis-
ed by politicians in their quest for power
I would be utterly disappointed with the
United States, but happily there stil! exists
another United States, timeless and un-
changing: the vast United States, where
there is freedom of expression (although
Patrick O'Neill may question that too) and
freedom of opportunity, the United States
of magnificent distances, where one's
spirit roams with the wind in a land
beautiful that it seems to expand and
magnify the knowledge of the beholder.
This is the United States that I s
first, travelling mostly by car during
golden days, living under tents in
parks during crisp summer nights.
"Life in those United States 1
been told three years ago, "is a story t
told and re-told Now that I have lived
here myself, I can assure you that I won't
be without an anecdote to tell to my grand
children � how vividly the mind's eye will
bring back certain unforgettable scenes.
"Campus Forum'
Is WZMB's General Manager A Tyrant?
To the General Manager of WZMB or
whom it may concern:
A recent problem has arisen on my
radio dial. You see, I have this problem
of distinguishing whether our college
radio station is located at 91.3 or 93.3.
The only difference I can find between
the stations at these two locations is that
one is automated at most times during
the day, and the one I assume is the cam-
ous station is live. The music played on
tne campus station differs very little
from that played on the commercial sta-
tions in our area.
Because of the new programming
policy (obviously created by someone
who has no idea of the purpose of a col-
lege radio station or any knowledge of
the music industry) our (student) radio
station has lost any individuality it may
have had.
It is no longer individual in its music
selection, and it no longer allows its disc
jockeys to be individuals. When our sta-
tion first went on the air, it was billed as
the "alternative and it was. The DJ's
themselves could not stress that point
enough. (1 notice that they now restrain
from using this term not only because
the general manager advised them to do
so, but, probably, also because they
would be embarassed to breathe such a
word.) How alternative can a station be
if the management decides what should
be played? And for that matter, how
much personality andor individuality
can a DJ have if he is given a clock divid-
ed into sections telling him which songs
he can play when? (I know you know all
this information Mr. G. Manager, and
you may turn off your ears, which you
obviously do well and often, but, please,
at least read the rest of the letter after
the technical stuff is over.) I think the
student population should know what
WZMB's new general manager has done
to, excuse me, with our radio station.
The DJ's are given a pie graph which
represents one hour of a clock. It is sec-
tioned into slots telling the DJ when
heshe may play high, medium and low
air play cuts and oldies. These limita-
tions are not the only ones. The albums
which are considered high, medium and
low air play are placed in special bins
marked accordingly. When the DJ
comes to a slot specifying one of these
three selections, he must go to the ap-
propriate bin and take the first album
off the stack (he has no choice) and pick
a cut from the marked cuts on the
album.
Oh, yes, even the songs themselves
have been pre-chosen and separated into
those that can be played anytime and
those that are playable in hours other
than morning hours. The only choice a
DJ may make is an oldie, and even these
are limited by a card catalogue system
that is too complicated to describe right
now.
There are a few "specialty shows"
that are allowed to break from this
monotony. They are the classical, jazz,
new-wave, soul and heavy metal shows.
At least these shows are a change of
pace.
So, what's your excuse, Mr. G.
Manager? I have heard you say that you
are striving for consistency. WHY? You
can't be trying to sell commercials! Con-
sistency should not be the main objective
of a campus radio station. These limita-
tions you have placed on the station
violate the principle purpose of a college
radio station: Expression. We no longer
can express ourselves freely on our own
damn radio station. Mr. G. Manager, is
it fair for you to decide what we should
or should not hear? You have taken our
choice away. Let the DJ's control their
own shows again. The people who don't
like what is being played can exercise
their choice by turning their tuning
knobs? They'll come back when so-
meone who plays exactly what they like
comes on the air. Students will at least
have a choice of what to listen to and
when. People tend to tailor their listen-
ing to what they like. To hell with con-
sistency!
Please consider what I have said. I
think you will see that some changes
should be made.
Edith Jeffreys
Junior
Computer Science
P.S.Mr. G. Manager, if 1 may express a
personalprofessional opinion, you have
poor, if any, taste in music.
ERA
I'm glad to see a campus newspaper
cover such national issues as the Equal
Rights Amendment. Students need equal
rights too.
The cavalier manner in which the
Senate tabled the Equal Rights Amend-
ment is deplorable. Registered voters
should call Senator White, he is in the
book, Vernon E. White, and complain
There is still time for two-thirds of th-
senate to untable the bill but only if we
who favor it will let those senators know
our thoughts by writing and calling on
the phone.
Sincerely,
Ms. Dot Gronert
ERA Hotline
Despite the state senate's tabling of the
ERA last week, supporters of the
amendment feel strongly that it is all but
a dead issue. Therefore, with the na-
tional deadline fast approaching, it may
be worth your while to give your state
representatives a phone call and voice
your opinion. Pitt County legislators
can be reached at the following
numbers:
� State Sen. Vernon E. White
� Rep. Edward N. Warren
�Rep. Sam D. Bundy
733-5850
733-5821
733-5824
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NO. 6
yro
! II
V?
-
ne
the
of the
s all but
the na-
ig. it may
Pour state
md voice
legislators
following
33-5850
'33-5821
'33-5824
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JUNE 9, 1982
Page 5
Fosse Shows
Us How It's
Done, Again
Juiced-Up Summer Concert Slated For Mall Thursday Night
With enthusiasm, excitement and plenty of talent. Juicy, a five-member
ensemble from North C arrna, will be performing in a concert on the
University Mall this Thursday at 8 p.m. The group recently debuted on
Arista Records with a good first effort. The band's background stems
from classical, jazz, popular, gospel, rock and soul and their sound has
been described as "dynamic and quite unique The rain site for the
concert is Hendrix Theatre. The performance is being sponsored b the
Student Union Special Concerts Committee.
By JOHN WEYLER
SUIIWriln
The Student Union Films Com-
mittee continues its successful sum-
mer film series with the Oscar-
winning All That Jazz, to be screen-
ed tonight at 8 p.m. Next Monday's
movie is the most popular contem-
porary comedy to date, Animal
House. Both films will be shown at
Mendenhall Student Center's Hen-
drix Theatre. Admission is free with
ECU ID and Activity Card or MSC
membership.
Bob Fosse won the Academy
Award for Best Director for the
musical All That Jazz, which was
awarded Best Picture. Jazz is a col-
orful, dizzying, kaleidoscope of
music, backstage drama, comedy,
sex, soul-searching autobiography,
fine performances (starring Roy
Scheider as Fosse's alter ego Joe Gi-
deon, plus Ann Reinking, Jessica
Lange and Ben Vereen), and most
of all, dance.
"All That Jazz is a film that
literally dances says Jack Kroll in
Newsweek. "Its opening is brilliant,
a thrilling and poignant montage of
leaping, straining bodies as Joe win-
nows out a stageful of young
dancers to the final chorus line. The
whole movie comes hurtling at you,
in dazzling editing and the superb
cinematography of Fellini's
cameraman, Giuseppe Rotunno . . .
Fosse has a fierce courage
that is a kind of genius: he makes it
work by a savage sincerity that out-
faces sentimentality. He is a fine
director and gets extraordinary per-
formances from everyone, especial-
ly Scheider. An actor of great in-
tegrity. Scheider at last makes the
powerful impression we've been
waiting for; he plays Joe with
wonderfully delicate and telling
detail. You see all the lusts and
weaknesses, but you see also an
underlying sweetness, a kind ot
forlorn and desperate innocence
that makes something deeply human
out of good, bad, weakness,
strength, triumph, defeat and all
that jazz
Moving from the sublime to the
ridiculous. Animal House will be
shown next Monday night. June 14.
at 9 p.m. Nothing more needs to be
said here about this film, as it has
already been seen several times b
every human being under the age of
ninety-nine, and so has been im-
pressed into the collective memory
of mankind for future generations
to enjoy.
The End Of An Era: 'Mash' Is On The Outs
B CD. SAINT-AM AND
Miff Whirr
The end is near. The leaders have met. and talks are
now concluded. The war is ending in 1983. At long last
Hawkeye, B.J. and the rest of the 4077th are coming
home; and 1A SH, possibly the best television series
of all time, will be off the air.
My infatuation with fASH began when I was in
the eighth grade. I remember watching the very first
show. The next day, mv friend Tommy and I talked
about it in shop class. We both agreed it was certain to
be a hit, but we had no idea it would ever be as suc-
cessful as it was.
In the show's first year ('7374) it won the Emmy as
Outstanding Comedy Series and has been consistently at
the top of this category since then. It has been on the air
a decade, a feat remarkable in itself, and it is syndicated
to stations across the U.S. 4.S can be seen vir-
tually every day, often two or three times a day.
Several factors account for the series' popularity and
its' consistently fresh, unusually creative outlook. After
all, the show has been dealing with the same conflict for
over 10 years.
Obviously Alan Alda, who will always be
remembered as the irreverent Hawkeye Pierce, has
always been the driving force behind the show. He is
everything most of us want in a comedian; charismatic,
charming, and a little off. He alone would have been
enough to carry the show for a few years. Alda has also
served as creative consultant, writer, and director. As
creative consultant he works out stories with writers,
polishes scripts, makes suggestions on how the set can
be improved and sometimes helps write new scenes. As a
director he is involved, in addition to coaching per-
formers, with the editing of MASH. Alda has also
written many a segment and in 1979 won an Emmy for
his script entitled "Inga the story of a female doctor
with more surgical skills than Hawkeye.
But while Hawkeye has been the focal point of most
fA SH episodes, one character does not a superior
television series make. Maclean Stephenson as Col.
Henry Blake gave us the best of two worlds: he played a
ridiculously inept commanding officer who also hap-
pened to be a warm, compassionate and genuinely
human being. Wayne Rodgers, as Trapper John, was
the perfect roommate, sidekick, and alter-ego for
Hawkeye. The early shows dealt primarily with the off-
beat antics of these two bawdy characters. Of course,
their counterpart Major Frank Burns (Larry Linville)
was the inspired antithesis for the unruly duo.
Those early days, as satisfying as they might have
been, gave us a serio-comic premise that became
perhaps a bit too pat. Episodes tended to evolve along
very similar lines: Hawkeye and Trapper spouting one-
liners that, as they should be, were wittier than anything
one ever hears in daily conversation; Frank, usually the
butt of the jokes, was easily made to look foolish; and
everything was neatly resolved within the half-hour
framework. MA SH began to get stale, the characters
shallow and predictable.
Following an NBC variety show offer that never
amounted to anything, Maclean Stephenson asked that
his Henry Blake character be written out of l.S,
thus leaving him free to accept the offer. The result,
Blake's plane being shot down over the Pacific, is telev i-
sion history and proved the turning point in the show's
life. Blake's departure meant new personnel in the
4077th, a new commanding officer and a chance for the
old characters to do a little soul searching.
Colonel Sherman Potter (Harry Morgan) was ushered
in with all his years of military experience behind him
and a big job ahead of him. 1ASH was suddenly
converted from a static, formula program into a signifi-
cant, ever-suprising, always thought-provoking series.
Once B.J. Honnicutt (Mike Ferrell) arrived, the
transformation was complete. Character development,
which was painfully slow in the beginning, began to take
form and each new episode involved more human emo-
tions than hi-jinks.
An early episode in which Hawkeye and Trapper
operate needlessly on a healthy general to keep him out
of battle was done later with much different results.
This time Hawkeye performs an unnecessary appendec-
tomy on a brutal general while B.J. refuses to take part
for obvious ethical reasons. The superficiality of the
early Hawkeye and Trapper would have made this show
See MASH Page 6
Can Khan Cope?
'Trek II' Slick But Schmaltzy
By JOHN WEYLER
stiff Wrilrr
Mr. Spock, taking a cue from Beldarr Conehead, has
gotten a job as a driving instructor. His pupil is Saavik,
a young female Vulcan who is trying out her training
ears. She wrecks the drivers' ed car, almost running over
James T. Kirk. Getting old, near-sighted and
overweight; needing glasses and a corset, Kirk waxes
nostalgic at the sight of the vehicle. He used to be a race-
car driver, but they won't let him drive anymore since
his eyes are so bad. He gets a chance to get back in the
driver's seat however, when he gets a telephone call
from an old girlfriend � the two of them as well as
Spock and a pocket calculator used to double-date years
ago. She calls to complain that somebody is trying to
steal her bottle of Miracle-Gro plant food. Kirk races to
her side, not realizing that it's a trap laid for him by
Ricardo Montalban, who hates him for having maroon-
ed him on Fantasy Island at the beginning of a crucial
network ratings period . . .
I could continue on in this stream-of-consciousness
fashion for another few hours, but I think at this point
I'll land this review right back here on the planet Earth
� that is, before I'm spent. Soooooo . . .
Star Trek has always walked a tightrope between high
drama and unwilling humor, with its actors sporting
contemporary hairstyles and futuristic outfits. The cast
speaks a combination of modern expressions and 23rd
century lingo, enthusiastically emoting through a
storyline saddled with highly implausable sci-fi and
heavy-handed humanistic philosophy. The second Star
Trek movie, sub-titled The Wrath of Khan (now playing
at the Plaza Cinema in Greenville), has all the above
faults and more. All in all though, the film is still decent
entertainment mixed with a message. Let's give that plot
summary a second try:
Spock is teaching Star Fleet cadets on the Enterprise
with special emphasis on a young Vulcan woman,
Saavik (Kristie Alley). With much simulated mass
destruction, she fails her test, the purpose of which is to
see how a starship commander would face a "no-win
certain death situation. Facing death is the theme of the
film, a motif given extra meaning with the arrival of Ad-
miral Kirk. Years ago, he was the only cadet ever to pass
that same test, but now he is growing old, unsure of
himself. Bored by the duties of an admiral, he misses
commanding the Enterprise, his first love.
Suddenly Kirk receives a distress call from an old
love, now a scientistworking on Project Genesis. Her
device is capable both of turning a desert planet into a
garden overnight and causing incredible chaos, and has
become a pawn in a game of revenge. Khan, a
genetically-superior renegade, was abandoned by Kirk
on a barren planetoid after an attempted takeover of the
Enterprise (related on a TV Trek episode) and lusts for
vengeance.
Once Kirk takes charge of the Enterprise the action
begins and never relents until the explosive climax. The
plot is twisted with sufficient suspense to keep one at
least near the edge of the seat. The direction by Nicholas
Meyer (Time After Time, The Seven Percent Solution)
is competent; the special effects are superb.
The worst part of Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan is
Khan. The character is given the most melodramatic
lines, mouthed with all the haminess Ricardo Mon-
talban can muster after a long career of bad movies and
worse TV shows. He looks as well as sounds ridiculous,
wearing a white fright wig and what appear to be falsies
(to make his chest look more manly). Montalban's
Khan is a villian to be classed with the Snidely
Whiplashes rather than the Darth Vaders.
What salvages Star Trek is its philosophy, however
overbearing it may become. Pondering the riddles of life
and death save the film from being just another science
fiction shootem-up. The saga of Star Trek, both TV
and film versions, is about life: a celebration of the
human spirit. That is what is important here, not such
silliness as whether Leonard Nimoy will get paid enough
to survive until Star Trek III.

I
1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 9. 1982
'Mash' Leaving Us
With Fond Memories
Continued From Page 5
implausable; the regenerated roles made the con-
sternation of B.J. and the despair of Hawkeye
utterly believable and realistic.
The development of the other characters has
been a joy, and in some cases a mirror, for most
Americans to view. Witness one Margret M.
Houlihan (Loretta Switt) who started out as an
egocentric, strait-laced, military-minded major,
but has survived her trials and tribulations and
has emerged as one of the distinct heroes of the
series. She has accomplished this through her in-
domitable will, and her willingness to bend but
not break. Since her recent shucking of two-
timing husband Donald Pnobscot, Magret has
become the best representation of the modern
woman that network television has ever attemp-
ted to offer. She has a strong sense of identity,
she's proud of that identity, and she has drive
and purpose.
Other unforgetables include Radar O'Reilly
(Gary Burghoff) whose coming of age has been a
hallmark for MA SH. Radar is the Iowa farm-
hoy who sleeps with a teddybear (but hopes to do
better someday), reads minds, runs the camp,
and in the meantime becomes a man.
Corporal Maxwell Klinger (Jamie Farr) has
certainly played a big role in the show's success.
A street wise kid from Toledo, he takes to wear-
ing dresses in an everlasting attempt to secure a
Section 8, until one day realizing the futility of it.
Klinger provides 1ASH with a zany misfit
who has no inclination whatsoever towards Ar-
my Life.
Charles Emerson Winchester (David 6gden
Steirs) is the most recent addition to the
l SH line-up but has always managed to fit
in like a veteran. He brings an air of culture and
sophistication to this "inflamed boil on the but-
tocks of the world He also provides an ex-
cellent counterpart for Pierce and Honnicutt,
since, unlike Frank Burns, he is an adept surgeon
and equally adept at making the quick retort so
vital to survival in the 4077th.
fASH has aged with grace, but the time
has come for this grand show to shut down. Even
Man Alda admits that the creative well is finally
uinning dry. It is simply running out of ideas.
Nevertheless, it has accomplished a great deal. It
is a show which has handled real problems in a
tare, intelligent and sincere fashion. It has had
the courage to expose the futility of war to a
country still smarting from the effects of the
Vietnam War, and it did this without sugar-
coating the material to achieve commercial suc-
cess. VM .S will be missed, but, thanks to re-
runs, will be enjoyed again-and-again by new
fans as well as old. It will continue to be aired,
like a classic film, for as long as television is per-
muted.
Nv
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Prices good at Greenville Food Ton Store only








r n .

It
J
N
THt tASTC AROl IN1AN
Sports
II Nf 9, 1982 Page 7
Odom Moving To Ralph's House
Third-Year Coach Heading To UVA
B CINDY PLEASANTS
Head basketball coach Dave
Odom announced in a press con-
ference Tuesday morning that he
has accepted the position of assis
tant coach at the University ol
Virginia.
Odom read a prepared statement,
saying, "Effective June 30th, I will
down a- Head Basketball coach
Carolina University to ac-
cept a position on Coach Terry
Holland's staff at the University of
irginia. I will remain at Last
Carolina as a working consultant
through the end of the second sc-s
sion summer school without
Odom said he made the decision
giving much consideration to
the people it affected and to the
"two fine universities it involved
He went on to thank the ad-
ation and staff for its sup-
� and described athletic director
Dr. Ken Karr as being a friend
rather than just his boss.
Odom further stated his feelings
� � . ECl basketball team.
"The c " anv program is the
ayers he said. "The ECU
avers have always
d the university in a first
exemplifying the high
that every coach seeks to
tch dom said he has alwav
d o' the players and would
rish the relationships he had with
� them.
"1 expect great things from them
lually and collectively he
"1 will be available to help
:n in anv was the deem ap-
idd 'd that he ived
total backing from the University,
alumni, fans and eastern North
Carolina. Odom also thanked the
media for "treating him fairly dur-
ng the past three years
The Answer
In itemeni was the
question even one wanted an
answer to. W hy would a head coach
leave to accep i lessei positioi
the same division1 "I can honestly
�hat there are less than a handful
of schools in the country that would
be bold enough to make such an of-
fer Odom said. "1 would consider
such an offer from only three or
tour schools in the country And
Odom named UVA as being one of
them.
Odom said he does not know at
the present time what his duties will
be as Holland's assistant coach. "I
believe Holland tries to involve his
staff he said. "We'll decide who
is best to serve where after we get up
there
Odom came to ECU three years
ago after serving as an assistant
coach ai Wake Foist University.
During his first season here, he led
the Pirates to a 16-11 record. "1 was
shocked at the amountof talent
when 1 first came here but the talent
is as good now as it was when I came
in he said.
Disappointing Year
But the Pirates slipped the next
season, ending up with a 12-14
record. After the disappointing
year, Odom was looking forward to
improving his won-loss record the
next season but that was not to hap-
pen. The Pirates accumulated a
10-lb record despite Odom's ef-
forts
"I've never worked harder for
lower positive results he said. "1
was sorely disappointed that our
record was not better.
"If 1 could go back and change it
1 would
odom compared his leaving to
that of a maior medical operation.
�sometimes it takes more than one
surgeon he said. "Of course
we're dealing with a round ball, a
bunch of kids and happiness rather
than a major operation but in both
cases you must sometimes call in
another person to do the job
When asked when he started con-
sidering the UVA offer, Odom
answered. "When Terrv Holland
backed me in the corner and asked
me to visit the campus Odom said
he knew he was serious enough
about it when he decided to take
Holland up on his invitation.
Odom, 39, leaves ECL with a
38-41 record and the valuable ex-
perience of being a head coach. "I
can better appreciate both roles
now he said. Odom added that
he is looking forward to helping
continue the winning program at
UVA and working with Holland.
"I've become associated with a man
that does not believe the sun rises
and sets on just basketball he
said, "I can learn a great deal from
him Odom will be filling a void
left when Craig Littlepage left his
post at Virginia to become the head
coach at Penn State.
As for ECU's basketball pro-
gram, Odom feels the future is a
bright one. "I fully expect them to
snap back he said. "Recruiting
has been good and the goals they
have set are definitely reachable
Twelve players will be returning to
next year's squad in addition to five
signees.
Odom ended his prepared state-
ment by saying. "The ECU ad-
ministration, staff, students, alumni
and fans have been most supportive
and helpful to me. I could not ask
for more
� � �
Athletic director Dr. Ken Karr an-
nounced at Odom's press con-
ference that ECU's new head
basketball coach will be named by
August 1.
Karr said he is looking for the
same qualities that Odom acquired.
"We want someone who can
manage, motivate and recruit he
said.
We feel it (the basketball pro-
gram) has been in very capable
hands and we regret his leaving he
said. "We're just glad and thankful
for having him the three years we
did
Karr said the available talent will
be throughly screened, including
those assistants who served under
Odom here at ECU.
"I think our basketball program
is on a solid base he said. "Our
charge now is to find the best possi-
ble leadership to take us onward
� � �
"To date, we have received
nothing that will verify that either
Morris Hargrove or Bill McNair will
not be returning to next year's
squad coach Dave Odom said
during his press conference Tues-
day.
Odom said the players had their
best academic semesters ever last
year and they are eligible both
academically and athletically to
return.
Both ECU basketball starters
have been considering other alter-
natives as to where they will play
next year Put Odom quickly added
that the two players will not be
traveling with him to UVA.
"We assume they are planning to
return he said.
Darlene Chaney (12)
Odom: Taking his act to Charlottesville
Brown Leaving After Two-Year Stay
By CINDY PLEASANTS
ui�!inl spurts lr dtlnr
Head tennis coach Caroline
Brown is leaving East Carolina
University after a successful two-
year stay. She has accepted the posi-
tion of women's tennis coach at
Davidson College in Charlotte, N.
C.
Davidson finished first in the
state A1AW championship this
year.
Brown took over the women's
tennis team during mid-season last
year and coached both the men and
women's team this past season. She
led the men's team to a 15-4 record
and guided the women to a third-
place ranking in the state this
season.
Brown said it was a very good
year for the two teams.
"Both teams have improved
significantly she said. "The
scores weren't as close against the
same schools we played earlier
Brown mainly attributed the con-
vincing wins to the increase of emo-
tional support. Brown, along with
assistant Alan Farfour and student
helper Danny Weant were always on
hand to boost the players along on
the court. "There were three
coaches on the court that cared
about the program Brown said,
"and that makes a difference
Being named as head coach for
both tennis teams was a position
Brown was thrilled about. "They
hired a female she said, "which is
not usually the case in the Division I
program and 1 appreciate the con-
fidence the administration had in
me
Brown added that the primary
reason for hiring one coach for two
teams was a matter of economics.
"Combining sports is not unusual
nowadays she said. She named
golf and swimming as two other
sports that are practicing this
coaching method.
Has the method worked for
ECU? Coach Brown thinks it has.
"Our goal was to promote a team
concept she said. "It was not
men's or women's tennis but liCU
tennis
During practices, the two teams
did warm-ups together, which in-
cluded stretching and jumprope ex-
ercises. Afterwards, the teams
would then separate and meet back
for running and sprintwork during
the last 15 minutes of practice. "We
felt that by beginning and ending
our practices together, the players
would have a chance to com-
municate and have a real sense of
being a team she said.
While Farfour worked with the
men's team. Brown drilled the
women in practice. During her one-
and-a-half years as the women's
coach, she first directed the Lady
Pirates to a seventh and fifth place
finish before finally placing third in
the state this year � East Carolina's
highest ranking ever.
Brown indicated that many
players are on partial scholarships
but no full scholarships are given
out because of the money situation-
a problem the team had in other
areas.
"We are on a tight budget finan-
cially she said, "so we had to
come up with some creative ideas
One of her ideas was to schedule
more home matches. About 70 per-
cent o our matches were at home,
but we discovered that it was not a
minus point at all she said. She
added that the players were not as
tired and could get to their
homework sooner because of home
matches.
It has become evident that
Caroline Brown has built a suc-
cessful program here at ECU. So,
the next question to ask is, what will
become of the men's and women's
tennis team now?
Five members of the men's team
and two of the women will be be
returning next year but ECU still
has a solid foundation to build
upon, according to Brown. Top
recruit David Creech
Bern. N. C, will be joining .am
in the fall. Creech was one I
leading juniors in the 5
Freshman (Catherine rolson, ECU's
number two singles player this past
year, will be returning to the squad.
Tolson is the first woman eve: from
ECU to attend the regional
Brown said there should also be a
large number of potential walk-ons
who will be living out in ill.
Because the joint-team method ot
coaching turned out to be a positive
approach, besides an economic
short-cut. li.e program will more
thank likeiv continue. nci it's a
program coach Brown will miss.
"1 reallv enjoyed that ex-
perience she said. But Brown is
looking forward to focusing com-
pletely on women's tennis too.
"I'm glad 1 can concentrate just on
coaching, rather than trvmg to teach
and coach she said.
Brown said that during her short
stay at ECl she gamed new ex-
periences that she could carry with
her and she feels good about the
program she is leaving behind.
"We set a solid foundation emo-
tionally she said, "and it's a pro-
gram that can be built upon
Chaney Selected To Eastern Squad
By WILLIAM YFLVERTON
SporU F.�Hlor
For East Carolina center Darlene
Chaney, last year's experience was
this year's gain.
Last summer, Chaney tried out
for her East regional basketball
team, hoping for a chance to par-
ticipate in the National Sports
Festival at Syracuse, N.Y. But she
was only chosen as an alternate.
However, this summer will be a
little different. She made the squad
� chosen from 177 hopefuls at
Rutgers University � and will be on
her way to Indianapolis, Ind. for the
Olympic-type competition in a few
weeks.
The big difference in this year's
performance? Without a doubt,
says her coach Cathy Andruzzi, it
was her defense "that made her a
sure bet from the start. Her offen-
sive game was excellent, but her
defense was great.
"The selection committee was im-
pressed with her fundamentals
Andruzzi added. "Most of them
said, 'Was she on your team this
year? How come we didn't see her
play?
Chaney. 6-2, was a reserve as a
freshman, averaging 6.9 points and
5.3 rebounds for the Lady Pirates,
who were chosen to participate in
the first NCAA women's tourna-
ment.
"We're so excited; it's
unbelievable Andruzzi said. "It
means a great deal to her (Chaney)
and East Carolina University. It's
the first time we've had a player to
make the Sports Festival team. It's a
real great opportunity for her. And
it opens up a lot of doors. This is
one of the things we strive tor for
our athletes
Andruzzi savs Chaney's ex-
perience at the trvouts last summer
made an impact. "She knew what to
expect this year she said. "She
worked very, very hard � every day
� before the trvouts She's shown a
lot of improvement � especially in
the two months she's been train-
ing
Another East Carolina player,
guard Lorraine Foster, was suppos-
ed to have tried out for her regional
team but did not do so because she
was too old.

i





? THE EAST CAROLINIAN JUNE 9, 1982
Robin Still Has Diamond Blood
TAMPA, Fla. (UPI)
� When Robin
Roberts hung up his
spikes at the end of a
19-year major league
pitching career that led
him to baseball's Hall
of Fame, he turned his
back on professional
coaching.
"In my last year,
1966, I was pitching
coach and active pit-
cher for the (Chicago)
Cubs and they asked
me to stay on the next
year as pitching
coach Roberts said
recently.
"I would have liked
to have stayed in the
major leagues as a
general manager or
some other front office
job Roberts said.
"But the travel more
than anything else, was
distasteful
So the fireballing
righthander who com-
pleted his major league
career with 286 vic-
tories and 245 losses,
an earned run average
of 3.41 and a World
Series appearance with
the Philadelphia Phils
Whiz Kids of 1950,
stepped out of the
limelight and went into
the investment business
in Fort Washington
near Philadelphia.
But he had been in
baseball too long to
quit cold turkey.
"I did a little
coaching in the high
school there as a hob-
by Roberts admits.
In 1977, the year
after he was inducted
into the Hall of Fame,
Roberts was lured away
from the investment
business and back into
baseball when he was
hired as baseball coach
at the University of
South Florida.
Roberts said he
always had the thought
of college coaching in
the back of his mind
but had not made any
move to seek such a
position.
"I always mentioned
to my wife that maybe I
should give college
coaching a try before 1
got too old he said.
"I think what hap-
pened was that I sent a
pitcher down to Bobby
Richardson, who was
coaching at South
Carolina at the time
and Bobby knew I kept
a close interest in the
player Roberts said.
"So when (athletic
director) Dick Bowers
called Bobby to see if
he was interested in
coaching at S ith
Florida, Bobby sug-
gested I might be and
Dick called me
Roberts said.
The USF Bulls went
25-25 in his first year in
1977 and followed that
with seasons of 25-26-1
and 28-25 before falling
on bad times in 1980
with a 20-34 record and
a 21-32 showing in
1981.
But this year the
Bulls bounced back
with a 45-13 record,
winning the Sun Belt
Conference and getting
their first invitation to
the NCAA Atlantic
Regional Baseball
Tourney in Miami.
The Bulls finished
third in the regional,
beating Florida and los-
ing to regional cham-
pion Miami and a one-
run 11-inning game to
Stetson.
"It was fun and
gratifying Roberts
said. "We deserved to
be there. We were very
happy.
"We were a good
club last year for the
last 15 games and we
were better organized
and I had a full-time
assistant this vear he
said. "It was kind of a
once in a lifetime mix-
ture
Roberts wouldn't
rule out a possible
return to the big time as
a manager.
"But if I stay right
here I would be com-
pletely happy he
said. "I enjoy watching
college baseball. These
young men are very
capable
Roberts said USF
still is not in a position
of some of the univer-
sities that have well-
known baseball pro-
grams where recruiting
is easier because the
player wants to go
there.
"1 can't get over the
fact the boy has to want
you as much as you
want him he said of
recruiting. "We don't
have the tradition that
some of the others
have. I still can't just
recruit a boy for his
ability. He has to want
to come here.
"I think the college
athletes today are a lot
smarter than they
were he said.
"Ninety-nine percent
of them come here with
a dream of going into
pro ball but as the
mature and grow up
they become more
realistic
Roberts said he has
never made an attempt
to be a father figure to
any of his players.
"I just try to teach
them to appreciate the
simple things in the
game he said

5
Diving Coach
Looking To Sept.
last Carolina
1907-1982
By KEN BOLTON
Stiff Whirr
The East Carolina
diving team recently
finished their season
with a team meet
record of 5-6 for the
men and 5-4 for the
women. But for Jon
Rose, the season was a
little different: he is
now the head diving
coach after his gym-
nastic program was cut
from the ECU athletic
program.
"Overall, we had a
successful season
commented Rose. This
successful season saw
ECU competing in
some tough meets, in-
cluding the Eastern In-
tercollegiate Swimming
and Diving Competi-
tion in Pittsburgh,
Penn. The team did
well, finishing fourth
out of a total of seven
teams.
One of the members
of the team is Scott
Eagle, a freshman from
Winston-Salem. In the
Eastern Collegiate
meet, Eagle finished
eighth on the one-meter
board and 13th on the
three-meter board. Ac-
cording to Rose, "Scott
is probably our best
diver and is a really
super competitor
Another top diver is
Kim Lowe from Mar-
tinsville, N.J. Lowe is a
former gymnast at
ECU, and she placed
high in a number of
meets. Both Eagle and
Lowe will be returning
next season.
Among the recruits
that Rose will look for-
ward to working with
next year are Roy
Johnson, a transfer
from Appalachian
State, Tracy Fearr-
ington from Greenville
and Renee Seech from
Allentown, Penn.
"As a first-year ex-
perience, I learned a lot
about diving, and I
hope I was able to teach
the members of the
team a lot also Rose
adds.
He says he is looking
forward to the upcom-
ing year with optimism.
Next year's team will
begin practice in mid-
September for the
season's opener in
November. The season
ends in March.
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Title
The East Carolinian, June 9, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 09, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.200
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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