The East Carolinian, June 2, 1982






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Students Sentenced
In Pizza larceny
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Drop- rfcl I ines
One Student decide nul i go, another ttiture sindtni decides t get there earlv
Dropout Rate Hits 40 Percent
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leandei disciplinary
sttn, a n researchei and How do thesi reas
� iect, students drop the local level at I-CM ' V
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i numbei ol ol students
d i hai school pi ioi
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out is als als oi maj
PKi �rol I . Page
ECU Students Protest At Air Base
B PA IKK K O'M II I
I leven E( I student and fa nitv
members were among a gi
two doen people w ho t k ik pal I III a
unusual kind ol Memorial la
event.
I he group, all members ol the
Northarolina Peace Network,
gathered at the gates oi Seymoui
I ohnson An I or( e Base in
Goldsboro last Saturday (or a silent
iil foi peae
In a prepared statement the group
said, "Today we remember out wai
dead and vigil in silence as an
1 pe that pea( t will
ii world
I he N �rth t arolina Peace Net
work fia been I- e ping a regulai
pres� ;u t ai Sey mom I ohnson to
protest the nucleai aimed B-52
bombers, which the I nited states
v.i Forc keeps ai the base
Seymoui lohnson, which is
known a a SA( (Strategic Anom
mand) base because oi its nuclear
status, lias been targeted as a level I.
which nil ans it would be one oi the
First places bombed in the event ol a
leal war
I h Peace Network has been ask
ing that all the nucleai w i
taken out oi Goldsboro "It's go
to be our next generation that's
ing to be affected said rheresa
Dulski, an 1 t I ot, i up
therapy student who took pai
igil. "It we evei want to see oui
children's children we've goi
now
"I went because I decided ii as
important to let the peoplt know
thai the nucleai amis situation is
totally out oi hand said Il
physical therapy studeni Maryl
Kozai "We're at the point now
where it's going to be
�� � is beer
l
la x

. base
D pril vigil the Pi
: peoph
mi. the
of vij
�up oi lapanese B
w ho were walking
� Nations foi peace
also took part
Se Ml MORI VI . Pane 2





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 2, 1982
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or yoor organization
would like to have an item printed
In the announcement column.
please type it on an announcement
form and send it to The East
Carolinian in care of the produc
tion manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications Building
Flyers and handwritten copy on
odd sized paper cannot be ac
cepted.
There is no charge tor an
nouncements. but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you want
ana suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column for publicity.
The deadline for announcements
is 5 p m Friday for the Tuesday
paper and S p m Tuesday for the
Thursday paper No an
nouncements received after these
deadlines will be printed.
This space is available to an
campus organizations and depart
ments
JOBS AND JUSTICE"
A march tor "Jobs and Justice"
sponsored by the Southern Chris
tian Leadership Conference will
be coming to Greenville on Thurs
day All students are invited to
participate The march will begin
at 401 Moyewooci Drive at 4 p.m.
Everyone must get together to
"stop Reagans war on the poor"
and help to win extenfion of the
Voting Rights Act. For more infor
mation -ail 758 6820.
DISARMAMENT
Come to the largest rally in
history for disarmament in New
York City. It is on June 12. Car-
pools will be coordinated through
752 4216 or 758 9250. We will be
returning in lime for Monday
class
NUCLEAR FREEZE
An organizer's meeting at Jar
vis Church this Thursday at 730
p m We hope to join citizens of
Ashville, Chapel Hill, Charlotte.
Greensboro, and Raleigh, perhaps
working toward coordination of
larger activity by July Call
758 9250 or 758 4906 for more infor
mation
OFF-CAMPUS
HOUSING
"If you will be needing a room
mate or would like to find and
share an apartment for Fall, con
tact the Off Campus Housing Of
fice, 211 Whichard Building
757 6881, before June 14 Orien'a
tion will begin at that time and
many students will be seeking ac
commodations We need your
listing
ECGC
The East Carolina Gay Com
munity meets every 2nd and 4th
Tuesday at 7 00 at 953 East 10th
Street. June 8th the ECGC will
have a hot dog supper and
homemade ce cream for dessert.
its pot luck so call Mark at
758 7743 about how you can help
AEROBIC MOVEMENT
Aerobic Movement and Exer
sise will be offered on Mon and
Wen, July 5 28, from 630 7 30
p.m Eight sessions of simple but
energetic dance movements com
bines with stretching and muscle
toning exercises Call 757 6143
INTRAMURALS
The Department of Intramural
Recreational Services is once
again offering the ever popualr
Fitness Classes. Join the Aerobic
Fitness Class and get fit the tun
way. The Belly Dancing Class lets
you I earn a beautiful art form
while firming up that tummy
Learn to protect yourself by join
ing the Self Defense Class Find
out all about logging, weight lif
ting, biking swimming and a
variety of activities in the Body
Conditioning Class All students,
faculty, staff and spouces are in
vited to attend Registration is be
ing held now in Room 204
Memorial Gym between the hours
of 9 12'00 and 1 5:00 The cost is $5
for one four week session and S10
for two sessions
NC PRISON SYSTEM
A Symposium on the North
Carolina Prison System will be
held at St Gabriels School on Sat.
June 5 at 10 00 am "Possible
Alternatives" will look into the usp
of Alternatives to incarceration as
a human and economical option
for NC For more information call
752 4216 or 758 1504
SCIENCE DAY CAMP
A Science Day Camp for
primary grade children ages 6-9
will be offered by the ECU Depart
ment of Science Education in
June.
Sessions are set for June 14 18
and June 21 25 Drs Carolyn and
Carol Hampton are co-directors
and will be involved in teaching
participating children.
This year's activities focus
around a series off high interest
physical science topics including
liquids, properties of water and
air, interaction of systems,
pulleys, magnetic interaction and
electrical interaction
The scheduling of topics for the
two sessions will not overlap, so
that youngsters attending both
sessions will not repeat the same
activities
Daily camp classes will be held
in Flanagan Building from 9am
until noon daily. Six vacancies
still exist for each camp session
interested parents should apply
to Dr Carolyn Hampton, Depart
ment of Science Education, ECU,
Telephone 757 6219
PSI CHI
Are you interested in self
actualization, educational
psychology, intellectual develope
ment, sexual behavior or
statistical interpetation" Come to
the Psi Chi Library Book Sale held
in Speight 202 Books pried from
05 to 85. Psi Chi throws in a
bonus, quiet atmosphere for stu
dying with a comfortable couch to
relax in Hours from 8 to 1
ECU BIOLOGY
Due to circumstances beyond
our control. This announcement
was-not printed in April The East
Carolinian regrets the error.
The Biology Club held a lun
cheon for the faculty of the Biology
department as a display of ap
preciation for their contributions
of time and 'cooperation for
members of the club The lun
cheon took place on April 21st in
the Biology department Special
recognition went to Or Charles
Bland and Dr Gerhard Kalmus
for their leadership and assistance
n heoping the club with projects
and various other goals Speakers
of the hour were Dr John M
Howell, Chancellor, Dr Angelo
Volpe, Dean of the Arts and
Sciences, and spoke in behalf of
the school and acknowledged the
accomplishments of the Biology
Club Those also attending were
Dr. William H. Queen and Dr.
Susan McDaniels.
As tokens of appreciation, the
club officers and members
presented to each faculty member
a personalized lab coat as a way of
sayng thanks for their advice and
support
Biology club officers were in
vited by the department to attend
the Awards Banquet held on April
27th at 12 noon Awards and
scholarships were presented to
those students involved in
research and recognition of
special leadership abilities and ac
complishments Biology club
president, Gary Henry was award
ed a plaque from the faculty for
display of outstanding leadership
and enthusiasm Darlene Keene
received the G,W, Kalmus Award
and the $200 00 scholarship for her
active participation in the club.
She is the first recipient of this
award Dawn McDonald, biology
club member and previous officer
was awarded the Outstanding
Female Senior for 1981 82
Funds were made available by
the Biology Club to Biology faculty
members for travel and educa
tion. This pledge of S2S0.00 enables
a progessor to have up to $50.00
per project. Biology Club officers
were also invited to a faculty pic
nic held at Dr. Patricia Daugher
ty's residence on April 25th Plea
sant weather, nice company and
as array of good food made it a
memorable afternoon
Club members assisted in the
University's 75th Anniversry Open
House at Mendenhall and the
Biology building held April 23rd
and 24th
maros
iWIl INVITES YOU TO
WW HAPPY HOUR
()ur Bar Will Stay Open Every Mon - Sat.
UNTIL for Your Pleasure. F�� 3 p m. 7 p.m
and 9pm until
Patio Concert with ROD GREY this
Thurs.& Fri. June 3&4 8pm � until
Happy Hour prices are not effective during live Entertainment.
$New Waitress Service Available on patio during entertainment.
We also have added your
favorite selections of wine,
swiss cheese, whole wheat and
rye breads
RESTAURANT HOURS
Mon. Sat. lla.m11p.m.
For Take Out Orders Call
752 4761
SYMPOSIUM
A symposium titled
"Possibilities of Alternatives" will
be held this Saturday (June 5) at
St Gabriel's School (1101 Ward
St.) beginning at 10 00 p.m The
symposium will focus on the NC.
Criminal Justice System and look
into alternatives to incarceration
The program is free and is open to
the public. For more information
call 752 4216 or 758 1504
HESSSSSEEmSTV' a���
Memorial Day Peace Vigil Held At Base
Continued From Page 1
"I think the number
one issue of our time is
the whole nuclear
issue said Mickey
Skidmore, an ECU
social work student.
"It was real important
to be there on
Memorial Day, because
we were there to
remember the dead
continued Skidmore,
"and a hugh percen-
tage of those people
killed in wars are inno-
cent civilians
"I thought it was ap-
propriate to vigil on
Memorial Day added
Kozar, "because it was
a vigil for them (our
war dead), too, and
also to show that we
didn't want any more
of this (war) to go on
Kozar admitted to
not being very op-
timistic about the
world's chances of
averting a nuclear war.
"I don't know whether
we'll ever be able to
convince the leaders of
different countries to
take steps toward
peace
Skidmore was more
hopeful that disarma-
ment might be realized,
because people were
beginning"to think and
discuss" the nuclear
issue. "That's the first
reason that I'm out
there. We are making
progress he added.
Reaction to the vigil
from passing motorists
going in and out of the
base was mixed with
the majority showing
little interest. Occas-
sionally, the driver of a
car would blow their
horn in approval;
others would shout out
their windows in disap-
proval.
Many of the par-
ticipants in the vigil
held placards with
disarmament themes.
Members of the
peace network
distributed 500 fliers
that invited "North
Carolinians to: pray,
study and act for world
peace The flier con-
tained quotes from the
Bible and Jesus Christ
and suggested various
ways for people to get
involved in activities
that might lead to
world peace.
When asked if speak-
ing out against U.S.
military policy was un-
patriotic, Skidmore
replied "I'm just as
patriotic, if not more
patriotic because of my
Christian and
humanitarian beliefs. If
people do not take a
stand he continued
"and attempt to con-
vince their governments
of what it's doing
wrong, then they're be-
ing unpatriotic
Kozar also expressed
her disapproval of the
unpatriotic label. "I'm
not unpatriotic she
said. Kozar added that
those who looked on
her as unpatriotic were
under the blind belief
that "these nuclear
weapons are maintain-
ing peace-but they're
not
"Even the smallest
actions that we do for
peace are important
added Dulski, "We're
not anti-American, we
love this country
Asked why she
thought more ECU
students did not take
part in the vigil, Kozar
replied, "As a general
trend students at ECU
have become apathetic,
they seem to be mainly
concerned about mak-
ing money and getting a
career
"I'm not so sure that
apathy is the reason
added Skidmore, "We
all place our priorties in
different sequences
he concluded.
The North Carolina
Peace Network plans to
return to Seymour
Johnson on July 3rd
and to continue return-
ing until all nuclear
weapons are out of
Goldsboro.
J.A. UNIFORMS
SHOP
All lypes of uniforms a reasonable
prices. Lab coa's, s ' pes,
shoes, and hose. Als u ECU
nurses uniforms. Trade ins al .�. � ci.
Located 1710W.6ih s .
off Memorial Dnv
Near Hullowell's Druci a"�c;
Citizens Participate In Study
Classifieds
the No. 3
Marshall
Dillon
t&Ncfl Marshall
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Old stajidardB never: fade
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standard Broiled sirloin tips
with bell peppers and onions,
served with your choice of
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Once you Ve
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$3.89 strntn
203 E 10th SI
? 10 W Greenville Bivo
A contingent of
Greenville citizens, in-
cluding East Carolina
University personnel
and students, is plann-
ing to participate in the
events surrounding the
United Nations' Se-
cond Special Session
Devoted to Disarma-
ment.
Dr. Carroll Webber,
a retired ECU math
professor, has been
coordinating a local
"Greenville Task
Force" devoted to stu-
dying and planning
events for the U.N. ses-
sion. Webber says he is
"guardedly optimistic"
that the special session
will realize its goals.
Webber further
points out that the arms
race is still unchecked
and that the ceiling on
arms buildup,
established in SALT I
has been realized.
"So we see that ar-
mament rather than
disarmament is the out-
ward result of all the
many forces since 1978,
including the special
session said Webber.
" But to justify my op-
timism, I believe that a
foundation was laid on
which the second ses-
sion can erect a struc-
ture within which disar-
mament can really be
accomplished
Webber noted that a
worldwide negotiating
committee was formed
with "comprehensive
unanimously agreed
principles" as a result
of the first U.N. Ses-
sion.
There was a
unanimous agreement
from the nations par-
ticipating in the first
special session that the
arms race "jepoardizes
the security of all
states
"Removing the
threat of a world war, a
nuclear war, is the most
acute and urgent task
of the present day.
SUMMER JOB Need student
technical draftsman. Must have
working knowledge of electrical
schematics. Pay commensurate
with skill and productivity.
757 6711 D Lunney, R Morrison or
A. Salt
HIGH PERFORMANCE, high
fidelity stereo speakers. Five
cubic feet enclosure Call Al
757 4713. 752 7817 nite.
Professional TYPING service- ex-
perience, quality work, IBM Selec
trie typewriter. Call Lame Shive.
758 5301 or Gail Joyner, 75 102
TYPING: Term, thesis, resumes,
dissertations, etc. Professional
quality at lowest rates. Call Kern
pie Dunn anytime 752733
ONE OR TWO female roommates
wanted. $230 a month plus utilities.
Village Green. Grad students
preferred Available in July,
752 758
TYPING TERM PAPERS all
sues. Proofreading offered.
Dependable typist. Call Mary,
355 240
1974 DATSUN 410 Stn iMgn
Manual Shift in good condition
(VUOO) call 758-45 after 5 30 p.m.
and before 10 am. weekdays.
Anytime on weekends.
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0)0
GRAND OPENING
June 2nd,3rd&4th
NEW AND USED BO
�it
321 Evons St. Mall Phone 752-3333
Open 9-S Seven Days a Week
DOUBLE CREDIT on
USED PAPERBACKS
you bring in!
FREE DOOR PRIZES
GRAND en � ,
PPJZF " Certtf,catt
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r





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 2, 1982
Dropout Rates Posing Problems
For Major Colleges, Universities
Continued From Page 1
-imately the same age
as other students. She
also has an extremely
good high school
academic record.
Dropping out
presents a major pro-
blem to universities and
colleges, since a reduc-
tion in enrollment
mean a corresponding
reduction in income. In
his book, "Four
Critical Years Astin
explained that a 10 per-
cent increase in enroll-
ment does not cost a
university 10 percent
more to provide the
same services to each
additional student.
However, a 10 percent
drop in enrollment nor-
mally means a 10 per-
cent reduction in
university income.
Many universities are
taking steps to increase
retention, according to
information published
by the American Coun-
cil on Education and
similar organizations.
It is viewed as a cost-
effective measure since
it cost less to retain a
student than it does to
recruit a student.
ECU is among those
universities which
would like to increase
retention. However,
there is no formal pro-
gram as such set up.
Vice Chancellor for
Student Life, Elmer E.
Meyer explained that
the school is taking in-
formal steps to increase
retention. Several
reports on retention im-
provement have been
passed around and ac-
cording to Meyer, the
university is looking at
ways to increase reten-
tion
Susan J. McDaniel,
acting director for ad-
missions, explained
that the information on
dropouts is so sketchy
that she is not sure if
there is enough infor-
mation on the subject
for anyone to actually
get a handle on the
dynamics of dropping
out.
However, she does
feel the university is
taking steps toward in-
creasing retention.
"The most potent
device we have to
counter dropping out is
the faculty and student
relations explainecf
McDaniel. "Every stu-
dent needs an advisor
and for more than just
what course to take
Because of this
McDaniel explained
that the school places a
lot of emphasis on
student-faculty and
student-advisor rela-
tions, hoping to slow
the drop-out rate.
According to
McDaniel, since the
university switched to
the semester system a
few years ago and con-
sequently lost much of
its previous data base,
it is not known if the
actions taken by the
school have actually in-
creased retention. "We
are currently building
back up our data
base said McDaniel,
"and in a few years
should have more in-
formation to get a han-
dle on the situation
Meanwhile, Lisa
stills plans to get out
and spend more time
with her family and
have more money to
spend. She is not com-
pletely happy about her
decision and feets there
is a stigma associated
with dropping out.
"My family wasn't
happy to hear about my
decision but they
understood my situa-
tion said Lisa, ad-
ding that she has not
told many other peo-
ple.
Lisa does not blame
the school for her deci-
sion, nor does she
believe the university
could do anything to
change her mind. "I
hope to return to
school in a few years
said Lisa, "but right
now I need the break
Do You Frequent
The Library?
Maybe
You Should
Gl Camouflaged Fatigues and
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See Gordon hulp
GCC
756-0504
HAVE A PROBLEM?
NEED INFORMATION?
REAL Crisis Intervention
24 HOUR SERVICE
758-HELP
1117 Evans Street
Greenville, N.C. 27834
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Attention BIKIES!
East Carolina Roadracing Association
carries a complete line of Professional
Bicycles and Accessories for the Serious
Cyclist,Racer or Tourist.
call Kip Sloan
756 0246 Vr 8b
7b7 1680 weekends & utter 7pm
Distributor of Panasonic Bicycles
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ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available for sale
lbelow the advertised price in each AAP Store, except as specifically noted
in this ad.
prices effective thru wed, thru Sat. June 5 Greenville, N.C.
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
at or
C
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Stye East (HwcalMun
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1923
Fielding Miller. ow ��,�.
Mike Hughes, mm
WAVERLY MERRITT. Dtrtcto,of m, WlLLIAM YELVERTON. ����
Robert Rucks, ���,� MaH4mtr Ernest Conner. n, u�
Phillip Maness. emu ,� Steve Bachner. &���� ��-
Chris Lichok. nwwm a.wr Alison Bartel.
THMEAST CAROLINIAN
June 2. 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Equal Rights
Extremists Questionable
Equality of rights under the law
shall not be denied or abridged by
the United States or by any state on
account of sex. The Congress shall
have the power to enforce by ap-
propriate legislation the provisions
of this act. The amendment shall
take effect two years after the date
of ratification.
Perhaps no other collection of
words has brought about the con-
troversy of the above paragraph.
And much to our surprise, the con-
troversy over these words may be
just beginning.
Nearly 12 years ago, The U.S.
House of Representatives approved
the Equal Rights Amendment by a
vote of 350 to 15. Eighteen months
later, in March 1972, U.S. Senators
voted 84 to eight in favor of the
amendment. At that time, ERA was
given seven years to gain the ap-
proval of two-thirds, or 38, of the
states to become law.
Less than one year later, 22 states
had ratified the amendment. Yet the
heated debate was just beginning in
North Carolina. The state became
the ninth to reject ERA in March
1973, following a House vote of 83
to 82 opposed and a Senate rejec-
tion of 27 to 23. A month before, a
state House subcommittee had ap-
proved a bill calling for a referen-
dum on the proposed amendment.
r . years �nf1 numerous debates
iaic the iSuiin Carolina House of
Representatives again rejected the
referendum. That year, 1975, mark-
ed, perhaps, the most controversial
period in the amendment's North
Carolina history. After being rein-
troduced to the state legislature, the
bill was tentatively approved, re-
jected, re-reintroduced and finally
killed.
In 1977, the bill came extremely
close to gaining approval in the
state. After being approved in the
House, the bill lost the N.G Senate
vote when Sen. James McDuffie,
D-Mecklenburg, reversed his cam-
paign promises and his vote. The
full Senate vote was, thus, 26 to 24
opposed.
With the deadline for ratification
fast approaching, the state voted to
extend the limitation to June 30,
1982. Bitter and placid discussion
has brought the history of ERA in
North Carolina to the present.
When the full state legislature
convenes today, it is expected that
the slated budget hearings and
discussions will be extensively
downplayed and that ERA discus-
sion will take the floor.
Legislators commenting on the
upcoming session claim they've
been 4 Swamped" with letters from
proponents and opponents of ERA
ratification. They have sworn to
take their "hopes and fears' with
them into the legislature when the
bill goes to the floor today.
However, experts claim that the pre-
sent ERA situation in the state is
"too close to call
By virtue of the ERA's being a
topic of considerable controversy,
extreme views on both sides have
come full thrust in the past 12 years.
Some radical supporters of the
amendment seem to feel that adop-
tion of the ERA is the long-awaited
solution to sexual descrimination in
the U.S. Extremists opposed to the
amendment have gone so far as to
propose that adoption of the ERA
will mark the end of family life in
the U.S. as we know it.
Wouldn't it be amazing if a writ-
ten document could have that much
direct impact on a society? Why,
with the mentality of those ex-
tremists, it should be easy enough to
eliminate poverty by enacting a law
against it.
Of course, getting involved in an
issue of controversy is not "wrong"
per se. Certainly, if there were no
support or opposition for today's
key issues, it would be extremely
difficult to gauge the gravity of
world news.
But blind adherence to one side or
the other can be detrimental,
especially when dealing with an
emotional issue such as equality of
rights under law. Those who con-
demn a cause without any factual
basis work only to extend the
apathy professed by others. Senator
Sam Ervin, one of the most vocal
opponents to ERA, even warned at
one time that adoption of the
amendment would merge jail and
restroon facilities for men and
women.
Asinine.
Perhaps one stage of citizen in-
volvement has come to an end. The
letter-writing phase is obviously
over. Legislative debates will, in ef-
fect, determine what lies ahead for
the ERA in North Carolina. But this
is not to say that state citizens can
expect a written change in the U.S.
Constitution to straighten out sex-
ual descrimination and work force
tensions. The principle behind that
and its resolution lie far beneath a
paper document.
W!W!?B?!SS!?!?mu.mjj
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ECU Baseball
Sparse Crowds For Half A Century
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
As a child in nearby Farmville, I
couldn't wait to get home from Little
League practice and flip to the sports page
of the Greenville Daily Reflector and see
how the Pirates did. And more often than
not, they had won.
But every time 1 looked at the bottom of
the boxscore, "Attendance: 150" would
always catch my attention.
And when I went to high school, our
coach would end practice early, and we'd
pile into our old activity bus so we could
see the Pirates play a few games a year.
And they still played before only a cou-
ple of hundred fans � a couple of hundred
loyal fans. Many of whom attended every
game, knowing each other's names and
sharing victories and defeats with James
Mallory's, Monte Little's and Hal Baird's
teams.
But there were always many more vic-
tories than defeats, though. Which has
been pretty much the case the past 50
years.
This is East Carolina baseball's golden
anniversary, celebrating 50 years of rich
baseball tradition. A championship tradi-
tion.
Yet baseball at East Carolina doesn't
receive nearly as much recognition as it
should. And that's pretty hard to swallow
since the program has had only had one
losing season in the past 30 years. The
football and basketball programs certainly
can't boast about that.
But the most difficult thing to unders-
tand about Pirate baseball is the atten-
dance. WE have a nice baseball field; the
people are friendly; the grass is green. And
yet the only time we fill the stands is when
those uppity boys from Chapel Hill come
to town.
The Pirates are our Boy's of Summer.
Names such as Billy Best, Eddie Gates,
Mickey Britt and Sonny Wooten were just
as familiar to youngsters in this area as
were the Robinsons, the Seavers, the
Aarons. When the Pirates won, we all
won. When they lost, we all lost.
They were once national champions
(NAIA). Back in 1961, under the leader-
ship of a crafty coach named James
Mallory, this bunch of good ol' country
boys defeated Sacramento State, 13-7, to
bring a national title back to Greenville.
"The phoenomenal thing about it
Mallory once told me, "was that I didn't
have but 13 boys
And Finances were a problem, too.
"Money was hard to get back then he
said. "The people in Greenville raised
three or four thousand dollars for us
Just a great big family.
Mallory retired in 1962 after compiling
an overall record of 145 wins and only 52
losses. But he returned to coach briefly in
1973.
Monte Little coached East Carolina
from 1976-79, winning 82 games and los-
ing only 49. Under his direction, the
Pirates won their sixth Southern Con
ference championship. And his 1977 team
set 21 new school records.
And when Little retired in 1979, he turn-
ed the program over to a friendly, dark-
haired, three-year assistant named Hal
Baird, who held the East Carolina record
for most saves in a season.
The new coach knew what to do,
thougn. He won, and he won. and he won.
Twenty-eight times that year. Only seven
losses. And he was rewarded with a bid to
the NCAA tournament.
Which brings us to this year.
The Pirates, for the first time in six
years, belonged to a conference. Another
chance to build rivalries, where the
homefield advantage really comes in han-
dy.
And again the Pirates won. But this time
they did it like no other East Carolina team
had ever done. They won 34 games, losing
14. They were ECAC-South Conference
champions and a participant in the NCAA
tournament.
And they still played before only a cou-
ple of hundred fans. Loyal fans.
So nothing has really changed, has it0
The Memorial In Memorial Day?
By MIKE HUGHES
Memorial Day. I can remember when
that holiday really meant something.
Everyone got the day off (and they knew
why); churches held special services, and it
seemed the whole day was devoted solely
to commemorating the thousands of war
veterans who "gave their lives for our
country
But Memorial Day 1982 seemed to be
lacking something. Sure, there were the
usual sales at all the local stores, and
federal employees were able to take advan-
tage of the convenient three-day weekend,
but somehow Memorial Day just didn't
seem the same this year.
Perhaps the problem is that nowadays
we're more concerned with forgetting the
trials and tribulations of our nation's tur-
bulent past. We no longer look back on
r Campus Forum
wars with patriotic eyes.
Granted, war is not a romantic proposi-
tion. Men, women and children being kill-
ed in needless battle is not something to be
glorified. VVar, simply put, is hell. And
perhaps the memories of bloodshed are
better off forgotten.
But if our wish to forget the belligerent
past causes us to ignore the brave soldiers
who have served this country with the
ultimate sacrifice, then I fear we have
forgotten too much.
As Americans, we tend to take our
various "freedoms" highly for granted.
We sometimes forget that freedom � just
as any other commodity � has a price.
Unfortunately, history has dictated that
the high cost of freedom be paid in human
lives.
We can argue that war and military ac-
tion do nothing to bring about any sort of
peaceful solution. We can scream about
federal defense spending on nuclear
missiles. We have the choice to complain
about draft registration. But when we
forget our gallant men and women who
have served and died at war, we have taken
too much for granted.
The history of the United States is, in-
deed, heroic. As U.S. citizens, we have
much to be proud of and thankful for.
And anyone who thinks otherwise: jus:
take a gander at the world news on teleu-
sion some night. Just see what price people
are paying all over the globe for the
freedom we have grown so accustomed to.
Be proud of your heritage, and be
grateful for those who have preserved it.
Don't let Memorial Day become just
another three-day weekend.
SFA Secretary Earns Praise
In a small office located in the
labyrinth of second floor Mendenhall,
there is a frazzled young woman who
can teach bureaucracy a lesson in the art
of resilience.
Two or three weeks ag. Student
Fund accounting suffered a setback
when the manager, Joy Clark, left tem-
porarily because of a back ailment.
Since then, Debbie Stevens, secretary of
SFA, has been running the office with
unusual spirit. Despite the mounting
workload of handling requisitions and
posting financial statements, she has
kept a smiling face and a willingness to
help those in need of financial
assistance.
We at WZMB appreciate the time she
has put into helping the station with
keeping the financial records straight.
We also appreciate her ability to put up
with the business manager and CM.
and all of our ludicrous questions.
The campus is very lucky to have so-
meone who truly serves the students. So-
meone give this woman a commenda-
tion.
Applause, please.
Warren Baker
G.M.ofWZMB
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. Alt let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JUNE 2, 1982
Page 5
Conan's Film
Exploits Are
Razor-Sharp
ByJOHNWEYLER
Staff Writer
Do you like to see people's heads
being hacked off? How about
gigantic snakes trying to eat bar-
barians? How about prehistoric sex
scenes? If any of the above is your
idea of a good time, then rush to see
Conan the Barbarian before it com-
pletes its run at Greenville's Plaza
Cinema. The rest of you will do just
as well to stay home and save your
hard-earned money (perhaps your
stomach as well).
The backers of Conan are gambl-
ing that many will rush out to see
their savage hero � which may be a
safe bet, since the embattled bar-
barian has been bloodying up pulp
magazines, paperbacks and comic
books since the early 1930's.
The producers have spared little
expense in bringing Conan to the
screen, enlisting the talents of John
Milius (The Wind and the Lion, Big
Wednesday) to direct the star, six-
time Mr. Universe Arnold
Schwarzenegger; James Earl Jones
and Max Von Sydow were obtained
for supporting .oles, and Ron Cobb
( Alien) was hired to design the pro-
duction. Together these men nave
created an exotic, erotic, very
violent actionadventure movie,
sprinkled over with a pinch of pop
philosophy.
All of the violence in Milius'
mayhem-filled epic really doesn't
amount to being any gorier than the
violence in Speilberg's Raiders of
the lost Ark, which was considered
fine for family consumption. What
really hurts Conan is that it is miss-
ing Raiders feel for high-spirited
high-adventure. Conan is also
devoid of any of the magic and
wonder of, say, a Star Wars.
What Conan replaces these
elements with is lethargy. The film
lumbers along like a wounded
Hyborian bear, never developing
much mood, epic scope, or even
continuity (nearly every single scene
change is very sloppily, choppily
handled). The film does have a feel-
ing of raw power and impact, a sen-
sation similar to that of being sliced
with a Cimmerian broadsword �
which is basically what Conan is: a
couple of hours of flashing steel and
filletted flesh.
The character of Conan was
created by Robert E. Howard, a
writer who committed suicide at the
age of thirty in 1936 (see The East
Carolinian, May 26, 1982).
Reclusive, moody, mother-
obsessed, Howard was a sickly,
wimpy kid with a mind full of
macho fantasies, who became a
writer of not-unconsiderable skill
and created a dream-world of bar-
baric savagery and splendor.
From Howard's various tales oi
Conan and other hulking he-men,
Milius took Howard's imagery and
welded on his own ideas in an at-
tempt to turn male adolescent wish-
fulfillment and bloodlust into a
philosophy.
See CONAN Page 6
Summer Flies A re No Match
ByJOHNWEYLER
M�ff Wriler
"Heeellppee Meeee cried the fly, and he needed
help for he was the hero of a film so ridiculous it has
become a comedic cult classic.
The Fly was based on a short story by George
Langelaan which was originally published in Playboy.
Says Richard Hodgens in Focus on the Science Fiction
Film: "Since Langelaan's story is impossible to begin
with, is inconsistent anyway, and is a horror story as
horrifying as the most horrible SF films, one might ex-
pect that it could endure motion-picture adaptation.
The film, however, managed to be more impossible and
less consistent, to add cliches' and bright blood, arid io
contrive a happier ending withsome morally repugnant '
implications
Says John Brasnan in Future Tense: "Despite an
unusually absurd story The Fly turned out to be the sur-
prise financial success of 1958, mainly because of the
cunning approach adopted by (director Kurt) Neumann,
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who also produced it. Instead of making another cheap,
exploitation movie, he hired a good scriptwriter (James
Clavell) and a good cast and shot the film in colour. He
also insisted that the cast play it absolutely straight,
though it must have been difficult at times and Vincent
Price has his usual trouble keeping his tongue out of his
cheek
Reportedly, Price and Herbert Marshall kept crack-
ing up during the filming of the famous "Help Me
scene, which is supposed to be the terrifying climax but
is in fact one of the funniest sequences ever recorded on
film.
The plot is as follows: Andre Delambre (played by Al
Hedison, who later changed his name to Dave and star-
red in Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea) builds a device
which is intended to be capable of disintegrating objects
into their component atoms and reassembling them in
another chamber.
For the first experiment Andre sends a dish through
the "matter transmittesr The dish comes out okay ex-
cept the lettering on it has been reversed. The second
time he sends his pet cat through, which totally disap-
pears, leaving only an eerie molecular meow. Evidently
caring little for his own life, Andre sends himself
through the process. Unfortunately, a fly had gotten in-
to the device and their atoms get mixed up, resulting in a
man with the head and leg of a fly and a fly with a man's
head and leg!
. . Understandably this transformation causes some fric-
tion between Andre and his wife (Patricia Owens). At
first he locks himself in his lab, trying desperately to
cure himself while his mind receeds every minute. Of
course he never succeeds and ends up having his wife
smash his head and arm to smithereens in a huge
hydraulic press.
Andre's brother (played by Price) doesn't believe any
of this strange story until he comes upon a spider web in
which is caught a fly with a man head and leg. The tiny
fellow screams for aid as the spider descends for its sup-
per, just before Price crushes it with a rock.
The plot of The Fly raises some disturbing questions,
including:
Why did the "matter transmitter" act differently
every time it was used?
How could the cat poibly completely disintegrate
and still make an audible cry?
How did the fly's head and leg enlarge sufficiently to
fit Andre, and vice-versa?
Considering the very dissimilar structures of insects
and humans, how could the parts fit onto and interact
with each other?
How could Andre have the head of a fly but still have
most of his own mind?
How then could the fly with the human head a'so
have Andre's mind, which it must as it is able to talk?
And the most important question:
How could a film so far-fetched as to be hilarious
rather than horrifying as was intended be not onlv
financially successful, but spawn two sequels, The
Return Of The Fly (1959) and The Curse Of The Fly
(1965)?
'Divine Miss M'
Bette Goes Mad This Evening
Flutist Julius Baker On Tap For '82- '83 Artists Series
internationally acclaimed flutist Julius Biker is just one of many fine musicians already scheduled for the
M�d"nh�llI Student Center 198283 Artists Series. In addition to the talented Baker, the full line-up for
upcoming fall and spring semesters includes the Tokyo String Quartet.
By JOHN WEYLER
SUff Writer
An outbreak of "Madness" and "Murder" will soon
occur at Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix Theatre,
courtesy of the Student Union Films Committee. The
Bette Midler concert film Divine Madness will be
presented tonight, at 8 p m. Next Monday's (June 7)
movie will be the Neil Simon comedy Murder by Death,
to be shown at 9 p.m.
Admission to the summer film program is free with
ID and Activity Card or MSC Membership.
Bette Midler's highly infectious form of insanity has
made it to the screen before and since Divine Madness.
Her performance as a Janis Joplinesque singer in The
Rose invigorated an otherwise tepid flick. Her ap-
pearance at the Academy Awards presentation stole the
show. But only in Divine Madness does the real "Divine
Miss M" have free reign to do what she does best: sing,
dance, clown around. Her style is a synthesis of the An-
drews Sisters, Gypsy Rose Lee and Jimmy Durante �
she is as entertaining as all of the above put together.
Bette is, according to New Republic's Stanley Kauff-
man, the bad girl, grinning, dirtily defiant, non-
committally shrugging, and smart. She has the abil.ty to
pull the audience up to her, like a small group of
friends; she teases, reminds, shocks � in the no-longer
shocking way in which they want to be shocked. She
tells some of the unfunniest filthy jokes I've never
heard, even off the screen, but she also makes a joke
which relies on the audience's knowledge that Milton
went blind.
"One moment she does wickedly sharp spoofs of
Queen Elizabeth and Princess Anne and the next she
does 'heart' songs so schmaltzy that you don't unders-
tand how they got past her sense of humor. But she belts
and paws and grins at her own impudence and has
enough of a good time � justified by her singing and
miming ability � to provide a good time for us. The
talent tha. can pull this performance past its low spots
has got to be strong; and it is
Having never heard of Bette Midler, some of the
world's greatest detectives get a Simonizing job in
Murder by Deuth. Among the sleuths stung by Neil
Simon's wit are the Bogartish Sam Diamond (Peter
Falk), the inscrutable Sidney Wang (Peter Sellers), and
two Agatha Christie caricatures: Milo Perrier (James
Coco) and Dame Jessie Marbles (Elsa Lanchester).
They and others of their investigative ilk are invited to
"dinner and a murder" by eccentric millionaire Lionel
Twain (Truman Capote). Whodunit? Who cares? This
one's strictly for aughs.

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 2. 1982
Summer Theatre
Back In Action
Big musicals are back, as the East Carolina
Summer Theatre is in operation again after an
absence of nine years. McGinnis Theatre will
once again dance to the Broadway beat, with pro-
ductions of Grease (July 5-10), Shenandoah (July
12-17), Cabaret (July 19-24), and She axes Me
(July 26-31).
"I'm glad we're able to be back in business
says Edgar R. Loessin. The Summer Theatre pro-
gram had suffered from lack of a proper space to
hold large-scale shows in, but with McGinnis
newly renovated and christened with a well-
received production of Show Boat last April,
Loessin looks forward to a successful summer
season.
Loessin will direct Shenandoah, Cabaret, and
She Loves Me. The choreography for these three
shows will be by Mavis Ray. Dale Muchmore will
direct and choreograph Crease.
The summer season's opening production,
Crease, should need no hard-sell to prospective
audiences, being the longest running show in
Broadway history, besides being the basis for the
most profitable movie musical id history (with
Crease II coming this summer).
'Conan' Barbaric
Continued From Page 5
Milius' mystical mumbo-jumbo may warp the
psyche of impressionable youngsters; it definitely
mars the entertainment. Conan begins with a
quote from Nietzsche: "That which does not kill
us makes us stronger This reviewer proposes
another quotation for the end of the film: "It is a
tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signi-
fying nothing
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as
I
I HI EASTCAROl IN1AN
Sports
JUNE 2, 1982 Page 7
Scarcella
Knocks Off
Pirates, 4-1
SC Wins Title
I
(. Ol I
iiiwinn krion
1B1
� Mike
S (.
t
West
. w ho car-
md
ito the
Regional,
ligh
niesi
it na-
uth
nioi
cxplan
v i c;
. i K OI rill t; jii
in I
tie
arne
inn-
Bill
V ilder, who eae up a tie-breaking
sacrifice, followed b a two-RBI hit
down the right-field line.
"Our pitching was good enough
to wm Baud remakred. "They
got a seeing-eye tut in the eighth that
brought in two. But if you can't
score tour or five runs in a park like
this, you can't win, and we just
couldn't do it
� � �
WES1 VIRGINIA grabbed the
It id in the tust inning. Jeff Wilson
opened the frame with a single to
right, and Vic Rabbits lined to
1 vans, who dropped the ball while
turning to throw to second. He pick-
ed tiie ball up but was wide on the
throw to t'iisi, leaving Rabbits safe.
Roger Hohlbein singled, scoring
Wilson.
The Pirates bounced back to tie
'he game in the third when, with one
out. lack Curlings walked and
scored on David Wells' double to
center.
The Mountaineers didn't threaten
again until the sixth when Glenn
tioss reached first on an infield hit
but was left at third aftera sacrifice
and an out
Gil Parthemore lotted a fly to
Jeep center, scoring Hohlbein. Greg
Van ant hit a liner past a diving
1 odd Evans at tirst, driving in the
other two runs.
"Thev tried hard, and thev played
hard Band said of his team after
the contest. "I can't ask for any
more
The Pirates finished the season
w ith a 34-14 record.
BOB PATTERSON overslept
betore his team's meeting with
North Carolina in a do-or-die game,
missing breakfast.
North Carolina probably wished
he had never gotten up.
The senior left-hander hurled a
ECU completed their finest season ever winning 34 with 14 defeats.
seven-hit 1-0 shutout, knocking the
Tar Heels out of the national tour-
nament.
Defense was a big ke in the wm.
as Patterson received several
outstanding plays to back up his
five-strikeout performance.
Baud called Patterson's perfoi
mance a "career-type game. We
were calling alot ot the pitches, and
he was hitting them pertectlv most
o the time. It was like he was wired
m to what he wanted. Being familiar
with a team like Carolina helped to
in selecting pitches. But to hurl a
shutout in this park is jus! amaz-
ing, " the Pirate coach said.
Past Carolina made the most of
North Carolina starter Brad
Powell's wildness to score in the
third. Mike Sorrell walked and
Hallow drew another. Powell was
then relieved and Todd Evans ad-
vanced both runners with a
sacrifice. Fran Fitzgerald thenj
grounded out, allowing Sorrell t
score.
Lady Bucs
Hope For
Chance
Spots Open
Bv WILLIAM YELVERTON
Pirate ba - etball players
raine luster and Darlene
�lev know the feeling. Both tried
their regional teams last
summei hoping tor the opportunity
� i partipate in the National Sports
1 estival And both came close, mak-
ing the squad tes.
Bui this vear. with a campaign of
collegiate experience under their
belt may be diffei ;i is thev head
this week's tryouts, according
to their teacher, hast Carolina
ich Cathy Andruzzi.
The National Sports festival, a
type of pre- and mini-Olympics will
be held at Indianapolis, Ind. the last
week ot July. Teams from various
areas ofthe United States will com-
pete in 33 Olympic sports.
"It's just a tremendous oppor-
tunity to have these girls represent
our school Andru.i said. "Both
are working very, very hard. But the
ompetition's going to be very
nigh. There are many good
players
Foster, a 5-7 point guard, will be
participating in the Southern tryouts
it Delta State University ii
( leveland, Miss and Chaney, a 6-2
enter, will travel to Rutgers Univer-
for the East as will in-coming
i CU freshman, Slvia Bragg.
Both have that year of ex-
nence Andruzi said. "That's
important, but it really comes down
Lee
Very
Optimistic
B THOMAS BRAME
Jerry I ee is totallv optimistic
about his new position as last
Carolina golf coach. "I'm looking
forward to building a successful
program says I ee.
"I have some tough shoes to fill
adds I ee. "Bob Helnuck was a
good coach and that's where I learn-
ed the game ot golf I ee has onlv
praise tor his former coach.
I eeadds, "I have an advantage in
that I will be able to spend tune at
the course to help the golfers
I he Pirate golfers have five retur-
ning lettermen to next year's squad.
There will be no seniors on next
year's team. " We have a young
team but we have a lot o poten-
tial said I ee.
The recruiting is beginning to pick
up now . I ee said. "We have a good
chance at three recruits that could
come in and play next vear. In the
past, only one freshman a year had
the potential to step in and play
1 otal consistency plagued the
Pirates this past season. ECU could
not seem to get five players to play
well the same day in a tournament.
"Our main objective for the off-
season will be to achieve better con-
sistency in our play said Lee.
"I'm looking to have a good
season next vear said Lee. "My
goal to having a successful season
will be to be in the top 10 in our 12
tournaments
"1 want to see the players develop
and put forth is probably my main
objective as coach said Lee. "My
goal tor the future is to have a
plaver and possibly the team in the
NCAA tournament and Sweeting
has a chance if he continues his pro-
gress
Lee can only anxiously wait and
see now what tKe future lies for him
and the ECU gou' program.
Chaney travels to Rutgers for tryout.
Cougs Win Title
to how well you play for three days.
So some luck ib involved
Foster, who played forward in
high school, is "a good shooter and
handles the ball well Andruzzi
noted. "She might be selected as a
forward but used as a guard
Chaney is "potentially one of the
best 6-2 people around in the years
to come she said. "She's quick,
shoots well and is agile
Both helped lead the Lady Pirates
to a berth in the NCAA tournament
this past season as freshmen.
PINEHURST (AP) � Freshman
Billy Ray Brown kept his game
steady and his teammates folowed
Saturday as Houston swept the team
and individual titles in the NCAA
division 1 golf championships.
Brown, who earned his way onto
the Cougar golf team this winter,
fired a final round 70, 2-under par
on the 6,934-yard par-72 course. He
finished at 8-under par 280, two
shots bettter than Andy Dillard of round lead.
Oklahoma State.
Three golfers were at 285, in-
cluding Brad Faxon of Furman,
who was tied with Brown and Jerry
Haas of Wake Forest for the third-

t





THFFASTCAROl IN1AN
JUNE 2. 1982
Braves Have Come Down
ATLANTA (UPD �
It was fun while it
lasted, but it appears
the Atlanta Braves have
come back down to
earth.
The euphoria that
gripped the city when
the Braves opened the
season with a record-
setting 13-game winn-
ing streak has been
replaced bv a feeling ol
uneasiness, a feeling
that, alas, the long-
suffering Braves have
fallen back into their
same old rut.
Since that winning
streak ended, the
Braves lost 20 of their
next 34 games. That's
.412 baseball And. to
the dismay of their
tans, while thev were
still in first place in the
National I eague West
on June I, ii appeared
onh a matter of time
before the Braves
would start slipping
down the ladder.
"We can't let panic
set in Atlanta
manager Joe Torre said
after the Braves suf-
fered their seventh loss
in eight games in the
opener of a three-game
series in New York.
"We're still in first
place.
"But we are playing
badly and we know it
said Torre who warns
that 'losing can
become a habit. We
know we can play bet-
ter baseball because we
have done it. We have
to start plaving better
The question is
whether the Braves,
despite that fabulous
start, are plaving about
as thev should have
been expected to play.
The pitching has
been inconsistent over
the past month. But is
that really a surprise0
With the exception of
Phil Niekro (2-2 with a
3.21 ERA), none of the
Braves starters came in-
to the '82 season with a
record of consistency.
More puzling has
been the fact that the
Braves' three most pro-
mising batters 8 Dale
Murphy, Bob Horner
and Chris Chambliss '
all went into a slump at
the same time. In the
last half dozen games
of May, the three com-
bined for only 15 hits in
69 at bats � a .217
average, and, worst,
had only one rbi bet-
ween them after total-
ing 93 over the first 41
games.
In an attempt to get
more punch in the
lineup, the Braves call-
ed up outfielder Tom-
my Harper from Rich-
mond where he was
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i
leading the Internation-
al League in batting
with a .386 aerage and
lost him after just two
games when he broke
his right thumb sliding
into second.
Harper is expected to
be out for a full month,
so Brett Butler, who
started the season in
centerfield for the
Braves but was sent to
Richmond because of a
.222 average, had to be
recalled after only fie
days.
"The hitting will
pick up again insisted
Torre. "We're just in
one of those slumps
you hope don't last too
long. Before,
everybody was hitting
at the same time. Now,
everybody's stopped
hitting
Compounding the
problem, Horner foul-
ed a ball off his instep
and was expected to
miss at least three
games.
The Braves' mound
staff has had its
physical setbacks too.
Niekro, still rated
Atlanta's most depen-
dable pitcher even
though he's 43 years
old, missed the opening
weeks of the season and
the Braves no sooner
got Niekro back when
they lost reliefer Al
Hrabosky for the better
part of a month.
Niekro and
Hrabosky are well
again, but Tommy
Boggs, expected to be
m the Braves' starting
rotation, is now on the
disabled list and so is
rookie Joe Cow ley who
was beginning to show
promise.
At the moment one
questions how many
"starters the Braves
really have. Rick
Mahler has four of only
five complete games
claimed by the entire
staff' and he lasted on-
ly a couple of innings
his last time out.
"You look tor a
starter to give you six
or seven strong innings,
then go to your short-
relief people to mop
up said Torre. "It
isn't working out that
way. We have to face
it, the pitching hasn't
been too good
Torre reportedly lost
his patience this past
Sunday and chewed out
the Braves behind the
locked doors of their
dressing room after a
loss in Philadelphia. He
was calmer the next
night, but still upset
"I just wanted to let
them know I felt they
can play better than
they have been playing
of late Torre said
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Title
The East Carolinian, June 2, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 02, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.199
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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