The East Carolinian, May 19, 1982






�he
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No.61
Wednesday. May 19,1982
Greenville, NX
8 Page?,
Howell Accepts Post
By MIKE HUGHES
Managing Kdiior
On Friday. May 14, Dr. John M.
Howell was elected as the eighth
chancellor in East Carolina Univer-
sity's 75-year history.
Howell, who was named interim
chancellor in January, was one of
three finalists recommended to the
UNC Board of Governors by the
ECU Board of Trustees in April. He
was nominated to the board by
UNC President William C. Friday.
Howell referred to his appoint-
ment as a challenge but said that he
is confident in his abilities as an ad-
ministrator.
'The road's always going to be
rough he said, hopefully
moreso in the near future than in the
distant future
Howell assumes the full-time
position as of July 1, one day after
former chancellor Thomas B.
Brewer's resignation takes effect.
Brewer, whose tenure at ECU was
marked by controversy, is currently
vice president for academic affairs
at Atlanta's Georgia State Universi-
ty.
Howell's election marked the end
of a process which began in
September, 1981. Since that time,
the 15-member ECU Chancellor
Selection Committee reviewed 148
applications.
The other two finalists recom-
mended by the committee were Dr.
J. Fred Young, Elon College presi-
dent; and Dr. James A. Robinson,
president of the University of West
Florida.
After the meeting, Friday said
that Howell was elected because he
is familiar with all facets of the
university. He explained that ECU
could not afford the time lag which
would result from appointing so-
meone unfamiliar with the workings
of the school.
Howell, who came to ECU in
1957, has served as chairman of the
political science department, dean
of the College of Arts and Sciences,
graduate school dean and provost
and v ice chancellor for academic af-
fairs.
Before coming to ECU, Howell
taught at the University of Idaho,
Randolph-Macon College, Duke
University, Sweet Briar College and
Memphis State University.
When asked what, if any, changes
he plans to institute in the near
future, Howell indicated that he
foresees none in the near future. He
did add, however, that any changes
or progressions in store will be
dependent on the amount of fun-
ding the school receives.
"We don't have the luxury of
assuming that we'll always have
enough money like they (other ad-
ministrators) had a couple of
decades ago he emphasized.
He also indicated that he does not
plan to rearrange the administra-
tion, as his predecessor, Brewer,
had done.
"People may come and go he
said, "but 1 have nothing in mind.
I'm going to work with the people
already here
"This is a good place to be if
you're in higher education he con-
tinued, "because the government
officials of North Carolina have
generally been supportive
During the selection process,
Chairman Ashley Futrell implied
that the next ECU chancellor would
have to bleed purple and sweat gold.
This implication stems from the
discontent felt on campus when it
was learned that Brewer was looking
at new job possibilities.
However, Howell indicated that
he plans to stay in Greenville for a
while. "We've been here for 25
years during a period when there
were jobs available he said. "So,
I'd say we've liked it here
When he assumes the full-time
position, Howell will earn $69,730
annually.
Chancellor John M. Howell
����?� By SCOTT LARSON
The Inside C1 A
By ERNEST CONNER
N��s hdilof
East Carolina still does not have a
clear winner in the SGA presidential
election.
A decision by Chancellor John
M. Howell and Vice Chancellor for
Student Life, Dr. Elmer Meyer has
ruled Eric Henderson's swearing in
as SGA president void. This situa-
tion has led to Vice President Bob
Mills being named acting president.
Henderson, who won the April 7
SGA presidential runoff election by
46 votes, was sworn in amidst con-
troversy.
Within 48 hours of Henderson's
winning the election, his rival,
David Cook, a business major,
leveled charges of campaign im-
propriety against him.
The review board met to consider
the charges. They deemed the alleg-
ed violations as being too insuffi-
cient to disqualify Henderson, even
though two of the six charges level-
ed against Henderson were substan-
tiated.
Henderson immediately got the
then SGA Attorney General, Ken
Hopper to swear him in, even
though Cook had five days to ap-
peal any decision of the review
board.
This situation led to the ad-
minstration's involvement. Accor-
ding to Meyer, the review board had
done all it could do, and there was
nobody higher except the ad-
minstration, so they had to come in-
to the matter.
Once How oil and Meyer got in-
volved, they met with both can-
didates and tried to decide what to
do. This meeting, according to
Meyer, was around commencement
time.
Since they were unable to get a
tape of the last review board
meeting they could not come to a
final decision on who would be the
next SGA president. The tape of the
meeting had been taken to Hooper's
home, and according to Meyer, was
returned Tuesday.
Meyer said that hopeful!) they
will now be able to come to a final
decision on who will be president
within the next few days since they
now have complete records of what
has been happening.
The charges leveled by Cook con-
cerned Henderson's alleged cam-
paign violations. The charges in-
clude illegal placement of campaign
literature in the mailboxes at Green
Mill Run apartments, campaigning
in the female dormitorities without
an escort, tearing down campaign
posters, overspending allowable
campaign budget, campaigning near
polling places and illegal placement
of campaign posters.
The review board found evidence
that Henderson violated the latter
two charges; however, they did not
feel the violations were serious
enough to warrant Henderson's dis-
qualification.
Group Marches To Washington
Actress Ann Reinking here
shown in the movie All That
Jazz, one of 19 movies sponsored
by the Student Union Films Com-
mittee this summer. See Features.
Inside Index
Announcements 2
Opinion 4
Campus Forum 4
Features 5
Sports 7
Classifieds 8
B PATRICK O'NEIL
stiff Wnlrr
A "Pilgrimage to Washington,
D.C. for political and econonim
justice" is being sponsored by the
Southern Chrisitan Leadership Con-
ference (SCLC).
The March, which began on April
18 in Tuskegee Alabama, reached
North Carolina on Tuesday and will
continue throughtout the staet until
June 9 when it heads into Virginia.
The North Carolina - Virginia
Field Office of the United Church
of Christ Commission for Racial
Justice is coordinating the schedul-
ing and the intinerary of the march
as it travels through North
Carolina.
The march is scheduled to reach
Greenville on June 3. Mr. Bennie
Roundtree, President of the Pitt
County Chapter of SCLC will be
heading up local events surrounding
the march.
The purpose of the march is to
call attention to various economic,
political, and racial issues which
adversly effect the poor, as well as
support the extention to the 1965
Voting Rights Act.
Armenta Eaton, a stage assistant
of the Commission for Racial
Justice, says the march has several
purposes. "We want to speak out
against the funds for the military
build-up, cut backs of money for
social programs and support of the
Voting Rights Act (Extention)"
A kick off rally was held in
Laurinburg N.C. on Tuesday.
Leaflets distributed called on people
to join the march to "protest the
budget cuts, tight student aid cut-
backs, (and) stop Reagan's war
against the poor
Roundtree said the march has
already run into some resistance in
Fayetteville where local laws pro-
hibit marching without a permit.
High priced insurance policies are
required to obtain a permit. "They
plan to march requardless" said
Roundtreewith or without a per-
mit
"We have no intention of paying
insurance for marching" added
Eaton. She called the requirement
unconstitutional and said the mar-
chers will go to jail if thev have to.
Roundtree said his members were
on "stand by" to go to Fayetteville
to support the others if necessary.
Resistance to many of President
Reagans policies has been surfacing
recently as the full impact of many
of hie budget cuts are being felt by
many Americans.
The SCLC, which was founded
by Martin Luther King, has had a
long h'story of supporting Justice
issues. It has always adopted non-
violence as its' tactics.
Roundtree says a peaceful
demonstration" and a "church
meeting" is planned when the
march reaches Greenville. Round-
tree also plans to join the march in
Wilson and stay with it until it
reachs Washington D.C.
The idea for the march grew out
of an earlier march in Alabama
which was organized as a protest
against the conviction of two Black
women, Mrs. Maggie Bozeman and
Mrs. Julia Wilder. Both were charg-
ed with vote fraud because they
were instructing elderly and disabled
Black citizens in the use of absentee
ballots.
Graham Awarded Prize
For Religious Progress
LONDON (UP1) � Evangelist Billy Graham, receiving a
$200,000 prize for spreading religion around the globe, warn-
ed Tuesdav of humanitv "plunging madlv toward Armaged-
don
Prince Philip awarded the Templeton Foundation's 10th
annual prize for "progress in religion" to Graham at a private
Buckingham Palace ceremony.
Previous award winners include Mother Teresa of India.
Later Graham was introduced at a public ceremony by Sir
Geoffrey Howe, Chancellor of the Exchequer, who spoke of
"the time of trouble" Britain faced as Graham visited the
country.
"The destiny of men and of nations is always being decid-
ed Graham said. "We must not fail to meet the challenge of
this hour. This decade may be the most decisive years since
Christ walked the roads of Galilee
"Our world is on fire Graham told some 1,500 Britons at
Westminster's Central Hall. "And man without God cannot
control the flames. The fires of passion, greed, hate and lust
are sweeping the world.
"We seem to be plunging madly toward Armageddon he
said.
Graham, who received the Templeton award for his work in
evangelism, said his recent tours in the United States and
England revealed the greatest interest in spiritualism since he
began preaching.
"There were no trick questions, no demonstrations said
Graham, referring to his sermons before college audiences in
New England.
The exception was Harvard, Graham said, "where there
were just some flags unfurled. I never was sure what it was
about. I'm not sure they did
Graham was presented the Templeton award as he returned
from a controversial visit to the Soviet Union, where he
preached for the first time to Soviets and unofficially attended
a relgious conference.
"I learned a great deal that I will be taking home with me
Graham said of the conference.
Braxton Pleads 'Nolo Contendere'
Taking The Plunge
This bathing beauty enjoys her own version of the champagne-and-hot-tub lifestyle.
MW� By SCOTT LARSON
ByGREGRIDEOlT
.itini Nr� Kdilw
Former SGA Vice President Mar-
vin Braxton pleaded " nolo conten-
dre" to nine counts of common law
forgery in Pitt County District court
on May 13.
Braxton, 22, had been arrested on
April 6 and charged with one count
of forgery. He had falsely signed
checks belonging to Mary F.
Nelson, a friend in whose house he
once resided.
According to an employee at the
county clerks office, Braxton had
agreed to plead no contest to the
lesser charge of common law
forgery, a misdemeanor.
The 1981-82 SGA Vice President
had been arrested by Detective M.E.
Barnhiil of the Greenville City
Police after an alert was placed on
Nelson's account at North Carolina
National Bank. Braxton was jailed
after the arrest. He was released on
the same day of his arrest on a $4000
surety bond in the name of Charles
R. Blake Jr.
Judge Robert P. Wheeler sentenc-
ed Braxton to six months in jail and
six months probation. Both were
suspended.
In addition he was ordered to pay
$2057 restitution to NCNB. Braxton
did not have to pay the court costs.

��:��-� ������ �gg






THE EAST CAROLINIAN MAY 19. 1982
Dropouts Losing Their Way
RALEIGH. N.C.
(UP!) � A national
study of school
dropouts indicates
young people leave
school because "they
have lost their way
the president of the
Carnegie Foundation
for the Advancement
of Education says.
During an address to
a North Carolina con-
ference on school
dropouts. Dr. Ernest
Boyer praised the
state's school system
and encouraged efforts
to reduce the dropout
rate, which he said is a
national problem.
An estimated 700
people, including
school administrators,
state officials and
government leaders, at-
tended the one-day
conference at Meredith
College.
Boyer, who was U.S.
education commis-
sioner under President
Jimmy Carter, said
still-unpublished fin-
dings of a 1981-82
Carnegie Foundation
study indicate a need to
improve efforts to keep
young people in school.
"Young people drop
out of schools for
precisely the reasons
people drop out of
work and drop out of
jobs they have lost
their way Boyer said.
Education leaders at
all levels should show
personal concern for
students, help them
become confident in us-
ing language and
modify school pro-
grams to provide a
closer link with the job
market or "real
world Boyer said.
"I am absolutely
convinced that we do
not have a school pro-
blem, a youth problem,
we have a culture pro-
blem he said. "This
nation is not in love
with its young people.
We somehow wish
them out of sight and
out of mind
Boyer said the foun-
dation's study included
about 300 hours of in-
terviews with teachers,
students and other
school representatives
in high schools across
the country. The inter-
views took place from
fall 1981 through spr-
ing 1982.
He said after the
speech that the results
of the study, which has
a budget of about SI
million, will be publish-
ed sometime in 1983.
Boyer said the foun-
dation hopes its study
will serve a purpose
similar to a national
education report 25
years ago. That report
provided a basis for the
National Defense
Education Act of 1958,
Boyer said.
Nationally, between
20 percent and 25 per-
cent of an estimated 16
million high school
students leave schools
without receiving
diplomas, Boyer said.
He said the study in-
dicated young people
drop out because of
personal problems,
academic failure or a
sense of uselessness
while in school.
Boyer, former
chancellor of the State
University of New
York and a veteran of
several presidential
commissions on educa-
tion, praised Gov.
James B. Hunt Jr. and
state education
superintendent A.
Craig Phillips.
"I wanted to come
here because I believe
that this state has the
most impressive com-
bination of education
leadership of any state
in the nation bar
none he said.
Earlier in the con-
ference, Hunt delivered
a 20-minute address
calling on local and
state educators to con-
centrate on reducing
the dropout rate
without significant ad-
ditions to existing state
funding.
The state's dropout
rate is estimated at 33
percent.
A high priority must
be placed on reducing
the dropout rate using
existing resources and
personal commitment
by educators, state and
local government agen-
cies and officials, Hunt
said.
"We must put this
strategy into effect
without substantial ad-
ditional funding
Hunt said. "Federal
support for education
is being cut, and state
and local budgets are
strained to the limit.
The governor said
the state has made im-
provements in day care,
skill-training and
reading programs
across. But he noted
150,000 students drop-
ped out of North
Carolina schools over
the last five years.
"Despite all the pro-
gress we have made,
there still hangs around
our neck a millstone ' a
weight that keeps us
from reaching our
economic, intellectual
and social potential
Hunt said. He said
three out of every eight
high school dropouts
nationally are from the
South.
Hunt said the state
must identify potential
dropouts earlier, inten-
sify guidance and
counseling efforts,
establish job centers,
diversify course offer-
ings and keep track of
students who do drop
out.
"Right now there are
only eight job centers in
the entire state Hunt
said. "I want to add
100 during the next
year, and by the fall of
1984, I want to have a
job center in every high
school in North
Carolina
Tar Landing Seafood
Resuurut
Ct"
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Classifieds
Popcorn
Shrimp
$C39
All you can eat
Bob Hearing �
Manager
Phone 758-0327
Cross Greer Street 6'
TakeleH a' 1st Light
Locced one block do' '� ��'
WED.&
THURS. ONLY
TYPING: T�rm. Tht�i�,
Rnumii, Oi�ser!�tionj, etc. Pro-
fessional quality at lowatt ratts.
Call Kempie Dunn anytime
7J2-47JJ.
PART�TIME employee wanted
to put up posters on campus now
and during I9I2-S3. 2- to
hoursmonth, M.SOhour Call Mr.
Fenton, (MO) 243-477.
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
if yi.u or your crg0ni2dton
would like tc �ave an item primed
� n t"e announcement column.
Dies wpe it on an announcement
form ana &nd it to The East
Carohman m care of the produc
tion manager
Announcement forms are
avaiiaoie at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications Building
Flyers and handwritten coov on
� �do sited paper cannot be ac
cepted
T-ere s no Charge for an
iiouncenienis. but space is often
limited T'ieretore. we cannot
guaramc mat your announce
ment will run as long as you want
and suggest that you do not rely
soleu on this column lor publicity
The deadline for announcements
� s 5 p m Friday t�r the Tuesday
oaoor urap m Tuesday lor the
Thursday paper No an
niiuncements received after these
ONdtinet win be printed
T' is space s available to all
campus i rrjanijatiorts and depart
ments
SCIINCI DAY CAMP
A Science Day Camp tor
primary grade children ages 49
will be ottered by trie ECU Depart
ment of Science Education in
June
Sessions are set tor June M II
and June 21 25 Or Carolyn and
Carol Hampton art co directors
and will be involved in teaching
participating children.
Thii year's activities focus
around a series off high interest
physical science topics including
liquids, properties of water and
air. interaction of systems
pulleys, magnetic interaction and
electrical Infraction.
The scheduling ot topic tor the
two sessions will not overlap, so
that youngsters attending bom
sessions . ill not repeat the tame
activities
Daily camp classes will be held
in Flanagan Building from 9 a.m.
until noon daily Six vacancies
still exist for each camp session.
interested parents should apply
to Or. Carolyn Hampton, Depart
ment of Science Education, ECU.
Telephone 757 �2t�.
OFF-CAMPUS
HOUSING
H �ou want to live oft campus,
nt.w is the best time to look tor
summer or fall Or if you rave an
apartment to sublet tor the sum
rr.er t,r are looking for a roommate
i.r the academic year, list your
avaiiabMity with us Contact the
OH Campus Housing Office. 2)1
vV'hcnaro Building. 757 6M1. 80S.
Monday through Friday
ONCOLOGICAL
NURSING
The Eastern Carolina Oncology
Nurses invites an registered
nurses, licensed practical nurses,
nursing students and others in
terested in care of cancer patients
to loin the recently formed
organization.
The group meets monthly In
Greenville to share ideas and con
cerns and participate in education
programs. Dues are S10 tor
registered nurse members and i
tor LPN's and students
Further information is available
from Debbie Kennington at
757 42M. Diane Meeihiem at
757-4629 or Mary Ann Rose at
757 M04
GUESS WHO'S THE
LUCKY LADY
The box is shaken, the stubs are
tossed and mixed, an authoritative
hand reaches in and withdraws a
ticket revealing the name of a
lucky lady who has just won an all
expence paid trip to Mertle Beach,
South Carolina I The trip entitled
her and the person of her choice to
send two nights at the Holiday inn
North, two breakfasts and two din
ners and admission to the lounge
on May 7 and 8. The trip raffle was
sponsored by the Biology Club.
The winner was Judy Mitchum.
one of the secretaries in the
chemistry department
Judy, we ail nope you enioved
yourself Your tan looks great!
The East Carolinian
Vm his ittf ('�n tniunnnii
simr v
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ing the summer
The East Carolinian is the ol
f � c � a i newspaper ol East
Carolina University, owned,
operated and published lor and
by me students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate: S20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
art located in the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU,
Greenville. N.C.
POSTMASTER Seno address
changes 'o The East Carolinian.
Old South Building. ECU Green
vine NC 27834
Telephone: 757 34�, 4347. 4309
Application to mail at second
class postage rates is pending at
Greenville. North Carolina.
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SUMMER SESSION
BUS SCHEDULE
PURPLE SCHEDULE
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GOLD SCHEDULE
(7:30 a.m9:30 p.m.)
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i Univ. Cond.25 till hr.College Hill26 after hr.
i i Cannon Court24 till hr.Mingeson half hr.
S I Eastbrook22 till hr.Allied Health28 till hr.
I River Bluff20 till hr.Greenville Square25 till hr.
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! Village Greene15 till hr.Oakmont15 till hr.
l I Memorial Gym10 till hr.Mendenhall10 till hr.
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j I River Bluff10 after hr.Pitt Plaza6 after hr.
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Unemployment On The Rise
THE EAST CAROLINIAN MAY 19,19823
(UPI) � Worsening recession and
high interest rates have thrown more
Americans out of work than at any
time since the Great Depression.
They are unwilling conscripts in a
defeated army the president's critics
dub the "Reagan Poor
Blue-collar workers, blacks and
teenagers top the jobless figures but
the scourge of unemployment has
spread relentlessly across the land
into virtually all segments of an in-
creasingly polarized society.
President Reagan denies his
policies ere to blame, or that they
favor the rich over the poor. He has
expressed compassion for those in
economic distress. The president
and his supporters insist that his
budget and tax cuts will cure the ail-
ing economy, benefitting everyone,
including the poor.
In a recent news conference,
Reagan predicted the unemploy-
ment situation "will improve, I
think, in the latter half of this year.
1 do believe there is every indication
that the recession is bottoming
out
Two leading Democrats, predic-
tably, took the opposite view.
Said Sen. Ted Kennedy, the man
some pollsters say could defeat
Reagan in a presidential race held
now, "It's obviously a depression in
the housing industry and 'he steel
industry and the auto industry. It's
a real depression and I think it's on-
ly a matter of time before it extends
into some of the other industries
House Speaker Thomas (Tip)
O'Neill, personally but not political-
ly friendly to Reagan, rapped the
President hard. He said, "We're
dealing with a fellow that's
unbelievable, to be perfectly
truthful. He doesn't even know
there's a recession. It's just in-
conceivable that a man could be that
much isolated
Reagan has alienated some
Americans by wondering aloud why
it is news when "someone in South
Succotash" loses a job.
Nor was Reaganomics well
defended with the president's anec-
dote about an unnamed man in an
unidentified grocery who paid for
an orange with food stamps and
with the change bought a bottle of
vodka.
The unemployment rate has
reached the highest level since
August 1941.
There are 10.3 million Americans
9.4 percent of the labor force,
compared to 7.4 percent when
Reagan took office In January 1981
actively looking for jobs.
The figures do not include 1.2
million jobless people government
analysts say have given up looking
for work or another 5.6 million
"underemployed" workers who
have part-time jobs and want full-
time work.
The president points proudly to
slowed inflation. But Reagan's
�critics charge his budget cuts have
reduced social services for the most
disadvantaged at a time when they
desperately need help, and that his
tax cuts have bestowed most of the
savings on the privileged.
As unemployment spread from
the automobile and housing in-
dustries into steel, textiles, pulp and
paper, mining and chemicals and
even oil drilling and refining, a re-
cent Gallup poll disclosed that
joblessness had displaced inflation
as the No. 1 concern of Americans.
The upper Midwest is the hardest-
hit section of the country but almost
anywhere in the United States there
is evidence of the dehumanizing ef-
fects of joblessness.
There is fear and frustration in
Dixon, 111 Reagan's home town, as
there is in Washington, D.C where
"street people" wander homeless
and hopeless within blocks of the
White House.
Even Central Florida, for years a
veritable Sun Belt paradise where
working men could make the
American Dream come true, has
fallen on hard times.
The housing slump has pushed
the lumber industry in the Nor-
thwest into deep decline.
Many unemployed Americans
who hit the road in search of jobs
have found hard times had preceded
them, even in places which only
recently had seemed immune to the
recession.
Welcome Back
ECU
Summer Students
Amendment Proposed
Washington(UPl)- President
Reagan on Monday sent Congress
his proposed constitutions! amend-
ment to put prayer back in the
classroom - a single paragraph cer-
tain to become a legal, moral and
political battleground.
It says: "Nothing in this Con-
stitution shall be construed to pro-
hibit individual or group prayer in
public schools or other public instu-
tions. No person shall be required
by the United States or by any State
to participate in prayer
Reagan announced earlier this
month - on National Prayer Day -
that he would sponsor such and
amendmam, which is counter to
several U.S. Court decisions.
The White House proposal comes
in the form of a joint resolution that
would require a vote of two-thirds
of both the House and Senate and
ratification bv three-fourths of the
state legislatures within a seven-year
span.
In his message to Congress,
Reagan, said the measure would
"Restore the simple freedom of our
citizens to offer prayer in our public
schools and institutions
"The founders of our nation and
the framers of the First Amendment
did not intend to forbid public
praver, Reagan said, citing the
writings of George Washington,
Benjamin Franklin and Alexis de
Tocqueville.
"Just as Benjamin Franklin
believed it was beneficial for the
Constitional Convention to begin
each day's work with a prayer, I
believe that it would be beneficial
for our children to have an oppor-
tunity to begin each school day in
the same manner Reagan wrote to
Congress.
"Since the law has been construed
to prohibit this, 1 believe that the
law should be changed. It is time for
the people, through their Congress
and the state legislatures, to act, us-
ing the means afforded them by the
Constitution
SPECIALIZES IN:
RESUMES
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-





Qttr Eaat �arnliniati
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, o������
Mike Hughes. Mmmutm&�
WAVERLY MERRITT. mmtm �j i.f��, WILLIAM YELVERTON, v ��,�
Robert Rucks, ����� ����� Ernest Conner, v,�, td,�
Phillip Maness. mi mmm Steve Bachner, ammmmm m
CHRIS LICHOK, Imululion Manuxrr Al ISON BARTEL, Mwwa Vonuxrr
May 19, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
ECU'S New
Chancellor
Cooperation Necessary
So, after nine months of uncer-
tainty, ECU finally has a
chancellor.
Dr. John M. Howell, who has
been with the university since 1957
(when ECU was a college), was
named to the post on May 14 by the
UNC Board of Governors.
Naturally, then, all of ECU's
uncertainty is over. Right?
Wrong. The uncertainty is merely
beginning. Of course, this is not to
presuppose that the new chancellor
will misuse or neglect the position.
Not at all. However, the uncertain-
ty, the rough roads ahead, lie in the
cooperation necessary to insure a
smooth-running institution.
The uncertainty lies, then, with
the students. It goes without saying
that a school can't function unless
students and faculty live and work
in some sort of harmony.
Whenever transitions are brought
about, certain changes are inherent.
Some changes are clearly for the
better, yet some may not im-
mediately appear so.
Former Chancellor Thomas
Brewer � despite his ac-
complishments in some areas �
never completely gained the support
of the ECU community. His initial
scrambling and realigning of the ad-
ministration caused anger among
and students alike.
However, it is difficult to con-
demn Brewer for instituting the
changes he felt necessary. After all,
he had the dubious honor of follow-
ing in the footsteps of a virtual
legend, Chancellor Emeritus Leo
Jenkins. Perhaps rearranging the
administration was not a smart
move on Brewer's part; perhaps it
was. Judging the validity of that ac-
tion would be an obvious mistake if
not almost impossible.
However, the dissention among
students and faculty certainly came
full thrust when it became apparent
that Brewer was dissatisfied with his
post at ECU.
Naturally, the community felt
that Brewer's "job-hunting" in-
dicated that he was not wholly in-
terested in the school's progress.
Now, after a nine-month respite,
ECU has, at last, a chancellor who
says he's happy where he is.
Having worked with the universi-
ty in one aspect or another for 25
years, Howell was the likely choice
for chancellor. But without the sup-
port of students, faculty and "staff,
making any sort of accomplishment
will be a difficult task.
Although Howell says he isn't
planning any immediate policy or
administrative moves, some changes
will inevitably become necessary as
time elapses.
Despite the fact that we, as
humans, are naturally opposed to
change, the ECU community must
give its full support to Dr. Howell
and the rest of the administration.
Naturally, then, the students
should be able to expect that this
support and respect will be retroac-
tive. After all, running a university
without a chancellor is difficult;
without students, it's impossible.
In conclusion, therefore, the pro-
gress which has been characteristic
of East Carolina University in the
past relies heavily on a cooperative
effort between students, faculty and
staff. No individual runs the univer-
sity single-handedly.
Students Not Responding
Campus Forum
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Why do so many East Carolina
students decide to use their "editorial
response" options whenever the letters
E�C�G�C are mentioned?
The East Carolinian "letters to the
editor" section has been full of letters
condemning, criticizing and applauding
the fact that the SGA has appropriated a
lousy $100 to the ECGC, which is a
"recognized campus organization
The East Carolinia Gay Communtiy is
not trying to "convert" anybody, and
I'm sure they wish people � especially
Christians � would stop trying to con-
vert them.
Why are so many people preoccupied
with the "sexual sins" and not respon-
ding with similar zeal to many of the
other news and feature items which have
appeared in The East Carolinian that
have reported on matters of life, death
and global annihilation.
World hunger, violence in El
Salvador, the military draft, handicap-
ped awareness week, the family life sym-
posium on alcholism and Ground Zero
Week have recieved little or no editorial
response while homosexuality com-
mands a seemingly endless flow of
discussion. Certainly, these issues have
received some biblical mention worthy
of response.
It seems to be a sad state of affairs
when a college community such as ours
has so few people who opt to express
their "outrage" over the issues that real-
ly decide the future of the human race.
"Ground Zero Week" has clearly
shown us the potentional horror of
nuclear war and the reality that it can
happen in our lifetime.
Millions of Americans will be sub-
jected to the military draft if it is re-
activated. Are you willing to go to war
or see your loved ones die for the cause
of El Salvador or Middle East oil?
Many more millions of Americans
also suffer and die as a result of
alcoholism. Isn't that worth a letter or
two?
Human beings perish everyday as a
result of "dramitic starvation Didn't
Jesus say something about the poor?
We have 125 handicapped students on
our campus. Did you see any of the
"Fantasy" performances this year?
How about a letter the the editor con-
gratulating the cast? 1 didn't see any.
Did you enjoy the events of
"Handicapped Awareness Week?" I im-
agine many of you did, but still there
was no mention.
My point is obvious: "to make this
campus operate � and if a student
newpaper is to function - - it requires the
participation of all of us. While our
world is poised pcriliously close to
nuclear annihilation, most of us are
assuming no responsibility to avert this
madness only those questions pertaining
to "sexuality" seem to matter. How
about the gospel callings to love your
enemies, feed the poor, clothe the nak-
ed? Don't these words of wisdom call us
to response � editorially or otherwise?
CfleMleT
TH� EA�T 6AAOLJMIA
Auto Racing: 'A Death Trap'
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
No matter how many times the wall is
washed or painted, the mark will always
remain.
No matter how many times the crash
replay is shown, feelings of terror and hor-
ror become dominant emotions as we see a
once live man sliding down the asphault
track like a helpless doll.
Oh, athletes die. Of old age. Of sickness.
Of unfortunate accidents.
But death at 200 miles an hour is another
story.
And now that we have lost Gordon
Smiley at Indianapolis and Giles
Villeneuve in Belgium less than three weeks
apart, I think it's time to question the
validity of this "sport
First of all, "sport" as defined by The
American Heritage Dictionary is "an ac-
tive pastime; diversion; recreation
How can we call high-powered, suped-
up cars speeding down tracks at incredible
speeds "an active pastime"?
How can we call people being maimed,
burned, crushed when their car crashes in-
to a wall for the right to claim a few thou-
sand dollars a "diversion"?
How can we call drivers with little pro-
tection competing with other drivers with
that same minute protection a form of
"recreation"?
Man is no match for Formula I
machines.
Incident: driver Gordon Smiley, warm-
ing up to qualify for the Indianapolis 500
April 24, killed instantly when his car
slammed head-on into the third-turn con-
crete wall, bursting into flames and nearly
disintegrating.
Incident: driver Gilles Villeneuve, died
May 8 when his Formula I race car crashed
at Zolder, Belgiun, as he was preparing for
the Belgium Grand Prix.
Incident: veteran driver Art Pollard,
killed during Indy practice and driver
Swede Savage and pit crewman Armando
Teran, killed, in separate incidents during
the race.
But what can we do? Nothing. The only
glimmer of hope that has been resurrected
appeared in a United Press International
wire story Tuesday. The story said "if a
driver is hurt during this year's In-
dianapolis 500the track hospital will be
raced to him Emergency personnel will
be stationed in the pits.
But it won't make that much of a dif-
ference, as in the case of Gordon Smile
He lost control of his car; it slid 280 feet in-
to the wall. And now his wife Barbara
longer has a husband.
Driver Bill Whittington said Smiie
"was doing what he wanted to do. It just
happens.
"He may not have been one of the best
race drivers, but he added a lot of color to
racing. We are all obviously going to hae
some thoughtswhen we're out there. 1
might have not have as much affect on the
Foyts, Unsers and Ruth erfords. but it sure
will on the lesser drivers.
"The whole (third) turn is going to be
difference now. Just seeing that black
(crash mark) on the wall will remind u
what happened. This will all bring u b
to reality
Why don't racing enthusiasts and par-
ticipants come back to reality? We've seen
too much death because of driving �
whether on the racetrack or an urban
highway.
Racing's a death trap. A suicide rap
A nd we 'd better get out while we 're yt
HKMOOTIRD
HWHffOllH
TtePreadeNt wa n&M :heres LOTS of Jcte available here.
ANY Of VDUSt KWH arty ttimG about NMJOttOLOJ ?
r Campus Forum
Fan To Restaurant's Rescue
Yes, Kim Albin, there is a Crow's
Nest nestled amidst bustling Tenth
Street traffic (April 15 issue of East
Carolinian) - a Crow's nest, a refuge, a
"home-away-from-home" for many
loyal "Crow's nest crew members No,
Kim Albin, it is not the Casablanca nor
the Beef Barn but, neither is it the West
End. Grill
Chris Browning and his wife, Jane,
offer more than just a variety of good
food and the best iced tea in Greenville.
You may enjoy a full dinner or just a
sandwich and fries in a secluded section,
or "watch the traffic" section, or "view
the TV" section. Loyal Crow's Nest
diners all have their favorite table and
their choice selection from the menu -
tempting roast beef, mile - high Cap-
tain's sandwich (3 meats and cheese),
man - sized Pirate's Plate, and, yes, a
wonderful steak-and-cheese Grab a
Schooner or jar of beer and some
quarters and enjoy your favorite video
game.
But there is more to the Crow's Nest
than just good food and fun. Chris and
Jane give many college students a
livelihood and dignity to make it
through the college years. Those loyal
Crow's Nest diners are mostly former
employees who recognize Chris'
generosity to hard-working employees,
almost a fatherly presence.
Chris Browning is also one of the big-
gest financial and promotional backers
of East Carolinia Univeristy, particular-
ly ECU athletics. Many "Business lun-
cheons" or pirate club activities are con-
ducted over a Crow's Nest meal.
Numerous visiting athletic shools bring
their teams to the Crow's Nest to enjoy
the best breakfast in town - served 24
hours a day.
The Crow's Nest, formerly Lum's if
you're an oldie-goldie, will remain
amidst Tenth Street, for it is a landmark
and an institution to Greenville and
ECU. I'm proud to be: a loyal Crow's
Nest fan, a grateful former employee,
and an admirer of the Brownings
Ellen M.Stroop
ECU School of Medicine
Copied Submission
The poem M Drawing by Ronnie C,
Grade One " that appears on page
thirty-three of the 1982 Rebel was not
written by Rebecca Ann Hemby. Ruth
Lechlitner is the actual and original
author. The submission of the poem by
Miss Hemby to the Rebel and the Rebel
Poetry contest was an error of judge-
ment and memory. We regret that this
happened, but we cannot check all
published poetry, and therefore, must
rely on the personal integrity of our con-
tributors. We make this statement
because it is important that you, learn
this from us first.
Bill Rapp
Editor '82
Rick Gordon
Poetry Editor
Editor '83
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing alt points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, alt tetters
must include the name major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs). Utters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. Alt let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
MAY 19, 19822
Page 5
'less' Tonight:
Free Summer
Films Abound
The Student Union Films Com-
mittee has come up with the best
solution for any seasonal blues you
may be experiencing: a full slate of
tree movies set to be screened every
Monday and Wednesday night
throughout what promises to be a
long, hot summer.
Each of the nineteen films in the
line-up will be shown in Mendenhall
Student Center's Hendrix Theatre at
9 p.m. on Mondays and 8 p.m. on
cdnesdays. Consequently, the stu-
dent center will operate with extend-
ed hours on these evenings.
Admission to the films is, as
always, by student ID and activity
card or MSC Membership.
The list includes some more re-
cent titles than has been typical in
summers past. Roman Polanski's
dazzling love story Tess will be
shown this evening at 8 p.m.
The following Monday, May 24,
at 9 p.m the classic Humphrey
Bogart Katherine Hepburn vehicle
African Queen will be back on the
big screen.
The rest of the schedule is as
follows: Wednesday, May 26,
Breaking Away (8 p.m.); Monday,
May 31, Bedazzled (9 p.m.);
Wednesday, June 2, Divine
Madness (8 p.m.); Monday, June 7,
Murder By Death (9 p.m.); Wednes-
day, June 9, All That Jazz (8 p.m.);
Monday, June 14, Animal House (9
p.m.); Wednesday, June 16, Time
After Time (8 p.m.); Monday, June
21, Richard Pryor Live in Concert
(9 p.m.); Wednesday, June 23,
Dracula (1979 version, 8 p.m.);
Monday, June 28, Came From
Outer Space (3-D version, 9 p.m.);
Wednesday, June 30,
Slaughterhouse Five (8 p.m.);
Wednesday, July 7, Taxi Driver (8
p m. � the student center will be
closed Monday, July 5); Monday,
July 12, Blazing Saddles (9 p.m.);
Wednesday, July 14, Young
Frankenstein (8 p.m.); Monday, Ju-
ly 19, Andy Warhol's Frankenstein
(9 p.m.); Wednesday, July 21, The
Blues Brothers (8 p.m.); Monday,
July 26, The French Connection (9
p.m.).
i
�v
Cliff Gorman visits Roy Sdiekkr In tMs seeue
from Bob Fosse's All That Jazz. The film returns to campus later this summer.
McCartney Rolling Again With 'Tug-Of-War
By ROBERT PALMER
Nr� ori Time New. Nt.irc
Paul McCartney was "the cute Beatle He was also
the Beatle who wrote "Yesterday" and "Eleanor
Rigby ballads that transcended the popularity of this
most'popular of all rock groups and became standards,
recorded by artists of ever stylistic persuasion. And
although it's been more than 10 years since the breakup
of the Beatles, McCartney's image hasn't changed much
- to the public at large, he's still the cute, consummate
pop tunesmith.
He is also the surviving member of the Lennon-
McCarney songwriting partnership that made the
Beatles what they were, and as such he has been sub-
letted to intense media scrutiny since John Lennon's
death almost a year and a half ago.
When he began working on a new album a few mon-
ths after Lennon was shot, and working on it with
George Martin, who produced the Beatles from the
beginning, rumors began to fly. Teams of reporters
scoured the Caribbean island of Montserrat, where
Martin owns a studio. When Ringo Starr showed up to
play drums on a song or two, rumors of a reunion of the
surviving Beatles flared once again. There were even
reports that Yoko Ono, Lennon's widow, was about to
participate in the sessions. She didn't; neither did the
Beatles' lead guitarist, George Harrison.
Now McCartney's album is here, and so, briefly, was
McCartney last month. Sequestered in the office of the
CBS Records President Walter Yetnikoff and provided
with tight security, he talked about the record, Tug-of-
Hr, and about some of the things that interest and
Music
worry the most commercially successful ex-Beatle. He
was dressed in a 7-neck sweater, checkered shirt and
jeans, and although he is about 40, he has retained his
"cute Beatle" looks. He has also retained the acute self-
awareness that seems to have come with being a member
of the world's most famous pop group.
Tug-of-Har, McCartney's exquisitely crafted though
lyrically flawed new album, is his most ambitious piece
of work in a number of vs. Even the title sounds
substantial.
"The theme we were messing with was conflict, he
said, "and it also has something to do with the idea of
opposites. 1 don't think 1 would have used that theme
before; I would have been afraid of bringing people
down. But I've been growing up, and after all, it isn't
news that there's a tough side to life
The album sounds like a surefire hit and a vundtall
for Columbia Records, which has several million dollars
invested in McCartney. His two earlier albums for the
label were neither spectacularly huge sellers nor critical
successes. Since the early 1970's, McCartney has work-
ed mostly within the confines of Wings, the rock group
See MCCARTNEY, Page 6
Amazing Metcalf
SOC Director An Inspired Man
By WILLIAM A. SHIRES
ECU Nmlwu
Dr.
Zubie W. Metes Jr successful Erector of ECU's Studeat Opportunities Ctattr.
When he was four years old Zubie W. Metcalf
scraped his face when his tricycle overturned on a
sidewalk at Tuskegee Institute in Alabama. A slender,
soft-spoken man comforted the frightened child, cleans-
ed his face and applied some salve.
Metcalf learned later that his benefactor that day had
been the great Dr. George Washington Carver.
The wound healed without leaving a scar. But the
gentle, soothing touch and kind word of the famous
scientist-educator of Tuskegee left a deep, lasting and
symbolic impression upon the young Zubie Metcalf.
More than 40 years later, Metcalf himself is a
scientist-educator lending a helping hand in the form of
student opportunity programs at ECU. In a dozen years
of this work, Metcalf has written grant proposals for
programs funded for more than $3 million primarily to
help blacks and the disadvantaged.
"It's a part of me. It's the only life 1 know and I am
totally committed to it says Metcalf, director of
ECU's Center for Student Opportunities.
Within a year after coming to ECU in in 1976, Met-
calf obtained a renewable three-year Health, Education
and Welfare grant totaling $142,514 to support recruit-
ment and retention of disadvantaged and minority
students in ECU's schools of Medicine, Nursing and
Allied Health and Social Professions.
Under this program, an academic monitoring system
was established to determine strengths and weaknesses
of 107 pre-hcalth professional students and remedial
steps were taken.
He received recently a 123,670 grant form the na-
tional Fund for Medical Edudation for a summer
tutorial program to identify, recruit and prepare high
potential minority and disadvantaged students for the
"challenging expectations of medical school The pro-
gram is designed for 24 students this summer.
In recruiting, "we go the whole spectrum, reaching a
wide range Metcalf says.
He has prepared proposals for National Science
Foundation support of a program of research appren-
. ticeships for minority high school students.
Ten percent of students enrolled in ECU's relatively
young School of Medicine are blacks. Two blacks were
among the first class of MD's graduated in 1981.
"We are very proud of our programs and the national
attention they are getting as far away as California
Metcalf said.
California education authorities have listed ECU s
summer enrichment program with those of such
prestigious medical schools as Georgia, Baylor, Univer-
sity of Texas, New York, the University of Tennessee,
and Tulane as offering exceptional opportunities for
Californians. .
Piecing together educational opportunities as they
arose is part of Zubie Metcalfs personal education
story, from public schools in Sheffield, Ala to a
chemistry assistantship at the University of Dayton,
Ohio, where he majored in biology. He drove at night to
further his studies at Antioch College and picked up
courses at Purdue, then received a National Science
Foundation graduate fellowship for a masters in
teaching from Miami University Of Ohio.
He returned to Dayton as a biology instructor. Then
for five years he was an assistant professor on the facul-
ty of Florida A&M University, picking up further study
at Florida State University. In 1970, he received a Ford
Foundation fellowship for advanced s'udy which led to
a doctorate at the State University of New York-
Buffalo.
It was at Dayton that he "really got started and in-
terested in college opportunities work Metcalf says.
"I really liked it. It was a very good feeling
He became director of Academic Opportunity Pro-
grams at Ball State University where, in 1973, he asked
himself, "Why not go back home?"
"I felt I had made very good use of my educational
opportunities as they arose. It was hard to do, but I had
learned how. I asked, 'why not do the same thing for my
people?' I had the feeling that 1 could go there (to
Alabama) and make a contribution to the people of my
home state
He returned then to Tuskegee where 35 years before,
George Washington Carver "worked on my face and
gave my parents a little can of salve. I will never forget
it
As assistant vice president for academic affrirs and
dean of graduate programs, Metcalfs office at
Tuskegee was next door to the archives housing the let-
ters, papers and writings of George Washington Carver.
"It made me feel good. 1 worked hard and it inspired
me to work-up some of the best educational opportunity
programs Tuskegee ever had One of these was a
$2,150,000 advanced institutional development pro-
gram, funded by the U.S. Office of Education.
In the mid-70s, Metcalf was a finalist for and narrow-
ly missed being chosen chancellor of the University of
Maryland-Eastern Shore. Then he became interested in
the programs and philosophy of the newly established
medical school, health and science at East Carolina.
He had heard of ECU's growing reputation and also
knew that the late Dr. Carver had corresponded with a
famous eastern North Caroina personage, the late Lucy
Crisp Cherry. The Cherry-Carver correspondence was
in the Tuskegee archives and Metcalf had been in-
terested in her telling about East Carolina's founding
and years of growth and development.
He was especially attracted to ECU because of its
vigorous program to recruit, retain and strengthen op-
portunities for minorities and disadvantaged students in
medicine and the health professions.
?
, . �MNM MM M � MM
II
K





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 19, 1982
McCartney Wins
1Tug- Of- War'
Continued From Page 5
he started with his wife, Linda. He has made
some delightful pop singles, and his second Col-
umbia album, McCartney II, was a one-man-
band studio project that had plenty of inventive
moments.
But critics and fans alike have been waiting for
a really first-rate album from McCartney for
some time. Since the breakup of the Beatles, he
has tended to exaggerate the light, frothy side of
his music. His work retained virtually none of the
emotional toughness that characterized may of
the early Beatles songs he co-wrote with Lennon,
and many listeners concluded that the emotional
toughness was Lennon's contribution.
McCartney hinself has bolstered his image as a
clever but essentially lightweight pop craftsman
by announcing in one of his biggest hits that he
simply wants to "fill the world with silly love
songs" and asking "what's wrong with that, I'd
like to know?"
What was wrong was that McCartney lacked a
strong collaborator like Lennon, someone who
would leaven his sugarcoated esthetic with a bit
of grit and irony.
On Tug-oj-ar he had several strong col-
laborators, most notably producer George Mar-
tin and Stevie Wonder, who performs on two
memorable tracks and co-wrote one with Mc-
Cartney. Wings guitarist Denny Laine and
ocalist Linda McCartney appear on most of the
ongs but, Tug-of-H'ar is a Paul McCartney
album, and its release signals the breakup, at
least for the foreseeable future, of Wings as a
group.
When 1 commented to McCartney that the
challenge of working with Martin and Wonder
seems to have been good for him, he nodded
vigorously.
"I don't want to take away from Wings, but
it's true 1 needed that he said. "1 had been feel-
ing there was something missing, and making this
album, 1 found out what it was. When George
and 1 were working on the orchestral arrange-
ment for the song Tug-of-W'ar for example, we
recorded the orchestra and it sounded pretty
good. But we had some bass parts we hadn't
recorded quite right, and George said, 'Look,
this is my reputation and yours going right on the
line, would you mind if we brought the orchestra
back and recorded it again?' So we did it, at huge
cost to somebody, probably us in the end, but it
was worth it
' Tug-of-War isn't a rock 'n' roll album. But it
can stand as McCartney's vision of pop, a vision
that encompasses the 1950s rockabilly of Carl
Perkins (a big Beatles influence and a guest on
one song on the album) and the contemporary
pop-funk of Wonder as well as ballads and
uptempo tunes that are typically McCartney.
����
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
MAY 19, 1982 Page 7
1
Pirates Capture
ECAC Crown
Pirate ace Bill H ilder
HARRISONBURG, Va. -
Fran Fitzgerald's two-run
homer over the leftfield wall
in the East Carolina fifth
spurred the Pirates to an 8-4
win over Catholic University
and the ECAC-South cham-
pionship, thus a berth in the
NCAA tournament beginning
next week.
Earlier, Catholic defeated
top-seeded Old Dominion,
7-6, to reach the champion-
ship game.
The Pirates swept through
the tournament by winning
three straight games and pro-
pelling their seasonal mark to
33-12 � the most wins in the
school's history.
A first-round win over host
school James Madison mark-
ed the Pirates' first post-
season win since 1968. The
Dukes were 24-1 in their home
park this season and finished
the year at 40-14.
In the finals, the Pirates
pushed across two runs in the
first inning � one on a double
by Todd Evans and another
on a groundou t � then added
another run in the third frame
on a sacrifice fly by John
Hallow.
East Carolina held a slim
3-2 lead in the fifth, but
Hallow doubled and Fit-
zgerald belted his seventh
home run of the season.
The Pirates added an in-
surance run in the sixth and
two more in the eighth. Geoff
Mack hit a two-run shot for
Catholic in the sixth.
Catholic finished the season
at 21-14.
ECU Placed East
The Pirates of East
Carolina, coming off the
ECAC-South champion-
ship and a 33-win cam-
paign, hae been selected
to participate in the
NCAA's East Regional
beginning next weekend
in Columbia. S.C.
Other teams in the
regional include host
South Carolina, an in-
dependent, The Citadel
and West Virginia. The
final team will be an-
nounced May 24.
Joining East Carolina
in the East will be arch-
rival and ACC champion
North Carolina, 29-25.
The Citadel,36-6, won
the Southern Conference
championship, and West
Virginia, 22-21, was vic-
torious in the Eastern 8,
Joining the University
of South Carolina as
hosts in the NCAA tour-
nament are Miami,
Texas, New Orleans,
Maine, Arizona State
(defending champion),
Oklahoma State and
Fresno State.
SS Kelly Robineite
Bucs Take
4th Place
Manahan: first-year winner
By CINDY PLEASANTS
,uM�ni Sports r.dn�r
GRAHAM � The East Carolina
Lady Pirates were eliminated in the
AIAW National Slow-Pitch Softball
tournament this past Saturday, los-
ing 1-0 to the University of Florida.
Florida captured the win by slam-
ming a homer in the fourth inning to
knock ECU out of the invite.
Florida was beaten in the finals,
however, by Florida State, 9-4. The
Lady Seminoles were undefeated in
the tournament.
After tournament play had end-
ed, rightfield Cynthia Shepard and
centerfielder Mitzi Davis were nam-
ed as all-Americans. Davis and
Shepard have both been ECU's
powerhitters this year, batting over
.400 this season. Shepard and
Yvonne Williams were also named
to the all-tournament team.
The Lady Pirates finished fourth
in the nation and had an overall
record of 42-13.
ECU started out strong in the
beginning of the tournament, down-
ing the University of Florida, 13-2,
in the second round of play. The
Lady Pirates, who were seeded third
in the tournament, had a bye the
first round.
ECU scored twice in the first and
third innings to take the lead.
Florida, who was seeded sixth,
scored its only runs in the bottom of
the third.
After two single runs in the fourth
and fifth, ECU rallied for six runs in
the sixth.
Shepard, Davis and Jo Landa
Clayton led ECU's hitting with
three apiece. Davis popped a dou-
ble and a triple while Clayton drove
in a five runs and Shepard drove in
two.
Williams, Shirley Brown and
Fran Hooks each had two hits, with
one of Hook's a double.
Florida's Mary Guzzardo and
Carlyce Cononie had two hits each.
The Lady Pirates then faced
tenth-seeded UNC-Charlotte but
lost 10-6 after committing five er-
rors in the first inning. UNC-C took
advantage, scoring four runs in the
first, then three more in the third.
ECU scored two in the first and
rallied to within 7-6 in the fifth but
the Forty-Niners scored twice in the
sixth and once in the seventh to keep
the lead.
ECU's Shepard was three-for-
four; Williams was two-for-four
and Davis had a homerun.
hi the second game, ECU barely
edged out Western Carolina, 6-4, by
scoring two runs in the bottom of
the sixth.
At one point during the game, the
score was tied 2-2 but ECU gained a
4-2 lead with runs in the fourth and
fifth. Western fought back with a
run in the sixth but the Lady Pirates
then scored twice in the bottom of
the inning to win.
Maureen Buck singled and then
went to third whenShepard reached
on an error. Both runners came in
on William's double.
ECU was led by Williams who
went three-for-four with four RBI.
Fran Hooks, Buck and Jeannette
Roth all were two-for-three. Davis
was two-for-four with a double and
triple.
4 lady Pirate runner is safe
Tolson Wins
Bushbeck Honored
?
V
Defense a Pirate key
Graduated placekicker Chuck
Bushbeck, who transferred to East
Carolina last fall from Villanova
and became stricken with Hodgkin's
Disease has been awarded the 1982
Christianburg Award.
During the year, Bushbeck kicked
six of 13 field goals, including a
48-yarder while battling the effects
of cancer treatment. He also kicked
32 of 32 extra points.
The award, which is presented to
the Pirate athlete who is a member
of the varsity squad, shows ex-
cellence in the classroom and high
standards of charcter as a person
and service to the university. The
award is in honor of former Eas
Carolina football and baseball
coach John Christianburg.
Bushbeck, who is back home in
Philadelphia, is now awaiting a
tryout with a professional team.
While playing at East Carolina,
Bushbeck would receive radiation
treatments throughout the week and
then participate in Pirate contests.
. Though he would often become ill
at these games, he would still kick,
after shedding an umbrella he used
to protect himself from the heat of
the sun.
Katherine Tolson, a freshman
from New Bern and the first ECU
women's tennis player to ever attend
the regionals, won the consolation
bracket at the regional event this
past weekend at the University of
Tennessee-Martin.
Tolson, playing the No. 2 singles
spot, drew the No.2-secded Mary
Gengler of William & Mary and lost
in two straight sets, 6-2, 6-2.
Tolson rallied in her next two
matches, downing UNC-Charlotte's
Dorothy Brown 6-1, 6-0 to win the
consolations.
Buc On Squad
Eastern Basketball magazine has
announced its list of the top 10
Junior College transfers, and East
Carolina is represented on this
year's squad by Tony Robinson.
The 6-1 guard from Jamestown
Community College in New York
was picked as the top guard pro-
spect in the 1982 National JC Tour-
nament.
He averaged 13.8 points per game
and 6.2 assists.
�"

1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 19, 1982
Their Cup(s) Runneth Over
NEW YORK (AP) � A year ago, Denis Pot-
vin, captain of the National Hockey League New
York Islanders, was talking with baseball slugger
Reggie Jackson about dynasties.
"Reggie said no one's a dynasty until they've
won three in a row Potvin recalled. "Well, 1
guess by Reggie's standards then, that makes us
one
The Islanders laid claim to that designation, br-
inging home the Stanley Cup, symbol of NHL
supremacy, fo the third straight year. The team
and its prize arrived early Monday to a small, but
loud crowd of fans at LaGuardia Airport.
The Cup was secured in a four-game sweep of
the Vancouver Canucks, completed Sunday night
in a 3-1 victory. That made the Islanders the first
United States-based franchise to capture three
straight NHL championships.
The only other teams to capture the Cup with
that kind of consistency were the Montreal Cana-
diens, who won four straight from 1975-76
through 1978-79; the Toronto Maple Leafs with
three in a row, 1961-62 through 1963-64; Mon-
treal with five straight, 1955-56 through 1959-60;
and Toronto with three in a row, 1946-47 through
1948-49.
Does this Cup triumph, climaxed with a string
of nine straight victories, put the Islanders in the
ranks of the game's all-time great teams?
"That's up to the people across the United
States and Canada to decide said Clark Gillies.
"I think we deserve to be called a great team
because of what we've done
General Manager Bill Torrey was impressed
not only with his team's triumph, but the manner
in which it was accomplished. In the first round
of the playoffs, three division champions � Min-
nesota, Montreal and Edmonton � were upset.
The Islanders were trailing by two goals with 5
and a half minutes left in the decisive fifth game
against Pittsburgh, but rallied to tie the score and
then win the game in overtime.
"We never stopped working in that last period
against Pittsburgh, and when you don't stop,
good things happen said the general manager.
That dramatic victory allowed the Islanders to
continue on in the playoffs, meeting the New
York Rangers in the quarterfinals. The Isles
droped the opener of that series, but then won 12
of the next 13 games and the final nine in a row.
The Rangers were eliminated in six and Quebec in
the semifinals and Vancouver in the finals went in
four each.
"Pittsburgh was tough, and the Rangers are
always tough for us Torrey said. "But that just
made us harder to beat as we went on
Torrey was asked to compare cups.
"This is the most exciting win for us he said.
"This year in many respects was the most dif-
ficult. Every one gets tougher and better and br-
ings more satisfication
Can the Islanders keep us this string of cups,
challenging perhaps Montreal's run of five in a
row?
"First said Torrey, "we have to go after No.
4 or we'll never get to six. In fact, right now, I
just want to enjoy No. 3
The Islanders will share that joy with the tradi-
tional Stanley Cup parade today, carrying the
Cup through the streets of suburban Long Island
near their home rink, the Nassau County Col-
iseum.
Then, on Thursday, Mike Bossy will claim his
Most Valuable Player Award, the Conn Smythe
Trophy, and the car that goes with it from Sport
Magazine. Bossy scored two goals in Sunday's
clincher and finished the playoffs with 17 goals.
Bossy said the thing that helped the Islanders
capture the cup was the team's character.
"We have a lot of guys here with the talent to
win, but that's no good if you don't have the
drive the right wing said. "We showed a lot of
character right through the playoffs, winning the
tight games, winning at home and winning on the
road
Bryan Trottier, Bossy's linemate who has
scored 29 points in each of the three years the
Islanders have won the Cup, said: "We don't
compare them; we just win them. I sincerely hope
people don't take us for granted and get tired of
seeing us win it
Vancouver coach Roger Neilson certainly
doesn't take them for granted.
"At the beginning of the year, people figured
the Islanders would win it he said. "In the mid-
dle of the season, people figured they'd win it.
And heading into the playoffs, people figured
they'd win it.
"Trottier is the best player in the game today.
Bossy is the best scorer. Potvin is the best
defenseman and (Al) Arbour is the best coach
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Title
The East Carolinian, May 19, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
May 19, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.198
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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