The East Carolinian, April 27, 1982






Wat
(EarnUman
si
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No.
Tuesday, April 27, 1982
Greenville, N.C,
14 Pages
Three Recommended
For ECU Chancellor
B MIKE HUGHES
rhe ECU Chancellor Selection
v. ommittee and Board of Trustees
held meetings on Saturday, April
24, and speculation has it that three
names were submitted 10 UNC
President William Friday for final
consideration.
However, Futrell could not be
(cached to comment further on the
meetings.
According to reports, the three
names recommended to Friday were
John Howell, acting chancellor of
I CU; James Robinson, president of
the University of West Florida; and
lion College President J. Fred
Young.
The other finalist was Charles Q.
Brown, acting dean of the ECU
School of Technology and chairman
ol the ECU Department of
Geology.
The new chancellor is expected to
be named on May 14, when the
UNC Board of Governors holds its
next meeting; however, this date is
tentative.
The selection committee was
formed last year as a subcommittee
of the Board of Trustees, after
Chancellor Thomas B. Brewer
resigned on Sept. 9. The ensuing list
of potential candidates numbered
148 at one time but was narrowed to
four names earlier this semester.
According to unconfirmed
reports, the Board of Trustees was
almost unanimous in its decision to
okay the recommendation of
Howell but was split between two of
the other finalists. Thus, rather than
submitting two names � which
Futrell said in February would pro-
bably be the case � the board chose
to send three recommendations in
alphabetical order to Friday.
Earlier this month, members of
chancellor search subcommittees
traveled to the University of West
Florida and Elon College to inter-
view several of Robinson's and
Young's co-workers. These inter-
views and discussions were reported
Saturday before any recommenda-
tion was made by the committee to
the entire body of trustees.
Howell, who was appointed ac-
ting chancellor on Jan. 8, has been
at ECU (then East Carolina College)
since 1957 and has served as
political science department chair-
man, dean of the college of arts and
sciences, graduate school dean and
provost and vice chancellor for
academic affairs.
Young, who has been president at
Elon College since 1973, has spent
more than 25 years in education in
North Carolina and Virginia. He
served as deputy superintendent of
public instruction for the com-
monwealth of Virginia for two
years.
Robinson, who took over as
president of the University of Wesl
Florida in 1974, also has an long
record in the education field.
Among other positions, Robinson
was vice president for academic af-
fairs and provost at Ohio State
University, and he served as presi-
dent of Macalester College for three
years.
Aside from being chairman of the
geology department and acting dean
of the ECU school of Technology,
Brown has held the position of
director of institutional develop-
ment (now institutional advance-
ment). He came to ECU in 1966
after teaching at Clemson Universi-
ty.
Open Mouth, Insert Foot
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
Although it would seem violent in front of the Student Store, this scene is a weeklv event for the ECU Karate Club.
Handicapped 'Access9 Threatened
B PATRICK O'NEILL
Maff Writer
On Wednesday, April 28, a nationwide network of
candlelight vigils will be held to mark the ninth anniver-
sary of section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and
-o protest in cnanges in 504 that were recently pi opos-
ed by the U.S. Department of Justice.
According to ECU political science student Rick
Burke, the proposed changes in 504 now being reviewed
by the Bush Presidential Task Force on Regulatory
Relief wili set back the civil rights gains of handicapped
Americans 10 ears.
"It's a terrible thing Burke said.
"It's frightening added ECU student Brian
Rangeley, "because of the possible implications of it
"Accessibility" is an important word for handicap-
ped indiv iduals. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of
1973 coordinates and enforces guidelines which
guarantee accessibility to services and buildings for all
handicapped persons.
Section 504 was adopted as a "satisfactory com-
promise" after years of public debate and public hear-
ings wee held between disabled Americans and the
federal government.
The changes now being proposed will apparently
loosen the strict guidelines and remove certain
, 'VV�
Ail-American
Status Given
ECU Yearbook
legislative wording, which is considered crucial to the
enforcement of the regulations.
Also proposed is the elimination of 504 coverage to
alcohol and drug abusers and those who are
"emotionally ill Approximately 35 percent of the
U.S. disabled population currently acknowledge
substance abuse or alcoholism as their primary or secon-
dary disability.
According to a memorandum from Andi Reynolds to
504 Committee members, the relaxed wording in the
new proposal will not guarantee "disabled children the
right to an appropriate education" and will reduce the
availability of auxiliary aids and accessible buildings for
the disabled. Reynolds, an employee of the North
Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Com-
munity Development, is helping to coordinate the vigils
in the state.
"The geology program is not accessible to handicap-
ped students psychology major Wrayne Dawson said.
"They probably won't have to make it accessible if the
new version of 504 is approved
"This will set a negative precedent added Roy Pate,
an ECU graduate student in the Department of
Rehabilitation Studies.
Burke, Rangeley, Dawson and Pate, who are all con-
fined to wheelchairs, are joining together with ECU's
125 handicapped students and are asking others to join
them on the campus mall for the one-hour vigil to be
held this Wednesday at 7 p.m.
The largest vigil will be in Washington, D.C and
ABC's Sightline plans to cover the event live.
"It appears that tU: Bush task force has advanced the
entire spirit and philosophy of rehabilitation Dawson
said.
"This is the first time Vice President Bush has done
something Burke added, "and he's trying to take
away riehts that a lot of people have worked a long time
for
Rangeley was especially critical of the new 504 draft
because contrary to the current administration's policy,
the new bill would limit the power of the states. He add-
ed that federal regulations would mean a loss of several
thousand dollars to his family in Virginia because he
was rendered "financially ineligible for assistance" bas-
ed on his father's income.
"Bush's rewording of 504 Rangeley said, "can onlv
serve to further impede my progress
Rangeley was also critical of ECU's housing policies,
which he said had "discriminated against wheelchair
students for years He added that the changes in 504
would allow this discrimination to continue as long as
their intent was good.
"I am not unsympathetic to the cost-minded politi-
cians Dawson emphasized. "However, 1 do not think
cost can be made the primary consideration for han-
dicapped individuals
At present, any federally-funded building must set
aside five percent of those funds for the purposes of
making that building accessible for disabled people.
According to the Reynolds memorandum, under the
new version of 504, "compliance" to these accessibility
regulations would not be properly enforced. Burke add-
ed that the new wording is often "ambiguous and
weighted in favor of those who oppose the rights of han-
dicapped individuals
"The impact of these guidelines, if implemented, will
curtail our ability as disabled Americans to participate
fully and equally in our communities
This is a partial quote from an "urgent alert" state-
ment of the Disability Rights Education and Defense
Fund, Inc. The organization is also calling for political
action and letters to be written to oppose the new
guidelines.
"Truly a sad state ol affairs exists when a government
looks upon its disabled populus as a responsibility or
liability rather than an asset Dawson concluded.
Such a state is only a breeding ground for contempt

Student 9s Bad Check
Buys Court Conviction
rOn The inside

The 19X1 Buccaneer, ECU's an-
nual pictoral publication, has
received an All-American rating
trom the American Collegiate Press,
Amy Picket the editor, announced
Monday.
The yearbook received a four-star
rating, the second highest given by
the ACP. Of the more than 400
yearbooks reviewed by the organiza-
tion, eighteen were given Ail-
American status, thus putting the
Buccaneer in the top 4.5 percent.
Pickett. who was also editor of
the 1981 Buccaneer, was very pleas-
ed at the announcement, which she
received April 23.
"We all put a lot of work into last
year's yearbook Pickett said,
"and I'm really pleased that it paid
off
According to Pickett, the 1981
Buccaneer received recognition in
the areas of copy, display, coverage
and concept.
The award was the second in as
many years for the yearbook, which
also received the recognition in 1970
and 1971.
Later this month, the Buccaneer
will be automatically entered in the
"Pacemaker" competition, which is
judged by the ACP, which is based
in Minneapolis, Mn.
Three judges will determine which
of the 18 yearbooks receiving Ail-
American recognition is the finest.
The winner will be announced dur-
ing the first week of May.
fe'wsy'i
tn.
B GREG HIDEOUT
Maff Urilrr
Kevin Torrence, who enrolled at
ECU first session last summer by
paying his tuition with a bad check,
was convicted in Pitt County
District Court on April 13 for 56
counts of passing bad checks.
According to Detective Sergeant
Gene McAbee of the university
police, Torrence had never attended
classes while here. He left after two
days.
McAbee said that Torrence was
first arrested in Wyoming in July
for possesion of marijuana. He was
held there on a National Crime In-
formation Center "want" (an
organization to track criminals) but
was released before he could be ex-
tradited. He had been riding
amateur rodeo under the name of
"Tex" at the time.
Torrence was then arrested in
New Bern, N.C, at the beginning of
April for a traffic violation. He was
driving a gypsy cab enroute from
New York to Florida.
McAbee said that Torrence was
then brought to Greenville where he
was tried. Judge Robert Wheeler,
who presided over the case, sentenc-
ed him to 21 months in prison plus
court costs.
McAbee added, that there are
more warrants pending in Craven
and Pamlico counties.
ECU's Rebel Available
On Campus This Friday
Photo By OAVf WILLIAMS
Editor Amy Pickett: "I'm glad it paid off
The Rebel, East Carolina's
literary-arts magazine, will arrive
here Friday, April 30.
Copies of the magazine will be
available on top of the newspaper
boxes at Mendenhall Student
Ctnter, Joyner Library, the Student
Supply Store and classroom
buildings on campus.
"This year's issue, the 24th
volume, has been expanded from 64
to 80 pages to better portray the
students and attitudes on campus
said Bill Rapp, the 1981-82
magazine editor. "The goal of the
Rebel is to provide a stimulus and
outlet for the literary and artistic ex-
pressions of the students at: ECU
The 1982 Rebel contains the work
of more than 80 students. Five short
stories, 40 poems and more than 30
art works and illustrations are in-
cluded.
The magazine has won numerous
awards for excellence from the
Society of Collegiate Journalists
and the Associated Collegiate Press.
The Rebel will be entered again this
year for evaluation, Rapp said.
Community support has increas-
See REBEL, Page 5
clockwork
orange
Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork
Orange will be shown at a
"Future Shock Double Feature"
Wednesday night See Enter-
tainment
1981-82 A year without a
chancellor. When it took letters
to the editor to get ECU students
"riled up For a retrospective
view of the academic year, see
page 6
Weather Watch
Occasional rain and possibly
thunderstorms today with a high
in the low 70s. Lows tonight in
the 50s.
Inside Index
Announcements2
Opinion4
Campus Forum4
Entertainment7
Sports10
Learning About College 12
Classifieds12



T





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 27. 1982
Announcements
CATHOLIC NEWMAN
CLUB
1 fe ECU Catholic Newman Club
will he holding Sunday Mass in the
Biology building 'his Sunday at
l? 10 p rn
CLOSINGOF
RESIDENCE HALLS
The residence halls will be clos
ea at the end of Spring Semester
as if Saturday May 8. 1982, at �
p m Students must vacate their
rooms and remove all their
belongings, including self styled
bods and lofts prior to this time
� dents returning to t"e same
rooms tor First Term of Summer
School, provided they have reserv
� such ' 00�"s. may receive per
mission from "e Office of Housing
'oi" ations lo leave their belong
m Ti'e University will not
issume the responsibility for any
'�udent owned items left behind
f-urther. the occupants of each
ORi will be held accountable tor
any missmg or damaged furniture
� other damage within tne room
The Residen! Advisors will com
ptete a room inspection as
residents check out at the dose of
Semestei Eact resident
, .� . u ��� room inspection
I i m al ng with ,he Resident Ad
Residents arc oemq asfc.ed to
ughiy clean their rooms prior
' vacating them The removal of
all trash, especially food items.
us "ftp to the
HOUW keep g Statl University
beds ' � 'rive been dismantled
. . also ti he re assembled
Sludei is h m a d'Staoce of 100
r more miles from East Car Ima
University will be allowed to siore
lain items over the summer
-Dt t ili ota is pertaining t. sum
iei st rage will be available from
-�'sprivp Residence Hall
� . after ion! U 1�B?
n i � box Kevs art li
� . � -lie respective
, , hall offices (Umstead
Hflo keys are to be turned m to
Mat Hail ana Fleming Hall keys.
Mice in Jai-v.s Hail! during
�oquiar office hours In cases
� ' o'C keys cannot be returned to
� Alices thev may be ma'led to
"e Office of Housing Operations,
r rn 201 Whichard Building,
� Carolina University, Green
N C 27834 Please be
� rjed M a' a S10 charge will be
i Heel il a key is not returned
.� i delivery to the
es, � � � wot be en Wednes
. v� s Students wf wish �
, . � -es � - uld gc u ihe ECU
� . � � .� and file a
. tM t re " i �
Students who are
, v �� a magazines
hfv their
� at e abi i
� , � �
�Q '� . .MOk of
� � gs are usualliy
i - disappear
CANDLELIGHT
VIGIL
All ECU students are asked to
come to a "Candle Light Vigil" on
the mall to oppose new federal
restrictions that will severly limit
the civil rights of handicapped
Americans
The Vigil is being sponsored by
many of ECU'S handicapped
students and will be held on
Wednesday evening April 21
beginning at 7 p m For more in
formation contact any handicap
ped resident of Slay Dorm
BUCANEER
Has your organization had its
group photograph taken for trie
1981 1982 yearbook? If not contact
The Bucaneer for an appointment
by calling 757 6501 The appoint
ment times are 30 8:45 on
Thursday, April 29 in Room Ml
Mendenhali This will be the last
time this semester group
photographs will be taken
GRADUATE BUSINESS
ASSOCIATION
The ECU Graduate Business
Association announces new of-
ficers tor Fall tJ Congratulations
to: Bill Bapp � President. Steve
DeLorm � Vice President, Trudy
Cooper � SecretaryTreasurer,
and Bay Baer - Student
Representative
MENDENHALL
STUDENTCENTER
M S C will be operating with ex
tended hours during exams The
M.S.C. will be open until 1 00 a.m.
on April 27, It. 29. May I and 2
Conference Booms will be
available tor group study.
CHAIRPERSON
Applications lor ISM �3 Elec
lions Chairperson now being taken
m 2� Mendenhali Student Center.
You may apply from IS. Monday
through Friday.
PEACE COMMITTEE
The Greenville Peace Commit
tee it Inviting anyone interested to
join them In traveling to the Se
cond United Nations Special See
sion on Disarmament. Many rides
� including bicycles � ere
available lor the trip. Free ec
comodetions will be provided in
New York City so the cost of ihe
trip will be minimal. The national
event will be held the weekend of
June I and rides will be returning
in time tor Monday classes. For
more inio call 7SS eMt.
OFF-CAMPUS
MOUSING
If you want to live oM campus,
now is the best time to look tor
summer or fall. Or if you nave an
apartment to sublet tor tt�e sum
mar or are looking lor a roommate
tor the academic year, list yeur
availatolility with us. Contact the
Off Campus Mousing Office. 211
Whichare Building. 757 Mat, 105.
Monday through Friday.
The Easi Carolinisn
Serving ikt ttinpui fmmumiiy
simrrl92S.
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ing the summer.
The East Carolinian is tne of
ficiel newspaper ol East
Carolina University, owned,
operated, and published lor and
by the students ol Easi Carolina
University
Subscription Bate: Ma yearly
The B�� Carolinian offices
are located la the Old South
�wilding a the campus of ECU.
Greenville. NX.
POSTMASTER: Send address
changes to The Easi Carolinian.
Old South Building. ECU Green
ville. NC 2734
Telepheae: 7W-4JM. J7. J�
AppticalkM to mall at second
class postage rates is pending at I
SSSSSSggp
L
-

m floors y jio re
�. � roes ��� � �
I terns pack
n ving si old
� �
. . . . � ns cot
Prrung this nfoi mal ' '
� � , H using Operations
2H� �a0i Caralimatt
The management
and entire staff
of the newspaper
wishes to sincerely
express our thanks
to all of
the advertisers that
have made the year prosperous.
vv-ave
be tere
atest
vie vvrreeases-
tVe
neaV
Qotne
lyjorre-
beve
ra0)e-
'�.
CnsX
n
i
Co'
SUN MAY 1
ROBBIN
THOMPSONI
BAND
WSECRET
AGENTS
Souths No. 6 Rock Nightclub
ATTIC ATTIC
FBI APRIL 30
HAPPY HOUR
WITH
� i
IlPnXU
T-shirt
sfiLe

THURS. & FRI MAY 64 7
SIDEWINDER
MARCH OF DIMES SPECIAL
(CONTESTS & GIVE-AWAYS)
EMCEE FOR BOTH NIGHTS
HOWARD HESSMAN
(DOCTOR JOHNNY FEVER OF WKRP)
b
��
4
FA &
IN CONCERT
SAT. & SUN. � MAY 8 & 9
IN CONCERT
WED MAY 5th
THE
NITTY GRITTY
DIRT
BAND
IN CONCERT
THURS MAY 27th
f

?





THfc LAS1 C AKOl INIAN
APRIL,24 1982
Organizations Receive National Recognition
Vv inners.
al 1 asi c ai olina organiza-
have hi ought national recogni-
to the university through theii
landing records ol achievement
ICC
the North Carolina
�! �! Mpha Epsilon
iwards at the pre-
al pre-dental honoi society's
onvention in March
the New Orleans convention,
received the Activities
Fo
v
exam
n ch;
Award for its service to students,
the university and the community in
the last two years. AED was also
selected for the Attendance Award
tor having the largest percentage of
members at the convention.
The awards are judged according
to regional location and chapter
size. The ECU chapter has won
these awards at the last three con-
tentions.
Tau chapter of Phi Sigma Pi Na-
tional Honor Fraternity won its 16th
consecutive Joseph Torchia Award
in October as outstanding chapter
of the fraternity.
At a convention in Washington,
D.C Tau chapter was awarded for
its record of scholarship, leadership
and fellowship activities. The frater-
nity supports the Heart Fund with
an annual bikini contest, mans
telephones for the Cerebral Palsy
telethon and alumni fund drive, and
hosts Greenville's underprivileged
children at Christmas and Easter
parties. The chapter was also noted
for its number of members and of-
ficers in campus organizations as
well as social events.
A co-ed honor, social and service
fraternity, Tau chapter has the
largest membership of the national
fraternity and is the oldest fraternal
organization on the ECU campus.
Dr. Jack Thorton. a professor in the
economics department at ECU, is
the national president of Phi Sigma
Pi.
ECU's chapter of the Sigma Nu
social fraternity was recognized in
August as having the most outstan-
ding community service record of
the national fraternity. The award
and a $250 prize were presented at
the fraternity's College of Chapters
in Salem, Va.
The brothers of the ECU fraterni-
ty raised funds for such charities as
Easter Seals, Muscular Dystrophy,
Cystic Fybrosis, the American
Cancer Society and the March of
Dimes. A seven page portfolio ol
the fraternity's work was submitted
to the national office after the ECU
chapter won the university's inter
fraternity community service award
And Kappa Delta's Gamma
Sigma chapter received a silver plat
ter last June at the sorority's na-
tional convention in Scotsdale,
Arizona. 1 he plattei was presented
in recognition ol the sorority's No
1 status in scholarship on campus
tin the last lour years.
Student Rides Bicycle To Raise
Funds For American Lung Association
PMKK K
ONI II I
1!1
mess,
i
return is Manned tor
Ma 15.
Hicks considers bicy-
cle tiding more a than a
hobb oi sport. "It's
my mam source ol
transportation he
said
�I've worked with
the American I ung
ssociation prior to
this, so 1 decided to
give all the proceeds to
them
Hoping to raise
$1,000 from his ride.
Hicks is accepting
sponsors on a per-mile
whole-trip basis
His training has in-
cluded 25-mile practice
rides around Greenville
and daily stretching ex-
ercises. "1 believe I'm
in excellent physical
condition he said.
manv other students
around this time" of
year. Hicks' training
has been hampered
with approaching final
exams.
Debra Bryan,
However,
with
setP.S
� w
y t&
RESPONSIBILITY
FAST.
Current
Opportunities
- ?, t iltt.ri.
�. .
. A N
Ad n � � . � �
ltti i
� Shtpboat c Op" ��
t oil I (,� (,Kl)l MKS
led
Ol IK IK l�RO.KMs
1 Navaho Drive
NIC. 27609
1 800 662 7231
regional director of the
American Lung
Association, has been
helping Hicks with
organizing and obtain-
ing public service an-
nouncements for his
trip. "We think it's ter-
rific she said. "We
rarely have someone
call and offer to do a
fund-raising event of
this nature
N.Y. Rally To Be Held
Scores of ECU
students and Greenville
residents will be travel-
ing to New York City
the weekend of June 12
to take part in a na-
tional antinuclear rally,
which will be held in
conjunction with the
second United Nations
Special Session on
Disarmament.
The session will go
on for several weeks
and will provide a
forum for discussing �
in an international at-
mosphere � the poten-
tial for achieving global
disarmament.
Many world leaders,
including President
Ronald Reagan, will be
in New York to address
the session.
In addition, some
members of the Green-
ville Peace Committee
are planning to make
the trip by bicycle.
According to Edith
Webber, an ECU
English instructor and
a member of the com-
mittee, any interested
person is encouraged to
participate
Webber and her hus-
band. Carroll, traveled
via tandem bicycle to
New York for the first
LN. special session on
disarmament in the spr-
ing of 1978.
�UBGiInW
WISHES EVERYONE A SAFE AND HAP-
PY SUMMER. WE HOPE TO SEE YOU
'AGAIN NkxT FALL HATCH FOR OU
UPCOMING SPECIALS AND OUR ORE A T
HAPPY HOUR
Phone 758-7979
208 E. 5th St.

DRAFT
NITE
Tuesday, April 27
8:30-2:00 P.M.
Admission � $1.25
W
:
THE NEW KID
ON THE BLOCK
AT 3Cd & JARVIS
GRANDOPENING
WED APRIL 28, TO WED MAY 5
� MtLtL ice with Purchase of beer
J7? I7f7 coffee with purchase of Deiner's Donuts
FREE
popcorn with purchase of $5.00
in gas or beer
BUDNATURAL LIGHT12 Pack $4.39
ANDRE DRY CHAMPAGNE$2.89
CELLO LAMBRUSCO$2.69
16-OZ. NON-RETURNABLE SOFT DRINKS 38c
SPECIALIZES IN:
RESUMES
and
THESES
DUPLICATION
Located Across From Campus
In The Georgetown Shops
� Copies Cost 60 to 30copy
� Phototypesetting
� Binding Service
� One Day Camera Work
� Geotype Supplies For Art Students
OPEN 9-7 m-f 9-2 sat
758-2400
ftm
TUESDAY
THRESHHOLD
WEDNESDAY
DIAMONDS
AIR GUITAR CONTEST
THURSDAY
DIAMONDS
EXAM JAM
FRIDAY
BRICE STREET
HAPPY HOUR 4:00 7:00
SATURDAY
BRICE STREET
SUNDAY
ROBBIN w
�THOMPSON BANI)
� WEDNESDAY .
t frTHEDlRTBANPfr
TUES. - PIZZA SPECIAL $2.49
LADIES' NITE wkenny shore
WED. - SALAD BAR
SPECIAL - S2.15
THURS. - SPAGHETTI SPEC.
FRI. - HAPPY HOUR 4-7
wBRUCE FRYE
SAT - HAPPY HOUR 4-7
vBRUCE FRYE
SUN - t.ASAGNE SPEC. $2.99
MON - END OF THE
YEAR PARTY - FREE DRAFT
tfae f$LL
C5
TUES, APRIL27
NEW WAVE POGO PART
COMPL. BEY. 8-10:00
WED APRIL28
MOVIES
THURS APRIL29
MOVIES
FRI APRIL 30
NEW TOWN COMMONS
ROCK N ROLL
SAT, MAY 1
ROLLY GREY &
"SUNFIRE" Raggae Music
WEDNESDAY
HI MPNITF
THURSDAY
COLLEGE NITE
BULLPEN NITE
1st beverage M ft ficttet stub
from ECU baseball qamt' Thurs rt' ch 4
FRIDAY
ENDOFWK. PART
SATURDAY
BEST IN DANCE MUSIC
SUNDAY
LADIES' NITE
IT TAKES 12 INCHES
TO MAKE A HERO
Dili So"d-n hr - Solodt
Vee'ofior Sodwic&�� -
Homemade Soupi H�ro� on fr��My baked mill
THURSDAY
DAVID GARRY
This week only �
Attitude
Adjustment
4-7 Daily
except Sunday
,ii
(.nUiiJ I HIll'S
VIDEOGAMES
Aiii'odi Adjustment Daily -4pm 7pm
' Eastern North Carolina's
o I Beach Club"

TUESDAY
Zoo Nile � 25C ponies
WEDNESDAY
Ladies1 Night
Free Draft for
all ladies'
THURSDAY
Happy Hour � Free
Free Admission till 10
25c Ponies till 11.
FRIDAY AFTERNOON
END OF THE WEEK
BUCKET PARTY
SUNDAY
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Stye Eaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1923
Jimmy Dupree. ���
Ric Browning. &,�, �, Charles Chandler. c�
Fielding Miller. bus, ��,�, William Yelverton. s�,�, e,�
Alison Bartel. , ���, Steve Bachner. tr .m.imim h�
Steve Moore, omm. v Tom Hall. v,wWiw
April 27, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
30
As all good things must come to
an end, so it is with mixed emotions
that I sit down to write my final
editorial as editor in chief of The
East Carolinian. I suppose a few ex-
planations are in order.
The term
-30-
is a jour-
nalistic expression signaling the end
of a story. Symbolically, it
represents the ending of the term of
office of the editor of this paper.
It should also be made clear that
this is the only time the author of an
editorial is identified. Well, so much
for technical explanations.
There are many reasons for mixed
emotions at this time. On one hand
I'm relieved that this burden is now
lifted, but at the same time I'm sad-
dened that it's over � such a
dichotomy of feelings?!
As anyone who really knows me
will attest, my friends come first
and foremost � before work,
before school, before anything. For
this reason, I will temporarily delay
comment on other matters of con-
cern.
Working in The East Carolinian
exposes a person to a variety of at-
titudes, cultures and beliefs. I con-
fess to being a devout conservative,
while on the other end of the spec-
trum there is arch-liberal Pat
O'Neill. You'd probably never hear
us agree on anything political, but
still you have to admire his deter-
mination and knowledge. There are
few, if any, other students on this
campus with the amount of
knowledge concerning nuclear war-
fare possessed by Patrick; it's just
too bad he can't find it in his heart
to aid our side of the arguement.
Friendships develop slowly, and
the true test of friendship is its abili-
ty to survive adversity. I feel for-
tunate to have nurtured numerous
"friendships" through my associa-
tion with The East Carolinian.
My conscience will not allow me
to mention anyone before Charles
Chandler. It was "Chuck" who
timidly approached me when he was
assistant sports editor and asked if
I'd like to write for the school
paper. Four years, several dozen
arguments and many sleepless
nights later we find ourselves ap-
proaching the finish of our college
careers. We both know this is not an
end � just a beginning. You can't
remove yourself from family � he
and ol' Kimbo certainly have earned
special membership.
It's hard for me to imagine what
it'll be like without Alison Bartel
around to listen to me gripe and
complain every Monday and
Wednesday. I'll always pick on her
about her "foreign" accent (Lodi,
Ohio � wherever that is), but she
knows it's all in good spirit.
There's a lot to be said for uppity
women. Diane Anderson came to
this paper just over a year ago, and I
truly feel richer for the experience
of getting to know her. Openness,
sincerity and devotion are valuable
traits which come to mind.
When you're together for a lot of
time (30-45 hours a week), it's easy
to get on each other's nerves. Enter
William, Mike, Tom and Steve.
These guys can simultaneously
enrage, offend, entertain and in-
spire hilarity. The nights in the of-
fice seem to pass quickly with
clowns such as these around. What
would we do without you. Y'all
really should should record a com-
edy album.
There's a peculiar bunch of
rowdies in the office across the hall
who seem to take pleasure in mak-
ng fun of our work hours. The Buc-
caneer staff has par tied with us,
hired us as free-lance writers, stolen
(?) typewriters and generally been a
pain. Seriously, Amy has been a
catalyst of controversy, princess of
parody and, most important, a
friend I'll never forget.
Sometimes working for the
newspaper can put a person in the
awkward position of choosing bet-
ween letting a friend be hurt by a
story or going against standards of
practice and blocking the article. In
that case it is best to divorce
yourself from the situation and let
history proceed. If the story is
printed and the individual is hurt
(emotionally or professionally) to
the point of holding you personnal-
ly responsible, then it wasn't much
of a friendship in the first place.
That's one of the sad facts of life.
In the years I've been associated
with The East Carolinian great
strides have been made to make
your student newspaper the best.
That's right; your newspaper. The
East Carolinian is whatever you
want it to be.
Those who would argue that this
paper is not concerned with truth do
not understand its operation. From
time to time alternative publications
have been published on campus
with the guise of protecting the
welfare of the students. Examine
these periodicals for what they
represent: a handful of self-
righteous cry-babies unwilling to
follow prescribed channels of com-
munication.
We have stated on numerous oc-
casions that all letters are published
(eventually) in "Campus Forum I
assume this policy will not change.
There are, naturally, several areas
of campus life which I feel deserve
criticism, while others have earned a
more positive type of distinction.
Prior to the creation of the Media
Board nearly five years ago, the
SGA controlled the funds of the
various campus media. The logic
both then and now is that "it's
easier to deal with eight idiots than
fifty The membership of the
board has expanded over the years,
but the logic remains the same.
Let's get something clear: I'm not
saying the members of the Media
Board are "idiots They're ig-
norant � ignorant of amount of
time, effort and dedication it takes
to work and go to school at the
same time.
I honestly think they mean well;
they just don't know what it is
they're governing.
They dump the responsibility of
producing a .yearbook in three mon-
ths on one person (Amy Pickett),
later complain because she changed
the cover at added expense and later
still make no acknowledgement of
its publication. After all the con-
troversy, the 1981 Buccaneer was
recognized by the Associated Col-
legiate Press as an All American �
one of the top 18 yearbooks in the
country. Congratulations, Amy (et
al.).
It's easy to sit back and criticize
without offering solutions; I hope I
am not guilty of this fault. Ashley
Futrell, chairman of the board of
trustees, has stated that the new
chancellor should be someone who
bleeds purple and sweats gold.
Perfect � a committment to the
university's diminishing identity
must start at the top. Pride has long
been the strong point of East
Carolina.
Fielding Miller will be the name
next to "Editor In Chief" at the top
of this page for the next year. I can
only repeat one thought � Fielding,
you don't know what you're getting
into. But in the end, the friendships,
knowledge and experience gained
will make you glad you put forth the
effort.
JAMES E. DuPREE
Editor In Chief
7HB �& CrVtOUMIAfi
�� - � in i iqy�� rr H' � -���-����?� Irvine
MOST OP ECUS TEAMS AkENT TOO
HOT BUT OUR SUNBATHEk-VATCHING
7"�AM IS bOING PINE!
Athletics Face Questionable Future
By CHARLES CHANDLER
For four years I have worked close to the
East Carolina athletic department, cover-
ing both the good and bad for this
newspaper.
Like any journalist, 1 have strived for
objectivity. But there has always been that
gut feeling that I needed to get something
out of my system. The athletic department
has problems � many of them. I decided
to address some of them before I accepted
my diploma.
First of all, East Carolina's athletic pro-
gram has enormous potential. The
geographic and academic settings are much
better than many big-name programs. The
department, however, has developed into a
self-defeating organization.
"Problems? you ask. "There aren't
problems Oh, but there are. Why do you
think the athletic department is in debt for
more than half a million dollars? Why do
you think athletes come and go from many
of the teams (especially men's basketball)
at an alarming rate? It's not because things
are all hunky-dorey.
Quite the contrary, there are major
roadblocks along ECU's highway to
athletic success. Until those roadblocks are
recognized and torn down, the department
will continue to stagnate.
Perhaps the major problem is the non-
correlation between the goals of ECU's
athletic department and the assets on hand
to help meet those goals. Pirate supporters
have high ambitions, which reach a "10"
on a 1-10 scale. No problem there until you
realize that the budget on hand rates no
better than a "5
There is no way that the ECU football
and basketball teams (the two biggest
revenue producers) can compete with the
nation's best on the current budget. If
ECU supporters want to rank with the
best, they must donate with the best. Like
it or not, the bottom line in college
athletics in the 1980's is going to be bucks
� BIG bucks.
Any department needs leadership, and
athletics is no different. It is my opinion
that the ECU athletic machine is running
at half-speed and Athletic Director Ken
Karr is directly responsible.
Karr, no doubt, is a very knowledceable
man who has tasted success in the past. But
the past is just that � the past. The athletic
director often refers to "the way we did
things at San Diego referring to San
Diego State, where he served as AD before
coming to ECU.
One of the most important qualities of
an athletic director is flexibility. That Karr
appears to be lacking. He simply must deal
with East Carolina as East Carolina, not as
another San Diego State.
I also question his enthusiasm for the
athletic program. Beyond the fact that he
is a low-key individual, Karr simply does
not appear to have the gung-ho spirit that
is needed to lead the ECU program into a
position of distinction
The fact that Karr has applied at
numerous other institutions for jobs dur-
ing his stay at ECU also sticks in my craw.
This does not make me � and many-within
the department � feel confident about his
leading the Pirates.
The athletic department certainly is not
the best employer in the world. There is no
such thing as a job description. I shake my
head every time I see an assistant athletic
director � a person in a real prestige posi-
tion � working with concessions at home
basketball games. Can you imagine an
assistant AD at UNC selling popcorn and
sodas?
The athletic staff is overworked,
understaffed, and underpaid. Every high-
ranking member of the department that I
am familiar with is called on to do far
more than is included in his or her job
description. The end result, low morale,
only serves to hinder the growth of the
overall program.
I haven't meant to sound like a know-it-
all martyr � that I most certainly am noi.
I am just tired of watching the ECU
athletic program self-destruct. 1 set
much potential there and don't want w see
it go to waste.
If something isn't done soon to :reate
more revenue and enthusiasm, the Pirates
may find themselves listed among the
NCAA's Division II institutions. That is
plain and simple reality. Much needs to be
done here, such as upgrading of facilities,
increase in staff size, etc. Nothing will
change, though, until the leaders of this
university stop ignoring the problems that
are there.
This university's athletic department
could be so much to so many. I can really
foresee a thriving program if the right
steps are taken. But it all comes down to
one simple thought � you get out or
something what you put into it.
- Campus Forum
Wo Respect" In Poor Taste
We can appreciate the fact that you
people probably get no attention in your
daily life, but to gain respect, you first
have to earn it! A piece of trash like your
"newspaper" is no way to gain respect.
It doesn't take much of a person to sit
around and pick out bad things about
ECU. Some of us are perfectly happy
with our school and wish you would stop
griping about its flaws. There are plenty
of other schools in the state you could be
attending. We thought No Respect was
done in poor taste to anyone with
enough intelligence to attend college.
We woi'ld like to express our sym-
pathies to the -�ire staff of No Respect,
because of your ignorance nd your ap-
parent need to stoop so low as to believe
you will gain respect by composing this
piece of filth. Better luck in your future
endeavors � try "investing in paper
clips" � you might be more successful
in that career. We hope you greatly
mature over the summer!
PAMELA BLACKBURN
Freshman, Pre-Law
ANNE HENRY
Freshman, English
WZMB
1 am writing in regards to your radio
station � WZMB. The importance of
yoqr support and comments for and
about WZMB cannot be overstated. I
am a jock at ZMB and have been with
the station since we became fully opera-
tional. 1 have seen how a group of most-
ly total strangers � strange, if not most-
ly total � has emerged through hard
work and sheer determination into a
smoothly working single unit despite
broad and varied musical tastes. By no
means do I suggest that WZMB has no
problems. "Rome was not This
radio station, which took over four
years to become a functioning reality,
has only been fully operational for two
months.
This summer, as always, WZMB
needs input from the student populus.
We have recently undergone a change of
administration and are to be introducing
innovative music and programming this
summer. Our firm conviction is to have
a fully-developed-professional-
sounding-but-still-no-commercials radio
station revved and waiting for the fall
semester. To the incoming freshmen, we
intend to sound as though we have been
on the air for many years � since we
were freshmen.
Remember, with the exception of the
executive staff, no staff members are
financially compensated for their ef-
forts. They are volunteering their time
and energies to give you an alternative in
FM radio. Give us your support. WZMB
is the jammin'est if not the most jam-
min' in progressive radio and it's all for
you.
RANDY S.ALLEN
Junior, Accounting Major
'Lust Not Love'
Throughout his book Paul refers to
"lust" not "love" in his condemnation.
There is a world of difference between
the two words; "lust" is condemned
throughout the Bible whether it be
heterosexual or homosexual. In Gen. 19-
1-38 Sodom and Gomorrah's sin wasn't
for homosexuality, but for inhospitality
towards strangers and lust. Jesus speaks
of love in John 13: 34-35: "A new com-
mandment I give unto you, That ye love
one another; as I have loved you, that ye
also love one another. By this shall all
men know that ye are my disciples, if ye
have love one to another And Paul
states in Romans 14:13-14: "Let us not
therefore judge one another any more:
but judge this rather, that no man put a
stumbling block or an occasion to fall in
his brother's way. I know, and am per-
suaded by the Lord Jesus, that there is
nothing unclean of itself: but to him that
esteemeth any thing to be unclean, to
him it is unclean Rev. Bragg, Jesus'
Great Commandment was to love thy
God and love thy Neighbor (Matt 22:
37-40). By spending so much time
criticizing and condemning, where do
you find time to love? Homosexuality is
not listed as a disease or illness accor-
ding to APA and AM A; however
HOMOPHOBIA (the fear of homosex-
uals) is still listed as a disease and mental
illness.
It appears that for the sake of their
own perverted causes, many Christians
have chosen to neglect or forget God's
Greatest Commandment which was and
still is LOVE � whether it be homosex-
ual or heterosexual. We are all God's
children, and to quote the Rev. Troy
Perry, "The Lord is mv Shepherd, and
He knows I'm gay
P. TODD ELLIS
Senior, Dance
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity

A
t
I
.





THE FAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 27, 1982
Black Leaders Discuss Critical Issues
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By PATRICK O'NEILL
Lack of leadership, lack of
economic stability, the extension of
the Voting Rights Act,
"Reaganomics" and a rededication
to Christian values are some of the
key issues facing minorities today,
according to three black campus
leaders.
Virginia Carlton, Russell Parker
and Ron Maxwell, who served as
presdients of ECU's NAACP,
SOULS and Student Union, respec-
tively, were recently asked to sum-
marize what they think are the
critical issues facing minorities.
Reflecting on her five years at
ECU, Carlton noted that she has
seen the school become a
"well-rounded, respected universi-
ty
She said she believes the quality
of students is a major reason for this
progression, and she stressed what
she feels is a necessity for all
students to involve themselves in
various campus organizations.
"Until all people get involved,
our knowledge of the system will be
distorted Carlton said. "A
minority remains a minority until
attempts are made to balance the
scales of equality
Maxwell and Carlton both noted
apathy as a major problem facing
not only minorities but all
Americans. Maxwell also criticized
leaders for what he called a lack of
leadership.
"True leaders are those who wish
to be true servants Maxwell said.
"This requires great sacrifice and
most of all our black leaders today
are not willing to make the per-
sonal sacrifice
Parker noted that prejudice, op-
pression and discrimination are ma-
jor problems that must continue to
be fought "because today there
seems to be a new push of these
negative attitudes in this country
He also criticized the federal
budget cuts as being harmful to the
poor, but he added, "Reaganomics
was one of the major things that
woke everybody up to the injustices
in the attitudes of some of the
lawmakers that continue to
disregard the needs of the poor peo-
ple -
"Blacks have always been the last
hired, first fired Maxwell said.
"We've always faced economic in-
stability He added that "things
look even worse" because of the
' shape of the economy and
'Reaganomics
"With an enrollment of almost
13,000 students Carlton said, "it
seems sad when one views the
number of students who do not par-
ticipate in campus activities
She added that "overtones of in-
feriority or something less" which
are often the stigmata associated
with minorities, could be counter-
productive to advancement and
growth. She cited the "controversy
of WZMB" as one of the key
minority problems on campus.
"The history of social achieve-
ment for blacks and the history of
the black church are one in the
same Maxwell said. "The black
church has been the most effective
tool the black man has used for ad-
vancement in this country
Maxwell feels that "Christian
values" need to be reinforced in to-
day's society.
'�Blacks should rededicate
themselves spiritually Parker add-
ed.
Parker also mentioned that no
other race in the U.S. has to worry
about the right to vote except
blacks. "Aren't blacks American
citizens?" He also stressed that
Americans should take political ac-
tion to extend the Voting Rights Act
of 1965, which is currently drawing
opposition from some legislators.
All three student leaders called
for greater participation of the
students in extracurncular activities.
Parker said blacks should pay at-
tention and keep aware of the
political happenings on campus
whether that be in the SGA, the
state or the federal government. He
added, "Blacks should push for
more registration of potential black
voters and make political action a
weapon against those who would
use politics as a means of oppres-
sion
"This is my message Carlton
said, "get involved in something. It
doesn't have to be NAACP; it
doesn't have to be SOULS. Just get
involved.
"Make your contribution and
remember we are here because of so-
meone else's blood, sweat and tears.
You have an obligation
Rebel Ready
Continued From Page 1
ed the quality of the magazine, ac-
cording to prose editor Cheryl
Fisher. More students submitted
work to the magazine because of
prize money donated by the Attic
nightclub and Jeffreys Beer and
Wine Company, Fisher said. Prizes
were awarded in the Rebel prose,
poetry and art contests.
Correction
Due to misinfor-
mation given an East
Carolinian reporter,
this newspaper in-
correctly stated that
Carl G. McCoy was
convicted for
larceny. McCoy was
convicted for posses-
sion of stolen goods.
The East Caroli-
nian regrets the er-
ror.
HAVING PROBLEMS
DRUGS?
with
ALCOHOL? FAMILY?
SCHOOL?

&j&2&r
WE SEW
LEATHER COATS

iw - -
Quality Repair
SAAD'S
SHOE REPAIR
113 Grande Ave
758-1228
We Can Help
Students helping Students
CAMPUS ALCOHOL & DRUG PROGRAM
SOI-SOS Erwin Bldg.
757-6793
MEDIA BOARD
is now accepting
applications for
Day Student
Representatives
Applications can be
picked up at
Media Board office.
8-1 and 2-5
Deadline for
applications � 4-29-82
I
PTC
j





5 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 27,1982
Year Marked By Resignations, Controversy, Accomplishment
August 1981
Aug. 24 � Ashley Futrell was elected
chairman of the ECU Board of Tiustees, sue
ceeding Troy Pate. Among the new trustees
was Katie Morgan, wife of former U.S.
Senator and ECU alumnus Robert Morgan.
The East Carolina basketball program got a
big boost when it was admitted to the ECAC-
South Conference A $3.8 million addition to
Mendenhall Student Center was proposed
that would add $37 per semester to individual
student fees. Students had to find their books
upstairs at the Student Supply Store because
of renovations to Wright Auditorium. With
benches forming ��ECU a $20,000 bus
shelter was constructed near Mendenhall.
Aug. 27 � Thomas W. Willis, director of
the Regional Development Institute, resign-
ed, saying Vice Chancellor for Institutional
Development Donald Lemish's "persistent
harrassment" had "adversely affected" his
health.
September
Sept. I � Chancellor Thomas Brewer
denied that he was seeking the presidency of
West Virginia University Board chairman
Futrell was quoted as saying Brewer's com
mitment to the university was
"questionable
Sept. 3 � A group of protestors from ECU
were at Sen. Jesse Helm's visit to a Greenville
tobacco warehouse Instead of waiting in line
at football games, students had to pick up
their tickets beforehand at the Central Ticket
Office or Mmges Coliseum
Sept 10 � Chancellor Thomas Brewer
resigned "in the best interests of ECU" and
claimed his action was not requested by UNC
president William Friday or the Board of
Trustees Ashley Futrell said Brewer 'made
too many changes too fast The first
"two-hour parking" signs appeared in the
residential neighborhoods near Joyner
Library. Buccaneer editor Amy Picket! asked
the Media Board for a budget transfer of
$5,900 to print "a cover that won't be thrown
in the fountain " The cover printed for the
previous editor pictured a mannequin prop-
ped against an antique car.
Sept. 12 � It was billed as the last game in
a great rivalry That it was not, though
North Carolina gave the ECU football team a
whipping it would not soon forget, thrashing
the Pirates 56-0. UNC halfback Kelvin
Bryant was the big star, scoring an ACC
record six touchdowns.
Sept. 14 � East Carolina's Traffic and
Security Department announced it was mov-
ing into the Howard House on Tenth Street
Some English faculty were moved into the old
security building to make room for the com-
puter science department in Austin.
Sept. 15 � Even with renovations and
redecorating, the Student Health Center
operated with a $309,207 surplus
Sept. 23 � After a three-year hiatus, the
Ebony Herald appeared with associate editor
Edward Nesbitt in control. Editor Lamont
Byrd had taken a cooperative education
assignment in Washington, DC.
Sept. 30 � The Media Board chose Debra
Wiggins as editor of the Ebony Herald
October
Oct. 5 � $55,000 worth of equipment ar-
rived at the WZMB-FM studios.
Oct. 6 � Curtains and wallpaper for the
Mendenhall lounge and Student Union and
Student Government Association offices cost
$7,500. For the !5-member Chancellor Selec-
tion Committee, the Board of Trustees chose
six board members, five faculty members,
three alumni and one student � SGA Presi-
dent Lester Nail.
Oct. 12 � At its first meeting of the year,
the SGA legislature passed a resolution urg
ing more student representation on the
Chancellor Selection Committee. The SGA
met with eight positions still left to fill.
Oct. 13 � Donald Lemish, vice chancellor
for institutional advancement and planning,
resigned to take a job at Longwood College
in Farmville. Va.
Oct. 20 � The Media Board ordered East
Carolinian editor Paul Collins to reinstate
Chuck Foster as Director of Advertising.
Collins fired Foster for printing an ad sup-
porting Greenville merchants without permis
sion after an editorial had appeared criticiz-
ing the local businesses. Board chairman
Carter Fox claimed there was "insufficient
evidence of insubordination
Oct 27 � A traveling art show of the
works of nationally- and internationally
known artists caused an uproar at
Mendenhall. Among the photos was a print
oi a man and woman whose genitals had been
joined by fishing wire.
November
Nov. 5 � Paul Breitman, associate direc
tor of Mendenhall, resigned to take a position
at Rutgers University.
Nov. 9 � Watson Electric, contracted for
the new ECU medical school and drama
department renovations, was indicted for its
role in bid-rigging.
Nov. 10 � The East Carolinian was charg-
ed with racism by some students after it
printed a photo of Homecoming Queen Kim
Cloud. Cloud, who is black, felt the photo
was unflattering and demanded a retraction.
The newspaper countered that Cloud looked
"surprised and happy" in the photo and that
she had received more coverage than other
homecoming queens in the recent past.
Nov. 13 � Two wheelchairs belonging to
two handicapped students were stolen and
dumped into the creek behind Darryl's
Restaurant on Tenth Street A section of
Fourth Street near campus was reoned to
keep students from parking there for more
than two hours on weekdays. In a letter to
The East Carolinian, student Ronald Fisk
called the East Carolina Gay Community "a
sickness" and complained that ECU had a
black homecoming queen. Negative response
to the letter was tremendous.
Nov. 16 � Board chairman Futrell an
nounced that an interim chancellor would be
named by Jan. 1. Rumor had it that the tern
porary replacement would be political science
professor John How-ell. UNC president Fri-
day claimed no such decision had been made
and that arrangements for Brewer's leave ot
absence were incomplete.
Nov. 17 � "Renaissance man"
Buckminster Fuller lectured on campus, but
he was left alone at Mendenhall Student
Center the next day at an autograph session.
Nov. 20 � The Charlie Daniels Band per-
formed to a sell-out crowd at Minges Col-
onial.
Nov. 30 � The SGA legislature voted to
reinstate the $25 student loan fund that was
suspended in the summer.
December
Dec. 3 � WZMB general manager Sam
Barwick announced that the station would
broadcast in the first week of classes in
January Walter M. Bort, director ol admis-
sions, gave up his post for a job at the
University of Hartford (Conn.).
Dec. 8 � The lead story ot The East
Carolinian was removed and replaced atter
the editorial staff had left the newspaper of
fice. The papc went to the printers with an
interview with and photo of Chuck Foster as
its lead. In the story, Foster announced his
resignation and called editoi Paul Collins
"hot-tempered" and "unbusinesslike "
Foster did not return lo school the nexi
semester and Collins did no! press charges
January 1982
Jan. 8 � John Hovel! was named interim
chancellor of the un versity and Thomas
Brewer's paid leave was scheduled to end
June 30.
Jan. 14 � Sam Barwick claimed H SIR
lacked a studio-to-transmitter license nee
cessary in getting on the air.
Jan. 17 � The candidates for chancellor
numbered 148, it was revealed at a Board ol
Trustees meeting.
Jan. 19 � The SGA legislature approved
the reinstatement of the emergency medical
loan fund. President Lester Nail vetoed the
bill because he felt the loan was used often
for abortions
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25C Nacho Chips with pitcher.
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Jan. 21 � After a letter to the editor ap-
peared in The East Carolinian claiming the
campus radio station had a studio-lo-
uansmiiter license, Sam Barwick said WZMB
did have the license but that it had been
apparently mispalced The Media Board
voted unanimously to convert the unused
Buccaneer book jackets into notebook
binders.
February
Feb. 1 - By a large margin, the SGA
legislature overrode Lester Nail's veto on the
emergency medical loan bill.
Feb. 2 � Alter a tour-year struggle,
WZMB I M went on the an
1 eb. 4 � Russell Parker, president of the
Society of United 1 iberal Students (SOULS),
questioned why WZMB had not given
"special consideration" to the minority
listener.
Eeb. 11 � East Carolinian editor Paul Col-
lins resigned and withdrew from school
following two surgical operations.
Eeb. 24 � Ebony Herald editor Debra
Wiggins resigned her position, saying no one
wanted the minority publication.
Eeb. 25 � Scores of students learned the
hard way that Jams Street had been rezoned
Jan. 29 for two-hour parking, their cars were
towed.
Eeb. 28 � The Chancellor Selection Com-
mittee narrowed it field of candidates to
�' less than 10" people .
March
March I motion tailed before the
S(, .ailing tor the "censuring and ad-
monishment" ol SGA vice president Marvin
Braxton At the Eeb 22 meeting, Braxton
reportedly had to be "pulled off" Tim Mertz.
who was watching the legislature. Mertz
reportedly had written a note containing an
ethnic and sexual slur that offended Braxton
and a female East Carolinian reporter. Thirty
students and Greenville residents participated
in a 90-minute "Silent Vigil for the People of
El Salvador" in front of the Student Supply-
Si ore-
March 2 � The Pirate basketball team lost
in the first round at the EC AC -South tourna-
ment in Norfolk, Va
March 3 � No Respect, a one-page
satirical leaflet containing suggestive
language, caused an uproar among
Mendenhall employees after copies were plac-
ed on a newspaper box there
March 15 � Alter protests from students
that Minges Coliseum could not hold the ex-
pected attendance at commencement
ceremonies, graduation was moved back to
Ficklen Stadium. Roger C reech Jr pleaded
guilty to tour tountN ol braking and entering
during the Thanksgiving holidays When ar-
rested on. Nov. 27, Creech had more than
S9.000 worth of stolen goods He was given a
three-year sentence.
March 16 � Nine separate assaults on
women near campus were discovered to have
occurred before Spring Break In each case
the women reported being "flashed" by a
man.
March 22 � The Chancellor Selection
Committee narrowed its search to four can-
didates � Dr James Robinson of the Univer-
sity of West Florida, Dr. Charles Q. Brown
of the ECU technology department, Dr John
Howell, and Elon College president J. Fred
Young.
March 23 � Dean Rusk, secretary of state
at the beginning of the Vietnam conflict, in-
itiated a week of lectures and seminars on
campus. Installation of campus "blue-light"
emergency telephones was suspended after a
dispute over costs.
March 24 � David Cook won 20 more
votes than Eric Henderson in the SGA
presidential race; Henderson requested a run-
off. Bob Mills, Becky Talley and Sarah
Coburn wer� winners in respective vice presi-
dent, treasurer and secretary races Coburn's
opponent, Robert Mcsser, ran on a platform
of "14 Points" that called for disbanding the
East Carolina Gay Community, hiring
Gerald Ford for chancellor and expelling
from the nation "all Iranian students loyal to
the Ayatollah within twenty-four hours of
my assuming office Messer received 726
votes.
March 23 � Dean Rusk, secretary of state
at the beginning of the Vietnam conflict, in-
itiated a week of lectures and seminars on
campus. Installation of campus "blue-light"
emergency telephones was suspended after a
dispute over costs.
March 24 � David Cook won 20 more
votes than Eric Henderson in the SGA
presidential race. Henderson requested a run-
off. Bob Mills, Becky Talley and Sarah
Coburn were winners in respective vice presi-
dent, treasurer and secretary races. Coburn's
opponent, Robert Messer, ran on a platform
of "14 Points" that called for disbanding the
East Carolina Gay Community, hiring
Gerald Ford for chancellor and expelling
from the nation "all Iranian students loyal to
the Ayatollah within twenty-four hours of
my assuming office Messer received "26
votes.
March 25 � The Media Board named pro-
duction manager Warren Baker to replace
Sam Barwick as WZMB station manager
The board also chose East Carolinian
business manager Fielding Miller over former
editor Paul Collins, who had planned to
return in the summer Donna Wiley, former
business manager of the Ebony Herald, was
named the publication's new editor
March 26 � Joseph El lewis was named
as the Student Union's second black presi
dent.
March 30 � The SGA appropriated $100
to the East Carolina Gas(immunity V
Rev. J. M. Bragg wrote a letter ol protest to
the campus newspaper, negative response was
almost as strong as it was against Ronald
Fisk.
April
April 3 � The John D Messick Theater
Arts Center was dedicated
April 6 � SGA vice president M-
Braxton was arrested and charj d -
lorgery
April 7 � Eric Henderson defeated D
C ook in the SGA run-oft Eorma
were filed against Henderson for "illegal
campaign practices" � or allegedly
distributing election pamphlets at an apar:
mem complex
April 14 � John Gardne assistanr t
Chancellor Elmer Meyer, resigned lev �
his full time energy to "global piee "
April 15 � Rick Atkinson, a S9"4
Carolina graduate, won a Puliter Hr;r �
journalism.
April 20 � Timothy Leary and G Gord
l.iddy staged a debate before � and wi
an ECU audience. U.S. senators Jesse Helm:
and John East, state congressman V.
Jones and Gov James Hunt all refuu
vitations to speak at F:( I dui
Zero Week "
April 24 � ECU celebrated its El
niversary with an �"open-house" ceiebra
across campus The Chancellor Selc
Committee reportedly submitted
choices for the post to U N presidei I
The new chancellor was expected to
May 14.
April 25 � Joan Jef and the Bia �
appeared before a crowd of apprc�or'
4,000 people and earned almo" SJ 0
the Student Union Major Attract
m i: t ee
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quired to be readily available for
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you your choice of a comparable
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same savings or a rameneck which
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Kroger Sav on
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preM
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I HI AS I (.A KOI INI AN
Entertainment
APRIl 27. 1982 Page 7
Gang Violence
Twin Feature
Packs Wallop
SingerSongwriter Perry Leopold Coming To Campus Friday
Folk artist Perry Leopold will perform this Friday evening, April 30,
from 9 until 11 on the patio of Mendenhall Student Center. Free
refreshments will be served and there will be no admission charge for
the show. The appearance marks the return of the popular
singersongwriter who last performed on campus two years ago to a
standing-room-only audience in the (offeehouse.
By JOHN WEYLER
Suff Wriier
. . It seems to me that there is
an enormous amount of latent
violence in our society. Perhaps it's
my background, but I believe that
we're all subjected to a constant
physical threat says director
Walter Hill. Both his film The War-
riors and Stanley Kubrick's -1
Clockwork Orange are frightening
visions of the ever-present specter ot
violence. Viewer be warned: these
motion pictures are as brutal and
shocking as tomorrow's headlines.
The films comprise a double
feature set for tomorrow night at
Mendenhall's Hendrix Theatre. The
Warriors will be shown at 7 p.m.
and A Clockwork Orange follows a!
9 p.m. Admission for what has been
dubbed a "Future Shock Double
Feature" is by ID & Activity Card
or MSC Membership. The films are
sponsored by the Student Union
Films Committee.
The Warriors, a saga about street
gangs, has been accused of inciting
actual bloodshed. Isolated out-
breaks of violence � including
murder � have reportedly occured
at showings of the film. These in-
cidents have been exaggerated, and
were probably mr: coincidences to
begin with � but Hill's mini-epic is
a compelling one.
I he storyline concerns members
of a New York City gang who at-
tend a mass gang meeting in the
Bronx, are accussed of the murder
of a group chieftan, and must fight
their way back across town to their
home turf in Coney Island. The
style the story is told in is that of a
flashy, fantastic table. The violence
is treated romantically,
unrealistically. occurring in careful-
ly choreographed patterns: a
beastial, but bloodless, ballet4
" The Warriors is a comic-book,
rock 'n' roll version of the
Xenophon story says Hill, referr-
ing to the ancient Greek tale which
inspired his film. Hill's works
revolve around people put into
dangerous situations, and how the
characters courage and moral
character stand up to the adversity.
The W arriors is one of his earlier ef-
forts. Hill has since gone on to big-
ger and better things, including the
well-received The Long Riders and
Southern Comfort.
4 Clockwork Orange is a much
more intense and involved film.
Based on Anthony Burgess' novel,
Stanley Kubrick's picture is at once
horrifying, humorous, outrageous,
and grimly realistic. It is definitely
the most bizarre creation of
Kubrick, a master of the motion pic-
See VIOLENT, Page 9
Kate Talks About Family, Friends, Associates
By ROSEMARY W1TTMAN LAMB
NEW YORK � "Well. Henry and I were just playing
ourselves, l! would be too bloody bad if we couldn't
Mav the pan. We would have failed in UJeV
Four-time Oscai winner Katharine Hepburn is talking
about he Oscar-winning co-star, Henry Fonda, in the
film On (olden fond (which is still playing at the Plitt
Entertainment Center in Greenville).
"1 think he likes me and I like him she says. "He's
an interesting character. He's a very withdrawn person.
Like a little tram. He just goes straight ahead, no
curves, no turns. He's on his own track and he just
moves straight through life. No conversations. No ex-
cuses. Stops. Does his chores. Gets back into the engine.
�vels in coal, blows the whistle. Off he goes.
"He's got a lot o character, though. A lot of guts.
He did thai scene in the water in mid-September in a
;uhbe suit with a gale blowing. With his heart . . . you
know?"
c are sitting in her living room on the first floor of
hei brownstone house in Turtle Bay (Manhattan). She
has lived in this city communitv o writers, publishers,
and composers for 50 years. Her English companion
and secretary, Phyllis Wilbourn. hovers discreetly. A
how! ot thin soup and melba toast has been brought in
by a maid in a black uniform with a white frilly apron.
iiss Hepburn's lunch.
In contrast Katharine Hepburn has just come in from
working in her garden, and she's comfortably dressed in
tan trousers, a white cotton polo shirt and red V-neck
lerkin. She is sitting in a stiff curved chair made of
mahoganv and upholstered in red. The sun is streaming
through the trees, lighting up old oak furniture, African
art, a fireplace with a gleaming brass fender and an or-
nate clock ticking awav on the mantlepiece.
She continues to talk about making On Golden Pond,
and her co-stars Henry and Jane Fonda, discussing the
scene in which she "rescues" Henry, who is in the
water.
"I swam without a rubber suit she says, "because I
had to do that dive in, and that dive was a scream,
because I hadn't dived off a moving boat in, you know,
30 years. And, well, you never think about yourself, you
just think about yourself as a sort of thing that works,
then you get used to things that don't work. But I
thought, well, I can do this. Well, you can do one of
anything, of course . . .
So when poor Jane was trying to do that bloody
back somersault flip, I said, 'That's all right Jane, if
you can't do it, I'll do it for you
"But she's like her Dad. She really worked like the
dickens to do that. A gale was blowing the day she took
that dive. 1 would have told them where to hit it, but she
was very sweet. She did it over and over and over again.
"We all got on fine. Why wouldn't we? It would have
been a disaster if we'd gotten on badly wouldn't it?
Jane's so good
This is Katharine Hepburn. Tough and vulnerable.
Intimidating yet surprisingly nervous. Eyes filled with
tears and then humor, mocking what she loves. Com-
plex, paradoxical, quixotic and, in the end, very lovable
Kate.
A tribute to two differing sides to her personality lies
on the coffee table between us. A gold cigarette box is
hand-engraved: "To Kate, the bane and beauty of my
life. Love, Alan A gift from Alan Jay Lerner, creator
of Coco, the musical about Chanel. As the star, Miss
Hepburn argued with him fiercely over many aspects of
the show. Where did she get that incredibly independent
streak?
"My parents were a very interesting pair she says.
"We were very close. I was the second child, the eldest
girl. The first one died. My parents' god was George
Bernard Shaw and that sort of atmosphere prevailed.
Very Fabian. Very intellectual. 1 was sort of nursemaid-
ed up on it
Her mother, Katharine Houghton Hepburn, known
as Kit, was a Bostonian aristocrat, who, because of her
radical beliefs, was ostracized by proper Bostonian
society. "Mother was very, very left of center. Dad was
a socialist, but Mother went far beyond that. She was
very 'eft in a very conservative communitv where it was
difficult to be independent in vour thinking
Slender,angular, beautitul. Kit Houghton used to
take little Kate with her when she spoke on behalf of the
See KATE, Page 8
Poor Dick Pryor
Another Bomb Levels Our Fun
By JOHN WEVLER
SUff W nlrr
Poor Richard Pryor. He has drug problems. He burns
himself up. And he makes terrible movies, the latest of
which is Some hind of Hero, now playing at the Plitt
Theatre in Greenville.
The best word to describe Some hind of Hero is
mediocre. It is not as intensely sloppy and silly as
Pryor's earlier Stir Crazy. On the other hand, it has
none of the drive and dynamism of Blue Collar, one of
the few fine films he has been in. Rather, Pryor's new
film is simply slack, lackluster, lacking any exceptional
qualities of any kind. .
Prvor plays Corporal Eddie Keller, the quintessential
G I Schmoe. Released after years of captivity in a Viet
Cong prison, he returns home to find a wife in love with
another a mother succumbed to a stroke and an Army
bureaue'racy that couldn't care less about him or his
problems Keller finds solace only in the arms of an ex-
pensive prostitute, played by Margot Kidder.
What could have been an informative and entertain-
ing look at the tragedy of the Vietnam Vet instead
emerges as a meaningless movie about nothing at all.
Some hind of Hero tries to tackle the Viet Vet issue but
doesn't go deeply enough into the effects and causes of
coming home from an unwanted war. Mostly
unoriginal, unfunny comedy is combined with the dull
drama, diluting whatever effect the movie might have
had.
The screenplay for Some Kind of Hero is by James
Kirkwod, based on his novel, which is hopefully better
than the screen version. The mistakes of the script might
have been overcome by an inventive, clever director, but
the opposite occured in the hands of Michael Pressman.
As for the acting, Kidder and Pryor are okay but
unmemorable, monacled as they are by the filmmakers.
Kidder's character especially suffers from the script,
which shows her little and explains her even less, leaving
the audience wondering why her costly call girl falls for
Pryor's fall guy.
Richard Pryor is one of the most electrifying enter-
tainers alive today, volatile and very funny. Alone on a
stage he is alive and hilarious, but he is murdered by
most of his movies, with the exception of his two con-
cert films. Some Kind of Hero preserves the Pryor pro-
fanity but smothers the spark. Fans of the comedian
are urged to see Richard Pryor Live on the Sunset Strip,
or find one of his better, earlier films, or listen to one of
his albums, or do anything but see Some Kind of Hero.





THfc EAST CAROL INIAN
APRIL 27, 1982
PhoioB� HI! 1 W4RD
Xtra Xtral Performing
Xtra Xlra! bassist Jac Cain displays his split per-
sonality during a performance at J.l's Musk-
Hall. The foursome are scheduled to play a free
concert on College Hill Wednesday afternoon
beginning at 5:30. The eent is being sponsored
by the ECU Intramural Department.
Kate Tells
Continued From Page 7
vote for women.
"Many, many fascinating people came to sta
with us in Hartford, because of m Mother and
Dad's beliefs she says. "I-mils Pankhurst came
and spoke. I was quite young and I can remember
lavender clothes. Mother did an awful lot of suf-
frage work, and an awful lot of birth control
work, and an awful lot of fighting the prostitu-
tion and poverty of Hartford
Katharine Hepburn's father. Dr. Thomas Nor-
val Hepburn, was a Southerner from Virginia
who became a distinguished surgeon on the staff
of Hartford Hospital. He, too, was a social
reformer.
"He was very, very influential in the social
hygiene fight against venereal disease, because he
was a urologist Miss Hepburn says. "And he
got thrown into that when a woman patient of his
was infected by her new husband who'd gone to a
stag party and then got drunk. And they'd put
him into bed with a whore who had syphilis, and
she (the wife) got it and died. She died Miss
Hepburn says it passionately, angrily. "And it
made such a terrible impression on Dad that he
began to get violently interested in this
The Hepburns were unconventional patricians,
left-wing rebels in a provincial, Connecticut citv.
Their methods of raising children appear to have,
been equally progressive. Katharine ana het foul
brothers and sisters were encouraged to speak
out, to participate in vigorous sports and to
discuss birth control or sex as free!) as they liked.
Katharine excelled at sports.
"I was noticeable she says. "1 was a good
golfer, a good diver, and a good athlete when 1
was a girl. I was so energetic. If there was a race.
1 wanted to be first
It never occurred to her that women were often
regarded as second-class citizens. "I was totally
unaware that we were the second-rate sex. 1 really
was not brought up to feel that women were the
underdog. I knew a lot of women who were first
class. Margaret Sanger was a great friend of my
mother's.
"Then 1 went into a business where women are
the equal of men. And I could have been a direc-
tor any time I wanted
Her family provided Miss Hepburn with warm
ties that she takes care to maintain. "We had a
very interesting, very close family life she says.
J
lhls rJLn versitp
3Kfair utters
is offering a
20 discount
to all ECU Students wvalid I.D.
k.
Phil Jones
specializes
in easy-care,
low maintenance,
precision
haircuts.
Located on corner
of 14th &
Charles Blvd.
Phone 752055V
By appointment only
Central Book
&News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open 7 days a week � 9:30-9:00
Now that it is vacation time, we
have a full line of campground
guides and tour guides for all
regions of the United States.
Also tour guides and phrase
books for the seven continents.
fTai Landing Sejffooc
Restaurant
-
.4r
Popcorn
Shrimp
499
All you can eat
Bob Hearing �
Manager
Phone 758-0327
Cross Green Street Bridge
Take left at 1st light
Loco�ed one block down on left
TUESWED
THURS. SPECIAL
Ctairol Set to Go
Traveling Instant
Electric Hairsetter
$
67
Hawaiian Tropic
Dark Tanning
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$340
48 qt.
Igloo
Cooler
$2997
Mark III
Sizzler Grill
13" Adjustable Grill
2"
Little Playmate
Cooler
$Q97
Sunglasses
Polorized
Sun Sensor
25
Off
Vivitar Instramatic
Camera
Built in flash,
telephoto lens. Reg. $49.88
Sale $2095
Portable Window
Fan
$2597
Cigarettes
$450
Reg, per
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Long
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$1196
J. D. DAWSON CO.
2818 10th St.
752-1600
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Violent
Movies
On Tap
Continued From P. 7
ture medium, responsi-
ble for such classics as
2001: A Space Odyssey
and Dr. Strangelove.
The setting: the near
future. The pro-
tagonist: Alex (Malcom
McDowell), a vicious
young hoodlum, who
together with his
"droogs" (fellow
punks), gels high on
"milk plus" to better
enjoy an evening of
"ultra-violence
which includes random
beatings and gang rape.
Betrayed by his friends,
Alex is captured by the
police and sent to
prison. There he
volunteers for an ex-
perimental brain-
washing technique, a
type of avoidance con-
ditioning that renders
him physically ill at the
thought of commiting
violence or rape.
Anthony Burgess
(quoted in The Great
Science Fiction Pictures
by Parish and Pitts) has
said. "4 Clockwork
Orange was an attempt
to make a very Chris-
tian point about the im-
portance of free will. If
we are going to love
mankind, we will have
to love Alex as a not
unrepresentative
member of it. If anyone
sees the movie as a bi-
ble of violence, he's got
the wrong point.
Perhaps the ultimate
act of evil is
dehumanization, the
killing of the soul
lABCnEFGHIJKLMNi!
PQ.RSTUVW
GHIJKLMNOP
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fj(�3t7l
rQRSTUVW
INOPQRSTlVWXYZtf
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5 MORGAN
U POiNTIPS. Inc
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 27, 1982
-
A


7fl A NtnUl St
Pho,i� 752 5161
I
I
Phone 752-0326
The
Marathon
Restaurant
The Best in
Greek food, Pizzas, and Subs.
Try our delicious Souvlakia
Special only $2.65
FREE DELIVERY
AFTER 5:00 P.M.
located Across From ECU
at SO Evans St.
TASTE TEST.
Match your musical tastes
with the artists above each group of questions.
Circle the correct answers.
THE BLASTERS
Produced by the Blasters
1) Are you fed up with the i
tide of foreign-made American' music
flooding our shores?
(a) yes (b)no
(c)i
i need more information
(d) if other people are
2) Where was rock & roll invented?
(a) England (b) Gibraltar
(c) Liverpool (d) US of A
3) What's the most likely reason for
you to be shakin"?
(a) rent due (b) religious rite
(c) the economy
(d) a strong national defense
(e) car out of alignment
(f) the new Blasters single
(g) most of the above but especially T
(tjatsatfl M �t
poo6 ra � �i�i inoA uww 6c P PJ "� I fct�uv)
JOHN HIATT
ALL OF A SUDDEN
Produced by Tony Visconti
(c)briHlant
(d) all of the above
2) Do you like the sound track to "The
Border"?
(a) yes (b)no (c) need more
information (d) if other people do
3) What kind of songs do we need
more of?
(a love songs
(b) songs about partying
(c) songs about how hard it is being a
rock & roller
(d) songs about dancing your
gonadsoff
(a) aonga about something
interesting
( ueiMuwof mM
�n6ti � w no ind c put i pt UMttuy)
EYE TO EYE
Produced by Gary Katz
(a) since Steely Den
(b) since Steeleye Span
(c) since Stealer a Wheel
B
since K.C. & the Sunshine Band
longer than I can remember
( �3 oi � mi MW-oi-Jt Suumm
�J.noA '� put tt put p t 32 P 1 31 ptJMtui no j)
SECRET POLICEMAN'S
OTHER BALL
Produced by Martin Lewis
Tea sacsxr rvunmursMku
9av
xuinNuu
tM&n
1) What kind of guitarist is sought by
both Ry Cooder and Elvis Costello to
play in their bands?
(a) pretty decent
(b) ruggedly individualistic
1) Would you be interested in a new
band produced by Steely Dan's
producer Gary Katz, ana featuring
almost the entire cast of Kafy Ltod,
including Donald Fagen?
(a) somewhat
(b) more than somewhat
(c) more than more than somewhat
(d) ecstatically interested
(a) not right now
2) Do you like female vocals to convey
both innocence and irony?
(a) if they don't undermine a strong
national defense
(b) I don't want to commit myself on
this issue
(c) Yes (d) especially when they've
got something to say
3) How long has it been since a new
band came along that realty sounded
different, one that didn't try to tit any
radio formats, that managed to have
fun and maintain some semblance of
integrity at the same time?
Featuring:
Sting, Jeff Beck, Eric Clapton and Bob
Geldof, Johnny Fingers, Phil Collns,
Donovan, The Secret Police.
1) Who hopes Amnesty International's
benefit concert album above doesn't
make a piaster of profit?
(a) Chile's generals
(b) the Kremlin (c) the ayatollah
(d) 'Baby' Doc Duvalier
e) alt the above dictators and more
2) When was the last time Jeff Beck
and Eric Clapton recorded together in
the same band?
(a) Woodstock (b) Isle of Wight
(c need more information
(d) when they were in the Yardbirds
3) Would you like to hear intimate,
Pirsona! performances by Sting
Roxanne "Message In A Bottle ")
and Phil Collins ("In The Air Tonight")
without the usual supergroup hubbub
that follows them in The Police and
Genesis?
(a) haven't made up my mind
(b)yes (c)no (d)ASAP
1M9 AlPOMt JOJ W�3lK3
�iai � i-it �j�uix�jj�d doi i uniuQ o uiot
iO � !�! � �l�3ipu' pQC pu� PZ �l �i�M�u v)
Good Tastes
From Warner Bros
Geffen, SlashWarner
and Island records A tapes
On sale through May 12
� RECORDS & TAPES m Wfe
Record Bar
Pitt PlazaCarolina East Mall
UNIVERSITY BOOK EXCHANGE











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SPWWSEFfS




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U.B.E
BOOKBUY-BACKBONftNZA
Send $1.00 for Esprit's sportswear catalog or just write
for stores near you.
Esprn 332 Minnesota Street, San Francisco, Ca. 94107
SELL YOUR BOOKS AT UBE BETWEEN
APRIL 26 AND MAY 5
AMD RECEIVE ONE COUPON FOR A
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SWEKJSENJ'S CE CREAH CONiE
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(take out okjly, please)
�iiii in ii' iii





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
At'Kll 27, 1982
Page 10
Denkler, Robbins Year's Top Athletes
A Very Talented Player
But Books Count Too
By CINDY PLEASANTS
ll�nl SpurW di'or
Mary Denkler, lovingly known to
her coach and teammates as "the
Denk has been named female
athlete o the year by The East
Carolinian.
Denkler, a 6 0. 155-pound junior
from Alexandria, Va led the East
Carolina women's basketball team
and the state m scoring this year.
Undei her leadership as the starting
center, Denklei led her team to a
winning season and a national tour-
nament bid.
Denklei is one of eight Lady
Pirates to score oxer 1000 points in
hei career. The Virginia native
averaged 20.1 points and 8.6 re-
bounds pei game this year. She
made 228 field goals for 426 points,
and pulled down 231 rebounds. Her
career total in rebounding now
stands at 596.
Being an all-around player.
Denklei also exhibited her accurawv
in freethrou shooting. Out o' 114
attempted, Denkler made 86
free!hrows tor an average of 75.4
percent.
Head coach Cathy Andruzi said
Denklei has improved tremendously
;his yeai.
"Hei overall game has improv-
ed she said, "both offensively and
defensively
In the past two years as a lady
Pi:ate. Denkler has accumulated 32
steals and 16 assists. This season
Denkler had 24 assists and 29 steals,
almost doubling hei career total.
Andruzzi described Denkler as a
"clutch player
We can count on hei m tight
situations she said. "She just has
a knack around the basket
Denkler's unorthodoxed style o
shooting has puzzled both coaches
and opponents, hut the technique
has proven to be effective. "She's
definitely one of the most consistent
shooters on the team Andruzzi
said.
Loletha Harrison, a fellow team-
mate of Denkler's, agreed that the
Denk is consistent but attributed
another quality to h e r -
dependability.
"We can count on her to make
the basket she said. Harrison ad-
ded that she enjoyed playing with
Denkler. "She's just a great per-
son she said, "and verv easy to
get along with
Even though Denkler has excelled
athletically, her academic studies
have not been neglected. She
presently has a 3.0 grade point
average.
"She's a great student athlete
Andruzi said, "She's one of the
finest on the team
Andruzi further explained that
being a student athlete can be ex-
tremely difficult, but Denklei realiz-
ed her responsibilities. "I admire
her for the goals she has set for
herself she said. "It's a pleasure
for me to associate vvith a person
that is so goal-oriented
Mary Denkler. The East Caroli-
nian's choice and a well-deserving
on She's an athlete who has not
only demonstrated her abilities on
the court but also in the classroom.
SB A11-American Waits
For Career's 'CalV
Miry Denkler goes up for two.
Tootie Robbins: waiting for his call.
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
Sport Milnr
Tootie Robbins, Easi Carolina's
Ail-American offensive tackle, says
he feels a little nervous right now.
After all. I he last Carolinian's
Male Athlete of the Year has a right
to be. One phone all today � the
day of the NFL dralt - will decide
his football future.
"I'm pretty nervous but verv ex
cited the former Bertie High
School All American admits. "I'm
hoping things will turn out pretty
good. I'll just have to wait and see
After what he terms "a pretty
good season the 6'5'
276-pounder says he still has more
room for improvement. "I know
there were games he says, "where
I should have played better. 1 feel
more mature now. 1 know what it
takes for me to be successful
Professional scouts agree and arc
hoping his talents will p a y
dividends. John Stailings of the East
Carolina Sports Information office
says he has been swamped with
phone alls about Robbins.
Some scouts believe Robbins will
be chosen in the firsi or second
round of the draft. And according
to some sources, Green Bav and
Seattle have expressed much interest
in his services.
Robbins savs it doesn't really
matter w h e i e h e p lays.
"Anywhere he notes. I love
tootball so much. I doesn't matter
where I go as long as I provi
mysell that rootie Robbins can play
tool ball I can only go up
But once he was down, alter hav
mg left school when Pal Dye was at
last Carolina. Knee and shoulder
injuries bothered him at a time his
career was just getting started ' A'
the time I fell I was hurting the
team he says. "1 got out of here
but got a break when Coach (1
Emory came here.
"1 had something to prov the
students he said ot his return
"My attitude has changed 1 had a
lot to prove to myself
s a climax to a superb � .
nearly injury-free � senior season,
he was selected to play in the
prestigious Blue-Gray All-Star
game, where professional scouts
became impressed with his speed
(4.7 in the 40), his quickness and his
upper body strength.
He was the top-graded lineman in
all of the Pirates' games but two,
averaging almost 80 percent for his
performances. And he was reward-
ed with a spot on the first-time W
Southern Independent team. P
cond team All-American and
selected as the recepient
(Pirate) Blocking Trophy
Even though he didn't re
much publicity nationwide,
scouts knew who he iva
hopefully, he says, it will -
with a phone call sometime this
aftei noon.
the
he
Purple Routs Gold
Hey, Wait A Minute
It was only a practice game but the Purple's Steve Hamilton didn't hold anything back on this play in Saturday
night's Purple-Gold clash at Ficklen Stadium. Here he chases Gold quarterback I arry Brobst. The Purple won,
36-7, ending spring football drills.
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
sti. I ,1,1
The Pirates of East Carolina pro-
vided two meanings to that adage,
"feels like football's in the air at
the annual Purple-Gold intrasquad
game at Ficklen Stadium on a cool
Saturay night.
The Purple squad, under the
direction of defensive coordinator
Norm Parker, dismantled the Gold
team, 36-7, before a few thousand
spectators. And the show left many
of them recalling the days o former
coach Sonny Randle and quarter-
back Carl Summerell.
"1 think the crowd saw more
passing tonight on this field than
they did the last 10 years said
ECU head coach Ed Emory, who
watched the game from the
sidelines. The intrasquad game
marked the first public display o
the new I-formation supervised by
Larry Beckish, the Pirates' new of-
fensive coordinator.
The Purple team threw for 322
yards and the Gold only 73. The
Pirates ran the ball 65 times while
throwing it 52 � a striking contrast
to the past wishbone years.
Purple quarterback Greg Stewart
completed H-of-20 for 193 yards
and one touchdown. Teamn
Kenny Gihhs, a sophomore from
Fayetteville, threw 13 times and
connected on 10 attempts tor 129
yards and two touchdowns, promp-
ting Emory to a, 'l think that lit-
tle man came and did a good job
Tight end Robett Pittman, a
transfer from San Francisco City
College, caught two scoring strikes.
Kevin Ingram called the signals
for the Gold team, throwing 34
passes and completing jus! 14. But
he was forced to work under heavy
pressure from defensive end Jody
Schulz and tackle Hal Stephens.
"I was surprised that it wasn't
close said Emory, who is beginn-
ing his third year at FCC after tak-
ing the reins from Auburn head
coach Pat Dye. "The Gold squad
had lost some kev people because of
injuries, and that would have made
the game much closer
The coaches planned to utilize the
pass much more than in the past.
"We wanted to emphasize the pass
ing game he continued. "Stewart
has always been the better passer.
Ingram just didn't have the protec-
tion Stewart did. And Ingram,
because he didn't have the protec-
tion, might have forced the ball
some. Stewart didn't force the ball
any
The game concluded spring drills
for East Carolina, a practice which
Emory labeled "intense
"We've had 19 straight day-
nothing but intense practices he
said. "We've gotten better as a men-
tal football team. We've go; �
that have a lot invested out there �
especially after the last game against
W ilham &. Mary (a loss,
"Our offseason weight programs
have been very, very tough, and any
time you've got that much invested,
you're no going to give up as easily.
We've got thee or tour months
(before preseason drills in August).
Our players will be in much better
health
Emory says that a shake-up in the
coaching staff has helped the foot-
ball program tremdendously in spr-
ing drills.
"Our coaching staff has been
very enthusiastic, very com-
petitive he said. "We've made
lots of changes across the board. It's
been the most competitive spring
we've had coaching-wise
And his current crop of players,
he says, "are probably the best per
sonnel bast Carolina has ever had
G
A I
Emory: Commitment Key To Future Success
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Managing I- dtior
East Carolina head football coach
Ed Emory is the man on the hot
seat. After consecutive 4-7 and 5-6
seasons, he knows he must win this
tall or suffer the consequences.
Yet Emory is bold in addressing
what E U must do to compete on
the Division I-A level, a distinction
the school was given earlier this vear
by the NCAA.
"I think lots of people are just
happy we're in that group Emory
said last Thursday in an interview
with The East Carolinian.
"Nobody's had enough forethought
to ask where we are in that group �
and where we want to be
lor. you see, there is much about
the Pirate football program that
concerns Emory. He feels that many
supporters and administrative
leaders are failing to recognize what
must be done to compete with the
powers that pace the Division I-A
pack.
"We've got to set up some
boundcries he said. "We've got to
decide if we want to compete in the
upper echelon of Division I-A, or if
we will be happy to be in the lower
bracket. Do we want to win in the
Southern Conference? We can win
there doing what we're doing now;
we're running on a Southern Con-
ference budget. But if we want to
compete with the best we've got to
change some things
The key word behind a drive to
boost the Pirate program, Emory
claimed, is commi tment.
� "If you want something you have
to be willing to pay the price. The
total thing can be summed up in one
word � commitment. From the top
to the bottom, commitment will
determine where East Carolina goes
in the future
Being committed in the Emory
vocabulary means doing things
"first class all the way That is
something the third-year mentor
feels has been lacking at East
Carolina.
"You've got to make things for
the kids first class before they can
play first class Emory said. "I'm
an ECU graduate and if I'm here to
lead 'em or if I'm not, I still want
the best for them
At this time Emory is anything
but satisfied that the administra-
tion, Board of Trustees and the
athletic department are making sure
his players are receiving the "best"
possible treatment.
"You can't exploit the athletes
Emory said. "And I think that's
Hist what has happened
The coach pointed out several
areas' in which he felt the players
had gotten the short end of the
bargain:
� Scales Field House, which
houses (he coaches' offices and
players' dressing rooms � "For two
years the players have been patient.
They've been promised that
something would be done before the
fall of 1982 about the condition of
the dressing rooms. For two years
the ceiling has leaked. There is no
air conditioning and the ventilation
is very, very poor; the carpet is wet
and there is a musty smell. Scales is
really a health hazard
� ECU's athletic dormitory (Belk
Hall) � "When we recruit we're
competing against people like North
Carolina, VP1, Virginia, Clemson
and South Carolina. We want the
same people they do, but our dorm
situation is not competitive with
theirs. All of those places, and most
schools in the country, have air con-
ditioned dorms for their athletes. It,
too, is a health matter when you're
practicing during the months of
August, September and October
� Ficklen Stadium � "Our
stadium is probably in the worst
shape it's been in in its history.
There have got to be some major
renovations over there, especially a
major uplifting of the field. It's em-
barassing for a Division 1-A
school
The areas listed above, along with
the lack of a permanent strength
complex and an insufficient training
table, Emory said, have not kept
pace with what he described as a
rapid improvement in the ECU
schedule.
"We haven't made any move-
ment in those areas since I've been
here and have made a 1,000 percent
movement toward scheduling. In
two years this school has gone far-
ther in scheduling than some schools
have gone in 50 years
Emory offered for example the
1982 ECU slate, which features
powers such as Missouri, Florida
State, West Virginia and N.C. State
among seven road games.
"What I can't believe Emory
said, "is that they're contemplating
sending the football team to West
Virginia on buses. Now we're going
up there for 50 percent of the gate
and then we're going to Texas (at
Arlington) the next week, William
and Mary the next, and then to
Temple. And we're going to lose
two days on the road going up there
and two days coming back That
might cost us to lose the next three
games
"You can't play West Virginia
and do those things and then expect
a first class effort. If we're going up
there just for trie money, tell me
we're just going for the money; tell
me you're not expecting me to win
and I'll tell the kids that
Obviously, some extra finances
would come in handy in Pirateland.
"We've definitely got to come up
with more money to market our
athletes and to fill our stadium up
Emory said. "The money can be
raised. 1 think our resources are un-
tapped as far as fund-raising and the
Pirate Club are concerned
Wiin the proper committment,
Emory says the capabilities o the
ECU program are unlimited.
"There is no doubt that Easi
Carolina can be one of the top
teams in the country and probably
the team of the future.
"1 made the statement ten years
ago that Clemson would win the na-
tional championship because they
had the committment from the top
down. If we get that in the 1980s.
East Carolina will have a chance!
And that's our ultimate goal � to
win the national championship
Odom Signs Forward
East Carolina head basketball
coach Dave Odom announced the
signing of his third recruit of the
year Monday.
David Harris, a 6-8 220-pound
forward, joined guards Tony
Robinson and Curt Vanderhorst as
ECU signees.
A native of Brooklyn, N.Y Har-
ris led hi Wingate High School
team to back-to-back 18-4 records
the last two seasons. He averaged 16
points and 12 rebounds this year
and was named to the Public Schooi
Athletic league all-star team.
Harris is an honor student and
plans to major in pre-law at ECU
He chose the Pirates over For-
dhom, New Orleans, St. Peter's and
Texas-San Antonio.
'

t
f





THF FAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 27, 1982
11
s
to
,i plav
P JV
e vas at
auldcr
his
cd " AI
the
the
on,
the
md
r his
ard-

i
Mil
ling anils
Ice which
davs of
he
:� - a men-
gol kids
there �
le against
It igrams
1. and any
nvested,
is easiK,
months
;h better
-up in the
the foot-
in spr-
becn
m-
e made
iau.
S
I are un-
and the
imittment,
s of the
Bed.
that East
f the top
probably
t ten years
Mn the na-
cause they
m the top
the 1980s,
a chance.
goal � to
bnship
-4 records
iveraged 16
this year,
jblic School
It earn.
Jtudent and
at ECU.
over For-
Peter's and
Lady Pirates Finish Second
By CINDY
PLEASANTS
tulMMI sports t dllur
The East Carolina
women's softball team
fell victim to Western
Carolina in the
NCAIAW state cham-
pionship game this
Saturday, after
Western Carolina
rallied for three runs in
the fourth inning to
defeat ECU, 3-1.
Western Carolina
ended the scoreless tie
in the fourth inning.
The Lady Pirates
scored a single run in
the sixth but were
unable to pull any
closer.
The winner of the
tournament gets an
automatic berth to the
regional this weekend,
but the Lady Pirates,
now 35-9, stand a good
possibility to advancing
to the regionals in
Graham.
Preceding the cham-
pionship contest, ECU
lost to Western
Carolina, 4-1, and then
trampled UNC-
Charlotte, 17-0.
The Lady Pirates
took a 1-0 lead in the
third against Western
Carolina, but the Lady
Catamounts went
ahead, scoring twice in
the fourth and added
single runs in the fifth
and sixth innings.
Power-hitters Mitzi
Davis went two-for-
three and Shepard was
two-for-four.
ECU faced UNC-C
next, taking an easy
victory. The Lady
Pirates led 5-0 in the
fourth inning, scoring
two runs in the first and
three in the fourth.
ECU ran away with the
game in the sixth, scor-
ing twelve runs to shut
out their opponent.
APT
552
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fo
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Featuring name brand shoes at bargain prices.
Up To 7j OFF regular prices
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SAMMY'S.
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752-0476
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Sat Sun. I2p.m2p.m.
Located 1 mile past
Hastings Ford on
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104 Red Banks Rd. (Behind Shoney's) 756-6000
ECU Special
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includes skate rental
nAILY SPECIALS
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MENU INCLUDES:
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AT
JippHo cofidg
ACROSS FROM RAFTERS
DOWNTOWN.
$C99
When yoifa wanted for a murder
you didst commit,
Chased for secrets you didn't steel,
And numing from people who want
to kill yon,
The worst mistake yon can make is
falling in love
Carteret Technical
College
Will be offering the following
ECU courses for summer session
June2-August18
Moth 0045
Moth 1063
Art 1001
Philosophy 1100
Registration June 1st
Contact CTC Student Affairs
3505 Arendell St.
Morehead City, N. C. 28557
Phone 726-2811
Courses Are:
Miller High Life
featuring:
3rd Annual Spring
"O,
ag��
Michael .JordoiL And his mistake
Moke It a c6y.etaeach
BEAcfHAftfANACVv.
CONTEST SArilRrfAfNIJE, '
Concert begins at 11:00 a.
Adm.
$10.00 adv.
$12.00 gate
THE EMBERS
BUTLER
e Ice Man)
CHAIRMEN
; I
BAND OF OZ
�ring your blanket or lawn choU
Na Bottlae or Glass Allowed
MAY 8th Mom WCTH
MISSBEAtHiMh
BEAUTY C
nimil rllllll. Reseats i llllll UlSlllff hmm
(ill IIU1I (Ml IIHtl I UK! PU1T i Ullliil Bill -
HUM WnWfc- he at to ������ � � ��
iM Ma IHMU 1IHH Mi k �l� IKUUIII Wll H
PtdKtl IM1II UIMMff M k JIIK- PIIIHI
')
Cash and other valuable
prizes to dinners.
foT
anna-i
!���:������� � i"1 m'i
Opens Every where
Jtme4
The only Beach Muiic Festivol that i hold
directly ON THE BEACH.
MAY 9, 1982
EMERALD ISLE, N.C.
(on the beach)
"Beach Music Time
is Miller Time"
HOLIDAY
ii;M'J1;l
For mmrm Intocmotlow
�� c�m�inf rnww
tlana. c�lt:
354-2250
'





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRII 27, 1982
Leaimig Ac?qotCqcu:g�Th� Hmp ja)ah
by 9a)o a)ow
WHEO Ate YOU C�7WI0G
R vacation ?
WH60 TTfcf fciCX. us ooro

J.A. UNIFORMS
SHOP
All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, stethoscope
shoes, and hose. Also used ECU
nurses uniforms. Trade ins allow
Located 1710 W. 6th St
off Memorial Driv
Near Hollowell's Drug "� old hosp
Classifieds
LOST AND
FOUND
MISSING Black jnt) 'an German
Shepherd puppv 4 mo old lost
around 4th and Student S'r his
name is Sam If seen please
call 7Sg r$J3
PAIR OF tinted reading glasses in
brown case are lost Possibiv
dropped m Belk Dorm Reward il
tound Please call Jett at 78 0646
ATTENTION
Classified ads will be taken ONLY
during the tollowmg hours
Monday - 115 3 00
Tuesday 2 00 3 00
Wednesday I IS 3 00
Thursday : 00 3 00
Friday - I !S 7 00
You must place the ads m person
and pay tor them in advanct
Rates are SI tor the first IS words
and S 05 pei word aftei the first tif
teen
FOR SALE
TRAILER FOR SALE set up HI
Greenville 7 BR all electric, a c
excellent condition S299S call Tar
bora 625 �8�4
VIVITAR ZOOM LENS 75 210 with
macro lor Nikon mount used only
two .mes SU5 Call 757 3210
SKIS FOR SALE K185 comp
810 skis with Soloman bindings
St;s CaM 757 3210 and leave
number
WATERBEDS Don t pay retail
for your waterbed Buv a complete
1st quality waterbed with a 15 vr
far'ory warranty for as low as
SI 79 May styles to choose from
L away and Delivery adv Buy now
and recieve a free set of padded
rails (S39 value) Call David �or
appointment 758 2406
PIONEER STEREO direct drive
turntable 45 watt amplifier,
tuner four HPMIO0 speakers
audio rack si200 call 752 1993 late
niqnts
4 5 CUBIC FOOT refrigerator E�
cellan condition Automatic
defrost Like brand new �70. Call
752 2832
1980 SUZUKI SS0L black
silhouette fairing, many optional
parts, and matching nelmits 45 SO
mpq An excellant compromise
between luxury and speed Set up
for summer at S2300. Call 7Sg 9127
afternoons and keep trying
FOUR POINT FIVE Cubic fool
rrrigerator S'5 Call 757 6824 or
PERSONALS
LISA ANO FRIENDS in Special
Ed Music Classs I lost your
phone number and I need my
autoharp now Please call Kim
(52 4547
CARLA Hey. I finally did it I
hope you enjoy it I love you very
much Thanks tor ai the good
'imes You better make it through
the summer III miss you a
lot Don t worry we II be in each
other s hearts Love always Greg
p S wow it s the 27th
BETA PI S Congratulations, you
finally made it what a casual
crew Hey Billy what's rule
number 8' Big Dine, aren t you
glad to see the balcony got finish
ed? Roger Clemmons. the bad boy
who makes Big Boy's Whos
Winchester the Moles'er Eric
Goereky relly man, 'Sun
plague' Ellis, cathin up on some
lost time at the Brook of the East?
Personal plague Canuk what s
Als attitude? Johnny Aadd have
you been eating whistles long'
John Rogers, you are the one
eyed, rock and toll squid champ
Brett Morris, a month's up. you
can shave now "Satin Patton
lets see those pearly whites Clon
nmger. I heard the H P cars in
Farmville are incredibly clean
Joe C now that you've shown us.
show her The hard part is over
guys cause bulls only grave in the
best o groves FM
Bad Bad Boys YOu made it don t
forget 'he attitude and siqn
language Bets Pis are
there J T
I HOPE I can debate with you
again soon You definitely made
an A The
N !l R l I li.H I I jD I ��! �
I � sbees and t�S SakSS.Cal
p, '?8 l)3- suppls l.l-l
HELP
WANTED
INTERESTED IN Journalism
Public Relations work' Students
are needed to work in the ECU
Sports Information and Promo
lions Office Inquir, at 7S7 6491
Good Writing Skills necessary
REGISTERED NURSE Needed
tor summer 1987 at Camp Leach
Write for information Camp
Leach Manager, 215 E llth
St Washington N C 27889
SERVICES
LARICATJRtS B" WEYLER
Greenville s Original personaliied
art service Have cartoon done of
yourself or a loved one a unique
gilt idea S10 tor 8 x 10 black and
white or color Call 752 5775
TYPING TERM Thesis.
Resumes Dissertations, etc Pro
ftssional quality at lowes' rates
Call Kerppn Dunn anytime
752 6733
NOTARY PUBLIC Call Amy at
'57 3734
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST wants
to t,pe thesis dissertations
publications manuscripts or term
1 � t
Current dc'groduo'c pre
Tiedical siudenn may no co t pete
tor , fiji hundred Air Force
scholarships These scholarships ore
lo be awarded 'o students accepted
into medic oi schools OS freshmen or
ol the beginning of their sophornote
yeof The scholarship provides tor
lui'ior books lab tees and equip
menl plus o SS30 monthly
allowance Investigate this financial
alternative to the high cost ol
medical educotton
Can'oct
I S.A.I HI AI IH
I'KOH SMON
Kl( HI ITIM.
Suite GL 1 1 100 No.oho Dr
Roleigh N C 27689
r-honc College .91 9,755-41 34
papers at home Call 7S6 3660
TYPIST All papers, Professional
quality at low rates 10 years ex
perience. Call 757 1378
PROFESSIONAL TYPING Ser
vice, experience quality ' work.
IBM Selectnc typewriters Call
Lanie Shire 7S8 5301 or Gail Joyner
"Torrent
FURNISHED TWO bedroom apt
for sublease May August, possibly
Fall S740 month, includes heat
758 6995.
PERSON(S) TO Sublease one
bedroom apt llth St May Aug
Furnishedunfurmshed S190 mth
752 2841
TWO BEDROOM Furnished
apartment 5 mm from campus
Sublease May Aug Call 758 6686
ONE BEDROOM Apt tor rent.
Available starting May 1st Calbe.
pool close to campus Contact
Lisa or Gena at 757 1965
SHARE SPACIOUS Apt in Larg
House 1 2 everything Call
756 5650 Leave message for Dee
FURNISHED TWO Bedroom
Apartment Two blocks from cam
pus May August S2S0 month
Call 752 2886
NEEDED FEMALE roommate to
share a quiet apartment l 2 block
from Jenkins Art Building Rent is
S75 per month plus l 2 utilities
also bedroom furniture needed
Prclerably an Art maior but will
accept anyone interested Call
752 2606 and ask for Lisa
NEEDED A CHRISTIAN female
roommate to share two bedroom
apartment tor summer and fall
S90, month plus l 2 utilities One
block from campus Call 752 2606
and ask for Kathy
TWO BEDROOM apartment to
rent ttor summer Furnished, air
conditioning. Call Brenda at
758 3759
THREE BEDROOM Eastbrook
Apt to sublet tor summer Fur
j Amity
TGMAT
iffiLSAT
VMCAT
��!�� iHevlt PROGRAMS
June 16 HIW LSAT Bcg.r to im-
prove your writing skills now tot the
new essay section
June 23 GMAT Regisle. now for
June seminars Receive our Moth
Refresher teit by return mail
Coll now 800 243-4767
nished. I 12 baths For more info
contact Mimi or Carol at 752 6963.
FURNISHED TWO Bedroom
apartment lor sublease May
August possible tall. S-270month
includes heat. 758 699s
FEMALE ROOMMATE Needed
Neat and Responsible, May Aug
Swimming Pool S95 per month
plus 12 Utilities 758 9742
FURNISHED TWO Bedroom
Trailer for lease. S140 monthly
plus utilities, 12 mile from
Hastings Ford, excellent condi
tion More info call 752 3372.
ONE OR TWO Female roommates
needed to sublease for summer
� One block from campus. (E. 4th
St.) Nice furnished large house
Call Tonya 758 2344
SPECIAL SUMMER RATES for 2
bedroom motile homes SI 15 and
up. No pets, no children Call
756 9491 or 758 4541
FEMALE ROOMMATE Wanted
for share 3 bedroom townhouse at
Windy Ridge Pool, tennis courts,
sauna Call 7S6 9491.
5FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
lor nicely furnished apt. at
Cypress Gardens Within Walking
distance of campus. Call 758 3894
GOING TO SUMMER SCHOOL
and need a place to live? How
about a nicely furnished apart
ment instead of the dorms
Available May through Aug walk
mg distance to campus ca'l
7S8 3894
ONE OR TWO Females to share
large room. Mid May Mid
August Apt complex, one mile
from ECU Pool, laundry and Bus
Service Rent 577 Each Call
7 56 8464
ROOMS FOR RENT Per summer
session in furnished house with
AC, Kitchen facilities. TV. Pool
Table and Party Rooms call
752 1073.
PRIVATE ROOMS to rent in fami
ly home three blocks from cam
pus 110 S Woodlawn behind Over
ton's. Available lor summer ses
sions at SI 10 to 5130 per session
also available lor fall One large
room ideal lor art maior Call
752 0495 after 4 pm
ONE OR TWO Female Room
mates neede to share Georgetown
Apt Available now thru next year
Phone 758 2671
NEEDED ROOMMATE lor sum
mer and or fall Furnished Apt on
Woodlawn 3 blocks from campus
S80 per month Contact Ed
758 1662.
TWO BEDROOM furnished apart
men! Five minutes from campus
Sublease May Aug. Call 758 6686
FURNISHED TWO Bedroom
Trailer for rent summer and possi
ble fall. Available NOW
5100.month and 12 utilities
757 1193
USED
TIRES
1�
inquire at
Evans Seafood
$
oo
With graduation drawing
near why not look for that
unique gift at Gandalf's.
We also carry personalized
fraternity and sorority items.
e4!BrtiF's
Carolina EasrMail
Phone 756-7235
"Pilot pens!
You have to
hold onto
them with
two hands
- Rodney Dangerfieid
Get your claws off
my Pilot pen l don't get
no respect
ITALIAN N1TE
LASAGNA
AND
SPAGHETTI!
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
Plus Garlic Bread CQQ
f WITi-
Peopie hove
a hunger (or
my Pilot Fineliner De
cause they're always
fishing for a fine poinf pen
that writes through carbons And
Pilot charges only 79c for it
People get their hands on it and
forget it's my pen So I don t get no respect! I dori'� make out any better
with my Pilot Razor Point It writes whip-cream smooth
with an extra fine line, its metal collar helps keep
tne point from going squish - so people
love it For only 89c they
should buy their own pen
and show some re
spect for my
property
iWlOf
fine point marker pens
People take to a Pilot like it's their own
SHONEYS
432 Greenville Blvd.
ROOM FOR RENT TWO blocks
from campus 1100 plus 1 6
utilities. Available both sessions
summer school Call 758 7097
LARGE TWO BEDROOM Apart
ment within blocks for the college
Gas heat. Pool new carpi'
Available May I, 1982 SJ3S month
Cat 757 6824 and ask for Gail and
756 5577 after 5 00
ROOMMATE WANTED 1st and
2cd SS 5137 50 mo and 1 2
utilities Must be a non smoker
Call Keith at (hi 758 7878 or (o)
757 672�
RIDERS
RIDE WANTED to New York Can
leave at end of semester Will
share expenses Call Gregg at
758 6686
ALL STRIPES AND SOLIOS
IZOD LACOSTE SHIR I S
for men, cotton and polyesters alike
Normally S24 $27,
Now 4 1 O
Excellent Selection
ALL GOLF CLUB REPAIRS
12
Price
V.
Excellent Selection of Golf Shoes �
Used Clubs Available
see Gordon Fulp at
GCC � Memorial Dr. � 756-0507
Pa
D
Hv IIMl
I
.
s �

�t,
6 ,v X1
� rT" Q & sN' x
Pet Village
511 S. Evans St. Phone 756 9222
Across from Taft Furniture
12
A price
FISH SALE �nallfish-
PERI VIAN GUINEA PIGS $f95
Regularly $17.95 ON SALE FOR 1
TEDDY BEAR HAMSTERS $25
Regularly $4.99 SALE PRICED AT J
ALL BIRD CAGES at Sale Prices.
,cr &' c? o-
?3 ffjp
S? ,c
� jf
6 f3
�A.
&
cv
V
cr
tG
,C
N
,oN
o
the No. 3
Marshall
Dillon
er, that's
the No. 3 Marshall
s1
&
.5�
s
Old stajidards
away; Uiey seem lo get bet t
and better And like Marsh
Dillon,the No. 3 Mars
Western Sizzlui is a long tin
standard. Broiled sirlom
with bell peppers and o:
served with your c
potato, baJco 1
or fined a
Tfc �
3 U
S
Coupon 3
BEEF TIPS
youa
Only A &
, again to V.
with potato & Texas, ernSizz.
SizzUn
Toast
Thru 5 31 82
;v
7S9-4121
The Best Pizza in Town � Honest
MEN'S SHOP
c-CVElv.
AFERSGK-W
This new knit shirt by Baystreet is
made from specially spun, hand-
picked, long-staple Egyptian Giza
Cotton. Hand-picking protects
these extra-long fibers from the
damage caused by mechanical
harvesting equipment.
The natural lustre of the yarn tells
its own story.
The "motifs" and "designer
names" are gone. The quality is
back.
LOAFER'S GLORY found in fine
specialty shops.
only i
A Gentleman's
Tradition
MEN'S SHOP
Downtown Carolina East Mall Pitt
Gome
Machines
Big Screen
TV
Driv-Up
������ ��
ToOoOfttort
EvuyDay - Mb ii:to-2e2.79
Wm4. MYmCm far Spogiimi Mi m92J25
Tw'3.60
Th
I I I ! I I I I I I I I I
I 1 I I 1 I I
OLD FASHIONED
to a
Free Medium Pepsi
with purchase of any
sandwich or salad.
Expires
June 30,1982
t





.��
zlii
for
�X79
aw
�X25
'3.60
(
Parker Pleased With
D's Improvement
Bv THOMAS BKAMK
��" jir spurt rdilur
ing in said Parker.
"He is a comer
The competition bet-
The Purple-Gold een linebackers is
Game was the finale of touSh among returnees
sprina football for Amos Twitty. Ronald
ECU, and both head
coach Ed Emory and
defensive coordinator
Norm Parker were
?ased vs 11 h the
fense's performance.
"This is the best
defensive unit
Reid and P.J. Jordon,
the winner of the most
improved award for the
spring. Transfers Cur-
tis Santa Cruz and De-
wayne Anderson are
also pushing hard, hav-
since" inS led tne Go,d witn
V
eight tackles each.
The secondary
returns tuo starters
from last year's team.
Chuck Bishop did not
participate in spring
drills because he is
playing baseball. Clint
Harris is the other
returning starter, and
he intercepted a pass in
the intrasquad game.
"Our sirenghts are
our speed, unity and
aggressiveness he
said. "Our main goal is
to stop (the opposition)
from scoring. I believe
that you win with your
defnse
Kevin Walker had a
good showing for the
Gold w ith sev en
tackles. Garry Bishop.
Chuck's brother, in-
tercepted a pass for the
Purple. Smokey Morris
also picked off a pass.
And Sam Norris, a
junior college transfer,
broke up three passes in
the game.
"I'm happy with the
showing of the junior
college players this spr-
ing Parker said.
anight, and Overall, he added,
en they "We're in better shape,
more aggressive, and
we have no major in-
juries. Now all we can
do is wait and see what
happens next fall. I
think we are ready
have been here
Parker said after the
i ne. "We finally have
experience of plav-
gether for a few
u - and we're getting
ng ,ind taster than
re
. defense returns
i starters from last
� eat's team. I he bulk
tees are on the
Last year's
ible mention All-
� ei can Jod Schulz
trns at one end. He
: Purple with five
Re ning tackles are
Hal Stephens, winner
Tensive Fourth
�i -ward for his
play, and Steve
n, who won the
i a ai d for defen-
a tack Linebacker
M ke Grant also
irns but did noi plav
Sa day i ighi because
�� 1 he Purple line put
� pressure on
lack Kevin) In-
. remarked
E moi -
"We onlv had one
: � red said
v I . v
Defensive end Curtis
,ati impressed
"He is one of
besi transfers com-
Sea Hawks Win
L'N'C-Wilmington continued its mastery over
Pa c arolina, using Don Stevenson's eighth-
d ib e to defeat the Pirates, 5-3, Saturdav
night ai Haxnngon Field.
Pirates are now 26-12 while Wilmington
eir mark to 25-14.
a as tied 2-2 going into the top of the
when Wilmington loaded the bases, and
Stevenson ripped his double, driving in three
: uns.
ast Carolina's Bill Wilder went the full nine
nings but earned his sixth loss in 11 decisions.
Pii ites did not threaten in the bottom of
added one run in the ninth before
M ke S rrel! truck out to end the contest.
1 asi l arolina jumped out to a 1-0 lead in the
nning when Todd Evans singled to left to
re David Wells. Wells had walked to open the
and mined to second on John Hallow's
ngle. But Todd Hendley grounded into a
. ible-plav to end the inning.
WHAT'S IT LIKE TO BE
A SINGLE PARENT?
Lots f t enagers ten us it's tougn. if
pregnant teen, we'd like to
� , � ��:�(: counselor cno help
� , ur D'tt os and make
tor yi. ursell ana -ur baby
; : - � ur � c isii '
The Children's Home
Society of N. C.
752-5847
A LlrMf mHiitrvw
Bausch&Lomb
Soft Lenses
COMPL6TC
includes initial eve examination, lenses, care
Kit, instructions and follow up visits tor one
montn ECU student ID. required.
00
OPTOM6TWC
�Y�CAR�C�KT�R
Of Greenville PA
228GREENVILLE BLVD.
TIPTON ANNEX
756-9404
Dr. Peter Hollis
NOW
LOOKING GOOD COSTS LESS

?
THE EAST CAROL INI AN APRIL 27. 1982 13
lllTlWl'l'i
10-12 Lb.
Avg, W�.
.CHOICE
USDA Choice Beef Round Whole � Sliced Free
USDA
CHOICE
Lb.
USM Choice Beef Rib
Freeh Daily
Lb.
Rib Eye
Steaks
Ground
Chuck
Quf - Red Ripe
Straw-
Berries
Poekee.c of 6 12 0: Ceei
Miller
:
750 HI Biauee Reiele Laabrueee
Cella
Wine
Package of 6 12 0: Cant
Seblitz
V -
Q99�
PEPSI COU
22 Ounce
MAYQmiU
I
32 Ounce
Why Pay 139 jj
6 5 Oz. - light Chunk In Oil
12 Or Urge W (�)
y tEMDUmONAltf
aarnvsn amnmu
Why Pay M.55
Star-Kist
chunk uct
Pizza
Why Pay M.29
Why Pay 99
�'?Sni
96 Oz. � 40 Off Doarny
Fabric Softener
St Ounce
m
12 0z. - American Sliced Singlei
Borden Cheese
Pel Monte Catsup
-57100-
0 5 0z. � Lleer i Beef Blte-0-Kidney
Beef A Heart Slomored Suffer C�� Feed
Kal Kan
84 Ounee
Fab Detergent
1 lb. - Margarine Quartan
Mrs. Filbert's
400 Sheeti � 4 Roll Paek - Coronet
Toilet Tissue
16 Ounee � Cracken
Sunshine
Ears SweH
Yellow
Half Gallon)
Deteroent
A
Why Pay ;3 83
mk
9? Sheet Large Roll
T
�& -V.
Towels
Why Pay '1 03
Prieit �oo4 if firetnville Food To�efn Store only
T





i
M THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 27, 1982
RE
OF OUR NEW ENLARGED
AND REMODELED
SHOE DEPARTMENT
LOCATED AT H.L. HODGES CO. SPORTII IG GOODS
210 E. FIFTH ST. GREENVILLE
SHOES
SHOES
Asahi Men's Canvas s�i�-j Q95
Reg 123.95 X
Ladies Canvas su- Q95
Reg �21.95 Me�
Men's Leather
Res. $38.95
Ladies Leather s.i�O O
Reg. �3695 ��� Wi(
Nike Players $
9 Sale
Reg. $32.95Price
Nike 3 Pointers $
Sale
Reg. $19.95pce
24
15
3495
95
Converse Mesh Lo
Basketball Shoe O H 9 5
Sale
Reg. $33.95Prfce
27
TENNIS CLOTHES
Buy 2 Pair Of
Court Casual Shorts
And Get 3rd
Pair At y2 Price.
BASKETBALL
Mtkasa B1000
Rubber Basketball
Reg. 15.95
Sale Price
12
Fiberglass Backboard
and Goal
Reg. 79.95
Sale Price
69
Converse Mesh Lo
Basketball Shoe
Reg. 33.95
Pro Kennex
Silver Ace Grand Opening Sale
Reg. 109.95 (Stringing Extra)
SQQ95
(Stringing Extra) J � Price
Sale Price
27
iStringing Extra)
Davis Frames
Rossignol Frames
Prince Pro &01 Jl
,w � � � v � Grand Opening Sale
(Rainchecks Available)Reg. 109.95 (Stringing Extra)
Nike Players ���
(Tennis Or Racquetball Shoe) v M 7U
Reg $3295 Sale Price fcTT
Buy 2 Pair Of Court Casual Tennis Shorts
And Get 3rd Pair At Half Price.
UK&cm
The "Soft-Flex"
SOFTBALL GLOVE
A9845
SHOES
Puma Pioneer
(Men's Leather Softball Shoe)
Reg. $29.95Sale Price
Puma
Supersport
I (Boys' Or Ladies All Sport Shoe)
Reg. $18.95Sale Price
24
95
14
RACQUETBALL
Spalding Aluminum
Racquetball Racquet
Reg 24 95 Q 9 5
13
Rainbow Eyeguardsv � 7 5
Reg. 4.95
Nike Players
(Mesh Racquetball j
Or Tennis ShoesSa,�
Reg. $32.95 Prtc
3
24
SOFTBALL
99
Wilson A9845 v
Softball Glove SO OS-
Reg. 139.95. Softball Special
Rawllrtge RBGS6 a
Softball Glove
Reg. 149.95. Softball Special
Puma Pioneer
(Men's Leather Softball Shoe)
Res. �2 J 95Sale Price
29
3995
$2495
SWIMMING
Saf-T-Gard Goggles
Reg. 3.50 $25�
SPORTSWEAR
Ocean Pacific
Clothing
Arriving Daily
Puma Supersport �
(Boys Or Ladles Softball Shoe)
Reg. 118.95Sale Price
SOFTBALL
Dave Carroll Bombat
$1495
UNbon
Optic Yellow
CHAMPIONSHIP
TENNIS BALLS
Extra Duty Felt
For Hard Courts
TENNIS
Wilson
Tennis Balls
$050
BASEBALL
Spalding Little
League Baseball Glove
UttleLesgue
lUa 124.95Special Price
Rawllng Little
League Baseball Glove v
Little Leasue
GJ90Ral23.WSpadtilBct
Mizund Little .
League Baseball Glove v
Mrc001Rsf.�15.M Spartal Price
17
18
13
All Items Similar
To Illustrations
H.L. HODGES CO.
SPORTING GOODS
210 E. FIFTH ST. GREENVILLE
752-4156
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 27, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 27, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.197
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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