The East Carolinian, April 22, 1982






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Vol. 58 No9
i
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Thursday, April 22, 1982
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Henderson's Swear-In Controversial
By Mlkr HUGHES
On ruesday, April 20. at approx-
imately 6:30 p.m 1 ric Henderson
was sworn in as SGA presideni for
the schoolyeai 1982-83. But noi
w ithoul controversy
I he pi epondei a nee 01
evidence" thai was brought before
the SGA Review Board was deemed
insufficient to disqualify Henderson
from the election.
Ken Hooper, SGA attorney
general, swore Henderson in as
president immediately after the
Re iev Board's decision was made,
fen persons, including SGA Vice
President Bob Mills, witnessed the
ceremony, which took place a short
while before the flections Commit-
tee could file new charges against
Henderson.
Air hough 1 he Review Board
deemed the violations insufficient to
disqualify Henderson from the elec-
tion, two of the si charges against
him were substantiated. I he Review
Board found him 111 violation o Ar-
ticle Vll, sections 3 and 5 ol the
SGA elections rules.
Section 3 defines the acceptable
procedures for the distribution ft
campaign handbills, and section 5
states: "Campaign literature ol anv
type, solicitation lor the advance-
ment o! any candidate 01 commer-
cialization in favor o a candidate
shall not be permitted within
twenty-five (25) feet ol anv polling
place duimg the hours of the elec-
tion
Henderson admits that he did
break the two rules, but he claims
that his violations were unintended
and consequential.
Henderson said that the misplace-
ment o his campaign literature
(which was found in the women's
bathrooms oi Belk hall) was not
done by him and was unknown to
him until the charges were filed.
I ikewise, Henderson claimed that
the reason for his being near the
polling place was that the ballots
were late in arriving. "1 had to vote,
didn't I?" he theorized.
According to the SGA Constitu-
tion, any further trial ol Hender-
son's alleged impropriety must take
the form of impeachment pro-
ceedings. Thus, the Elections Com-
mittee � which was to have begun
its own investigation � has no mote
official jurisdiction in the case.
However, both Elections Com-
mittee Chairman Chuck Blake and
Henderson's opponent, David
Cook, seemed unaware Wednesday
of the swearing in which had occur-
red the night before. Blake saic.
ednesday
were still
Henderson
discrepancie
know who's
Blake said.
1 ikewise,
with Henry
during the
has it thai t
has disquah
peal to the
that he believed there
discrepancies in the
case. "Until the
s are cleared, we don't
going to be president
Jesse Yates, who (along
Little) represented Cook
hearings, said "Rumor
he flections Committee
Fied him pending an ap-
Reiew Board Yates
See SGA, Page 5
Liddy, Leary Debate Before
A Full Crowd At Hendrix
B IOM HALI
1 i ing legends.
rimothy 1 eary and G. Gordon Liddy � who are
as close a- anv one to being ingrained in modern
klore staged a debate at I ast Carolina ruesday
'u.
In a packed Hendrix 1 heater. the darling o the
psychedelic drug culture and the uncompromising
Watergate mastermind respectively addressed "The
1 reedom ol the Individual" vs. "The Power ol the
S I '
With I iddy in a herringbone suit and boots and
leary in a rose-colored sweater and sneakers, the
de sure thai the audience knew that they agreed on
nothing. Leary awI 1 iddy began with their conflic
ting views on their tirs; meeting in 1965 in a Duchess
inty, N.Y drug 1 aid
iry, ambling across the stage, told how
"In c louseau" (I iddy) and 19 "booted and
ed soldier" crashed up the stairs of his home
�ed him in his bedroom. thought. 'Is
a lucination?1 " 1 eary projected to the au-
, i I hunderous applause.
1 iddy strolled around to the front ol his table, and
I itwas difficult to surprise anyone when 19
booted policemen climb a steep stairway. In I iddy's
int i eary met him on the stairs wearing nothing
�� . haway shirt � and at that angle 1 iddy's
� � � impression ol the professor was sinking. Equal-
� mderous applause.
ige was set.
1 ittle comment on the colorful pasts ol the two
men was made by the speakers or the audience. I heii
introductory remarks ended with Athens and Sparta,
d each man took the predictable stance. 1 hen
Leary. looking appalled, addressed Liddy's topic.
"1 itc ights one student sailed out.
" I he siaie is a bureacracv aimed with guns 1 ear
replied. I believe we have personal paranoids
According to leary, the baby-boom generation
born alter 1946 is spoiled, which is the kev to in-
dividualism. "You people want the best - the best
love, you want Gloria Vanderbilt on your butts
"You may want Gloria Vanderbilt on your butt
I iddy told Leary, "but mine says Levi If a man
comes after you in the parking lot with an axe, you
are not going say I'm born after 1946 and I'm an in-
div ldlial
However, both men admitted that there cannot be
absolute power o the state or the individual, a state-
ment made by moderator Fred Ragan. Ragan, an
associate professor in the history department, eluded
the men for avoiding concrete answers and drew one
ol the largest rounds of applause ol the evening.
"A nation does what it has to do for its survival
1 iddy replied, comparing this to a man running a red
traffic light to gel his pregnant wife to a hospital.
"Police state people do what they want when they
get in power Leary argued. "I lie whole concept of
the government telling me what mood to be in and
how to move my brains around is hypocrisy. I've
been specific about us personally. It's up to you to
bring us down to earth � it you'll excuse the expres-
sion, "
microphone was set up in one of the aisles and
students lined up for that opportunity. When a pro-
fessor asked whether altruism or aggression "seemed
to be more adaptive to intellectual states ol con
sciousness I eary linked altruism to the individual
and aggression to society.
1 iddy, who often used graphic examples, said only
the strong survne and said agression was bom in all
creatures. He claimed that he chose his wife for her
genetic background and mathematical abilit
� species of Antarctican bird thai feeds only the
See 1 I Dm . Pajje 3
Photo By CHAP GURLEV
G. Gordon Liddy and Dr. Timothy Leary debated Tuesday night before a full crowd at Hendrix Theater.
Debaters 'Surprisingly A like'
Although hmothy leary suggests that Gordon
1 iddy would be happier at the head of the table, the
two men naturally fall into place directly lacing each
other.
Over a smgle candle and the Muzak of a heavy-
handed piano player at a local restaurant, the two
men playfully make verbal labs at each other before
then debate. "We disagree on about anything they
iell their dinner companions - Ragan. lecture series
chairman Michael Hosey, psychology major Pan
I isher and this reporter I earv and I iddy dominate
the conversation, and although they ate inturrupted
only once for autographs, they are the centers of at-
tention.
Yet m many ways they are surprisingly alike. Both
drink wine with their meal, I iddv ordering red and
I earv white. They inevitably ask us about tobacco.
as 1 iddy talks about the crop near his Mat viand
home and 1 eary putts away. 1 iddv does not smoke
at the table.
I he nasal tone in I iddv's voice, not accented by a
microphone looped around his neck, is subdued, and
the piercing dark eves are softened. 1 earv punctuates
his comments with giggles, and turns from side
See RENOWNED, Page 5
Weather Watch
. a.d cool today with a
near 60 Lows tonight in the
� 50s
Inside Index
Announcements 2
Opinion 4
Corpus f-orum 4
Style 6
Learning About College 8
Sports 9
Oassiheds 12
Forgery Charged In Braxton Arrest
By (,KL(, kIDLOl I
Greenville police arrested tormer
SGA vice president Marvin Braxton
on April h and charged him with one
count of forgery, the last Caroli-
nian has learned.
Braxton, 22, allegedly falsely
signed checks belonging to Mary K.
Nelson, a friend in whose house he
once resided.
According to court records, the
check in question was cashed Feb.
12 by Braxton at the North Carolina
National Bank on first Street.
Braxton verified that he had been
arrested, but denied committing the
offense. He said Mrs. Nelson'?
checks, along with some o his own,
were stolen in an October break -in
at the Nelson residence. Mis.
Nelson refused to comment on the
charges or the break-in.
Braxton also stated that a
separate investigation was being
conducted by the Pitt County
sheriff's office. Deputy Sheriff Billy
Braswell acknowledged that there
was an investigation ot the Nelson
household break-in, but that it was
being done in cooperation with the
Greenville Police Department.
Braswell said there was no cleat
evidence that a breaking and enter-
ing had occurred. He added that
Braxton was considered the only
suspect in the forgery case. Braxton
claimed he has lost more than
2.(X)0 from his account because so-
meone has been using his checks.
Braxton was arrested by Detective
M.I . Barn hill of the Greenville
police alter an alert was placed on
Nelson's account by the bank. A
teller at NCNB who is a witness tor
the state said Braxton had cashed
checks from the Nelson account
previously.
Braxton stated that he was ar-
rested because the Greenville Police
Department, especiallv Detective
Barnhill, was "out to get him He
referred to a city council meeting
where he had angered some
members o city government over
traffic ordinances.
Detective Barnhill slated that
Braxton was jailed after the arrest.
The W81-82 SGA vice-president,
however, denies this. He was releas-
ed the same day of his arrest on a
$4,000 jurety bond in the name of
Charles R. Blake Jr.
Blake, an assistant to the
chancellor, said he believes Braxton
is innocent. He added that he is in
agreement with Braxton's explana-
tion of what had occurred.
Braxton was arraigned the next
morning. April 7. His trial date is
set for May 12 in Pitt County
District court.
East, Helms, Jones, Hunt Refuse
Invitations To Lecture On Campus
By PATRICK O'NEILL
sialf Wriirr
"1 have given serious thought to
your kind invitation After full
consideration I do not believe I have
the expertise or knowledge to ad-
dress what 1 am sure will be a most
distinguished group
The above is a partial text of a let-
ter received by Dick Welch from
First District Congressman Walter
B. Jones. Welch, coordinator of the
"ECU Ground Zero Committee
had written a committee letter in-
viting Jones, Gov. James Hunt and
Senators John East and Jesse Helms
to participate in East Carolina's
"Ground Zero Week" events.
Hunt, East and Helms also turned
down the invitations to participate.
Committee members expressed
shock at Jones' admission that he
didn't feel qualified to address an
ECU audience on the topic of
nuclear war, despite the fact that
Jones himself must cast his vote to
, o. . . . . , appropriate the funds for these
The fast-approaching threat of final exams hits campus like a plague as students search in vain for an escape, weapons
Photo By DAVE WILLIAMS
Mom Said There Might Be Days Like This
Jones' letter to Welch was dated
March 19, but by April 4. in a let tor
to Patricia Dunn of the Pitt County
Chapter oi the league of Women
Voters, Jones had a diffrent repK.
"It is my opinion that should this (a
nuclear war) ever occur, there would
be no winners on either side he
wrote. Jones added that "this, of
course, points out the futility o the
apparent mad arms race that is now
being conducted
Dunn and ECU Interim
Chancellor John Howell joined with
the ECU Ground Zero Committee
in writing letters to the four
legislators.
"Although politicians will en-
courage citizen groups to get invoh
ed in discussing the nuclear weapons
issue, when you ask them to join in,
or even offer their opinion, most of
them run to the hills Welch said.
"This is what image politics is all
about
The committee letter asked the
four politicians to come to East
Carolina to present their point of
view on the three "fundamental
questions" raised by Ground Zero.
The questions ask how a nuclear
war might begin, what would be the
consequences oi such a war, and
how oik could be prevented.
"We desire to aecomodate you;
busy schedule read the commit-
tee's letter that offered the four men
any date on Monday thru Thursday
during the entire month of April for
appearances.
Despite the open invitation. East
cited "scheduling difficulties" as his
reason for not appearing. Hunt's
special assistant Carolyn Harmon
misunderstood the available dates,
wrote back that "the dates you men-
tion fall on Easter weekend and
she added that "prior com-
mitments" would keep the governor
from appearing.
Sen. Helms' office denied having
received the committee's letter for
two weeks, but later the letter was
apparently found. Welch was told
See POLITICIANS, Page 5


T

Mm �'
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1 HI I. s i Rt INi M'KII , 22 1982
ECU Sponsors Open House Saturday
Commemorating School's Anniversary
B Vtlkt HI (.His formances on the mail, Center, the Caswell
nlS�" six musical perfoi Spirit Singers
A campus-wide 75th mances will be provid (sponsored b the Stu
anniversan celebration ed b the ECU School deni Council foi 1
house ' ol 1 ceptional Children) will
the highlights of ECU's I es performances perform ai : 45 p.m.
is ei ts b the Fantasy, the si g n
percussion ensemble, language troup, will
j 24 flute �' populai musit
� i ;�� past temporan i -em beginning ai 15, and
e, wood � tl( ' l I Da
al n- 1 Mu Alpha Brass I heatei will hold a pei
Quir te musii lormance at 4
In the firsi flooi lob
U � mall will b ai Mendenhall.
h
Da
Cireenville will hold a 1 ducation, health
photograph exhibit, professions, natural
titled Last Carolina and social scienci
he I arlyears. no i. t ine a
glassblowing tilnis. slide pi.
demonstration w ill be lions and
given b the chemistrv are bui a pa ihe
departmeni in scheduled exhibits and
auditoi ium 244 a i
Mendenhall, and ai
45, a chemu al maj s,t'
-how. sponsoi In 'l
studeni affiliates ol tht da leaiuring I
American c hemical nual '
So ietv, will be p ,0o!i :
I'M me
enp
Sizemore To Speak At EC I
.

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� ' : . - i n
1 c I i
B i
ECUS,
x ' liiorium.
� .
d 22
pei i md
book,
N' all Studeni I've. lei multiple
1952 t
C i H e a 11
I Hei Worl ;
Menia H i !
the i book a
i I Depari
inspired the mo ie. Tl ; �
dci
was tesobed in
1974 b two Virginia Nov
)
I he appeal r �.
ed b ih P
M : Hea
mon md - t
sponsored I
� : I C ai i n,i
Announcements
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Look in the Yellow Pages under
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IH1 hASI K()I IN1AN
Af'KIl ,22 �-
ECU Campus Security Blotter Released; Shirt Thief Convicted
B GREGRIDEOI I
Mull rttei
Carl G McKoy, an
IiC I sophomore, was
convicted April 20 in
Pitt Count) District
Court ol stealing seven
shirts valued at $228
According to Detec
live Earl Wiggins ol the
University Police
Department, the shirts
belonged to a resident
ol Belk dorm and were
stolen at different
times He stated thai a
search wat i ant was ob
tamed and McKov's
room was searched on
March 22. 1 he shirts
were found and McKoy
ws arrested.
McKo was given a
12 month suspended
sentence with a three
veai probation period
In addition, he was
ordered to pav restitu-
tion to the ow nei ol the
shuts and a $200 fine
I u d g e Herbert
Phillips then ordered
thai the shii is be tui nd
ovei to the Salvation
V of (ireen die
1 he follow inn is the
police blotter for April
14-21. I h e v are
campus-related in
cidents.
April 14. : "�() p.m.
� James T. Crosier,
lab manager assistant
ol the biology science
complex. reported a
larceny from room B17
of the Animal facility.
April 15. 10 a.m. �
An Avcock dorm resi-
dent r epoi t ed t he
larceny of his bike
w hile it was chained to
a rack in front of Cle
ment dorm. 3:50 p.m.
� A White dorm test
dent reported the
larceny of hei bike
while it was chained
south ol White 9:20
p.m. � Rena Colvard
of the Graduate
Business Stud e n t
Association in Raw I
Building reported the
larceny of currency
from 222 Rawl. 6:25
p.m. - A White dorm
resident reported the
larceny of currency
from her desk drawei
April 16. 1:30 p.m.
� A Greenville resi-
dent i epoi l ed the
larceny of his hike
while it was pat ked at
Mendenhall.
April 17 2:40 am
Michael Shai kshnas
ol vden was ai rested
not th ol W lute dot m
foi trespassing. 4:10
p.m. Ik-Ik dorm
resident reported that
his vehicle had been
v andalied
April IS p.m. An
ycock dorm resident
reported thai the ti link
(t his cai had been van
lones dorm resident bidding. 4 p.m. � to the thud floor
reported the larceny ol Jackie Mines, resident bathroom.
his bicycle south of Jar- director ol Jones,
visdorm. 10:29p.m.� reported the vandalism April 21. 14 a.m.
Pei son s unknown
reported that a Scott
dorm resident's vehicle
had been vandalized.
pril 19. 12:05 a.m.
A White dorm resi-
dent was served with a
criminal summons for
worthless checks.
April 20. 10:20 a.m.
A Wilson resident
repoi ted the larceny ol
her bike from room
A Belk dorm resi
dent was arested foi
driving under the in
fluence.
dalied. 9:25
.in.
1 203 ol the physics
Liddy Leary Debate On Wide Range Of Issues
Continued from Pace 1
two st ronj
three shucks w a
ample used by 1
1 eary compla
the buds lose '
back on� 1
thev're still u
1 he key to
i n t e 11 i g e n
humor
i eai
moved about
'n a qiu '
posed to him

assertion" peace, because it's the
�mi led only way you'll ever
facts not have it
ron - but from "l! it comes down to
More surrendei oi fight, I'd
r he rather tight 1 ear v
irned away said. "There's no one I
ind their seats, would lather have on
v ne asked
was
my side than Gordon Sov ets' failure to con
I iddy Ronald quei that nation to the
Reagan he doesn't fact that "lhe are a
care. He'll be dead in nation ol riflemen
10 years anvway " and women with
km
And on Afghanistan, Lid le form,
1 iddy attributed the d I. "(J
reasons the Russians
ian ' t conqnet
Afghanistan is that
they 're swapping vodka
tor hashish Belter
hashish is being smok-
ed m Moscow than
I A '
"B
his table
en he
dent's
p p e u ,
hue
the big
hite
more
- ow was
stars
.�nine. When
. ined ' o
i 1 iddy told
bombed
I moose
led I �' � � (i
Slec-pmq B.iq
h I sit pmq Equip
s �: . t oed si
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I





7T
(Biit East Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Jimmy Dupree, Ed,iorinChirj
Charles Chandler, hih rmi
Ric Browning, d a, Tom Hall, mmemm
Fielding Miller, m. mmw William Yelverton. � �
Alison Bartel. �� ���� Steve Bachner, �nmm
Steve Moore. nnM. tk. D,ANE Anderson, mm-
WHY LASH SOLAR
SEARCH RJHDWG
NOW?
April 22, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
The Debate
WE'VE KADEGRI
SOON-MUCH OF 01
CAN GOME Fpl
z?oz SVes Have Faults, Plusses
"What a battle!
"Wow! Timothy Leary and G.
Gordon Liddy really went at it
If that's what you believe, you're
wrong. The "great debate" that
many came to see simply did not
take place Tuesday night in Henrix
Theatre between these two men of
varying backgrounds and beliefs.
This is not to say that the debate
the two held was not interesting. It
was that and very much more. It
was very entertaining and even a bit
educating.
Both Leary and Liddy are
brilliant men, make no mistake
about that. Neither, though, would
be a suitable leader for this country.
Neither's views are realistic enough
to stand alone in these United
States.
There is Leary's free, drug-filled
Utopia. Then there's Liddy's
"macho tough" government
(quoting Leary).
Leary has a point. Sure, we all
would like a little more freedom
from the state. But, then again,
would we really want drugs to be
legalized, or licensed, as he sug-
gested? Would we really want as
weak a state as he calls for?
Liddy has a point. The people
need the state � after all, the state
is there to serve the people. Our
government should not roll over
and play dead as Communism
spreads throughout the world,
creating a threat to the welfare of all
mankind.
power theory too lar. Just imagine
this man president of the United
States (don't strain yourself). What
a mess we'd be in! His idea of conti-
nuing to build nuclear weapons for
the sake of catching the Russians is
faulty.
After all, wouldn't it be better to
come to some sort of "cease build"
contract? Surely, there is no way to
abolish nuclear weapons from this
planet, but the senseless growth in
their numbers should be stopped �
and soon, before it's too late.
Leary and Liddy showed the Hen-
drix audience that they were indeed
opposities. They disagree on prac-
tically everything. Both men know
how to use an audience to their ad-
vantage; both men drew loud
rounds of applause on several occa-
sions; and both know how to win
people over. They did all of this
Tuesday night.
The two men were accepted well
by the crowd. This is surprising as
neither really gave any concrete
answers to the questions that
everyone had. In no way, shape, or
form was there a "winner" in this
so-called debate.
Those present should, however,
treasure the experience. Two men
bordering on legendary status ad-
dressed all there and shared some of
their most unique ideals.
Very few in the audience, if any,
totally agreed with either man. Most
felt the logical place to be was
somewhere in the middle of these
men's very extreme (though op-
posite) viewpoints.
Neither of their theories appeared
sane enough to stand alone. A fu-
sion of the two would be the ap-
propriate solution.
WG1NLENER3Y FREE
EXACTLY

College Press Service
KjrjWfc&P
Sending Food Alone Not Enough
By KIM ALBIN
"It is the opinion of most of us that
those who have food ought to try to help
those who do not. No one, whatever his
politics, wants to see anyone else starve
So begins Harold Hayes' article, "A
Conversation with Garrett Hardin which
appeared in a recent issue of The Atlantic
Monthly.
Hayes describes Hardin as "an
American biologist turned moralist1' and
sketches a rather comprehensive picture of
the man; we learn that Hardin has spent
decades mulling over his ecological ethics.
His conclusions are startling. 'The
worst thing he says, "that can be done
for a starving people who have exhausted
their own food supply is to give them more
food
Although Hardin's statements may seem
cold and inhumane, his rationale, as it
turns out, is sound: as long as we can send
only food to underdeveloped countries, we
are hurting them more than helping. Once
they have food, he reasons, the standard of
living rises � and so does the level of need.
Not only will the population increase ex-
ponentially, the new population will seek
more sophisticated lifestyles � and there
we cannot help them.
For instance, though we might be able to
clothe an entire third-world country
without missing so much as an Izod
sweater, we could not share our supply o
oil with that country. Not only that, most
of these countries lack the distribution
channels necessary to get the Levi's and
Nikes to the no-longer-starving masses.
World hunger fighters insist that once
the starvation problem is solved for a
country, the standard of living
automatically goes up. and 1 believe them.
Yet the resources of this nation stay the
same or diminish.
"Morever Hayes continues, "whereas
there has been and may continue to be a
surplus of food available in the United
States for relief purposes, there is certainly
no surplus of energy now, nor is there like-
ly to be one within the foreseeable future
And Hardin writes. "To send food only to
a country already populated beyond the
carrying capacity of it- land is to col-
laborate in the furter destruction of the
land and the further impoverishment of its
people
Hardin is the man who originally created
the "lifeboard ethic" � the idea that self-
protection should precede any attempts to
save the lives of "drowning" countries.
This is an argument that I have heard
and engaged in many times without realiz-
ing Mr. Hardin's authorship. A question
that is always asked at some point in the
discussion is "Well, if you have seven
countries sharing a 'lifeboat' and one of
them is hogging all of the resources, then
shouldn't the other six countries try to
destroy the fat nation?"
Translated from the metaphor, this
means "Aren't you scared that the
the nations on this planet are gonna n �
us for beins so heavy on the land-use.
man?"
My answer, with which I teel Mr Har-
din will agree, is no. Those count!
aware of and as grateful as we
technological superiority, and certain!
willing to try and get by without us.
No matter how selfish thev might think us.
the rest of the world must realize
much it depends on the U.S.
pushed off our lifeboat tor a while.
Forum Rules
The East (.arounn
expressing all points oj vie
drop them by our office .
-
Building, across from Jo.
For purposes of verificatia
must include the name, �
(lassification, addess,
and signature of the authorfs)
are limited to two typewrit t
double-spaced, or neatly prin ed
, 5 are subject to editing '
obscenity and libel, and
tacks will be permitted.
I� Campus Forum
Gay Community Draws Both Reader Support, Criticism
This letter is in response to several let-
ters which have appeared recently in The
East Carolinian. These letters, which
were concerned with homosesxuality,
were written by Mary Rider, Billy E.
Walker, Jr Joseph S. Babinski, and
Robin Hicks. These letters were written
pertaining to Reverend J.M. Bragg's let-
ter, which condemned homosexuality
and hence the appropriation of SGA
funds to the ECGC. After reading these
various responses to Reverend Bragg's
letter, we knew we could not leave him
to stand alone in his convictions.
We are Christians, and are well aware
of John 15:12, "This is my command-
ment, That ye love one another, as I
have loved you Another good verse is
John 3:17, "For God sent not his Son
into the world to condemn the world;
but that the world through him might be
saved If God is not condemning us,
we certainly have no right comdemning
others, for Matthew 7:1 and 2 say
"Judge not, that ye be not judged. For
with what judgement ye judge, ye shall
be judged However, condemning
homosexuality is not the same as con-
demning the homosexual. As Christians,
we believe the Bible shows that
Homosexuality is wrong. Yet we love
homosexuals and all other sinners and
Christians, for none of us is perfect.
Ms. Rider used, in her letter
(published Thrusday, April 15, 1982) the
example of the adultress who was
brought before Jesus by the scribes and
Pharisees. Instead of condemning her,
Jesus said to her accusers "He that is
without sin, let him first cast a stone at
her (John 8:7) Her accusers left, and
the adultress was left standing there with
Jesus, who then said to her "Woman,
where are those thine accusers? She said
4No man, Lord
And Jesus said unto her, 'Neither do I
condemn thee: go and sir. no more "
(John 8: 10 and 11) Ms. Rider failed to
include "sin no more" in her letter.
Of course, there are many who do not
feel homosexuality is wrong, so
therefore they feel the homosexual has
no need to repent. However, there are a
few verses no one has yet used, which
can be found in Romans Chapter 1,
verses 24, 26, 27, and 32. These are given
below.
"Wherefore God also gave them up to
uncleanness through the lusts of their
ffwn hearts, to dishonor their own
bodies between themselves. God gave
them up unto vile affections: for even
their women did change the natural use
into that which is against nature. And
likewise also the men, leaving the
natural use of the woman, burned in
their lusts one toward another; men with
men working that which is unseemly,
and receiving in themselves that reward
of their error which was due. Who
knowing the judgement of God, that
they which commit such things are wor-
thy of death, not only do the same, but
have pleasure in them that do themd
This clearly states that homosexuality is
a perversion and a sin.
We agreed with Ms. Hicks when she
said Reverend Bragg should pray for the
homosexuals. All Christians should be
praying for everyone, for everyone sins.
But, to refer to a verse quoted earlier in
this letter, "Go ye therefore, and teach
all nations (Matthew 28: 19), it is our
hope that this letter will condemn none,
but teach many.
LISA CASON
Freshman, Business
WILLIAM GREEN
Freshman, Business
Thank you for printing the letter from
Rev. J.M. Bragg in the April 13 issue of
The East Carolinian. It serves as just one
more reminder of how far gay people in
this community have to go in our strug-
gle against bigotry and persecution. In
his letter, Braqg makes a few points
which require some further scrutiny.
Bragg has based his arguments against
the Student Government's decision to
fund the East Carolina Gay Community
on his religious beliefs. It is important
that we remember that in this country
there is a separation of church and state.
The SGA definitely falls under the
clasification of the latter.
Bragg also compares human love and
sexuality to that of the othe,r animals of
this planet. This is a ridiculous com-
parison as humans are the only animals
with a constant sexuality. That is, we do
participate in sexual activity for reasons
other than just procreation. True, 1 have
never seen a gay large-mouth bass either;
but then, I have never seen a large-
mouth bass exhibit any loving behavior.
Bragg calls upon the upstanding
leaders of this community to rise up
against us. It is naive to assume that
because some one is gay he can not be
anything else. There are gay police of-
ficers, school administrators, Chris-
tians, and even gay ministers, who are
interested in the highest quality of life in
their communities.
In a world so full of hate and violence,
I find it hard to believe that a
"Christian" can condemn people for
loving. If a couple happens to be of the
same sex, what does it matter? Someone
once saidIt does not matter who you
love, but that you love
MARK ZUMBACH
Senior, Drama
Love & Learn
So again the East Carolina Gay Com-
munity makes the paper. Why? These
people have tried so long and so hard
and have only received $100.00 to be us-
ed to publish an informative pamphlet.
This pamphlet can't be used to influence
people's sexual preference. That
preference is established between the
ages of three and five � surely a piece of
paper isn't that influential!
.his pamphlet and the ECGC are here
to create an understanding among
members of different sexual preferences.
Rev. Bragg. God loves the homonsex-
ual, because he loves everybody. The
homosexual condition is not sinful, it is
the way that some people happen to be,
and certainly loving another person is
not sinful. We are all meant to love
other people.
When love exists between persons of
the same sex who intend to be faithful to
each other and who wish to share their
whole lives and who try to live in ge-
nuine mutuality, such physical contacts
as may occur are not sinful at all, they
are natural and normal. I am not ad-
vocating easy permissiveness. 1 am com-
ing to terms with facts.
God is love, humans are created to be
lovers and that, for those who can love
in a homosexual way, this kind of lov-
ing, with its almost inevitable yearning
for and joy in such contacts cannot be a
sin. If you cannot understand another's
love, pray for understanding and do not
take it upon yourself to decide how God
feels about it. "Love one another; for he
that loveth another hath fulfilled the
law (Romans 138) Rev. Bragg don't
write and fight; love and learn.
LAURA SHEAR1N
Junior, Nutrition
I am writing in response to Mary
Rider's letter in Thursday's edition of
the East Carolinian. Miss Rider, I agree
with you that we are not the ones to
judge others. The Bible does tell us,
"Judge not, that ye be not judged
You stated that it was to your understan-
ding that the ECGC had asked for and
received money from the SGA for the
purpose of publishing a pamphlet to tr
to help others understand their "sexual
orientation You also stated that as a
heterosexual and as a Christian you
could see nothing wrong in that.
Miss Rider, I question whether or not
you are a true Christian. You seem to
forget that homosexuality is a sinful act
The Bible tells us in Leviticus 20:13 that.
"If a man also lie with mankind as he
lieth with a woman both of them have
committed an abomination I do not
understand how you can have the at-
titude you have about homosexuality
and still have the nerve to say you are a
Christian. I hope that the rest oi the
Christians do not think as you do.
because if they do there will be an awful
number of so called "Christians" in
hell.
GREG PARKER
Junior, Psychologv
Three Points
1. Please tell us the book, cnapter and
verses in which God instructs us on sex
the way He likes it.
2. People whose livelihoods depend
on observing animals report homosexual
acts in other mammals (Frederick M
Toates, 1980, for instance).
3. If quality of life in our community
is your concern, may I suggest participa-
tion in Ground Zero Week activities or
in seeking solutions to hazardous waste
disposal in North Carolina, to name on-
ly two worthy causes.
TERRY GRIFFIN
Senior, Computer Science
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I





1111
I AS I CAROI INIAN JKH - lv:
SGA Presidential Situation Controversial
Continued I rom Pane 1 confusion involved in proceedings
pasi ECl elections), Since the SGA will
ihai bul I hope others will nol meel foi the re-
v able u see that maindei of tins
resoI i
ue
forwards the charges to Henderson, indicated
the legislature thai he feels Henderson
A simple majorit) should not have been
oie is required in the sworn in.
ice
M� .
mil
Ho
lames
-
roi
imei
and
ad
mavbe some things semester, and since the SGA to begin impeach- legal he said. 'lt
ineni proceedings, and shouldn't have happen-
a two thirds majority is ed I feel it violates im
need w be changed entire legislature for the
Meyei said. summei session eon
ccording to the sists oi three members,
SGA Constitution, no legislative indict
undei judicial rules and meni can be brought deni official from o
iding procedures, "All against Henderson un
lohn judicial findings are til the fall.
Dean subject to review by the I he SGA rules do Section I ol the con
vice chancellor foi stu provide that as presi- stitution provides tha
necessary to due process rights,
remove any elected sin ook said that undei
the constitution, he is
supposed to have tie
days to appeal the deci-
sion ol the Review
Board.
fice.
Howevei. i tii le N- I.
deni life deni pro tern ol the an elected official can
However, Mever said legislature, Bob Mills be recalled by a petition
se.
ins to me.
U L
that lie has as yel could call an emergency
"heard no direct report meeting ol the SGA.
mii the Review However, Mills said he
Board " has no intention ol call
1 he SGA rules also ing such a meeting,
state that the only Impeachment, accot
course ol action thai dm to the SGA Con-
bearing the names ol at Meyei said, "that peo-
least 15 perceni ol Ins pie are getting a little
oi hei constituency, tired ol the (annual
I hm " petition to election contusion)
recall the president "We're just going to
mus! contain the have to sleep on it
smnatures of at least 15 tonight (Wednesday)
ATTIC & DKT
GET BLASTED HAPPY HOUR
flifH KIDD BLAST
ADMISSION - 25C (THAT'S A LOT OF ROCK FOR A QUARTER)
HAPPY HOUR BEVERAGE PRICES - 65c
mMF HAVE A BLAST
be taken b the stitution, requires that percent ol the entire Meyei said. "It s too
ire againsi an a legislatoi present student body early to
official is charges to the attorney
inherent through impeachment general, who in turn
(. ook, who filed the happen. It s really a
hai e�. acai nst tough thing
Renowned Debaters 'Surprisingly Alike'
Continued from Page 1 1 iddy says theii book
about in ncy knows ol
�mpanions nothing beyond the
i �
��v
Hudson. On the in
t at was Greenville,
New ork, and Green-
n v i 11 e, New Jersey,
K �en's found
he correct site of the
o debate, I iddy says.
d Dinnei arrives. I id-
� wolfs down his lamb
ps but 1 eary barely
es to eai halt of
es his q ueen - si ed
� �� . rib 1 iddy is
anded, bul
th switches
righl and
liners on
Politicians on't Speak
i nntinued 1 rum Pat� I


! lelms to pre-
w riiing his
Aers to the three
questi ns
Cat oli na
vo ild know his
Helms
only person
. d .i nsw et
questions.
asked to
Heli :all the
an office,
atoi was received
t ast a as I he only ol -
espond to the
. iestions and
� . So iet will-
pursue
See POl IT1C1ANS,
Paui' 12
either side
Each acknowledges
the other's experience
in his field, sometimes
setiously, sometimes
jokingly. 1! the subject
is psychology oi ding
use. 1 iddy bows to
1 eary W hen Ragan
discusses his research
on government in
telligence, I iddy lakes
over and 1 eary quietly
disects his beet.
The piano player
comes to the table,
welcomes the lecturers
to Greenville, and asks
it there are any re-
quests. "You've
already played my
favorite 'You 1 ight
Up My I ife " I iddy
tells him. "Ohh, that
song is lett idle 1 eai
giggles. lt so right-
wing
I; seems that 1 eaty
has a passion for
chocolate. He asks the
waitiess foi cocoa in
place v'l coffee, but she
,i pol ogizes. I iddy
oi dei s vanilla ice
cream "Do you have
chat cream
Leary asks. I he
waitress doesn't, but
she surprises him with
ice cream flooded with
date syrup. 1 eary
is delighted.
I he men work out
the details ol the
rbat(
" I
untunes
on. Is
that what you want
I ake vn iu need,
1 un 1 iddy saw It is
decided that 1 eary will
speak first and will cue
1 iddy when the subject
moves to Athens and
Sparta. I hey stress the
importance ot a mike in
the audience; it is
crucial in getting things
�'heated up 1 iddy
always has a mike
around his neck. 1 eary
prefers to hold his.
It is s o lexk and the
men w oi i y about being
on time. I eai y retrieves
his coal that he has
draped ovei a chair at
the next table, and 1 id-
vi iises to the occasion
with his red linen
napkin lucked into his
trousei s.
APPLICATIONS FOR DAY-STUDENT
REPRESENTATIVES
FOR THE
STUDENT UNION BOARDOF DIRECTORS
FOR 1982-1983 NOW BEING ACCEPTED.
Applications may be picked up at the Information
Desk in Mendenhall Student Center.
Deadline for applications to be submitted is Wed April 21, at 12:00 Noon
Candidates will be interviewed on Thurs April 22, 1982,
at 3:00 P.M. in Room 241 of the Student Center.
JOLLY'S
PAWN SHOP
We Have
Layaway
Large inventory
mere
us
ed
of new and
handise
STEREOS
MUSIC INSTRUMENTS
TOOLS
mv items of value for collatera
BICYCLES
GUNS
JEWELRY
'Accepting any
� All transactions confidential
WEBUYGOLD&SILVER
ACROSS 1 HE RIV ER Corner of N Green & Hwy 33
(Pactolus Hw. 752 S7S� Mori. Fn. 9 to 6 � Sat. 8 to 4
TASTE
Match your musical tastes
with the artists above each group of questions
Circle the correct answers.
THE BLASTERS
Produced by the Blasters
1) Are you fed up with the senseless
tide of foreign-made American music
flooding our shores?
(a) yes (b)no
(c) need more information
(d) if other people are
2) Where was rock & roll invented?
(a) England (b) Gibraltar
(c) Liverpool (d) US of A
3) What s the most likely reason for
you to be shakin?
(a) rent due (b) religious rite
(c) the economy
(d) a strong national defense
(e) car out of alignment
(f) the new Blasters single
(g) most of the above but especially f
I .aiPig am se
poo6 se si aisei inoA ueaui 6(- put pj ei siawsui
JOHN HIATT
ALL OF A SUDDEN
Produced by Tony Visconti
(c) brilliant
(d) all of the above
2) Do you like the sound track to The
Border"?
(a) yes (b)no (c) need more
information (d) if other people do
3) What kind of songs do we need
more ofv
(a) love songs
(b) songs about partying
(c) songs about how hard it is being a
rock & roller
(d) songs about dancing your
gonads off
(e) songs about something
interesting
I ueiH unop Ml'
anbt'ai B ii "oA jnd at put? e pi sjSmsuv I
EYE TO EYE
Produced by Gary Katz
(a) since Steely Dan
(b) since Steeleye Span
(c) since Stealer s Wheel
(d) since K C. & the Sunshine Band
(e) longer than I can remember
di no- �,
SECRET POLICEMAN'S
OTHER BALL
Produced by Martin Lewis

THI STTUT IMMJ4 I�4MUJJ.
42�
STW�,
� CM IKtjt
IIUIKHU
huh i.i ivotC J
.��� 11V��
run 1 Ol t IfcV
MftfJMI)
1 MllM .
M 1(1 1 1 01 II 1
-
1) What kind of guitarist is sought by
both Ry Cooder and Elvis Costello to
play in their bands?
(a) pretty decent
(b) ruggedly individualistic
1) Would you be interested in a new
band produced by Steely Dan s
producer Gary Katz. and featuring
almost the entire cast of Katy Lied.
including Donald Fagen?
(a) somewhat
(b) more than somewhat
(c) more than more than somewhat
(d) ecstatically interested
(e) not right now
2) Do you like female vocals to convey
both innocence and irony7
(a) if they don t undermine a strong
national defense
(b) I don't want to commit myself on
this issue
(c)Yes (d) especially when they ve
got something to say
3) How long has it been since a new
band came along that really sounded
different, one that didn t try to fit any
radio formats, that managed to have
fun and maintain some semblance of
integrity at the same time?
Featuring
Sting. Jen Beck. Eric Clapton and Bob
Geldof. Johr ny Fingers. Phil Collins.
Donovan. The Secret Police
1) Who hopes Amnesty International s
benefit concert album above doesn t
make a piaster of profit7
(a) Chile s generals
(b) the Kremlin (c) the ayatollah
(d) Babv Doc Duvaher
(e) all the above dictators and more
2) When was the last time Jeff Beck
and Eric Clapton recorded together in
the same band9
(a) Woodstock (b) Isle of Wight
(c) need more information
(d) when they were in the Yardbirds
3) Would you like to hear intimate,
personal performances by Sting
( Roxanne. Message In A Bottle )
and Phil Collins (In The Air Tonight )
without the usual supergroup hubbub
that follows them in The Police and
Genesis?
(a) haven t made up my mind
(b)yes (c)no (d)ASAP
i Mtwa Auuowe 'ot ii�3uo3
.nei f hi siiuiioiDd doi s uieiug 10 aiuos
joj sisei e �i?3ipui p J qf P"� PZ �l sj��su�)
Good Tastes
From Warner Bros
Gefffen, SlashWarner
and Island records & tapes
On sale through May 12
Wf RECORDS & TAPES � Wtft
Record Bar
Pitt PlazaCarolina East Mall
A





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
APRIl 22, 1982 Page6
Mills, Talley, Coburn
Look Forward To 82-83
Robert Duane Mills Pho,� �� �VE ��"
Rebecca Anne Talley Pho,�� OAVE �"�-lim$
By DIANE ANDERSON
Sltlr Kdilor
Although there still remains some
controversy over our who will be
our next SGA President, the results
for vice president, treasurer and
secretary are final. The victors in
these races are Robert Mills, Rebec-
ca Talley and Sarah Coburn.
Bob Mills, whose father is state
senator from Onslow County,
William "Billy" Mills, says that his
interest lie more in marketing than
in politics. "That is where my in-
terests lie, in the business field he
said.
Bob majors in business with a
minor in political science. He was
born and raised in Maysville, North
Carolina. He has been in the
legislature for two years as the
representative from Scott Dorm.
"I would really like to apologize t
to the studentbody for having
to go through this Bob said of the
complications surrounding the
presidential election. "It is a
devastating blow to the SGA
because this occurs every year and
this is one reason student apathy is
the way it is
Becky Talley also expressed her
discontent with the situatin, stating
"I will be glad when this is over,
either way However she did say
that no matter what the outcome, "I
think I would work with either one
of the: i referring to Eric Hender-
son and David Cooke.
After a run-off election from
which Eric Henderson emerged the
winner, charges were filed in the
matter and the issue has still not
been decided.
Sarah refused to comment on the
situation, stating, "I have got to
work with them pretty closely and I
try to keep my business life separate
from my personal life
Overall, the officers seemed to
feel that the elections were suc-
cessful. "1 thought the first electin
was very well run. I thought it was
very fair from what I saw said
Becky. "Of course our banners kept
disappearing, but other than that I
thought it went very well
Sarah agreed, saying, "Overall, I
think they went pretty well. I was
very pleased with the voter turnout
for the runoff
None of these newly elected of-
ficials seem to be bothered by the
cuts made in their salaries at the re-
cent SGA meeting. "I didn't even
know how much 1 was going to
make until yesterday. I'm not in it
for the money explained Sarah.
"I can live with it was Bob's
comment.
All of the candidates agreed that
more student involvement was need-
ed in the SGA. "1 would like to get
the student body to be more
representative to the student govern-
ment because every student at ECU
is in the SGA. A lot of people don't
realize that said Bob.
"One thing that 1 would iike to
see in the future, and 1 think this
election has helped in this aspect, I
ihink it will get peole more in-
terested in the SGA and more in-
volved and 1 am glad to see that
because one thing that has always
concerned me is that lack of com-
munication between the SGA and
the student body. I know as a
legislator I always tried to find out
what my constituency wanted ex-
plained Sarah.
Sarah said she also was going to
miss debate in her new job as
secretary. "I am going to miss get-
Sarah Elizabeth Coburn "��� ��0AV williams
ting up and saying what I think
she said.
Sarah has been in the legislature
for two years, is from New Bern,
and majors in english with a minor
in psychology. She says about
herself that. "I was born to be a
teacher
Also, about her new job she
stated, "Denise did an excellent job
and I do have a hard act to follow.
All I can say is 1 am going to do the
best ob tht 1 can and you can't ask
for more
Bob is looking forward also to a
"very productive year. 1 feel 1 can
be effective as vice president.
"1 feel like we can get a lot ac-
complished, especiallywitha new
asdministration coming in. It will be
vitally important that the student
government take a good first step
Becky, a twenty-year old accen-
ting major from Raleigh, has some
big plans for the summer as
treasurer. I am going to try to get in
touch with all the organizations on
campusand tell them if thev need
help to come see me. 1 am justgoing
to try to do thebest job 1 can
ECU Gay Community Provides Support Group
B PATRICK O'NEILL
Miff Wriler
Since its inception in Januarv o
1979, the ECGC or, East Carolina
Gay Community, has been func-
tioning "to promote understanding
between persons of different sexual
preferences" and "to provide a sup-
port group for members of the gay
community
"The ECGC has been a service
organization at ECU said member
and biology major Cameron, who
felt it necessary to avoid using her
last name because of her fears of
ridicule, discrimination, and even
death threats.
ECGC member Mark Zumbach
received such a death threat recentlv
after his name appeared in The East
Carolinian. Zumbach, who has been
with the organization from its
beginning, was appealing to the
SGA for funds to print an infor-
mative pamphlet that would give
people a better understanding and
awareness of being gay.
The SI00 appropriation was pass-
ed without any negative debate.
"We had the full support of the
SGA said ECGC member John
Rarnett.
The ECGC has not found the job
of getting SGA funding so easy, in
the past. Previous attempts to get
funding have been successful, but
not without a difficult and lengthy
battle in the SGA and on the
editorial page of The East Caroli-
nian. Barnett points out that "part
of that money is ours - it's our stu-
dent fees too He feels that if the
ECGC members pay into the stu-
dent fund, then their organization is
as entitled to funds as any other.
Barnett, who majors in English,
has been one of the ECGC members
who "speaks Barnett and other
members of the "ECGC Speakers
Bureau" will often be asked to
make presentations to psychology,
sociology and health classes here on
campus and throughout the local
counties' community colleges.
"After 1 give a talk 1 receive a lot
of positive feedback said Barnett.
"People come up to me and say
thank you for telling me something I
didn't know
Speaking to groups also gives the
ECGC a chance to dispel the myths
associated with homosexuality.
Common myths mentioned by some
ECGC members were "that
homosexuals are child molesters,
that we're out to break up the fami-
ly or "that homosexuals have no
control over their sexual desires
Many times these myth, are
responsible for a very strong degree
of discrimination and misunderstan-
ding toward gays. Violence toward
gays is commonplace and many
ECGC members are fearful of
"coming out This expression
means that a person admits that he
or she is homosexual to someone
else. When "coming out" is done
publically, it can sometimes mean
family rejection.
"A lot of people can't go to their
families about this said a member
who chose to remain anonymous.
"It's hard personally because of the
hassles my family would get she
added.
"Hey your sister's a queer"mav
be a remark directed at another
family member. These factors often
keep a gay person from confiding in
his or her closest friends and familv
members. "Siblings take a lot of
abuse added Cameron.
"Everyone wants parental ap-
proval said Cameron. "Even if
you're proud ot your sell a a
person, you still war your parents
to accept that - more than that - love
you
"Parents want their children to be
happy and they're afraid their ga
children won't be because of socie-
ty's negative attitude towards
homosexuals said Cameron.
"Having the loving support of your
family makes a big difference
For the person who can't get that
familv support, the ECGC is often
the place to go. It is open to any of
the faculty, staff, students and
alumni of ECU of any sexual
preference.
See ECGC, Page 8
Student Alternatives
To Federal Funding
By ANGELA ROACH
Muff Writer
Many students are wondering
how to either survive or totally
escape the blows of the federal
government on educational
assistance. A number of individuals
as well as schools have found alter-
natives to federal aid. ECU has the
Carreer Planning arid Placement
Service, headed by Furney James,
and the Cooperative Education,
headed by Betsy Harper, to assist
students.
Career Planning and Placement,
located in the Bloxton House,
assists approximately fifty percent
of ECU's graduating class. Of those
who register, approximately
seventy-five percent report that they
have found employment.
Career Planning and Placement is
not for seniors only but includes the
entire ECU student population.
Participants are taught how to
prepare for resumes and interviews.
Films are shown to help students
grasp the importance of an inter-
view. Also available is the Career
Library which consists of descrip-
tive notebooks of various com-
panies in Greenville and elsewhere.
Director Furney James
underscored some points that are
essential in an interview. These
twelve points should be kept in mind
during an interview: (1) make the
employer aware of personal con-
tacts within the company, (2) be
prepared, (3) be down to earth and
realistic rather than using excessive
financial jargon, (4) sell yourself,
(5) be a well balanced, all around
person rather than relying solely on
credentials in a particular field, (6)
relate achievements to potential pro-
blems, (7) distinguish yourself from
the rest, (8) show positive results in-
stead of talking figures, (9) list and
stale all achievements, (10) inform
references, (11) once the decision
has been made to be with the com-
pany, communicate that the level of
compensations and benefis are war-
ranted, and (12) don't hesitate to
ask questions concerning the advan-
tages and disadvantages of the job.
"The attitude of the students has
been extremely good, very
cooperative. They have a positive
outlook in a very bad time states
Director James. In addition, he
says, "work experience is good to
have on your resume. The more it is
related to your major the better
Cooperative Education is com-
prised of two areas. Alternating Co-
op consists of one semester of a
forty-hour week job with a full-time
class load the following semseter.
The parallel model is a twenty-hour
work week while still in school.
"The parallel model works better in
a larger community. The best model
we can offer is the alternating ac-
cording to Coordinator Lorraine
Bortz.
At present there are 153 students
involved in Cooperative Education.
The number one employer is the
Department of the Navy with job
sites n New York, Maryland,
See COMPETETIVE, Page 7
Dance Concert To
Feature Students
Hun By DAV WILLIAMS
The first place winners in the Natural Lite Flying Disc Classic held last
weekend were Don Rhodes and Chris Ryan in the men's freestyle division,
and Suzanne Strait and Bronwyn Ryan in the women's; freestyle co-op win-
ners were Don Rhodes, Chris Ryan and Jason Salkey; the men's distance
winner was Tony Tomasino; women's self-caught flight winner was Linda
Burl; and women's distance winner was Michelle Marini.
Evenings of dance will be
presented by the East Carolina
Dance Theatre April 22, 23, and 24,
with nightly performances at 8:15
p.m. in McGinnis Theatre of ECU's
Messick Theatre Arts Center.
The program will include ballet,
modern dance and jazz dance selec-
tions, all choreographed by
members of the ECU dance faculty.
Featured will be "Claire de
Lune a romantic pas de deux in
comtemporary ballet, and "Grand
Tarantella a saucy, fast-paced
ballet derived from character ballet.
both choreographed by Petrus van
Muyden, ECU's ballet master.
Van Muyden has choreographed
for numerous ballet, opera and
operetta companies around the
world, as well as for television in
Europe and the U.S.
Paula Fraz Johnson, also a
member of the dance faculty, is the
choreographer of "Punkrocker a
dance arranged to "the most ir-
reverent, outrageous music possi-
ble
"The selection i used is a rock
and roll version of Tchaikovsky's
"March Militaire" from "The Nut-
cracker she said. "I feel that the
world is taking the whole punk rock
movement too seriously, and it was
time for a lighter look at it
Johnson has danced and worked
as choreographer for dance produc-
tions in Massachusetts as well as at
ECU.
Also on the program is "Court
Dances in a Magnetic Field a
dance about people being drawn
toward or repelled from one
another, choreographed by Patricia
Weeks, whose background include
work with the Virginia Tanner
School for Creative Dance and ex-
tensive work in rhythmic analysis.
The Week's dancers appear to be
attracted to various directions by a
magnetic force that may come from
any sphere. The final and most
abstract section builds to a frenzy of
sources drawing the dancers around
the stage and slows to a calm resolu-
tion.
A veteran of the New Orleans
Opera Ballet and now dance coor-
dinator at ECU, Patricia Pertalion
has choreographed two pieces for
the program, "SpacesBetween
Us" and "Homage The latter
work was inspired by the
movememnt qualities and
photographs of the legendary
Isadora Duncan.
The dance program is the first in
McGinnis Theatre since 1976. The
facility was extensively renovated
during the past few years, and now
includes a new computerized
lighting control system capable of
such special effects as pulsating
lights, which will be used during the
dance peformances.
Tickets for the Dance Theatre
concert are available from the
theatre's box office, which is open
10 a.m4 p.m. each week day. AH
tickets are $3 each and may be
reserved by telephone at
919-757-6390.
I he bo
heir Ji
lon-sti

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ar
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$.






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL.22 1982
Competetive Market For Grads
an
he box office will be open from 12-6 Sat. for anyone who hasn't purchased
their Joan Jell and the Blackhearts tickets. Price for students is $6. and the
ton-student price is $8.
Continued From Page 6
California, Cherry
Point (NC), and
Washington DC. The
National Institute of
Health in Maryland
ranks second in the hir-
ing of ECU Co-op
students. In the Green-
ville area, Burroughs
Wellcome and IBM are
the leading employers.
Many more companies
participate in the pro-
gram as well. Director
James states, "no
businesses actually
cater to graduates from
East Carolina (but) the
banks hire a lot of
graduates
Graduates of Co-op
have higher starting
stlaries as well as
shorter periods of
unemploymnet.
"Those people who are
the best students are
going to get a job. Not
just academically but
by developing relation-
ships with people nd
getting totally involved
in ECU Director
James predicts.
Interested students in
Career Planning and
Placement Service
should contact the
Bloxton House or call
757-6050. Intentions to
join Cooperative
Education should be
made known to the
dean or chairperson of
the respected depart-
ment. Applications are
then filed with the Of-
fice of Cooperative
Educaiton on the third
floor of Rawl.
These are two pro-
grams to keep students
informed about com-
panies, the job market,
competitive majors,
employment rates and
how to suceed to the
top. These agencies
help prepare students
for the real world of
job employment.
Various opportunities,
services, background,
and knowledge are pro-
vided.
Other alternatives to
the proposed cuts are
occuring within the
family. Some families
have devised a plan
whereby everybody
pools their money to
put one member
through school. After
graduation and becom-
ing employed, that per-
son provides the bulk
of the next person's
college costs. If a stu-
dent wants to go out of
state he may finish high
school in that state
while living with
relatives. However,
more students are at-
tending hometown
universities or the one
that is closest to home.
These students are stay-
ing at home rather than
in the dorms, also.
Schools are getting
into the act to help
students further their
education. Some
schools are allowing
students to pay for the
four years of school
without being subject
to additionl fees in case
of tuition hikes.
Washington University
of St. Louis began this
concept four years ago.
Installment loans for
up to eight years are us-
ed for those who don't
have all the money at
once. The total is paid
back with monthly in-
terest.
Gardner-Webb in
Boiling Springs (NC) is
using endowments to
help fund students
through school. Still
others are looking to
corporate funds as a
means of escape. Some
schools have altogether
placed a freeze on tui-
tion and room costs.
Tuition at ECU will not
rise significantly. As it
stands now the in-
crease will only be bet-
ween one and five
dollars.
Competition for
scholarships is becom-
ing more fierce.
Scholarship Search, for
a $57 fee will locate
five to twenty-five
scholarships the pro-
spective is eligible for.
For more information
send $1 to: Scholarship
Search, 1775 Broad-
way, Suite 627R, New
York, NY 10019.
Another source for
financial aid is:
Scholarsips,
Fellowships, and Loans
by S. Norman Feingold
which can be found in
the Joyner Library. A
Selected List of
Fellowship Oppor-
tunities and Aid to Ad-
vanced Education may
be obtained by writing
to: National Science
Foundation, Pulica-
tions Office, 1800 G.
Street NW,
Washington, DC
20550.
Scholarships at
various universities are
offered but with amus-
ing stipulations. Har-
vard University offers a
scholarship to students
surnamed Borden. One
school offers scholar-
ships to female students
who neither drink nor
smoke and plan to con-
tinue studying at the
University of Califor-
nia at Berkley. Another
school awards four
$300 scholarships to
left-handers.
Although unemploy-
ment is up, the summer
season opens up
various jobs. The
Greenville area seems
hungry for nursing and
computer science ma-
jors. Prospects for
math and science
teachers as well as for
intermediate education
and English majors are
becoming more com-
petitive. Two of eastern
North Carolina's
employment concerns
are the building of
technology especially in
the field of computers
as endorsed by Gover-
nor Hunt and the
North Carolina
Phosphate Company
which will operate by
the Pamlico River near
Washington.
Greenville's top com-
panies want the best
students and so does
the nation. This year's
top ten companies, ac-
cording to Fortune
magazine, are: (1) Exx-
on Corporation, (2)
Mobil Corporation, (3)
General Motors Cor-
poration, (4) Texaco
Corporation, (5) Stan-
dard Oil Company
(California), (6) Ford
Motor Company, (7)
Standard Oil Company
(Indiana), (8) Interna-
tional Business
Machine Company, (9)
Gulf Oil Company and
(10) Atlantic Richfield
Company. Atlantic
Richfield replaced
General Electric which
dropped to the number
eleven spot. Even
though Ford Motor
Company is the sixth
largest company, it has
the largest deficit -
$1.06 billion. The
Chrysler Corporation
has the second largest
loss with $475.6
million.
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��





8
I HI 1 SU ,KOI INIAN
APR It ,22 1982
ECGC Provides Service Lei at cwg r hw
el (?v)ip AJoRRis
Continued From Pane (�
I here are 2 million
gay people in the
United States which
represents ten percent
of the U.S. population.
The ECG feels that
estimate, from a '46
Kinse study, is
"conser. ative
'� Anyone w ho thinks
they can spot i teei
wrong. Ga people are
everyw here, t h ai e
parents, rv fri�
sisterv, teachers, room-
mates and employe! s
said Cameron "B,
ea is onh a small pai t
ot
are
pe
t
ccej .
always
tor ma
students at last
Carolin N
tor ti a appean
old Fount i
1978 made a I
students realie 1
rible : :
their pee �
promp
ing of tl LCCi"
students who si
the group re.i tha
"we've goi to
pie. we've hel
ou r selves.1
Barnett.
Although h�
been pai
the act �
for less h u
Barnett
speak
receni I.
publicalh
to the ed i

lan .i year,
is already
1 ast Carolinian. "For
me it is more important
to understand the dif-
ferences rather than
condemn them
Barnett wrote in the let-
ter
its (ECGC) great if
it gives me a voice
said Barnett. "1 can get
with other ga people
and talk about serious
issues
Barnett has not
received any negative
:espouses to his letter,
but Tve had lots of
positive responses
"Other members
have not been so for-
tunate. Often a gay per-
son who makes a public
admission ol his or her
sexual preference will
eceive negative phone
calls and derogatory
notes under their room
doors Recently one
1 (. CiC member got a
phone call from a per-
son who identified
i sell as a member of
ampus Crusade for
( hiist. "She told me I
could be converted and
at I was a good per-
son anyway said the
member. "I know they
can't change me
"If it were so easy to
influence your sexual
preference then
i v one w ou Id be
heterosexual because
those are the onlv role
models we're taught
when we are growing
up added Cameron.
Most gays see these
"conversion phone
calls" as intruding on
their personal lives.
"It's such an invasion
of privacy to have them
call me up in my
home said Cameron.
The ECGC facility
advisor is ECU English
Professor Edith Webb-
ber. "It's good to have
a faculty member who
is not gay but who will
stand up and speak out,
said Cameron. "It was
hard (to find an ad-
visor) because they
were afraid of harass-
ment
Webber took the
position cheerfully and
has been attending the
g r o u p' s bi-monthly
meetings on Tuesday
evenings ever since. "1
sure don't understand
gayness, but it doesn't
seem terribly impor-
tant said Webber.
"They're people who
are fun to be with, will-
ing to work, all the
good things
Controversy has sur-
rounded the group's
decision to hold their
meetings at the
Catholic Newman
House. Sister Helen
(Happy) Shondell, an
advisor to the ECGC,
allowed them to meet
there.
Since then she has
received main negative
phone calls and other
people using the
Newman House mav
hear an occasional
heckle from a passing
motorist. "1 am so
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Used Clubs Available
see Gordon Fulp at
GCC � Memorial Dr. � 756-0507
THE ATTIC &
PHI TAU'S
Bl AST OFF GREENVILLE'S
KICK ASS ROCK-N-ROLL
WEEKEND
&
K
uV
COME HAVE A BLAST
WITH TUNES FROM:
THE STONES
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V.H. LOVERBOY
REO JOURNEY
The Marines A re Coming!
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Leaders
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Candidate
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Air Ground Law
Freshman Programs � 2-Six Week Summer Sessions
Sophomore Programs � 2-Six Week Summer Sessions
Junior Programs � 1-10 Week Summer Session
THE PLATOON LEADERS CLASS PROGRAM (PLC)OFFERS A COM
MISSION AS A 2ND LIEUTENANT IN THE U.S. MARINE CORPS
AFTER GRADUATION FROM COLLEGE FRESHMAN THROUGH
GRADUATES, INCLUDING LAW SCHOOL STUDENTS ARE ELIGI
BLE TO JOIN HERE ARE A FEW OF THE FATURES OF THE PLC
PROGRAM AVAILABLE TO THOSE WHO CAN QUALIFY:
1. No on campus commitments (Drills, Classes or Meetings)
2. Aviation, Ground and Law options available
3 $100.00 a month, during school months after completion of
your fir6t session of training
4. Salary that is competitive with civilian occupations
5. NO commitment incurred until you accept your commission
YOUR MARINE OFFICER SELECTION TEAM IS CAPTAIN JACK
MOORE AND GYSGT. BOB LA MONDA. WE WILL BE ON YOUR CAM
PUS ON 20, 21 & 22 APRIL 1982 FROM 9:30 TO 4:00 IN THE
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER, OR SEE THE PLACEMENT OF
FICE FOR MORE DETAILS ON OUR VISIT.
HvJAl, MA Got
Lots olq ajotts to
ii �i i
i L'i �!
i unit
U IU'
HAS f Cfiico of yoos
tCrUAPYTrCCfWt
C0vjs� I
r
'liHUl
Jll III
IJI'f
.1111
III �l
ffel
111:
THogGH
grateful to Happy and
the whole Newman
community for lettng
us meet there said
Cameron.
'The most valuable
Barnett and concerned. "We are
Cameron both agree helping to dissolve
that times are getting that said c ameron.
better, as far as support Barnett cited the high
and openness from numbers of positive let
people in general is ters being written to
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I he East Craolinian Maybe Webber sum-
supporting the equal med up the new grow-
rights ot ga people ing openness and ac-
and supporting the eeptance of gays this
SGA funding for the way, "I sure do like the
ECGC. people she conclud
ed.
serice ve oiler is thai
ve give people a reasor
to think, noi to jusi ac
cepl what they've beer
taughtameron con-
tinued.
ATjTIC 1GrrRESP0N$,BUTY
So i
lightclub
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 16
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
J18S 00 Pregnancy Test Bitth
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Pregnancy Counseling For lur
thei information call 837 0535
(Toll Free Number
800 771 ?5o8) between 9AM
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RALEIGH WOMEN S
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917 West Morgan St
Raleigh N C
THURSDAY
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FRI. & SAT.
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SUNDAY f
REDUCED ADMISSION FOR
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ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re-
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as specifically noted in this ad If we
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CONDITIONER OR
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NET PEPSI OR
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Jeno's Pizzas
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40"
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BAGGED
Chips & Snacks n
0PMOLII
COSMITICS A J
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
APRIl 22, 19K2 PageS
Sweeting
Keys ECU
Placement
B mOMASBRAME
VnistaM Npiris t.diiur
Easiarolina's Dr
Sweeting won the individual
honors in the Old Dominion
Invitational while the Pirates
as a team Finished fourth in
their last tournament of the
yeai.
Sweeting broke a tourna-
ment record the first day with
a five under par score of 64.
He followed with a 73 the se-
cond da to take the individual
competition with a two-day
total of 137.
Sweeting was hard-pressed
by both Boh Mallox(UNC-W)
and Steve rasho (Temple) who
finished the tournament in a
tie with a score o 138.
rwo Pirates ended their
careers in the Nags Head-
based, tournament. Jerry Lee
had back-to-back 73 scores for
a two-da total o' 146. The
othei denioi was John Der-
� ho turned in a 148 total
The other Pirate par-
ticipants were Chris Czaja
with a score of 151 and David
Waggoner with a 148.
"we had one o our best
am efforts of the year said
1 (, I Coach Bob Helmick.
I he Pirates had their best
cam -core o' the year with a
score of 58 This score left
ECU m fourth place as a team.
After the first day, ECU
were tied for second in team
honors with ODU. Temple
was in first and did not falter
as they took the team competi-
tion with a score of 562.
William & Mary finished se-
cond with a teamscoe of 572.
Campbell took third place by
one stroke over the Pirates
with a 577.
ECU was hurt when golfer
John Riddle turned his knee
the first day. This injury left
ECU with only five golfers to
finish the tournament. The
other teams had six golfers in
with only four scores would be
counted for the team competi-
tion. This disadvantage made
the Pirates mark off one bad
individual score while the
others marked off their two
worse scores.
Lee said, "We went out on a
good note at ODU. Everyone
played good, and the team
played consistent throughtoi t
the tournament
Helmick added, "We did nt
have anyone spectating
"We're just happy someone
on the team won said Lee.
"This was the frst tournament
anyone has won since I have
been here
Sweeting replied after winn-
ing the individual honors,
"This is simply awesome
As A 17-Year-Old The Sport
Didn 7 Come EasyBut
By VMl I I AM YELVERTON
Sports diior
East Carolina golfer
Don Sweeting was in high
k -port didn't come
easily.
"1 couldn't start until 1 was
17 the 20-year old East
rolina business major says.
�"1 -imply wasn't good
enough
It only his former coach and
tmmates could see him now,
' East Carolina two-day
lividual champion since
it hern C onference winner
Ed Pinnex in 1972.
He launched a one-man
assault on a tough George
Cobb-designed Nags Head
course to win the Old Domi-
nion University Invitational
with an outstanding score of
137 � five-under-par � a
tournament record.
He shot a superb first-round
64 and followed that up with a
solid 73 � in inclimate
weather.
"It was hard to describe
he says of his record 64 Mon-
day . "It didn't affect me as
much as the 67 I shot in the
Palmetto (tournament).
Maybe 1 was just thinking
about something else
But even after those superb
rounds, he still was a little
disappointed. "As a team
he said, "we should have
finished first or second
The Pirates placed fourth.
The treacherous Nags Head
winds did have an affect on
play, he says. "The first day it
(the wind) was mild, maybe
five to 15 miles per hour. The
second day it was kind of
strong, maybe up to 20, and 1
had to use two extra clubs to
allow for the wind
He says he felt he had a
good chance of winning at the
beginning of the tournament.
"1 knew I had to play well
he adds. "I shot five-under for
two days, which is real strong
for a college golf tourna-
ment
His goal the second day was
to "play as hard as I could. 1
knew I wasn't going to lose it
with an 80. 1 felt it (the 64) was
to my advantage. 1 could
shoot a couple of bad shots
and not really worry about
it
He is familiar with Cobb's
work � his home course is the
Cobb-designed Finley course
in Chapel Hill � and he notic-
ed the similarities with the
Nags Head course. "It's a
placement course he says.
"You have to put the ball in
the fairway. And the wind
makes it tough
He made only one bogey
during his first-round 64,
shooting 31 on the front side
and 33 on the back.
Sweeting says he hopes for
an opportunity to get his pro-
fessional touring card but
quickly adds "college comes
first
By CINDY PLEASANTS
taMMl spurt r dtlur
The East Carolina women's soft-
ball team added two more victories
to their winning streak, beating N.
C. State, 4-0 and 5-3, in a
doubleheader Tuesday.
With the two wins, ECU will
enter the NCA1AW state tourna-
ment this weekend with a 32-7
record. In the first game, ECU
scored three runs in the second inn-
ing. Fran Hooks reached on an er-
ror by the shortstop, and Maureen
Buck hit a double to bring her in.
Shirley Brown also reached on an
error in centerfield and brought
Practice
Ends With
Sat. Game
durine the spring due to the change
in offenses. ECU's third-year head
A month of spring practice comes coach says the conversion to the "I"
B CHARLES CHANDLER
Syria t diior
Sam Jones: MVP
Jones Selected
Most Valuable
Senior Sam Jones received Past
Carolina women's basketball's most
prestigious award at the I adv Pirate-
Awards Dinner at the Greenville
Ramada Inn Tuesday night.
Head coach Cathy Andruzzi also
announced the signing o three more
recuits to climax the evening's
festivities.
Jones was selected by her team-
mates as the winner of The Daily
Reflector's Most Valuable Player
Award. This award is the only
honor voted on bv the players. The
Mount Olive native was also receiv-
ed the "Best Ail-Around Award
Mary Denkler, the state's leading
scorer this past season, was the reci-
pient of the "Best Offensive Perfor-
mance Award She averaged 21.1
points and also was her team's
leading rebounder.
Transfer Loletha Harrison was
the winner of the "Best Defensive
Player Award otherwise known as
the "Rat of the Year
A special honor, the "1 Survived"
award, was presented to guard
onlv
Pillion Barnes, who is the
player to have played tour years
under Andruzzi.
Jones and Barnes also received
senior plagues.
The new recruits joining already-
signed star Bridget Jenkins m next
year's freshman class are I isa
Squirewell, Sylvia Bragg and Rita
Simmons.
Squirewell was a star at Wake
Forest-Rolesville, where the 510"
forward earned All-State honors.
meaning she was one of the top 10
women basketball players in North
Carolina.
Bragg is a 58" wing player from
Jefferson-Huguenot-Wythe High
School in Richmond. Va. She is a
former teammate of East Carolina
center Darlene Chaney and has been
chosen All-Regional and par-
ticipated in the District oi Columbia
Metro-All-State game.
The 6-foot Simmons, a center-
forward, played at Miami Center
High School in Miami, where she
was an All-City selection.
to an end Saturday when the East
Carolina football team holds its an-
nual Purple-Gold intrasquad game.
Head coach Ed Emory, who will
watch from the stands as his
assistants do the coaching, expects
the game to be a close one. "1 think
the two clubs are divided almost
perfectly even he said.
Garnetime in Ficklen Stadium tor
the annual affair is 7 p.m. There will
be no admission charge.
The Pirates will unveil to the
public for the first time then new I
formation, which replaces the
wishbone as ECU's offensive set.
Offensive coordinator I arry
Beckish will direct the Cold team
and defensive coordinator Norm
Parkei will coach the Purple.
The teams were divided last
weekend through a draft by the
senior players. The Gold team
features quarterback Kevin Ingram,
fullback lamest Bvner, offensive
guard Terry Long and linebacker
Mike Grant.
1 he Purple squad is led bv
quarterback Oreg Stewart, tailback
Jimmy Walden, offensive tackle
and AU-Amercia candidate Jod
Schulz, a defensive end.
Alter the game, the Pirates will
call oft on-the-field drills until fall
practice begins in August. The
team's first game is September 11 at
N.C. State.
Emory says that the spring has
gone well, and that competition ol
late has been tierce.
�"It's been amazing' he said.
"Yesterday (Tuesday) the defense
slutted it in the offense's ear in a
scrimmage. Ffodav (Wednesday)
was totally opposite. 1 he offense
walked away with it
The offense � definitely the reci-
pient of most ol the media attention
has gone as well as expected.
"We've come a long, long way
offensively. We'll cap 18 days of
practice on Saturday and from what
I've seen I think we have a chance to
be a guod offensive team
The "I of course, demands
talent at the skill positions. The
foremost of those is quarterback,
where Greg Stewart and Kevin In-
gram have been involved in quite a
battle.
"If I had to play today I'd start
Stewart Emory said. "But with
another day of practice it might be
Ingram. They have both been com-
peting like hell for the position
Defensively. Emory says the
Pirates can be expected to show
marked improvement in the fall.
"Our defense is more aggressive,
more physical and plays with more
confidence than any time over the
last two years
Defensive end. especially, is a
spol that pleases Emory.
"I think we've got three defensive
ends that are as good as anybody in
the country. Jody Schulz. Jeff
Pegues and Curtis Wyatt have really
been something. And J.C. Plott is
pushing hard too. The situation here
is very solid
Emory described the current crop
ol Pirates as "probably the best per-
sonel Past Carolina has ever had
"We're about five players away
from being a great football team
he said. "I'm not saying they
necessarily have to come from out-
side. We've just got to come up with
some more depth at several places,
like the defensive line, center and
noseguard.
"We're a long way from being
ready to play, but we're a hell ol a
lot closer than any time since I've
been here
Paper Will Name Annual
Athletes of Year Tuesday
fhe Past Carolinian will name
Male and Female Athletes of the
Year in next Tuesday's edition, the
last of the semester for the paper.
This will mark the fourth con-
secutive year that the awards have
been pres ted. Previous male win-
ners were all football players �
quarterback Leander Green in 1979,
fullback Theodore Sutton in 1980
and halfback Anthony Collins last
year.
1 ady Pirate basketball standout
Kathy Riley is the only two-time
recipient, winning the female award
in 1980 and 1981. Another basket-
ball player, Rosie Thompson, was
the 1978 winner.
ECU's Cynthia Shepard swats a single.
Head
Buck in. Second-ba. man Ginger
Rothermel then singled to score
Brown in.
In the sixth inning, ECU's
Melody Hamm singled, and came
around to third on a single from
Sherri Stout. Jo Landa Clayton
then hit a sacrifice fly, scoring
Hamm from third.
In the second game, ECU scored
two in the second inning with Cyn-
thia Shepard leading off with a dou-
ble. Clayton singled, bringing
Shepard in. Buck was up next, hit-
ting a pop fly to advance Clayton to
second, and Brown singled to bring
Clayton in.
Still tied after seven innings, ECU
scored three in the top of the eighth
to take the lead.
With only one out, Rothermel
singled and Roth walked before
pinch-runner Beverly Humphrey
took her place on base. Mitzi Davis
pinch-hit for Yvonne Williams and
singled to load the bases. Melody
Ham, hitting .351 this year, tripled
to bring all three runners in.
N. C. State scored one in the bot-
tom of the eighth but came up two
runs short.
Head coach Sue Manahan said,
"We're still struggling with the top
of our batting order, but the bottom
pulled us through Manahan add-
ed, "Defense has been consistent,
which is important
In the second game, Manahan
praised Ham for performing when
the Lady Pirates needed her the
most. "We had a new heroine out
there Manahan said.
ECU will now prepare for the
state tournament this weekend. As
defending champions, there is no
doubt where the Lady Pirates
priorities are.
"We've been looking forward to
the playoffs for a good while now
Manahan said.
Does being the number one-seed
put any pressure on the Pirates? "I
don't think so Manahan said. "I
think people have been gunning for
us all year
And according to the statistics,
there's no wonder. As a team ECU
has 386 hits,including 25 doubles,
22 triples and 23 homeruns. After 34
games, the team's batting average
was .357 which is one reason for the
220 runs scored.
In accumulative statistics, their
opponents have hit .269 against
ECU, with only 13 doubles, 10
triples and 5 homeruns.
Two of the Lady Pirates, Mitzi
Davis and Cynthia Shepard, have
had over 50 hits apiece this season,
both with a .476 batting average.
Pitcher Jeanette Roth has had an
outstanding year with a 20-5 record
and an ERA average of 2.07.
The East Carolina coach refuses
to be over-confident. "We're going
to try and keep the same attitude
we've had all year she said. "We
just hope our luck continues for
about a month
The tournament begins Friday.
ECU plays at 2:30 p.m. against the
winner of the Campbell-Lenoir
Rhyne game.
V





.
10 THE EAST CAROLlNAjsl APRlL22iJ982
'
A

I
Any
Organization
Patti Harritl is a new ECU cheerleader majoring in interior design.
Beusch&Lomb
Soft Lenses
COMPLETE
UPTOWN GREENVILLE
752 7649
SPECIAL LATE SHOW
FRI. & SAT. NITE - 11:30 P.M.
3 BIG FEATURES
SPICY!
includes initial eve exarmra
kit, instructions anc
nation, lenses, care
jp visits tor one
�th ECU student ID. required.
00
Social, honor or
service, wanting to be
represented in the
yearbook must
schedule pictures
to be taken on
Thursday, April 29.
on AFRICAN Mil
WILD!
tro Ml
optomctrk:
�Y�CAR�C�NT�R
Of Greenville PA
228GREENVILLE BLVD.
TIPTON ANNEX
756 9404
Dr. Peter Hollis
SOW
LOOKISG COOI) COSTS LESS
THE NINE
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FRITZ
�ECAT
W O.AMWCWWWWOW
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Call 752-5543 or
757-6501 for an appointment.
Ask for Mike Davis.
mm
HI
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WRIGHT BLDG
SELECTED MERCHANDISE
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SPECIM VALUES I SPECIAL VALUES SPECIALV4LLJES
c.
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E.CU. NAPKINS, CUPS,
AND MATCHES
50 OFF
CAMPUS LIFE POSTERS
ECU. PIRATE POSTERS
20 OFF
75-th ANNIVERSARY
BUMPER STICKERS,
PENCILS,AMP T-SHIRTS .
50 OFF
SELECTED GROUP
RAINCOATS
SHORTS AND SHIRTS
JACKETS
SUN VISORS
RAIN HATS
COWBOY HATS
ENTERTAINMENT
E.CU. X4ZZ ENSEMBLE
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ROBERT SIMMONS BRUSHES
BELLINI OIL PAINTS
ONE TABLE BOOKS
25 EA.
ONE TABLE BdOKS
25iL 8.
NEW REMAINDER BOOKS
UP TO oQ OFF
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CtfEHJEETTtHlffCTTTTITXTI
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WED, APRIL 21
g.3Owr40O�
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
�����w�WrWtWWff3ffTmri
ixiiixixixpxpgp ��
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OWNED AND OPERATED BY EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 22, 1982
11
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loooooc
Georgia Tech Upsets 'Pack
CHAPEL HILL,
N.C. (UP1) - Stu
Rogers pitched a two-
hitler Wednesday to
lead Georgia Tech to a
5-1 upset of North
Carolina State while
home runs from David
Lemaster and Steve
Van Dyke lifted Clem-
son past Duke 10-9 in
the opening round of
the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference baseball tour-
nament.
Wake Forest took on
Virginia and host
North Carolina faced
With their victories,
Clemson and Georgia
Tech advanced to face
each other in the win-
ner's bracket Thursday
while North Carolina
State and Duke drop-
ped to a loser's bracket
match against each
other.
W
y&
8
Beta IKappa Alptja
New cheerleader Victor Hudson is a sophomore from Greenville.
Banking
Cheerleader Donald Sawyer is majoring in art.
STUDENTS!
Your last chance -
to buy tickets for the
JOAN JETT concert
this Saturday
Central Ticket Office,
MSC from noon-6 p.m.
THE SHOE OUTLET
(Located beside Evans Seafood)
Featuring name brand shoes at bargain prices.
Up To 75 OFF regular prices
Bass Steward-McGuire Brouse Abouts
201 W. Washington St. Within walking distance of campus.
104 Red Banks Rd. (Behind Shoney's) 756-6000
ECU Special
Tues. 4-27-82
6:30-10:00
All students will be
admitted FREE
includes skate rental
FRIDAY ONLY
ALL YOU CAN EAT!
FLOUNDER DINNER
.���
�JV
INCLUDES FRENCH FRIES. COLE SLAW. TARTAR
SAUCE & HUSHPUPPIES
$39
SHONEYS
264 By-Pass
Greenville, N.C.
l�hih ninmrsitp
QtCaircutters
is offering a
20 discount
to all ECU Students wvalid I.D.
Jfotternito

Phil Jones
specializes
in easy-care,
low maintenance,
precision
haircuts.
Located on corner
of 14th &
Charles Blvd.
Phone 752-0559
By appointment only
We appreciate the time and effort of
this year 's officers:
Whitten Little � Pres.
Carl Rowe � PresElect
Susan Beebe � Sec.
Ed Brawley � Treas.
Annual Banquet
Thurs April 22nd
7 p.m. at the Beef Barn
All members and guests
are encouraged to attend.
SPEAKER � Regional Executive of Wachovia
FOR FURTHER DETAILS � CALL 757-1330
I
1
MEDIA BOARD
is now accepting
applications for
Day Student
Representatives
Applications can be
picked up at
Media Board office.
8-1 and 2-5
Deadline for
applications � 4-29-82
t
r
-jJn�mwi will





� 12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL, 22 1982
Politicians Turn Down Ground Zero Speaking Invitations
Continued From Page 5
nuclear superiority over
the United States
(as) the most serious
threat to world peace
that we face
In the same letter,
East said 'the best way
to prevent a nuclear
war" is for the U.S. to
possess "a superior
nuclear force" in order
"to win a nuclear ex-
change with the Soviet
Union
Welch praised
Howell for being
"supportive and
helpful in trying to en-
courage our political
leadership to come to
ECU. He did every
single thing we asked,
he couldn't have done
anymore
"I was surprised and
delighted at the number
of faculty who are con-
cerned Welch added,
calling the efforts for
disarmament "a great
test of whether
democracy will sur-
vive
Here at East
Carolina, the theme of
"Ground Zero week"
is "Ignoring Nuclear
War Won't Make It Go
Away A full week's
program of events have
been going on.
"Health and
Economic Aspects of
the Nuclear Threat"
was the title of Wednes-
day's Allied Health
program.
Discussions and
films have also been
taking place. At 4:30
p.m. today in Room
205 of the Physics
Building ECU pro-
fessor Dr. James Joyce
will lead a program
called "Technology of
Nuclear Warfare
On Thursday
through Saturday the
film "Hiroshima and
Nagasaki" will be
shown in the lobby of
Mendenhall at 6:45
p.m. Other events in-
cluded "Physiological
Response to Nuclear
War a discussion to-
day at Pitt County
Memorial Hospital,
and "Nuclear War:
Religious and Moral
Perspective an in-
terdenominational
forum of local
ministers on April 28 at
the Allied Health
auditorium.
Classifieds
LOST AND
FOUND
4ISSING: Black and tan German
.hepherd puppy, � mo old, lost
iround �th and Student St , his
name is "Sam If seen, please
call 757573.
ATTENTION
Classified ads will be taken ONLY
during the following hours.
Monday � I 15 3:00
Tuesday � 3 00 3:00
Wednesday � 1:15 3 00
Thursday � 300 300
Friday � 1:15-3:00
You must place the ads in person
and pay tor them in advance.
Rates are $1 for the first IS words
and $.05 per word after the first fif-
teen.
FOR SALE
TRAILER FOR SALE: set up in
Greenville 3 BR. all electric, ac,
excellent condition $3t�5 call Tar-
boro M3-W.
VIVITAR ZOOM LENS 75 110 with
macro for Nikon mount used only
two times. U5 Call 757-3310.
SKIsTfOR SALE: K 3, 185 comp
110 skis with Soloman bindings.
St3S. Call 757 3310 and leave
number.
j7s CUBIC FEET
REFRIGERATOR Excellent con
dition 550 or best offer Call
7M-M0S.
WATER BE OS: Don't pay retail
for your waterbed Buy a complete
1st quality waterbed with a 15 yr.
factory warranty for as low as
$17. May styles to choose from.
Laway and Delivery adv Buy now
and recieve a free set of padded
rails (�3� value). Call David for
appointment 751-3401.
PIONEER STEREO direct drive
turntable, 45 watt amplifier,
tuner, four HPM 100 speakers,
audio rack, $1300, call 753 l�3 late
nights.
NEW FEMALE ten speed bike
$75.00. 753-3M1.
SINGLE YELLOW quilted bed
sread, pillow sham and mattress
pad included, $15, call 7SI m.
REFRIGERATOR 4.5 cubic foot
with small freeier. Like new. Stil
under warranty. $150.1 burner Hot
plate, like new $5 I large ad
iustable shelving unit $13-1 small
adjustable shelving unit $5 or both
for $15. Call 7S IM7 or see May
Brantley III Slay.
SIX FOOT wooden shelf, fitted and
ventilated to hold a small
refrigerator, 3 more large shelves,
perfect for dorm cooking supplies.
Call 7S� W4,
l�7TPHILCO FORD Refrigerator
30xS wice maker $100 or best of-
fer; I chest of drawers and I desk,
$45 each; l set of MacGregor golf
clubs, irons and woods, $50; must
sell all -Bob at 7H-S5W
4TCUBIC FOOT refrigerator. Ex-
ce-lant condition. Automatic
defrost. Like brand new. $170. Call
753-331.
1V0 SUZUKI 550 L: black,
silhouette fairing, many optional
parts, and matching helmits. 45-50
mpg. An excellant compromise
between luxury and speed. Set up
for summer at $3300. Call 75 �137
afternoons and keep trying.
PERSONALS
Bob de bob, bop bo de bop bop, Bob
shu bob. dang dang dang. Ding
dong dingBlue Moon.
DEAR BABY BEGOTA: This past
year has been great. Now many
times you've kept me from being
late. Oh thanks for changing my
sheets and whens the next time
that house councl meets Beinq
roommates was no hard labor I'm
looking forward to being
neighbors I'M never forget the th.
It'll be lammin' on the 2nd I have
faith. Read my lips theres
somethng I have to say. You're so
preaty and I Luv ya in a special
way. -Love, Sunshine.
REG: Thank you for the last year
and a half, yu made it wonderful
for me. I lovejfOuPep-pur"
Randy � Because of you, this
weekend is going to be the best
weekend of the year. I Love You,
Cara.
HELP
WANTED
753-JMl.
INTERESTED IN Journalism
Public Relations work? Students
are needed to work in the ECU
Sports Information and Promo-
tions Office. Inquire at 7$7-44fl.
Good Writing Skills necessary.
lilRVICES
CARICATURES BY WEYLER
Greenville's original personalized
art service. Have cartoon done of
yourself or a loved one - a unique
gift idea. $10 for � x 10. black and
white or color. Call 753-5775
TYPING: TERM, Thesis,
Resumes, Dissertations, etc. Pro
fessional quality at lowest rates.
Call Kempie Dunn anytime
753733
NOTARY PUBLIC Call Amy at
7 57 3734
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST wants
to type thesis, dissertations,
publications, manuscripts or term
papers at home. Cajl7S-30
TYPIST: All papers; Professional
quality at low rates; 10 years ex-
perience. Call WMW
PROFESSIONAL TYPING Ser-
vice, experience, quality work
IBM Selectric typewriters Call
Lame 5hire 75 1043 or Gail Joyner
754
FURNISHED TWO bedroom apt
for sublease May August, possibly
Fall. $340month. includes heat
7S��V
PERSON(S) TO Sublease one
bedroom apt nth St. May Aug
Furnishedunturnished $1�0 mth.
ROOMMATE WANTED yto share
one-bedrom apartment. Large
bedroom, fully furnished. Two
blocks from campus. $47.50 plus
one half utilities. The Wilmardeli
Apartments. 1005 South Elm
Street. Apartment . Drop by
anytime between four and eight.
TWO BEDROOM TOWNHOUSE:
Fully furnished, pool and sauna
rights. Great Location. Available
for summer rental. Call 75-05.
TWO BDR. FURNISHED Apt. to
sublease during the months of
May thru Aug. No deposit
necessary. Call TSTTMS
TWO BEDROOM Furnished
apartment. 5 min. from campus.
?�?� 7S"
ONE BEDROOM Apt. for rent.
Available starting May 1st. Calbe,
pool, close to campus. Contact
Lisa or Gena at 757 i�5.
HELP: FEMALE roommates
needed to sublease 3 bdr.
townhouse from May thru aug. Air
conditioned, pool and tennis
courts. Call Donna 75-40.
TWO BEDROOM Apartment for
sublease this summer and fall if
desired. Pool, air, tennis, call
7SI 7033.
SHARE SPACIOUS Apt. in Larg
House 13 everything. Call
754 5450. Leave message tor Dee.
ONE OR TWO Roommates
wanted to share Georgetown Apt.
Now thru next year. Phone:
7 5 J72
TWO FEMALE Roommates need
ed for summer school. College
View Apts. Rent $50 13 utilities
walking distance from campus
Call 757 173.
FURNISHEO TWO Bedroom
Apartment. Two blocks from cam
pus. May August. 3$0month.
Call 753-1M.
NEEDED FEMALE roommate to
share a quiet apartment 13 block
from Jenkins Art Building. Rent is
$75 per month plus 13 utilities,
also bedroom furniture needed.
Preferably an Art maior, but will
accept anyone interested. C�l
753 3404 and ask for Lisa.
NEEDED A CHRISTIAN female
roommate to share two bedroom
apartment for summer and fall.
$0month plus 13 utilities. One
block from campus. Call 7S3 304
and ask for Kathy.
5FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
for nicely furnished apt. at
Cypress Gardens. Within Walking
distance of campus. Call 75l-3tt4.
SUMMER SCHOOL ROOM
MATES needed: 1 or 3 roommates
needed for both sessions of sum-
mer school. Big pool and nice loca
tion at Tar River Apts. $0month
or less. 13 or 14 utilities
depending on number of room
mate. Call Yancey at 75144
anytime.
APARTMENT FOR RENT
Either or both summer sessions
One or two people, furnished I mile
from campus. 757-1715.
GOING TO SUMMER SCHOOL
and need a place to live? How
about a nicely furnished apart
ment instead of the dorms
Available May through Aug walk
� ng distance to campus, call
7SM.
THREE BEDROOM Eastbrook
apt. to sublet for summer, furnish
ed, I 13 baths. For more info con
tact Mimi or Carol at 753 4t3
TWO FURNISHED ROOMS
available to rent tor the summer.
Four blocks from campus. Call
JSHtM.
ONE OR TWO Females to share
large room. Mid-May-Mid
August. Apt. complex, one mile
from ECU Pool, laundry and Bus
Service. Rent $77 Each Call
754444
ROOM FOR RENT: Two blocks
from campus. $100 plus 14
utilities. Available both sessions
summer school. Call 75 7097.
ROOMS FOR RENT Per summer
session in furnished house with
AC, Kitchen facilities, TV, Pool
Table and Party Rooms, call
753 1073.
Apt. Available now thru next year
Phone 751 271
NEEDED ROOMMATE for sum
mer and or fall. Furnished Apt on
Woodlawn 3 blocks trom campus.
$�0 per month. Contact Ed
7513.
TWO BEDROOM furnished apart
ment. Five minutes from campus
Sublease May Aug Call 75 444
FURNISHED TWO Bedroom
Trailer for rent sumrr �r and possi
ble fafl, Available NOW.
$100month and 12 utilities.
757 1193
ROOM FOR RENT: TWO blocks
from campus. $100 plus 14
utilities. Available both sessions
summer school Call 75 7097
MODERN DUPLEX for summer
sublet. Two bedroom backyard,
sundeck.235 May
August 753 5070, 752 9J22.752 3570
LARGE TWO BEDROOM Apart
ment within blocks for the college
Gas heat. Pool, new carpet.
Available May I, 193. 23Smonth
Cal 757-4124 and ask for Gail and
754 S577 after 5:00
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: 1st SS only
$107.50mo plus 12 utilities
SMALL TWO BEDROOM furnish
ed house for rent. Need to
sublease; May through August
Close to campus and
downtown. $335 monthl, and
utilities Call 752 4434
PRIVATE ROOMS to rent in fami
ly home three blocks from cam
pus. 110 S. Woodlawn behind Over
ton's. Available for summer ses
sions at $110 to $130 per session
also available for fall. One large
room ideal for art maior. Call
753 0495 after 4 pm
TWO BEDROOM Apt for rent
River Bluff, $33Smonth Starting
mid May Call 75 1715
ONE OR TWO Female Room
mates neede to share Georgetown
(water and c. ble met) Can
Eluabeth at 753 30 after 30
weekdaysll day weekends
ROOMMATE WANTED 1st and
3cd SS $137 50mo and 12
utilities Must be a non smoker
Call Keith at (h) 75 77 or (o)
757 4729
CARICATURES BY WEYLER
Greenville's original personalned
art service. Have cartoon done ot
yourself or a loved one a unique
gift idea $10 for � x 10, black and
white or color Call 752 5775
TYPING: TERM, Thesis
Resumes, Dissertations, etc Pro
lessional quality at lowest rates
Call Kempie Dunn anytime
752733
7- -
f s
�v
JTOYNER
LIBRARY
� r.
Tar Landing Seafood,
Restaurant
PILOT TRAINING
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Bob Hearing �
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Phone 758-0327
Cross Green Street Bridge
Take left at 1st Light
Locc'ed one block down on left
BOOKS ALE
SoonterxA by tk fritnA ef the library
in CfniimcUen wftfc Et Cardinal Alwewtt A��
National Library Week
ana tftf University 9 75 At,�triry UUhmUan.
EVH16IT3
0OOKSALE U b kM it t-Hy ri Joy
tfriiv April 23- 9AM - 9PM
Saturiiv,Afrit ZA- ?AM-5fN-J
&ccA tctien a$ pfwtfc,k �� pricti ZSrg
and vtrAhackA � priced �'�
$2.99
MEAL
DEAL!
A foot long BMT
Subway Sandwich and bag
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Get a BMT�our Biggest, Meatiest Tastiest
sanawich. Ada a bag of chips, ana you've
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tnis coupon to your nearest Subway oaay
, - �
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208 E. 5th St.
758-7979
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THURSDAY
SPECIAL
ATTIC
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Come get blasted with the QKTs
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 22, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 22, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.196
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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