The East Carolinian, April 20, 1982






QTJhe �aat (Earoltnian
cl
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 58
No.
Tuesday, April 20, 1982
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
ECU Graduate Wins Pulitzer Prize
By PATRICK O'NEILL
V�ff Wnler
A 1974 East Carolina graduate
has won a Pulitzer Prize for jour-
nalism.
Rick Atkinson, who majored in
English at ECU, was the recipient of
this year's prize for a series of
stones he wrote for the Kansas City
firm's
"It's one o the most prestigious
awards in the country said ECU
English professor Dr. F. David
Sanders. Atkinson is a former stu-
dent ot Sanders and both have re-
mained friends over the years.
Atkinson told The East Caroli-
nian in a telephone interview that he
was verv surprised and excited to
have received the award. He added
that ECU was "a very exciting place
to be" during the turbulant years of
Vietnam.
According to Sanders, Atkinson
graduated magna cum laude in the
ECU Honors Program and main-
tained an average of better than 3.7.
He was also involved in campus
politics and was elected vice presi-
dent of the SGA in 1973.
Atkinson recalled his experiences
as ECU's first public defender and
his involvement in the defense of
Robert Thonen, then editor of the
Founiainhead. The editor was ex-
pelled from the university for
publishing a letter containing a
derogatory remark directed at then
chancellor Leo Jenkins.
Thonen was found guilty along
with Bill Shell, who wrote the letter,
and Founiainhead cartoonist Ken
Finch, who drew a cartoon "poking
fun at Leo Jenkins
Atkinson said the convictions
were imposed in "an utter kangaroo
court" and that "the administration
was trying to control the newspaper
and the student body m general" at
that time.
He called the case the "biggest
event in North Carolina at that
time" as "several hundred people"
sat through the proceedings.
Atkinson said Thonen had a lot
more savvy than most of the
students. The editor sued ECU in
federal court and eventually won his
case for readmittance to school.
Sanders called Atkinson "an ac-
tivist" for his contributions towards
enactment of "liberal visitation
hours and relaxed curfew hours for
women students He also was in-
volved in student housing efforts
and voter registration drives, accor-
ding to Sanders. Atkinson
"promoted programs to increase the
intellectual and artistic climate on
campus, particularly in campus
publications Sanders said.
While SGA vice president, Atkin-
son said he acted "as a liason with
campus publications particularly
the Founiainhead.
Atkinson received the Pulitzer for
a series on U.S. management of
water resources and for a story bas-
ed on interviews with the 1966
graduating class of West Point.
Sanders said that the judges chose
Atkinson's work for what they
described as "solid reporting and
stylish writing
Atkinson in fact applied and
received congressional appointment
and acceptance to West Point. In-
stead, he accepted a full scholarship
to attend East Carolina.
Atkinson, now 30, was born in
Munich, West Germany, in a
military family and went on to com-
plete his graduate studies in English
at the University of Chicago. He
became interested in journalism
after accepting job with a
newspaper in Pittsburg. He now
works in the Washington bureau of
the Kansas City Times.
"I hope the ability of students to
react in an outraged fashion has not
ebbed away Atkinson said. He
added that he was happy to see
students "stirring up consciousness
over the nuclear issue and that
grassroots movements, led by
students could be the impetus for
change.
Atkinson recalled with fondness
his four years at ECU and said he
"had lots of fun" while he was here.
He concluded by saying "hello" to
all his friends still in Greenville.
WILLIAMS
'Footing Good Time
I hursdav's "Barefoot on the Mall" celebration was electric (top left), with Touch, The Mime Trio; arresting
(rijjht), as one of ECU's finest shows comedienne Judy Carter: and envigorating (bottom), with the Trinidad
Iripoli Steel Band.
President Situation
Still Unclear Despite
Long Review Hearing
By MIKE HUGHES
Ammuim Ncwi Mimr
Does ECU have a clear winner in the 1982 SGA elec-
tion? No, not yet.
After a closed marathon meeting, an ECU review
hoard (comprised of members of the ECU honor board)
recessed having "accomplished nothing
This was the opinion of several members of the coun-
cil upon leaving the meeting room. However, none of
those taking part in the hearing would elaborate on just
exactly what went on during the the first six hours.
The hearing, which began at 7 p.m was called so
thai charges tiled against the candidates � Eric Hender-
son and David Cook � could be heard.
However, according to sources close to the parties in-
volved, Henderson has dropped all charges against
Cook.
Cook's charges stem from Henderson's alleged elec-
tions violations. These include illegal placement of cam-
paign material in the Green Mill Run Apartments mail
boxes, campaigning in the female dormitories without
an escort (an infraction of the ECU visitation policy)
and tearing down campaign posters.
Sources also said that Cook has charged Henderson
with overspending the allowable campaign budget of
$200.
But as of 1 a.m. Tuesday, no word was given as to the
substantiation of anv charge.
Those board members who ventured to comment at
all upon leaving the room simply repeated that they are,
in effect, sworn to secrecy.
The quest to fill the position of SGA president dates
back to Wednesdav. March 23 � nearly four weeks ago
� when Cook emerged as victor by 20 votes, 887 to 867,
However, since the vote spread was within three per-
cent, Henderson requested a runoff, which was then
scheduled for April 7.
When that date rolled around, and the runoff election
results were tallied, Henderson defeated Cook, 755 to
709.
Within 48 hours. Cook filed his initial charges against
Henderson. This constitutes an action provided for in
the SGA election rules.
However, just what exactly will happen when the
board adjourns is, as yet, not known.
According to Article XIV of the SGA Documents, the
appeals board has the power to disqualify a candidate
from the election if it is proven that he or she is in viola-
tion of the election rules.
A few board members did comment that they believe
some sort of decision will be reached some time todav.
NAACP Gets SGA Funding
The Insktei
B DIANE ANDERSON
sulr Miior
The Student Government
Association held its last meeting of
the 1981-82 school year Monday,
appropriating money to various
campus organizations.
The most controversial ap-
propriation was in the amount of
SI,050 to the NAACP for their
1982-83 budget. Once again, the
subject of this organization being a
political action group was raised, a
debate similar to the one that took
place last semester on the funds ap-
propriated to the organization for
this year. However, after a debate
of approximately 20 minutes, the
monies were approved.
Another appropriation was
awarded to the Student Welfare
Committee for a student off-
campus housing handbook. Five
thousand copies of the handbook
will be printed containing informa-
tion regarding types of housing in
Greenville, lease agreements, and
pertinent legal informaion, along
Supreme Court Decides
On Tax Exemption Question
with other helpful information for
students looking for housing off-
campus The total cost of this hand-
book was decided at $2,310.90.
The ECU Playhouse was awarded
a well-trimmed budget of $12,000 to
plan next year's entertainment
schedule.
The North Carolina Student
Legislature, a group open to all
students, was appropriated $3,000
for 1982-83.
The ECU Allied Health Student
Organization was also awarded an
appropriation of $1,250.
The SGA Executive Council's
budget was trimmed for next year.
The cuts included student salaries.
The total appropriation made was
$37,103
The amount of $4,094 was ap-
proved for the ECU Marching
Pirates for the 1982-83 season.
The campus alcohol and drug
program was awarded $1,900 for
next year.
Two resolutions were also
adopted by the legislature. One of
these was in recognition of outstan-
ding service performed bv the
1981-82 Transit Manager, Bill
Hilliard.
was introduced by Gina Lynch, the
freshman class vice president, and
the SGA representatives on the 75th
anniversary committee.
legislature.
The reinstatement of the Medical
Emergency Loan Fund was awarded
Best Legislation.
The other resolution was in sup- The SGA also held its annual ban- A special award was given to
port of the special programs and ac- quet last Thursday, at which Chuck Joseph Admire for his help and ad-
tivities included in the celebration of Blake was given the award of best vice to the SCA throughout the
ECU's 75th anniversary. The bill legislator for 1981-82 by the year.
Meyer's Assistant Leaves
' To Work For Global Peace'
WASHINGTON (UPI) - The
Supreme Court agreed Monday to
settle � once and for all � whether
private schools that practice racial
discrimination should enjoy tax ex-
emptions.
The justices announced they will
go forward with a test case on the
issue involving Bob Jones Universi-
ty, of Greenville, S.C and the
Goldsboro Christian Schools.
However, the court did not set a
special date this spring to hear
debate in the case and could put off
a decision on the politically sensitive
dispute until next fall at the earliest.
The controversy shapes up as one
of the top cases confronting the
justices this year because of its far-
reaching implications. It pits civil
rights groups against consrative,
fundamentalist institutions that
have been strong supporters of
President Reagan.
The high court action comes after
the administration � reversing its
See GOLDSBORO, Page 2
The assistant to East Carolina's
vice chancellor for student life has
requested and received a leave of
absence from his post to devote his
full- time energy to working for
global disarmament and peace.
John T. Gardner, assistant to
Vice Chancellor Elmer Meyer, said
"The issue of reversing the arms
race is the critical issue of our
time Gardner added that he and
his wife Lynne had been discussing
"for a long time" ways in which
they could spend "more time on
social issues
Gardner is currently a member on
the "ECU Ground Zero Commit-
tee" and he recently attended a
meeting about the nuclear issue with
Gov. James Hunt.
Gardner said he plans to join
forces with local "Ground Zero"
coordinator Dick Welch to develop
"a non-profit foundation called
Groundswell, which will act as a
catalyst and a clearing house for the
many existing national peace groups
and their chapters in North
Carolina
"The rhetoric on both sides (of
the nuclear issue) has picked up
Gardner said. "The time has come
for the issue. Almost everybody is
interested
Gardner cited "two items" in the
current plan of the Reagan ad-
ministration that stand out as
reasons behind his final decision.
"One is the reported plan to build
17,000 new nuclear weapons over
the next few years he said.
The other is the $4 million Federal
Emergency Management Ad-
ministration. "They claim it (the
plan) can save up to 80 percent of
the American people in the event of
a nuclear war Gardner added. He
saod he feels that both of these deci-
sions are "terribly destablizing
We're sorry to see him take a
leave of absence Dr. Meyer said,
"but understand his obvious deep
concern and convicitons in wanting
to try and educate people on the
problems with nuclear proliferation
and its potentional effect on all o
us
Meyer called Gardner, whose'
leave takes effect May 1, "a
dedicated staff member who we
sincerely hope will return to us in
the fall
Gardner's responsibilities includ-
ed monitoring and advisory work
with the budgets for dining and
housing. His work has included ex-
tensive negotiation with the new
ECU dining contract, Meyer said,
adding that Gardner has also taken
on "the added responsibility of ad-
vising all the media on their budgets
and financial problems" since the
resignation of Paul Breitman as
financial advisor.
Gardner said that he and his wife
"both see that long-term job securi-
ty and career development are moot
issues if we allow this issue (nuclear
proliferation) to remain uncheck-
ed Ms. Gardner is currently
employed by the state as a nutrition
consultant.
"Hard-bitten but distinctively
female " That's what critics are
calling Joan Jett and the
Blackhearts whose concert
Sunday will be the only concert
this semester at Minges Col
iseum See Entertainment
Weather Watch
Showers likely today with highs
in the 70s. Lows in the mid-50s.
Inside Index
Announcements 2
Opinion 4
Campus Forum4
Entertainment 6
Learning About College 8
Sports 9
Classifieds10, 11
T





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL. 20 1982
Announcements
POM-PONS
Tryouts will be haw at Fletcher
Music Hall April 34 25 Reglatra
'ion it at 10 a.m. on the 24tn. All in
terested ladle are urged to at
tend. For any further question?
contact Deborah at 7M �755.
ILO
The ILO. will be meeting on
Wednesday, April 21 at 3 p.m. in
BC 30) The purpose of the
meeting will be to discuss plans
for the Department of Foreign
Languages' program for ECU'S
7$th Anniversary.
JUNIOR BABE
RUTH LEAGUE
Baseball coaches are needed In
Washington, N.C if interested
contact Jim Harris at 946-0679
after 4 p.m.
CHAIRPERSON
Applications for 19M 83 Elec
tions Chairperson now being taken
in 2tt Mendenhall Student Center.
You may apply 'rom 15, Monday
through Friday.
CITIZENS BIKEWAY
COMMITTEE
� Will meet at 7:30p.m. in first
floor conference room at City Hall
on Tuesday, April 20.
Goldsboro, Bob Jones Going To Court
Continued From Page 1
position for a second
time � urged the court
last month to proceed
with the case.
Reagan ignited a
political firestorm in
January when he decid-
ed to overturn a
12-year-old policy,
adopted during the
Nixon administration,
of denying tax exemp-
tions to private institu-
tions that practice
racial bias.
At that time, the ad-
ministration urged the
high court to drop the
case, which it originally
accepted last October.
But in February
government lawyers
said the administration
changed its position
because of a decision
by the U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals in
Washington, which
temporarily bars the In-
ternal Revenue Service
from granting or
restoring tax exemp-
tions to such private
schools.
The justices also
granted the Justice
Department's request
for "divided argu-
ment" in the case �
meaning the ad-
ministration does not
intend to take the same
position in the dispute
as the two religious
schools.
Defending the deci-
sion to give the schools
tax breaks, Reagan has
argued government
bureaucrats usurped a
decision that should be
made by Congress and
he has called on
lawmakers to pass a
law clearing up the
dispute.
Senate Republican
leader Howard Baker
of Tennessee has said
he expects a "big
fight" in Congress over
ending the tax break
with a new law, but
predicted such legisla-
tion would be passed.
Bob Jones, however.
ATM
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when every message
and even' momento
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for the finest In
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come to
Morgan Printers, Inc.
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maintains Congress
cannot constitutionally
deny such tax exemp-
tions � a critical split
between the ad-
ministration and the
fundamentalist
schools.
Civil rights groups
and Capitol Hill critics
have charged that
Reagan's stand on the
tax breaks is part of a
pattern of insensitivity
to the problem of
discrimination.
The NAACP had
taken the lead in urging
the court not to drop
the case, charging
schools such as Bob
Jones and Goldsboro
represent a "badge of
slavery" to blacks that
should not be en-
couraged by special tax
breaks.
Bob Jones University
and the Goldsboro
schools took the case to
the high court after the
4th U.S. Circuit Court
of Appeals in Rich-
mond, Va upheld the
old IRS policy of refus-
ing to grant such ex-
emptions.
The fundamentalist
Goldsboro Christian
Schools, organized in
1963, have never enroll-
ed any black students.
Before 1971, Bob
Jones refused to admit
any blacks. It agreed in
1975 to permit unmar-
ried blacks to enroll as
students, but continues
to deny admission to
"any applicant known
to be a partner in an in-
terracial marriage
It also has
disciplinary rules re-
quiring expulsion for
any student who is a
partner in an interracial
marriage, engages in in-
terracial dating,
belongs to a group that
advocats interracial
marriage or encourages
others to violate the
rule against interracial
dating.
The East Carolinian
Serving the campus communu v
5nor 1923.
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the acacmic
year and every Wednesday dur
ing the summer
The East Carolinian is the ol
ficial newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned,
operated, and published for and
by the students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate: $20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU,
Greenville, N.C
Telephone: 7S7 434, 4147, 30�
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organuatior
would like to have an item printeo
in the announcement column,
please type it on an announcement
form and send it to The East
Carolinian in care of the produc
tion manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications Building
Flyers and handwritten copy on
odd sized paper cannot be ac
cepted.
There is no charge for an
nouncements, but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you want
and suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column for publicity
The deadline for announcements
is 5 p m Friday for the Tuesday
paper and 5 p m Tuesday for the
Thursday paper No an
nouncements received after these
deadlines will be printed
This space is available to ail
campus organizations and depart
ments
BUCANEER
Has your organization had its
group photograph taken for the
1981 1982 yearbook" If not contact
Mike Davis for an appointment by
calling 752 5543 or 757 6501 Theap
pomtment times are 4 30 8 45 on
Thursday, April 22 in Room 248
Mendenhall and Thursday, April
29 in Room 221 Mendenhall This
will be the last time this semester
group photographs will be taken
SIGMA TAU DELTA
Sigma Tau Delta is doing
something memorable on April 20,
Tuesday at 7 30 in Mendenhall
Room 244 All old and new
members, faculty and invited
guests are encouraged to par
ticipate in a Win and Cheese
Social honoring English Depart
ment Chairman, Dr Erwin
Hester Dr Hester is retiring as of
the end of this semester to resume
his teaching career Sigma Tau
Delta wishes to show their ap
preciation for his support of our
oranization over the past years
Please cornel
CHAIRPERSON
Applications are now being ac
cepted for the 19�2 Student
Homecoming Committee
Chairperson Applications can oe
picked up at either the Mendenhall
Information Center or the Alumm
Center The deadline for applying
for this position is Friday. April 23
OFF CAMPUS
HOUSING
If you want to live off campus,
now is the best time to look for
summer or fall Or if you have an
apartment to sublet for the sum
mer or are looking for a roommate
for the academic year, list your
availablility with us Contact the
Off Campus Housing Office. 211
Whichard Building, 757 6881 805.
Monday through Friday
CO-OP
NASA, international Affairs
Division, Washington, D C cur
rently has a co op position
available for undergraduates or
graduate students who nave an in
terest m international af
fairsrelations Position available
June 198? through December 1982
interested students should stop bv
the Co op Office. 313 Rawl, or call
757 6979 tor further details
THE GREAT DEBATE
ECU Lecture Series Committee
announces The Great DeDate
featuring G Gordon Liddy "The
Power of the State versus Dr
Timothy Leary The Freedom
of the individual Tuesday. April
20 at 8 p m m Hendn� Theatre
For additional information con
tact the Central Ticket OHtc
757 6611, ext 266 Admissior
ECU students, $2 50, Faculty ana
staff, 13 50. Public. $5 00 All
tickets solo at the door will Df
$5 00
PSI CHI
The ECU Psychology Honor
Society will hold its last meeting of
the semester on Tuesday. April 20
at 7 p m at 124 Greenway Apts
Can 752 3460 for directions New
officers will be installed ano
scholarships will be awarded An
members are urged to attend
BYOB
EVOLUTIONCREATIO
NISM
A panel discussion sponsored by
Phi Sigma Tau and the Philosophy
Club will be held on Wednesday
April 21 at 8 p m in B.ology 103
Professor Daugherty of the
Biology Department win presenl
the evolutionist view ana Pro
lessor Charles Coble of the
Department of Science Education.
although not Creationist himself
will present the belief system of
the Creationist as impartially as
possible There will oe an oppor
tunity tor members of the au
dienct u, direct questions M
participants Anyone interested s
strongly encouraged to attend
KAPPA SIGMA
Thanks to ai' Brothers p
ano little sisters for the turr
Paranl s Aecneno A spe' �
-S to Randy Evo
effort ano Suppor'
USHERS
� f to usner �
Dance Concer' Ap . 24
� ��- the show free, you
may signup on 'he bulletin board
me ma hallway I fha Ma�i�
� Center �
Re
quiremenfs are men must ear
a dress �
�' f- ����.� ' � -
a'er �'ar 6 45 p m
you
love
Rock 'n Roll?
Sun April 25
Minges Coliseum
wm
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Tuesday
Green Chile or
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Wednesday
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Thursday
No. 3 Dinner, Free Tea
$2.25
Friday Saturday Sunday
Big Red Day Vegetarian Day, No. 5 Dinner, Tacos
89C each, no limit Free Tea $1.45 4for$1.39
Happy Hour Monday-Saturday 4-7 p.m.
$2.00 pitchers 25C nacho chips with pitcher purchase
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?





THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL.20 1982
ECU Professors Speak During Ground Zero Week
woocoaaatiiaiMiimiTaaunimiiiiiiiiiiirniiJiinin
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Stan Writer
"Our primary assumption is that
nuclear war is not unthinkable. We
must not allow ourselves to become
paralyzed by the magnitude of its
destructive potential
These were some opening words
by Dr. Lon Felker during his in-
troduction of a panel discussion titl-
ed "Nuclear War: Causes, Conse-
quences, and Cures
Felker, an ECU political science
professor, organized and moderated
the panel as part of the "ECU
Ground Zero" activities.
Other panel members included
Dr. Mane Farr, Assistant Dean of
the ECU Arts and Sciences College;
Dr. Lawrence Hough and Dr. Ed-
ward R. Griffith, both ECU
political science professors; and
Yladtm I. Kuznetsov, first secretary
of the embassy of the Soviet Union
Dr. Farr, an English professor,
spoke about the movement against
war and 20th Century literature and
its relationship to war. "Nuclear
war involves everyone because
everyone will be a participant �
willingly or unwillingly Farr said.
She presentd "a literary sense of
what could happen if a nuclear war
ocurred" and added that she hoped
humanity could "create a new vi-
sion" in its efforts to prevent
nuclear war.
Dr. Hough's presentation dealt
with his personal opinions of the
nuclear issue. "The consequences in
my mind (of a nuclear war) are real-
ly too horrible to contemplate
Hough said. He called for "a moral
war upon war as immoral" and said
he believed that worldwide
stockpiles of nuclear weapons were
so great that the numbers were
meaningless to many people.
"It has always been my conten-
tion that once dead is sufficient
Hough said. He called for continued
discussion and negotiations between
the nuclear nations as one possible
"cure" for the nuclear problem.
Dr. Griffith gave an analysis of
American and Soviet defense posi-
tions. Griffith presented numerous
graphs, charts, facts and figures,
which he claimed showed the United
States no longer had nuclear
superiority over the Soviet Union,
and that deterrence was the best op-
tion for preserving world peace.
Griffith said the United States
had lost its superiority "both in
quality and ability to halt Soviet ag-
gression. "It's a nasty world out
there with a lot of nasty people
Griffith said. "I would like to pro-
pose to you that if there's an arms
race � we haven't been in it he
continued.
Griffith said he was opposed to
any kind of "nuclear freeze" at cur-
rent levels because it would prevent
the United States from maintaining
"a credible deterrence He also
supported U.S. efforts to prevent
the domino theory of Communist
expansionism in Central America.
"If things continue as thev are there
is only one domino left � and that's
Mexico he said.
Kuznetsov strongly disagreed
with Griffith, during his presenta-
tion of the Soviet position on
nuclear weapons. Kuznetsov claim-
ed the Soviets hope that nuclear
weapons will be controlled, reduc-
ed, and done away with "entirely
and forever
The Soviet embassy secretary
claimed war is alien to the very
essence of socialism and that if a
nuclear war took place, it wouldn't
be the USSR that would start it.
Kuznetsov read from his notes
various quotes from U.S. political
leaders that he believed indicated a
position of U.S. antagonism
towards preserving the peace.
Kuznetsov cited remarks by
See VISITING, Page 5
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THE SHOE OUTLET
(Located beside Evans Seafood)
Featuring name brand shoes at bargain prices.
UP To 75 OFF regular prices
Bass Steward-McGuire Brouse Abouts
201 W. Washington St. Within walking distance of campus.

Do you
love
Rock 'n Roll?
Sun April 25
Minges Coliseum
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BTSW0BLD1
104 Red Banks Rd. (Behind Shoney's) 756-6000
Tuesday Night �
ECU NIGHT
WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH
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JWje �et0t (Ewcaliniun
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Jimmy DuPREE, MMrcNv
Charles Chandler, -i � �
Ric Browning, ftWWl)wra�, Tom Hall, mutaom
Fielding Miller. �� Mm William Yelverton, spom Eduo,
Alison Bartel, production Manager Steve Bachner, ��m�w� ���
Steve Moore, cmwh �,��� Diane Anderson, Slyle Eduo,
April 20, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Review Board
Hearings Costly For SGA Image
"Hey . . . hey! You guys from the
paper? You might as well go on
home
Hardly a cordial welcome for
young representatives of the fourth
estate. But then, what can you ex-
pect?
As our story unfolds, a group of
minor league Perry Mason types are
arguing the virtues of campaign
charges levied against SGA
presidential runoff victor Eric
Henderson.
It's been almost two weeks since
the charges were filed with the elec-
tions committee. While it is
somewhat reasonable to expect the
parties involved to remain silent, it's
a bit much for no one to be willing
to divulge the substance of the
allegations.
"I'd rather have the case tried
before an impartial group of
students than in The East Caroli-
nian one party has stated.
Once again we're forced to con-
sult our old friend, Webster's New
World Dictionary.
editorial � an article in a
newspaper, etc explicitly stating
opinions of the editor or publisher
We make one slight adjustment to
this definition: ours are the opinion
of the editorial board. The
"Opinion" and occasional "Other
Opinion" pages are the only places
where stories which lack objectivity
are allowed.
So, sorry � that argument simply
doesn't hold water.
What's the real answer? Well,
mavbe the � cerned that an
impartial tribunal would be near im-
possible to find if the facts were
made public.
That rationale has a somewhat
chilling effect, though � under-
tones of covering up the facts and
that sort of thing.
Apparently the review board
hearing the case does deserve com-
mendation for having the deter-
mination to listen to the rhetoric in-
volved. No less than six hours pass-
ed before they called an official
recess.
If that's not determination, what
is it? Well, no further comment on
that subject (after all, they didn't
ask to be brought into this mess).
SO, what will be the result of all
this political maneuvering? Only
time will tell. But if history repeats
itself, it's likely to continue a while
longer (unfortunately).
What will be the cost of the pro-
cedings? Financially, the cost
should be minimal. But the cost of
further promulgation of the
negative attitude toward SGA will
be high.
rye fact caucunian
ueieT
BATTLE
OF THB
CENTURY
MVtElGHING IN XT 110 LBS
MINUS A FEW CHEMICALLY-
DESTROYED BRAIN CELLS,
WITH A RECORD OF 1300
TRIPS AND ALMOST AS MANV
bustsTHE FIGHTING
FREAK . . ALSO KNOWN AS
DR. TmOTHY LEAKY
WEIGHING IN AT ISO L8S.
not counting? a cranium
of Solid or.anite with
a record of countless
CRIMES A NO ONE PRISON
term THE POMMELING
PLUM BER.rL$o known AS
G.GOHbOM LIDDY
TONITEI
AT
MEM&BMHAl-L
Objectivity Not Compromised
It's Possible
With the discovery that ECU
graduate Rick Atkinson has been
awarded a Pulitzer Prize, the
thought of maybe another award
winner from this university sur-
faces.
While critics of East Carolina
University jokingly make reference
to EZU a record of academic ex-
cellance rapidly becomes a forte of
this school.
By ART BUCHWALD
Lot Aiftfai Timn Syadkatc
Despite the overwhelming evidence that
smoking can cause cancer, heart disease
and other fatal illnesses, there are still some
physicians in the United States who main-
tin that all the facts are not in, and the
medical profession is overreacting. Most of
these doctors are employed by the tobacco
interests, and some people are skeptical
about their research.
I don't happen to be one of them. I
believe that just because a doctor is on the
tobacco industry's payroll, doesn't mean
he is not as objective about smoking as so-
meone who isn't.
Take my friend Dr. Heinrich Ap-
plebaum, who gets $100,000 a year to de-
fend the cigarette manufacturers' interests.
He took me through his lab the other day.
There were hundreds of white rats in
cages, jumping about and playing and
munching on tobacco leaves.
"Have you ever seen happier rats in your
life? he asked me.
"Never I admitted. "Do they all
smoke?"
"A pack a day he said proudly. "They
don't get anything to eat unless they smoke
first
"And none of them contract cancer or
heart disease?"
"They better not. If one of our rats get
sick, we throw it out of the program
"But how do you know if smoking was
not the cause of its illness if you throw it
away
"It's a question of priorities. When
you're looking for scientific answers, to
medical problems, you don't waste your
time on sick rats
A lab assistant came up and showed Dr.
Applebaum a rat that seemed to be expir-
ing.
"What do you think, Doctor?"
"Get it out of here. It could have yellow
fever
"Then maybe it's a typhus
"Should I do an autopsy on it?"
"Who do you think you are, Dr.
Noguchi? We're running a laboratory here,
not a coroner's office
The lab assistant disappeared.
Dr. Applebaum seemed upset. "I run in-
to that all day long. Every time a rat comes
down with something, some smart aleck
tries to find out if it was caused by cigaret-
tes. Nobody ever wants to leave well
enough alone
"Maybe they're just being thorough?" I
suggested. "Haven't you ever found a rat
that died from a smoking-related disease?"
"Not since I've been working for the
tobacco industry. When I took this job,
they gave me carte blanche to find out all
the facts, plus a bonus of $25 for every rat I
could prove died of natural causes. I also
get $1,000 every time I go on television t
attack the Surgeon General's Report
smoking. So I call them as I see them.
because my scientific reputation is at
stake
"Then why is the entire med
establishment against you?"
"It's simple. If they blame smoking
somebody's heart attack they won't be
sued for malpractice
"Doctor, will you come over to 23
None of the rats seem to be moving a lab
assistant said.
We walked over. Dr. Applebaum sa
"What have you been feeding them?"
"Milk and cheese the assistant replied
"Just as I suspected. Look for calcium
kidney stones
"Suppose I don't find any�"
"Then you get yourself another job
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes tellers
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our oJice in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authors.
- Campus Forum
ECGC Funding Draws Support, Criticism From Students
In response to Reverend J.M. Bragg's
commentary toward the ECGC Fund
Appropriation, and homosexuality itself
(April 13), 1 would first like to unders-
tand the method which the Reverend
would apply toward maintaining "the
highest quality of life in our communi-
ty" with the help of Greenville's various
civic organizations. I am guilty of hav-
ing an open mind, in many respects, and
since no instructions for accomplishing
this task of administering preventive
"moral" medicine for the citizenry of
Pitt County were included in the letter, 1
assumed the responsibility of trying to
derive the nature of his task of ter-
minating the threat of eminent social
crumble and ruin.
Mass execution of all avowed
homosexuals residing in Pitt County,
Reverend Bragg? Certainly final, ir-
reversable, and attention-getting. Un-
fortunately, I have trouble in justifying
senseless murder, or at least the ending
of a human life, over an activity of
physical expression performed in the
privacy of one's own home that has vast-
ly more to do with the celebration of
life, instead of its end. Which sin is
greater in your eyes, that of murder or
private biological pleasure?
Death too extreme? May I suggest
that you recommend to ECU that they
should refuse to enroll any gay potential
students and immediately demand that
current gay students vacate the
classrooms, the dorms, and the campus
at once? Results would vary from stu-
dent to student. Some would deny their
sexual persuasion to remain in school.
Some would transfer to a more liberal
college.
Once again, 1 honestly cannot picture
the cashier's office refusing the hearty
check of a student simply due to the sex
of the person that that student chooses
to be emotionally and physically close
to. In addition, I know of no gay student
that currently pays his or her tuition
with Confederate bills, bottle caps,
stones, rope, salt, or other non-
negotiable currency. A gay student's
money is just as good as anyone elses.
And that still wouldn't take care of
those homosexuals who don't go to
school at ECU and live in Pitt County.
The solution isn't easy.
In fact, Reverend Bragg, the
"solution" is impossible, simply
because the problem exists only in the
human minds of those that allow alter-
native lifestyles to become a personal
problem. Homosexuality exists, has ex-
isted, and will continue to exist for a
long time to come.
I am assuming that you are not a prac-
ticing homosexual and that you
associate with a very limited number of
admitted gays, if any. What does the
manner of sexual expression conducted
by someone else have to do with you,
directly or indirectly? Your faith and
beliefs will not be shattered by either the
presence or absence of homosexuals.
No one is pleading or begging you to
participate in loving or making love with
anyone of your own sex, so why should
your lifestyle and life choices influence
those who disagree or have chosen dif-
ferently? If you feel threatened by a
group of individuals who, as a perma-
nent segment of society, intrinsically
pose no threat, that is your own pro-
blem.
BILLY E. WALKER, JR.
Sophomore, Communication Art
I would like to comment on Rev.
Bragg's brilliant expose on the dangers
of homosexuality to the community. I
am continually amazed that people as
reactionary, narrow-minded and in-
tolerant as him actually exist. I guess I
shouldn't expect much more living in the
"Bible Belt but being a lowly agnostic
gets uncomfortable when everyone ex-
horts their self-righteous opinions in the
guise of "truth Rev. Bragg may
believe, as is his right, that "the Bible is
recognized as the only set of absolutes in
the World but millions of Muslims,
Hindus and Buddhists would heartily
contest his blatant ethnocentrism.
Moreover, there are many Americans
with some familiarity with the Bible who
could care less whether or not homosex-
uality is condemned in it � a point that
is still debated among most scholars of
the Bible. Fortunately, some people
have progressed to the point where they
can think for themselves and don't have
to depend on the writings of some old
geezers from several millenia ago.
Rev. Bragg's premise that since other
members of the animal kingdom do not
practice hornosexuality, neither should
humans, reflects as much expertise as his
theological arguments. What Rev. Bragg
would undoubtedly call "perversions"
abound among animals. Many a dog has
tried to hump a human leg, which I
guess is the equivalent to attempted
bestiality on the canine's part. Raccoons
and non-human primates discovered
masturbation (another no-no?) eons ago
when the opposite thumb "came" into
being. And male porpoises are notorious
"perverts" who often get their jollies by
rubbing their copulatory organs against
each other � sort of like an under-water
orgy. So be careful next time you go to
the beach!
To end on a serious note, I'd really
like to know where this guy gets off tell-
ing people what is permissable in their
own social circles and homes. Who
made him dictator and conscience of the
city? It certainly sounds as if he ad-
vocates a police state to control his vi-
sion of the gay threat. Possibly he has
some unresolved homsexual anxiety??
JOSEPH S. BABINSKI
Junior, Medicine
I am writing in reference to Rev.
Bragg's letter which appeared in the
April 13 issue of the East Carolinian. I
accept the fact that you do not approve
of homosexuality and do not wish to
argue that point. The reason I am
writing is because of the way you went
about expressing your disapproval.
You seemed very cold towards all gay
people, but especially towards Mr. Zum-
bach. This is what surprised me so much
from your letter. You are a preacher,
you are supposed to know the Bible and
what it stands for. The Bible states in 1
Corinthians 13:2 "And though I have
the gift of prophecy, and understand all
mysteries, and all knowledge, and
though I have all faith, so I could
remove mountains, and have not charity
(which is love), I am nothing
Also in St. John 15:12, "This is my
commandment, that ye love one
another, as I have loved you You
should listen to what those two verses
are saying. They are telling us to love all
people because He loves us. It doesn't
matter what a person does; except
blasphemy, God still loves us � that's
why He died for us. I'm not asking you
to condone homosexuality; it's your
right to feel the way you do about it, but
as a preacher I feel you should show a
little more love for all mankind, gay or
straight.
In Matthew 28:19 the Bible states "Go
ye therefore, and teach all nations
You are a preacher and you should teach
the love of God. If you feel that
homosexual people are wrong you
shouldn't be condemning them, you
should be praying for them.
ROBIN HICKS
Freshman
Crow's Nest
Recently an article was published in
The East Carolinian concerning the
quality of food and atmosphere of one
of Greenville's oldest restaurants, the
Crow's Nest. The article was written by
Kim Albin. Az an employee and long-
time customer of the Crow's Nest, I was
truly shocked with her opinion. Ms.
Albin seems to get her kicks out of see-
ing how cleverly she can twist words into
poetically ruining the reputation of
whomever she pleases.
It seems that a newspaper whose pur-
pose is to inform and serve those who
pay for its publication would give the
service expected of them, that being the
unbiased (and I stress that word) repor-
ting of the news, not the libelous B.S.
that writers such as Ms. Albin so see tit.
Reading Ms. Albin's article did
however, put me into a most interesting
critical mood, which only helped me
notice the 41 errors in the article below
it. If the East Carolinian wants to be
such a fine specimen of the way
something should be, maybe they should
proofread their publications more
carefully.
The Crow's Nest may not be Green
ville's finest restaurant, but one thing is
for sure; the food is a lot easier to
swallow than the mess the East Caroli-
nian has been dishing out.
SCOTTRAUHL
Junior, Computer Science
Liberal Spending
In John Weyler's column on what
liberals represent he stated, "The major
distinction of the Left is that we care 1
would like to ask Mr. Weyler how he can
claim that only liberals have a corner on
caring. It is ridiculous to assume that
conservatives as a whole are apathetic.
greedy, and selfish. If some conservative
ideas seem hard-hearted it is only
because most conservatives have the
fore-sight to see that some problems call,
for short-term sacrifices in order to
reach long-term gains.
What Mr. Weyler fails to realize is
that it was his own liberals' long stan-
ding policies of spending and taxing and
spending some more that have led us in-
to the economic troubles we have had
for the past decade. It is this something
for nothing attitude that conservatives
are trying to reverse, and so far onlv
conservatives have had the political
courage to do what is right for the coun-
try and not just what is good for getting
reelected.
STERLING GARY GILL1AM, JR.
Senior, Accounting
f





THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL. 20 1982
Visiting Russian Secretary:
Nukes Cannot Be 'Limited'
i ontinued From Page 3
De t i Secretary Casper
Weinberger, Secretary ot State
. � Haig, and President
Reagan that appeared to be
tatements
ically, Kuznetso cited
Haig foi his remarks to a congres-
sional committee last year that
"there are more important things
than Wc also criticized
several I .S leaders who support a
i thai nuclei sar can be
ted " - lad cannot be hmrtedlv
he said.
K recalled the 21 million
Sox tel I nion dur-
orld W ai 11 as a reason that
ive no desire to be
lother wai
"Tht o basis for the assei
I mted States has not
(ai ms) i ace v� as
onse to Griffith.
Kuznetso were at
� he morning
Is During ques-
periods both men
monopolized their response time
and used it as their chance to refute
the statements of the other.
ECU political science student
Nathan Weeks said he agreed with
everything Dr. Griffith said He said
the United States needs to "get back
into the (arms) race instead of be-
ing left out in the cold. The Soviets
are the agressors he concluded.
"It it's (prevention of nuclear
war) left up to Dr. Griffith and First
Secretary Kuznetsov, we don't have
much of a chance said Tim Rad-
tord, a Defense Department
employee and ECU political science
extension student at Havelock. "I'd
like to maintain a degree of hope,
but realistically, and rationally 1
don't think we'll be luck) enough to
avoid a nuclear war
Dr.Farr summed up some of her
feelings about war when she read
the final line from a Wilfred Owens
poem: "To children ardent for some
desperate glory � rhe old lie: Duice
el Decorum est Pro Puma Mori (It
is sweet and fitting to die for one's
country"
i
YOUR BSN IS WORTH AN
OFFICER'S COMMISSION
IN THE ARMY.
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SUNDAY 4 25 82 8PM MINGES COLISEUM EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY S6 ADVANCE STUDENT.
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MAJOR ATTRACTIONS COMMITTEE
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re-
quired to be readily available for
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items and Prices
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i





THE EAST CAROL IN1AN
Entertainment
APRIL 20, 1982
Page 6
Tickets Sell
While Jett
Revs Engine
Intense and very hot, Joan Jett will be heard grinding her ax in Minges Coliseum this Sunday evening at 8 p.m.
This Sunday evening, April 25,
leather-rocker Joan Jett and her
band, The Blackhearts, bring their
wildly fun repertoire of party songs
and catchy chart-topping hits to
Minges Coliseum. The concert,
which is shaping up as another
sellout, is slated to begin at 8 p.m.
Tickets are priced at $6 for ECU
students and $8 for the public and
can be purchased at the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center as well as all area
outlets, Apple Records and both
Record Bar locations in Greenville.
Admission will be $8 at the door on
the evening of the show. According
to reports, tickets have been selling
extremely well.
In the early 70s, Joan Jett put
together The Runaways � one of
the first all-girl rock and roll bands
who, unlike those of the early 60s,
played their own material. The
Runaways recorded five albums,
with Live in Japan remaining one of
the best-selling imports in U.S. and
U.K. history.
In 1980, she started all over again
when she put together her current
band, The Blackhearts, with Joan
on guitar, Gary Ryan on bass, Lee
Crystal on drums and Ricky Byrd
on guitar. They have spent two
years lelentlessly touring and recor-
ding. In the earliest days of this
group, though, they toured with lit-
tle money for food or comfortable
accommodations; the: trudged on,
building a following and perfecting
their live show to achieve the
popularity they now have.
Jett recalls having to sleep on
floors on freezing nights and steal
See JETT, Page 7
Her Mary Poppins Imag
By LESLIE BENNETTS
� V ork Tim� News Servfc
NEW YORK � Broke and starving, she offers to
sleep with her landlord in exchange for a meatball.
Unable to find work as a singer, she begins to mas-
querade as a man, becomes successful as a female im-
personator and decides she likes life better as a "man"
anyway. Except that then she meets a real man she
wants to jump into bed with, but he thinks shehe is not
only male but also romantically involved with the aging
homosexual she, he lives with, and � well, things get
very complicated.
All of which may sound somewhat improbable as the
plot of a new Hollywood comedy, but most improbable
of all is that the star of VictorVictoria is Julie An-
drews. Directed by Miss Andrews' husband, Blake Ed-
wards, the film also stars James Garner, Robert Preston
and Lesley Ann Warren. (It now is playing at the Buc-
caneer Theatre in Greenville.)
Some iewers may find themselves somewhat startled
by the sight of Mary Poppins cross-dressing and carous-
ing with transvestites and people of assorted and am-
biguous sexual persuasions in the decadent Paris
nightclubs of 1934. Julie Andrews herself tends to snort
derisively and utter the kinds of words that can't be
quoted in the newspaper when mention is made of her
saccharine, sanitized image. "Does Mary Poppins have
an orgasm? Does she go to the bathroom? I assure you.
she does Miss Andrews says dryly.
But for years the goody-goody image has plagued her
career. Given Miss Andrews' wholesome, perky features
and British starchiness, the roles she played in The
Sound of Music and Mary Poppins were all it took to
put a seemingly permanent freeze on the public percep-
tion of her as brisk, prim and squeaky-clean.
"You're always best remembered for the things that
are successful Miss Andrews says philosophically. But
she concedes that there must be other factors involved.
"Ultimately I guess I can't help what comes across
she says. "I think of part of myself as a very passionate
person, but I don't think that comes across. I don't
know where it comes from, that reserve or veneer of
British niceness. But it doesn't bother me if other people
don't spot the passion. I know it's there She smiles.
"As long as Blake knows
In the process of playing a man, Miss Andrews says,
she � like her character, Victoria � found there were
distinct advantages.
"I discovered that even though we've come a long
way, men have it made, in terms of their freedom she
says. "There's a kind of ease, a self-assurance in the
way you walk through the world that comes from just
beint- masculine. It made me aware that there really is a
way to go before we arc truly emancipated
While she describes herself as a feminist, Miss An-
drews adds that she is personally most comfortable with
traditional sex roles.
Cinema
"Blake and I once changed roles she says. "I went
to work doing a television series and he stayed home to
write, and it threatened everything I felt about myself.
The house had never been run better, the children never
behaved better.
"I would come home from a busy day at the studio,
and Blake would say, 'Let me tell you about the kids
and I would say, 'I don't want to hear about the kids, I
just had the most awful day Or I would say, 'You
know, so-and-so has a dentist appointment today, so-
meone will have to drive her and he would say, 'Oh,
that's all taken care of. And 1 would feel totally � " she
hesitates, then shrugs � "castrated. And redundant.
"I wasn't happy with being all one thing. I like em-
bracing being a wife and a mother and an actress, but to
just go out to work and have everything else taken care
of, I found very threatening
Miss Andrews has been married for 13 years to Ed-
wards, her second husband, and for the last 10 years
their home base has been Gstaad, Switzerland. They live
with their two adopted Vietnamese daughters, Joanna
and Amy, who are 7 and 8 years old. Edwards also has a
son and a daughter by his previous marriage, and Miss
Andrews has a 19-year-old daughter, Emma, by her first
marriage to Tony Walton, a stage and film designer.
Miss Andrews describes the Edwards family's life in
Gstaad as "relaxed and casua4. Time seems to stand still
there she says. Her own role she sees as highly
domestic: "I do all the shopping and cooking, and we
mostly disappear there and lead a more normal ex-
istence. We've been through it all � all the family pets,
the dental appointments, the chauffeuring around town
and children's friends to tea
If her private life is relatively low-key, Miss Andrews
might well be said to deserve such a respite. At 46, she
has been a professional singer and actress for more than
30 years. "Most people think I must be 56, because I've
been around so long she says ruefully.
Her parents were divorced when she was 4, but her
mother soon remarried and formed a vaudeville team
with Julie's stepfather, who gave her voice lessons. By
the time she was 12, her extraordinary four-octave range
had earned her a spot with a revue at the London Hip-
podrome; by the age of 13, when she gave a special com-
mand performance for the Queen of England, she was
her family's primary source of support.
Miss Andrews became famous on her 19th birthday in
A Sixties Revival
Students Opening New 'Doors'
BOWLING GREEN, OHIO (CPS) - More than a
decade after the drug-related death of Jim Morrison in a
Paris hotel room, the "Lizard King" of rock music is
making a comeback on college campuses as the most
frequent subject for popular culture term papers.
That's the assessment of George Ward, who teaches
pop music at the Center for the Study of Popular
Culture here. Ward attributes the comeback of Mor-
rison and his group, The Doors, to a current of
pessimism among college students.
"Other groups tend to be too hippie-dippy and op-
timistic for today's students Ward says. "The Doors
tended to home-in on the more cynical side of things:
loneliness, the dark side of life. This being a rather
down period, The Doors are in sync with the times
Ward tells his students to "take an album from the
sixties, and write about it and what it meant to its time.
The number one group the students write about is The
Doors
Morrison was the group's lead singer, songwriter, and
focal point of controversy, mostly over his frequent ar-
rests for obscenity and nudity while on stage. He earned
his "Lizard King" nickname by performing in skin-
Curriculum
tight leather pants.
"Beyond just the music, there have been students
here who have tried to recreate the whole Doors thing. I
know students who dress like Morrison, take LSD and
listen exclusively to sixties music Ward reports. "I
first noticed it in the mid-seventies, and it's just as
strong today
Ward notes the group was the subject of a bestselling
book, Nobody Gets Out Of Here Alive, two years ago,
but attributes its current revival to the homage paid to
Morrison by New York punk and New Wave musicians,
who cite Morrison's brooding stage presence and
theatrics as an inspiration for their own work.
the Broadway opening of The Hoy Friend, in which she
played the lead. At 21, she created the role of Eliza
Doolittle in My hair lady, which was followed by
Camelot, in which Miss Andrews starred opposite
Richard Burton. By then, she was an international star.
The responsibilities Miss Andrews assumed early in
life have left their mark in her no-nonsense attitude
toward hard work and self-improvement. "I think I'm
fairly structured she admits. "I was raised to beliee
in discipline. That discipline gets results
In VictorVictoria the heroine must finally choose-
between the man she loves and the smashingly suc-
cessful career she has built for herself in the guise o a
man. Miss Andrews herself has consistently placed mar-
riage and family above professional rewards.
"By the very nature of the way our marriage works,
Blake is really the big breadwinner, and usually I will
defer to what he's doing she says. "In general, I have
ultimately chosen to go with the marriage and the fami-
ly, and that means I obviously wanted to more than 1
didn't want to. There have been many jobs I turned
down because it meant we would all be apart. If you're
happily married and love what you're doing, it seems
dumb to go off to Siberia for five months shooting a
film and leave them behind
In addition to her other interests, Miss Andrews has
two children's books to her credit and another in pro-
gress. "I love writing she says. "I'm very new at it
and very unsure, but it's all my doing I have total con-
trol. It's a little like pulling teeth while I'm doing it. but
I find it very satisfying
Could 'Prisoner' Be
Genuine Cult Fare?
(CPS) � "Sooo strange, they think it's sooo
strange reports Yale student Chris Chen. Fellow
students "usually don't sav anything as thev break for
intermission. They look like something traumatic has
happened
What's happened is the biennial, eight-night-long
Yale showing of a 1968 television show called The
Prisoner. At Yale, the series evokes from the audience a
cultish chanting "sort of like Rocky Horror Picture
Show), only a little more subtle, less sarcasl i " Cben
says.
At the University of Miami, which will screen the
series in March, students "are very excited about it
according to Beaumont Theater official George
See MCGOOHAN'S, Page 8
� � � �
'French Lieutenant's Woman'Plays Twice Tomorrow
Jeremy Irons and Meryl Streep are interrupted during an inspired tryst in this scene from The French
Lieutenant's Woman, playing at 5:30 and 8 p.m. this Wednesday evening in Mendenhall Student Center's
Hendrix Theatre. The Student Union Films Committee added the extra showing in anticipation of larJ
crowds at the film. Following the 8 p.m. movie in room 244 of the student center, Dr Mark Farr of tl
English Department will conduct an informal discussion of The French Lieutenant's Woman- coffee �
doughnuts will he served. Admission to the film is by student ID and activity card or MSC Membership
br
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Continued From Page 6
breakfast off other people's room
service trays, but, she goes on,
'That didn't dampen my spirit.
Things like that just make me want
to work harder
Joan was also among the first ar-
tists to start her own record com-
pany. When no major U.S. label of-
fered a deal to her satisfaction, Jett
used her own savings to start
Blackheart Records.
Musicians such as Sex Pistols'
Steve Jones and Paul Cook and
Blondie's Clem Burke and Frank In-
fante helped out on her first album,
Bad Reputation, making it as im-
portant a rock and roll effort as one
would expect from such an ex-
perienced crew.
As an import, it sold over 22,000
copies witnin weeks of its release,
and when the domestic record stores
were clamoring for more copies,
Joan had it pressed on Blackhearts
Records rather than giving in to any
contract not worthy of a record
which, as Joel Selvin of the San
Francisco Chronicle wrote,
"redefines classic themes of rock
and roll � anger, frustration, alien-
tation � into a hard-bitten, but
distinctly female perspective
The demand for copies still far
outnumbered those available when
Joan got together with Neil Bogart
and signed with Boardwalk
Records, where she remains with her
current release. On Love
Rock W"Roll, Jett proves she can
handle the whole r k and roll spec-
trum. Whether performing classic
pop hits like "Crimson and Clover"
and "Bus and Pieces" or Jett
originals such as "You're Too
Possessive "Run Away and
"Victim of Circumstance Jett's
ability and now recognizable hard-
rocking style make the entire record
what is sure to become another
classic rock album.
In spite of all Joan Jett has meant
to rock and roll, it is only recently
that she has received any recogni-
tion for non-stop efforts: "I think
people are finally starting to respect
me.
iMtbAbl CAROLINIAN
APRIL.20 1982
Hard-Nosed Rockers
Along with skyrocketing record sales, Joan Jett
and The Blackhearts' concerts have begun sell-
ing out night after night, and, writes the New
York Post, the shows leave "a sonic boom of
power and hard-nosed rock in their wake
A&
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL,20 1982
LEAfrsiiOG At Couieu, Tue Haw (AMi
lAjHAr DO YOU M��0 ,
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R�QOiisTT of
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of poietros, mO f
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McGoohan's Short-Lived 'Prisoner' New Cult Hit
Continued From P. 6
Capewell. Miami plans
to let students in free to
the first episode, and
charge for the rest.
All told, Prisoner
cults have slowly grown
on about 20 campuses
around the country.
Some hold regular
showings. Others are
led by professors who
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demonstrate social
psychology theories.
The unlikely object
of all the unlikely atten-
tion is a 14-year-old, The show is a
17-part British telcvi- wonderfully dramatic
sion series conceived demonstration of the
and produced by its contradiction between
star, Patrick man's need to form
McGoohan. societies.
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I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
APRIL 20, 1982
Page 9
Handball A
Team Task
B WILLIAM YELVERTON
sports r dil.ir
In 1963 United States Olympic
Committee President Robert J.
Kane said he felt ' 'America needed a
national event for all amateur
sports, where U.S. athletes could
test their mettle and their skills in
nun-Olympic years. "
That "national event" developed
into the Sational Sports Festival �
a large Olympic-type party, where
young athletes experience the pagen-
try and competition of the Olympic
Games.
And from the Olympic Training
Center in Colorado Springs and
through donations � individual and
corporate � the U.S. Olympic
mil tee tries to showcase
amateur athletes whose primary
goal will be to step up on the top of
the victory platform in Los Angeles
in the summer of 1984.
That young talent will shown to
the public in the fourth Sational
Sports Festival in Indianapolis,
I mi running from July 24-3 F
Approximately 2500 athletes will
compete in 33 Olympic sports from
ice hockey to track and field to team
handball.
Dr. Wayne Edwards, director of
the hast Carolina Intramural-
Recreational Services Department,
knows the importance of amateur
athletics to the United States. He is
the team handball coordinator for
the National Sports Festival.
Last year in the National Sports
Festival III in Syracuse, N.Y Dr.
Edwards says he had much to be
proud of: nine East Carolina
students took part in the games.
Eight played team handball while
one was a weight-lifter.
"I'm trying to do something for
East Carolina University says Dr.
Edwards, who has been working
with the U.S. Olympic Committee
since 1978. "East Carolina had
more athletes than any other college
in the United States at the Festival
last year. Our exposure is good for
intramural and sport club pro-
grams. It's also good for recruiting
from a student standpoint. I want to
help advance the name 'ECU
In last year's Festival, Gail
O'Brien, Maureen Buck, Donna
Eason, Shirley Brown, Jo Landa
Clayton, Elaine Davis and Ginger
Rothermel represented East
Carolina in the South women's team
handball competion. Another ECU
student, Carl Karpinski, was a
member of the South men's team
handball squad while weighHifter
Tim Swords also represented his
region.
Both squads from the East are the
defending team handball cham-
pions.
Team handball combines runn-
ing, throwing and jumping into a
fast-moving and rapidly-growing
sport.
The main objective of the sport is
to out-maneuver the opponent by
pin-point passing. A point is scored
when the ball is thrown into a two-
meter by thee-meter goal that is
guarded by one of the team's seven
players.
The playing area is much like a
basketball court, the dimensions be-
ing 40 meters long and 20 meters
wide.
Players may dribble the ball,
which is nearly the size of a number
three soccer ball. The defender may
use the body to obstruct the opposi-
Lady Pirates Prove There's
No Place Like Home
A player gets ready to fire in last year's Festival.
tion, and the offensive player is
allowed to take three steps with the
ball or hold the ball for three
seconds.
The game is played in two
30-minute halves with a 10-minute
intermission. There are no time-
outs.
Team handball had its origin in
Europe in the last 1920s and is now
popular throughout the world.
More than three million players are
associated with the sport's govern-
ing council, the International Team-
ball Federation.
The sport was reintroduced after
an absence of 34 years at the
Munich Olympics of 1972.
East Carolina will be this year's
try-out site for the South Women's
squad. The trials will be held on
May 8.
"We're looking for any person
Dr. Edwards says, "with the poten-
tial to become a good player. We're
hoping we'll get a large number even
though many people aren't familiar
with the sport
He says last year's Festival at
Syracuse was better than the
previous games held at Colorado
Springs. "There were better person-
nel involved, and we averaged
around 1000 per (handball) game.
We're in an ideal location this year
since we're in the same building as
the swimming and the diving. We
have an exciting sport; when people
see it, they always come back. It's
fast-paced and has lots of scoring,
which Americans like
The South men will be coached by
Jim Thome, and the nearest sight
will be at East Ridge Jr. High, Chat-
tanooga, Tenn.
The South women will be coached
by Harry Winkler, a former Olym-
pic player, now retired. He is now in
charge of the women's Olympic pro-
gram. Anyone interested may try
out on May 8.
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Aufctaal Sports E4ilof
No team would like better than to
win its own tournament, and the
Lady Pirates softball team did just
that.
Jeanette Roth, the tournament's
most valuable player, hit .455 and
pitched four wins to lead the Pirates
to a 6-1 victory over Lenoir-Rhyne
in the championship game of the
ECU Softball Invitational
The Lady Pirates scored three
runs each in the second and fifth in-
nings to gain a substantial lead.
In the second inning, ECU's
Sherri Stout came around on a hit
by Maureen Buck and scored when
Cynthia Shepard singled. Shirley
Brown came over with the third run
on a hit by second-baseman Ginger
Rothermel.
In the fifth, Rothermel came
around on a hit by Yvonne
Williams, and both Williams and
Roth scored on a sacrifice by Mitzi
Davis.
Lenoir Rhyne's Dee Williams
scored her team's only run, banging
a homer in the fourth.
Mitzi Davis, ECU's leading hitter
this season, went three-for-four, in-
cluding a triple. Buck also got three
hits, and batted .500 in the tourna-
ment.
ECU first defeated UNC-
Wilmington, 8-0, and dominated
again against UNC-Charlotte, the
only in-state team that has beaten
ECU this season, 5-1.
In the first game, ECU scored
once in the first and added single
runs in the fourth and fifth before
popping in three more in the sixth,
and two in the seventh.
Brown, Shepard, Davis, and Jo
Landa Clayton all had two hits
each.
In the second game, the Pirates
got one in the first and picked up the
other four in the third.
Yvonne Williams led the Pirates
with three hits, while Fran Hooks
picked up two.
In other games, N. C. State
defeated Lenoir Rhyne, 7-6, and
Campbell 5-4. Campbell went on to
top Lenoir-Rhyne, 5-2.
In the final games of the tourna-
ment, Lenoir-Rhyne beat UNC-C,
3-2, then eliminated N.C. State, 8-5.
Campbell nudged out UNC-
Wilmington, 1-0 in 19 innings.
That left the Lady Pirates and
Campbell, and ECU blasted their
opponents, 11-1. The Pirates then
had to face Lenoir-Rhyne.
Head coach Sue Manahan was
ecstatic ovfer the win and praised the
team for an excellent showing.
"The middle and bottom half of
our batting order really came
through for us today she said,
"that is, especially Maureen Buck
andand Jeanette Roth
The Lady Pirates, now 30-7, will
play in the NCAIAW state tourna-
ment in Graham this weekend, and
are considered a favorite in the in-
vite.
ECU has beaten N. C. State five
times this year and UNC-Chapel
Hill twice, both of which are in the
tournament.
Purple-Gold Sat.
Pirates Power Past UNC-C
Carolina used homers by
Robert Wells and Fran Fitzgerald to
battle hack ;wice for a 14-7 win over
L'NC-Charlotte at Harrington
Field Sunday afternoon.
The Pirates, now 25-10, powered
hack from 3-0 and 5-1 deficits to
rake a 7-6 lead in the sixth inning
nehmd Wells' solo blast and never
trailed again.
Relief ace Kirk Parsons earned
the win after taking over for
nman starter Brian Peterson
who lasted only two and a third inn-
ings. Parsons is now 4-0.
"We didn't play well, but we
hustled and came back and won it
remarked head coach HaJ Baird.
"Kirk (Parsons) did a good job in
relief, holding them off for us to
come back on them. He did all we
asked of him
Charlotte started the scoring in
their half of the second. With one
out, Carlos Strickland singled and
stole second. Randy Duncan reach-
ed first base on an error, and Chuck
McGee drove in Strickland with a
sacrifice fly. Ronnie Rideout then
homered, making the score 3-0.
The Pirates battled back in their
half of the frame as Todd Hendley
doubled and scored on shortstop
Kelly Robinette's two-out single.
But the 49ers added two more in
the third when Kevin Pittman reach-
ed on an infield hit, and Dickerson
followed with a single. Strickland's
hit brought in one run, and Duncan
singled into right field, scoring
Dickerson.
The Pirates closed the gap to 5-4
in the bottom of the third. David ble and scored when Hallow banged
Wells walked, and-Hallow singled to a hit to center,
center. Evans then doubled, driving
in both runners. A two-out single by
Jack Curlings scored Evans.
East Carolina tied the contest in
the fourth when, with two outs,
David Wells hit a ground-rule dou-
The Pirates had a late-night game
at UNC-Wilmington tonight before
having two days rest.
Don Fires Sweet' First Round
East Carolina's Don Sweeting
fired a 7-under-par 64 in first-round
play at the Old Dominion Invita-
tional being played at Nags Head.
Sweeting shot a 31 on the front
nine and 33 on the back and is the
leader in the competition. The
Pirates are tied for second place
with host Old Dominion at 286.
Temple leads the 15-team field with
a 277.
"Everything went right East
Carolina coach Bob Helmick
remarked about Sweeting's round.
"He had only one bogey, and the
rest were birdies and eagles.
The tournament continues today,
and is the Pirates' last match of the
season.
"A Real T Opener
That it will be on Saturday when
the East Carolina football team
holds its annual Purple-Gold intras-
quad game. Gametime is 7 p.m. in
Ficklen Stadium. There will be no
admission charge.
The Pirates will unveil the newly-
installed I-formation, which has
replaced the wishbone as ECU's of-
fensive set.
The team was divided this past
weekend via a draft by the senior
players.
Head coach Ed Emory will watch
the game from the stands while of-
fensive coordinator Larry Beckish
directs the Gold team and defensive
coordinator Norm Parker guides the
Purple squad.
The Gold offense will have
quarterbacks Kevin Ingram and
Larry Brobst at the controls.
Fullback Earnest Byner, the teams
leading rusher last year before he
went down with an injury, is the
Gold's top back. Carlton Nelson
makes his public debut at the split
end position for the Gold after mov-
ing over from the quarterback spot.
The offense also features strongman
Terry Long at a guard spot.
Defensively, the Gold will feature
linebacker Mike Grant, the team's
leading tackier last year, along with
defensive backs Clint Harris and
Sam Norris. The latter has been im-
pressive since transferring from San
Francisco City College.
Parkers Purple team will have
the Pirates' number one pre-season
quarterback, Greg Stewart, direc-
ting the offense. Stewart can call on
tailback Jimmy Walden out of the
backfield and tight end Norwood
Vann through the airways. Tackle
Johnny Roberston will anchor the
Purple offensive line.
Bonafide All-America candidate
Jody Schulz will lead the way for
what figures to be a strong Purple
defense. Besides Schulz, the Pirates'
two returning starters at defensive
tackle, Hal Stephens and Steve
Hamilton, will be on hand.
The Purple-Gold game will bring
to an end a month of spring football
practice. The Pirates will reopen
practice in August in preparation
for their September 11 season
opener at N.C. State.
QB Williams New Pirate
Last Carolina head football coach
Ed Emory announced the signing of
a junior college quarterback recruit
ednesday
John Williams inked with the
Pirates after spending two years at
North Greenville (S.C.))Junior Col-
V illiams graduated from Wrenn
High School in Greenville, S.C. in
9. During his senior season he
rushed for for 1,500 yards, passed
tor 1,100 and was responsible for 23
ichdowns.
Williams, after playing in the
N.CS.C. Shrine Game, initially
signed with Georgia Tech on a
basketball scholarship. He soon
dropped out and enrolled at North
Greenville JuCo.
This past season he averaged 10.3
points and four assists per game for
the NGJC basketball squad.
He comes to ECU as a football
recruit, though there is a possibility
that he might walk on for the Pirate
basketball team as well.
"At this time John feels that foot-
ball is his sport Emory said. "We
feel he can catch up on what he has
missed. He has the ability to be an
outstanding quarterback or defen-
sive back. He is definitely a premier
athlete
Odom Lands Point Guards
East Carolina head basketball
coach Dave Odom announced the
signing of his first two off-season
recruits last Wednesday. Both
players are point guards.
Odom inked both Tony Robinson
of Jamestown (N.Y.) Junior College
and Curt Vanderhorst of Fayettville
Byrd High School. Both players
stand 6-1 and weigh 180 pounds.
Robinson was rated by the B.C.
scouting service as the top guard in
last March's national JuCo tourna-
ment. He averaged 13.8 points and
6.2 assists per game for Jamestown
last season. The club finished 33-3
and finished seventh in the national
tourney.
Robinson, a Goldsboro native
who played his high school ball in
Boston, Mass picked the Pirates
over Rhode Island and Marshall. He
was a JuCo All-Region III selection.
Vanderhorst averaged 15 points,
5.3 assists and 3.3 steals for a Byrd
High team that was ranked as high
as eighth in the state among 4-A
schools. Byrd, which finished 20-7,
was knocked out of the post-season
tournament by eventual state cham-
pion Rocky Mount.
Vanderhorst was an All-Midsouth
Conference selection this past year
and was voted his team's most
valuable player as a junior. He
selected the Bucs over Richmond
and Western Carolina.
Odom was pleased to sign both
players, saying they met vital needs
of the ECU club.
"One of our main goals at the
beginning of the recruiting season
Odom said, "was to improve our
backcourt. We wanted to add speed,
versatility and depth. Both of these
young men give us these qualities
Odom hopes to sign about three
more players before the end of the
recruiting season.
Other new East Carolina cheerleaders include (left) Jennifer Cooper and Brian Foye (right). Jennifer is a dance major
from Durham, and Brian is a math major from New Bern. Both are juniors.
l
J





Classifieds
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST at Momt's Farm: On r�c
cooler containing a pair of con
tacts. II found, please call Krist
at lit 4731
ATTENTION
Classified ads will be taken ONLY
during the following hours
Monday - 1:1! 3:00
Tuesday - I 00 300
Wednesday � I IS-300
Thursday � 2 90 3 00
Friday � IIS 1:00
You must place the ads in person
and pay tor them in advance
Rates are Si for the first IS words
and SOS per word after the first lit
teen
FOR SALE
TRAILER FOR SALE: set up in
Greenville 2 BR all electric, ac.
excellent condition S29VS call Tar
boro 123 9(94
VIVITAR ZOOM LENS 7S 210 with
macro lor Nikon mount used only
two times. �1S. Call 757 3210
SKIS FOR SALE K 2, US comp
810 skis with Soloman bindings
HIS. Call 757 3210 and leave
number
2 5 CUBIC FEET
REFRIGERATOR Eicellentcon
dition ISO or best offer Call
7Sa 405
WATERBEDS Don t pay retail
for your waterbed Buy a complete
Is quality waterbed with a IS yr
iactory warranty tor as low as
$179. May styles to choose trom
Laway and Delivery adv Buy now
and recieve a free set of padded
rails (S3f value! Call David for
appointment 75 2401
PIONEER STEREO direct drive
turntable, 4S watt ampiiiier
tuner, tour HPM-100 speakers,
audio rack, SIM, call 751 l�3 late
wights.
NEW FEMALE ten speed bike:
S7S.00. 7S1M41.
USED REFRIGERATOR: PER
tap through door and all necessary
hookups (tubing, keg hook-up.
compressed air tank with gauge)
to hook up keg and tap SI SO or best
offer. Tim Tebey 7M-4W3.
PERSONALS
Bob de bob. bop bo de bop bop. Bob
shu bob, dang dang dang, Ding
dong ding Blue Moon
FURNISHED TWO bedroom apt
for sublease May-August, possibly
Fall. U40 month includes heat.
7S�te5
PERSON(S) TO Sublease one
bedroom apt llth St May Aug.
Fumishedunturnished '0 mth.
752 2041
ROOMMATE WANTED yto share
one-bedrom apartment Large
bedroom, fully furnished, Two
blocks from campus VI7 50 plus
one half utilities The Wilmardell
Apartments. 1005 South Elm
Street Apartment 9. Drop by
anytime between four and eight
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
Neat and Responsible. May Aug.
Swimming Pool,S9S mo. plus 12
utilities and less Call 751-9742
TWO BEDROOM TOWNHOUSE
Fully furnished, pool and sauna
rights Great Location Available
for summer rental. Call 7SI-4095
TWO BDR FURNISHED Apt to
sublease during the months of
May thru Aug No deposit
necessary Call 751 7345
Gl Camouflaged Fatigues and
T Shirts Sleepinq Baqs
Backpacks Campinq Equip
ment, Steel Toed Shoes
Dishes and Over 700 DtHerent
Items Cowboy Boots S34 95
ARMY-NAVY
1501 S Evans
STORE
Current undergroduore pre
medical students may now compete
tor several hundred Air Force
scholarships These scholarships ore
�o be awarded to students accepted
into medico! schools as freshmen or
at the beginning of their sophomore
veor. The scholahip provides tor
tuition, boohs, lab tees ond equip
ment. plus a $530 monthly
allowance Investigate this financial
alternative to the high cost ot
medical education
Contoct
I X VK m U HI
PROFESSIONS
KM Rl DIM,
Suite GL 1. MOO Novohc Dt
Raleigh N C 27689
Phone College 91 97 55-4 3 34
ABORTIONS
1 24 week terminations
App'ts. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1-800 321 0575
WE SEW
LEATHER COATS
tss-
Quality Repair
SAAD'S
SHOE REPAIR
113 Grande Ave
758 1228
Dausch&Lomb
Soft lenses
COMPl�T�
Includes initial eye examination,
lenses, care kit, instructions and
follow up visits for one month.
ECU student I D required.
9900
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
opraweiwc
�Y�GAR�C�KT�R
Of Greenville p
228 GREENVILLE BLVD.
TIPTON ANNEX
756-9404
Dr. Peter Hollis
NOW
LOOKING GOOD COSTS LESS
$2.99
MEAL
DEAL!
A foot long BMT
Subway Sandwich and bag
of chips for only 99
Get a BMT�our Biggest, Meatiest. Tastiest
sandwich. Add a bag ot chips, and you've
got a major meal for a meager price! Bring
this coupon to your nearest Subway today.
Limit one coypon per cus.tomei Ote' good only ot participating Si
wov restaurants and not good in combination with any ote' ottei
Otte' empires Apni 23
�SUBGifiW
'liH'l1'lll'?iVMI'tBilf,il
FOOD TOWN
7�
LFPINCSCVAGA
Holly Farms Grade A Mixed
208 E. 5th St.
758-7979
USDA
CHOICE
Lb.
USDA Choice Beef Roue. Fill Cert
Round
Steak
USDA Choice B�ef Round
Rump Roast
�2'�
2�
USDA Ckeleo But Rom. Botteee 3!
Round
Roast
USDA Choice Beef Rome 20-22 Lb. A?. Sliced Free
Whole Bottom Roundu. 168
t
-
USDA
.CHOICE
Qqqrt - R.C Ripe
Straw-
Berries
Package of 6 12 Oz. Cm
Miller
Beer
Ztr
Paeke�e of 12 - 12 Oz. BoHlo
Miller
Beer � t
3 Liter - Boreuooy Rbiie, Choblif
Piek Ceokllt Via Rote
Carlo
2 Liter
'Coke J-
(mM
Rossi
SOFT
STRONG
ABSORBENT
119 Sheett - larojt Roll
22 Oaaee
� Rail
wim
WbyPayS9
Why Pay M.39
1 Pound
ifid
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Premium
or
Zesta w
Saltines &
OFG
Quirt
Mayon
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7
Mayonnaise
Why Pay M 29
89
400 Sheeti - 4 Roll Peek - Corotot
Toilet Tissue
fc te
- J m f7imw �i
fOHHlIM
Prints
3100
8O2Light N'Lively
Yogurt
42 Oz. - Shortening
Bake Rite
6 5 0i. - Liver ft Beef BltiOKleeey Beef ft
Hurt $.���'�� Supper Cot Foee
KalKan
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24 Ct. - Family Size
�tu r cuims m cut mruf
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CATSUP
4100
49 Oz. - Determent
Upton Tea Bags I Cold Power
32 Oaaee
7.25 0z. -Foee To�e
Del Monte Catsup I Macaroni & Cheese
Ears - Sweet
6 5 Oz. Light Chunk In Oil
Star Kist
& Ste-Kfet
CMUHH LlCMt Tl
Corn
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Why Pay 99
Softener
Why Pay 3 63
Prices good at Greenville Food Town Store only'
?





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 20, 1982
11
Classifieds
ONE BEDROOM Apt tor rent
Available starling May 1st Calbe
pool, close to campus Contact
Lisa or Oena at 7JMMS
HEC FEMALE roommates
needed to sublease 3 bdr
townhouse trom May thru aug Air
conditioned, pool and tennis
courts Call Donna 7Si 4�0
TWO BEDROOM Apartment tor
sublease this summer and fall it
desired Pool, air, tennis, call
)M 7031
SHARE SPACIOUS Apt in Larg
House 11 everything Call
7S SS0 Leave message tor Dee
HELP
WANTED
INTERESTED IN Journalism
Public Relations work? Students
are needed to work in the ECU
Sports information and Promo
tions Olfice Inquire at 757491
Good Writing Skills necessary
SERVICES
CARICATURES BY WEYLER
Greenville s original personalued
art set vice Have cartoon done of
yourself or a loved one a unique
gilt idea $10 for I � 10, black and
white or color Call 752 5775
TYPING TERM Thesis,
Resumes Dissertations etc Pro
fessional quality at lowest rates
Call Kempie Ounn anytime
752 733
NOTARY PUBLIC Call Amy at
757 37J4
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST wants
ttf type thesis dissertations,
publications manuscripts or term
papers at home Call 7 5 360
TYPIST All papers. Professional
quality at low rates, 10 years ex
penence. Call 757 1378
PROFESSIONAL TYPING Ser
vice, experience, quality work,
IBM Selectnc typewriters Call
Lanie Shire 758 1062 or Gail Joyner
756 1062
BARGAIN
HUNGRIES?
CLASSIFIEDS
are the
answer
offlS
A?T
TvURSESCLASS OF '82
Make the Right Choice!
It could be the most important decision of your career!
Begin your career at Iredell Memorial Hospital
LRSIG OPPORTl Mill S VDE.
Individualized orientation with Preceptor
Hexihle scheduling, including special
Monday-Friday A weekend plans
Primary Nursing being implemented
1 variety of practice areas
"Internship progratr.r
"Reality Shock Program
lnservice I ducation with total C PRP approval
� i u�cr�tai i a 185 bed community hospital accredited by Joint Commission for Ac
,ril��f HosS innovative and offer a variety of services to our pa
uTmtSTre nemodynam.es monitoring, a Cardiac Reh.biHta.ion program,
Community Health Education, and an in house patient educat.on TV. system.
For more information write or call collect
Carol Biggs, Nurse Recruiter
IREDELL MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
p. O Box 1460, Statesville, N. C. 28677
(704) 873 5661 � ext. 3521 or 3520
AN EQUALOPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
i
Any
Organization
Social, honor or
service, wanting to be
represented in the
yearbook must
schedule pictures
to be taken on
Thursday, April 29.
Call 752-5543 or
757-6501 for an appointment.
Ask for Mike Davis.
�jgrjfrjtrjM .
:S
my
You re ready! For the biggest and
the best that life has to offer. And for
the college ring that will speak vol-
umes about you�and your achieve-
ments�for years to come.
What's more�you can afford it!
Because now, for a limited time you
can order from the entire ArtCarved
collection of 14K gold college rings
and save $25. Come and see the
exquisitely crafted styles�from the
classic to the contemporary. And
choose the ring and custom options
that most eloquently express you.
Now is your time to get what you
deserve. And remember�nothing
else feels like real gold.
I
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i
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CLASS RINGS INC
DATE:
APRIL 21, 22, and 23
TIME: 9-4 P.M.
PLACE:
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
LAST CHANCE to take
advantage of the
LOWEST
TRADITIONAL
GOLD RING PRICES in
two years.
ATTENTION SOPHOMORES:
SAVE MONEY BY
ORDERING NOW!
WE HAVE DELAYED SUMMER
DELIVERIES
Deposit Required. MasterCard or Visa Accepted.
� 1982 ArtCarved Class Rings, Inc
T





i

Part I in a series to
assist graduating
seniors
The Cover
Letter fl?
Resume
Cover letters and resumes weigh
heavily in most companies' hiring
criteria. The letters and resumes
that are well written, concise, and
neat are the ones that result in in-
terviews. This cover letter and
resume provide an excellent form
to follow. Followed properly, with
your own qualifications adapted, it
should prove very useful to you.
When a customer buys
a piece of clothing from
us, we want to be sure
he's receiving the
highest degree of per-
sonal satisfaction. But
more importantly, we
want him to understand
the difference in tailor-
ing, fabrics, and styling
that our clothing
delivers.
llia, H
�: AIbrt s?St C'olind "r � ��00
fe Minting
tit)
Part II in a series to
assist graduating
seniors
Dressing
for the
Interview
Lj very interviewer will agree that the
� way you are dressed for the interview
is extremely important. Many potential
employers will inspect you from head to toe.
When you consider that many companies
will interview more than one-hundred ap-
plicants for a position, it makes good sense
to insure that you're properly dressed.
A dark suit, preferably a navy, navy
pinstripe, grey, or grey pinstripe should be
worn for the first meeting.
A white shirt should be worn for each in-
terview (Some large companies require that
their employees wear nothing but white
shirts).
A conservative stripe or foulard tie is
preferred. Don't make the mistake of wear-
ing a linen tie in the winter or a wool one
during spring or summer. A burgundy stripe
with some navy blue andor grey usually
looks very nice with either of the aforemen-
tioned suits.
Dark shoes, preferably a dark leather
tassel or lace-up is best. Light colored
loafers won't cut it (a fresh shine would be a
good idea too). Wear a belt that matches
your shoes.
A navy blazer is permissable. But it must
be worn properly with a conservative stripe
tie. Grey pants are generally the best to wear
with the blazer (khaki's are too casual for an
interview). Again, dark shoes are best.
We want to offer you high quality choices
when it comes to making that important
decision on a suit. Our selection includes
suits by Austin Reed. Hart Shaffner & Marx.
Hickey Freeman, Chaps, Polo University,
and Corbin. We want to make sure you
understand the difference in tailoring,
fabrics, and styling that our clothing
delivers.
Make sure that your clothes are clean and
pressed.
Some self-proclaimed professionals say
that you should work your way up to your
best looking suit. In other words, save the
best for last to make the lasting impression
when it comes down to the final cut. This
makes sense until you consider that you
want to make a good enough impression at
the first interview to be asked back for the
second. This is a decision you must make for
yourself.
Part III in a series to
assist graduating
seniors
Getting the
Most out of
the Inter-
view
1. Use a strong, firm handshake but don't
try to break the interviewer's hand.
Limp, 'fishy handshakes suggest
unagressiveness and inferiority.
2. Express yourself clearly. Speak in a
moderate tone.
3. Look the interviewer straight in the eye.
Failure to hold eye contact makes the
interviewer feel as if you're bored or
scared.
4. Do a little research and find out
something about the company and the
position.
5. Express an interest in the industry or
business the company deals in.
6. Answer questions with definite
responses. Some elaboration is accept
able only if it's a factor in your answer
and is to the point.
7. Do not condemn past employers in any
way. Potential employers will figure that
you might have the same to say about
them one day.
Student Layaways Welcome
ns
MENS WEAR
Downtown Greenville Carolina East Mall
8. Be sure to ask questions about things,
such as hospitalization and fringe
benefits. Companies feel that people
who don't care enough to ask about
these things may not be conscientious
enough to serve them well.
9. If nothing is mentioned regarding
salary, ask as tactfully as possible
(toward the end of the interview), not
how much you will be paid, but how
much the position pays.
10. Don't be unwilling to start at the hot
torn. People who expect too much too
soon are usually the last to be hired.
11. If the interviewer does not tell you when
or if he will contact you, ask when you
might expect to hear from him.
12. Be sure to thank the interviewer for his
time.
13. Above all else, use your very best sense
of judgement. Tact and judgement are
the keys to a top-notch performance in
an interview.
�Mot all of these points are applicable in
every situation but it is our hope that they
will be of some benefit to you.
A
� fyjj i
4

��� �-� � � . MN0M I m"
-��inWWi.ap
MinaMV iii�i�II
iiMwwwmmiiiB





Title
The East Carolinian, April 20, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 20, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.195
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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