The East Carolinian, April 15, 1982






She iEaat Carolinian
Vol. 58
Ntvn
Q
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Thursday. April 15, 1982
Greenville, N .(
8 Panes
Counterfeit Pill Sales
Popular On Campus
B GREGR1DEOI 1
Speed Qualuudes. Wait a
take a second look. Y hat
the local dealer is selling could be
ffeine
ccording to Detective Set. Gene
McAbee ol campus security, these
pills have become fairly popular
dents on campus. Fhey
3 rtrolled substance, yet
;ni ol them on university
� m violation of solicita
Detective McAbee explained that
he pills themselves are not
u is a felony in North
o sell them claiming they
lied stubstance The
uic
statute concerning this, the
Counterfeit Drug Act, was passed in
19S1 and carries a maximum penalty
o five years in jail and a $5,000
fine.
Referred to as blue and clears,
pink hearts and speckles, the pills
contain 150 mg of caffeine, 37.5 mg
of phenylpropanolamine HCT and
25 mg o ephednne sulfate.
According to Dr. W.R. Wooles,
Chairman ol the School of Phar-
macology the pills are not as
dangerous as real amphetamines.
He stated that the pills can be ex-
tremely harmful to people with
heart conditons.
On March 3, two students were
arrested tor possession of these
pills. According to McAbee, the
students could not be charged under
the counterfeit drug law due to in-
sufficient evidence.
"We raided their room because
we suspected them of selling speed;
in the subsequent search we found
3800 caffeine pills McAbee said.
The two students told McAbee
that they had ordered the pills
through the mail. They paid $200
for 2,000 capsules, and according to
some sources, were selling them tor
as much as $1 downtown.
The pills will now be sent to the
State Bureau of Investigation to be
used in analvsis.
General College Committee
Proposes Requirement Changes
B Mlkr HI GHES
I lilh't
1 he i Cl Generalollegeom-
irrei l proposing a set ies
ru school's general
quirements.
idopted,
nevi students
aureate degi ees.
: ev ision is dh id-
: . v . seciions or concen-
ation eroups, inc verbal and
e skills
formanc
W h
present urn
.ills f
college houi
quanttta
u
1 '
� Mat
by p.
�Six sen
ts working toward
musi suc-
-4 hours o
rquirement at the
mmittee's pro-
increase in general
of verbal and
, students would
r completing 15
�a ing ai eas:
. 1200 determined
03 or 1065 i �� determin-
acem tirs).
(urs I be earned in
lages (103 and 1 (MM
courses), or from some combination
o' approved courses in computer
science, logic, math, statistics, ad-
vanced English grammar or com-
position, public speaking or natural
science.
The requirement for natural
sciences remains the same under the
new proposal. A minimum of eight
semester hours must be earned in
approved courses in biology,
chemistry, geology and or physics.
At least one course must require
laboratory work.
A minimum of 12 semester hours
is required in the social sciences
under the new plan, including one
course from each of the following
areas:
� Historv 1040, 1041, 1050 or 1051.
�Anthropology 1000, 2000 or 2010;
psychology 1050; or sociology 2110.
� I conomics 2113; geography 1000.
2001, 2002 or 2003; or political
science 1010. 2106. 2107 or 2108.
� One social science elective, to be an
approved course in social sciences
or interdisciplinary studies.
rwelve hours will also be required
in humanities and fine arts under
the proposal, including one course
in each of the following areas:
�English 2000, 2100 or 2200;
philosophy 1100.
�One literature elective from a
course in English, American, world
literature, literature in a foreign
language or in translation
� Three hours of fine arts from an
approved course in art, drama or
music.
�One three-hour elective in
humanities, fine arts or inter-
disciplinary studies.
Health 1000 and physical educa-
tion 1000 are to remain general col-
lege requirements under the new
proposal.
No single course may be used to
fulfill two or more general educa-
tion requirements under the new
plan
The General College Committee
will be holding three public hearings
next week to provide a forum for
discussion on the proposed changes.
On Monday, April 19, the com-
mittee will meet in Brewster C-103,
from 3 to 5 p.m.
From 9 to 11 a.m. on April 21,
the committee will meet in the Belk
Building, room 101.
The final meeting will be on
Thursday, April 22, from 3 to 5
p.m. in Raw! 130.
Close Your Eyes, And It on 7 Hurt
Prince, a retired frisbee champion, shows his expertise at precision Iricken f snuffing
brave straight man.
tnoto By OAVE WILLIAMS
A Bit
a can from the shoulder of a
rOn The Inside-i
1
Faculty Speak On 'Nuclear Exchange'
Larry Beckish (above). East
Carolina football's new offensive
coordinator, says he values
respect most in a coach player
relationship How's the switch to
the "I" formation coming along?
bee Sports
Weather Watch
Partly cloudy today with highs in
the 60s Lows tonight in the up
per 40s
B PATRICK O'NEILL
1 ighty -two percent of the
respondents to a recent survey ol the
II scientific community believe
that the death toll in the United
States would be great in the event ol
"a nuclear exchange
1 he survey, which was ad-
ministered to faculty members o(
the EC U Department ol Science and
the basic science department of the
1I School ol Medicine, was con-
ducted by ECl professor of en-
vironmental health Dr. Oris
Blackwell.
Blackwell sent the 14-question
survey to 150 faculty members as
pan ol the "Ground Zero Week"
program on campus. Fifty members
responded.
I he survey had eight questions
dealing with the effects a nuclear ex-
change would have on human life,
especial!) topics such as the number
ol fatalities that would result from a
blast (direct radiation and
firestorms), fallout and injuries,
disease, starvation, exposure, civil
disorder and psychological
breakdown.
The respondents were asked to
answer in one ol these six
categories: negligible, slight.
moderate, heavy, profound and ex-
tinction. All answers to these eight
questions were in the lattei three
categories.
The last six questions dealt with
the "disruption ol social and
biological systems" as applied to
metropolital areas, rural areas, the
industrial base, the economy, the
human race and "all human life
According to Blackwell. "In
terms of the 'disruption ol social
and biological systems the opi-
nions of the 50 scientists are no
more optimistic. The least disrup-
tion was anticipated in rural areas,
but even here, 76 percent felt that
disruption would be either 'heavy
'profound' or 'extinction
Eighty percent believe that
"disruption tot all life on earth"
would be significant � "not just for
people but all plants and animals on
earth
Eighty-four percent indicated
that they feel a nuclear exchange
would totally disrupt the economy,
while 94 percent feel that the in-
dustrial base would be practically
eliminated. Another 98 percent feel
that the metropolitan areas would
be nearly eradicated from any
nuclear exchange.
Blackwell opened the survey with
the question: "As a society, are we
denying the extent of the risk and
damage resulting from a nuclear
war?" and he went on further to ex-
plain. "There is a growing con-
troversy over the survivability in a
nuclear exchange. '
Recent reports from the federal
Emergency Management Ad-
ministration (FEMA) claim that SO
percent of the U.S. people can be
saved m an "all-out nuclear ex
change if new and improved civil
de tense procedures are im-
plimented. Strong resistance to the
FEMA statements have resounded
from the international scientific
communities, many of whom insist
that nuclear war cannot be perceiv-
ed as an option under any cir-
cumstances.
President Reagan has validated
his agreement with FEMA by pro-
posing a4-billion civil defense ap-
propriation increase
"The U.S. population is totallv
unprepared physically, mentally or
from an organizational point ot
view, to deal with even minoi
natural disasters said I c I phai
macology professoi Dr. A. J. In-
genito in a written statement.
let alone nucleai wai
Ingenito added that "A nucleai
war. even o limited scope, would be
insane and he suggested furthei
preparation and lobbying ol
legislators as responses necessary to
face the "eventuality" ol nucleai
war.
According to Dr. S lamal
Mustafa. "This nucleai aim- raci
everything the human species has
done in many years
In his closing comments.
Blackwell attempted to summarize
the views o the responding (acuity.
"Any nuclear exchange would be a
disaster of monstrous proportions
he said.
"A valued opinion � and it this
be so � the prophecy that 'the liv-
ing would envy the dead' could
come true Blackwell said "It this
be so. all should lend every effort
toward the prevention of a nuclear
a mad race which will engull wai
On-Campus Debates Are
Becoming'Lecture Wars'
Inside Index
Announcements
Opinion
Campus Forum
Style
Learn.ng About College
Sports
Class�fieds
2
4
4
5
6
7
8
Howell Interviewed For Post
The last of four men in the runn-
ing for East Carolina chancellor was
interviewed Wednesday, and selec-
tion committee chairman Ashley B.
Futrell plans to submit the commit-
tee's choice by May 14.
Dr. John Howell, acting
chancellor of the university since
January, is the fourth candidate to
be interviewed by university groups
in the last fou. weeks.
Howell, who claimed when he
took the position that he was not a
candidate for chancellor, has work-
ed at ECU as chairman of the
political science department, vice
chancellor for academic affairs and
dean of the graduate school and the
College of Arts and Sciences.
Charles Q. Brown, acting dean of
the ECU School of Technology and
the chairman of the geology depart-
ment, met with campus groups last
week.
J. Fred Young, president of Elon
College, and University of West
Florida President James A. Robin-
son visited the campus in March.
The selection committee's choice
will be submitted to University of
North Carolina President William
Friday and the UNC Board of
Governors.
(CPS) � It may be fading as fast
as the memories o the 1980 elec-
tions off campus, but the on-
campus debate over the political
role of the Christian right has
recently escalated into something ot
a lecture war between left and right
On the left are former U.S.
senators George McGovern and
Birch Bayh � both of them victims
of Moral Majority politicking in
1980 � who have mounted a
vigorous, almost frenetically-paced
anti-rightist campus lecture cam-
paign.
On the right are conservatives like
writers William Rusher and Howard
Phillips and Moral Majority
spokesman Cal Thomas, who have
taken to the campus hustings to de-
fend themselves against the
McGovem-Bayh campaign.
The McGovern-Bayh campaign
has been on a broad offensive from
coast to coast this school year.
McGovern spent the fall hustling
from Ferrum Junior College in
Virginia to the University of
Missouri, to Purdue, Cal State-
Fullerton, Alabama, Smith, Stan-
ford, Eckerd College in Florida, and
42 other campuses.
Among the 25 colleges he's visited
Hist since January are Ohio Nor-
thern, fouisiana State, Central
Michigan and the University of
California-Santa Cruz.
Bayh, whose schedule is less hec-
tic than McGovern's, mixes debates
with conservatives among his lec-
tures against right-wing politics.
Their efforts spring from
McGovern's promise, made the
evening after his November, 1980
senatorial defeat, to form a liberal
group to try to counter the conser-
vatives' advertising.
The result was a group called
Americans for Common Sense
(ACS).
"The lecture series is simply part
ol our public relations effort,
See CAMPUS, Page 3






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 15, 1982
Announcements
HEARING
Tht Genera College Committee
will hold public hearings on the at
tacned revised proposed general
education requirements for bac
calaurate degree programs The
Committee believes that these
proposals are well suited to meet
me general educational needs for
East Carolina University students
and mesh with a minimum of ad
jusfment in the existing degree
program requirements The hear
ing dates art nsied below Should
you wish to appear on the hearing
agenda, please call 627V Monday.
April 1� from 3 00 5 00 p m in
Brewster C 103 Wednesday April
31 from 9 00 It 00 am Allied
Health lOMBeik) Thursday. April
Ti. from 3 00 5 00pm Rawl 130
USHERS
if you would like to usher for the
Dance Concert April 22. 23 or 24
and thereby see the show free, you
may Signup on ine bulletin board
in the mam hallway of the Messick
Theatre Arts Center A limited
number of ushers are needed Re
qu'rements are men must wear
coat and tie and ladies mus' wear
a drss Everyone must arrive in
the lobby of McG'nms Theatre no
la'er than 4 45 p m
COR SO
There w.n e a CORSO meeting
Thursday April lb at 7 00 p m
Beik building The gues' speakei-
w.ll be Steven Creech The topic
will be Present and Future
Status of Sociai Work and Mental
Health Refreshments wn be
served Ail interested are invited
lo atteno
ROCKATHON
Alpha Sigma Phi Fraternity
i mcooperation with the inter
li-aternity Council' Will be holding
a Rockathon for the American
Lung Assooa'ion The proiect will
take place on Apr.i 15 from seven
In the morning until seven at
n.ght All are urged to attend and
contribute
EL SALVADOR
The Greenville, ECU Committee
on El Salvador invites one and all
to come Tuesday night at 9 OOP m
to the Baptist Student Center to
hear Roya Shokovfan, a ECU stu
dent from Iran, speak about the
similarities between the US situa
tion in El Salvador and our
previous Support of the Shah in
Iran Also on Friday April 16,
former Latin American Mis
sionary Gail Phares, co chairman
of the Raleigh, Committee on El
Salvador will be speaking to
various classes and a noon Com
munity Meeting in Mendenhall
All are Welcome!
NAACP
NAACP elections will be held
April 15, 1982 Anyone interested in
running for art office, contact
Virginia Canton at 757 6942 or
Jackie Rowe at 752 8450 The
deadline tor submitting names is
April 7 1982
NATURAL LIGHT
FLYING DISC CLASSIC
The high flying ECU Fnsbee
Club announces that this weekena
April 17 ana 18 the most spei.
'acular sportnq event ever in
North Carolina vntl be held on the
campus of ECU Competitors
from accross the East Coast win
be m Greenville tc compete tor
S2 000 in cash and pr.jes
Organizational meetings for those
wishing 'o help ana be a part of
this event will be on Tnursnay at
Peter Laubert s house at 620 S
Pitt Street, and Thursday m 247
MendennaH Both will be at 8 00
p m Staff shirts will be given out
at Thursday's meetings so ALL
MEMBERS are urged to atteno
Transportation 'o and trom the
tournament sight will be provided
by the Fr.sbee Club itwiilbeheid
from 10 00 am to 2 00 pm at the
High Rises The Mall, and the Hill
and end at the sightiAlhed Health
Fields'
For more information call Pe'er
Laubert at 758 0375 or Mike Hill at
758 6043
PPHA
The professional Health
Alliance (PPHA) will have a
meeting this Thursday, April 15
This meeting will be held at 5 30 at
the Afro American Cultural
Center Elections and nomina
tions for new executive members
will be conducted AM members
must attend
PRC DEPARTMENT
The PRC Department will be
having their annual banquet on
Friday. April 16 at the Casablan
ca Prior to the banquet, there will
be a reception in the PRC Building
honoring senior fieldwork students
and the alumni The reception will
begin at 5 00 Tickets are $12 and
will be sold in the PRC Building
everyday until April 15 at 4 00
p m AH are invited
GAMMA BETA PHI
our last spring semester
meeting will be held April 15 at
6 00 pm in the MSC Building in
room 221 We are also organizing
the highly publicized Move A
Thon tor Multiple Sclerosis held
Saturday, April 17 All informa
tion you need is on the sponsor
sheets which can be found m
Mendenhall at the information
desk Help us stop one of the mam
cripplers of young people
OMEGA PSI PHI
Omega Psi Pfi presents Superfit
contest Ail male entry s sign up
the night of the contest If you
think your body is a Superfit you
could be a contest contest winner
Thursday night April 15 aththe
Wiz
ECU HUNGER
COALITION
Or Ons Blackweii professor of
Environment Health will be the
guest speaker at the next meeting
of the ECU Hunger Coalition Or
Blackweii will speak about his ex
periences working in Sn Lanka, a
small island off the coast of India
There are no simple solutions to
Wend Hunger but if we work
together it can be stopped You
can help by getting involved m the
Hunger Coalition All are invited
to at'eno Dr Blackweii s presen
'atioo on Thursday evening April
15 a' 7 30 p m at the Newman
house 953 F Tentn S'roe'
WZMB
Keith Mitchell is your host
Saturday and Sunday nights from
10 to 1 as he brings you "The Elec
trie Rainbow Radio Show" Satur
days album special is the Door's
classis "LA Woman' . Sunday's
is "Gamma 3"
KYF
The King's Youth Fellowship
will hold its final meeting of the
semester in the Mendenhall Stu
dent Center at 8 00 p m on April
15 (Room 238) Refreshments will
be served at the conclusion of the
meeting
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
Greenville Special Olympics
rescheduled for Thursday April 15
from 9 00 a m till 2 00 p m at the
ECU Track field needs volunteers
All volunteers should meet Wed
April 14, at 3 00 p m at the ECU
track field
AHEA
AHEA willhave a coverd dish
supper on Monday. April 19 at 5 00
behind the Croatan Each person
should bring one dish Members
please bring a guest with interest
m Home Economics
SIGMA TAU DELTA
Sigma Tau Delta is doing
something memorable n April ?0
Tuesday, at 7 30 m Mendenhall
Room 244 All old and new
members, faculty and invited
guests are encouraged to par
ticipate in a Wine and Cheese
Social honoring English Depart
ment Chairman, Dr Erwm
Hester Dr Hester is retiring as of
the end of this semester to resume
hs teaching career Sigma Tau
Delta wishes to show their ap
preciation for his support of our
organization over the past years
Please cdme1'
COMIC BOOK CLUB
Fantasy fans and music lovers
will have a chance to meet, mouth
off and buy, sell or trade their
treasured items on Sunday, April
18 when the ECU Comic Book Club
will sponsor it's annual collector's
convention An added attraction
this year is record collecting The
convention will be held at the Holi
day Inn on 714 S Memorial Drive
from 10 a m to 5 p m Admission
is free to the public For more in
lormation andor dealer's reguia
tions, contact The Nostalgia News
tand 1919 Dickinson Aveor call
752 6389 between 8 10 p m
KARATE
Beit tests nave been changed to
this Saturday, April 17 because of
BATTLE Call Cnd Hems or
Rick Barrow or show up at Thurs
day night practice for any ques
tions Tests will be at 1 00 at
Dickenson Avenue
To Beth:
A Nice Girl
I Met One Day
And Went Google-Eyes for.
Happy 21 stt
Love, Mike
THE SHOE OUTLET
(Located beside Evans Seafood)
Featuring name brand shoes at bargain prices.
Up To 75 OFF regular pric-
Bass Steward-McGuire Brouse Abouts
201 W. Washington St. Within walking distance of campus.
PLAN A
HOBIE SAILING
ADVENTURE
TRIP INTO
YOUR SUMMER
Week long stress-challenge,
adventures along the Outer
Banks of North Carolina.
Beginning May 23
$100.00 Complete,
Register Now
For inlorrnation
write or call
UNITEDMETHODIST
OUTDOOR MINISTRIES
Camp Don Lee
Arapahoe. N C 28510
919 249 1106
V&M
ATTIC
THE SOUTHiWiLL RISE AGAIN!
0
THURSDAY SUPER GRIT
FRIDAY � � HAPPY HOUR M
65C BEVERAGE 25C ADMISSION � 4-7 P.M.
�BADGE
SATURDAY BADGE
SUNDAY � A&M RECORDING ARTIST
DOC HOLLIDAY I
& CONTROL GROUP J
i SPOBTSWOBLDl
104 Red Banks Rd. (Behind Shoney's) 756-6000
Tuesday Night �
ECU NIGHT
JUST $1.00 wID includes
Skate Rental
7:00-10:00
Every Friday & Saturday Night
ECU Students are admitted for
JUST $2.00 including Skate Rental
Items and Prices
Effective thru Sat
April 17. 1982
Copyright 1982
Kroger Savon
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold to Dealers
&
u
600 Greenville Blvd -Greenville
Open 8 a.m. to Midnight
Open Sunday 9 am to 9 p m
H

.��'
'
V v
.
r&1gyjjjo�u!2�
TWIN BLADES
REFILLS
Atra
-�-
M
BEG
OR
Black
LIGHT
Label
Beer

�Oz.
KROGER
HAMBURGER OR
ot Dog Buns
9 $419
���i Pkgs �
ASSORTED TOPPINGS
Fox Deluxe
DIET �
Pepsi-Cora
iO SAVE
40c
WASHINTON STATE
EXTRA FANCY
Red Delicious
Apples
11 To
HV2-O2
Pkg.
B�-
LIMIT TWO PER FAMILY
WITH $10 00 OR MORE
ADDITIONAL PURCHASE
PLANTERS
COCKTAIL OR
DRY ROASTED
APPLE
OR
CHERRY
PEACH
jmjf
wttneri
Fried P�s
SERVE' N SAVE
Weiners
BANTERS
i&cktad
PEANUTS
c

for
T2-Oz.
Pkg.
BAGGED
RtPE
GOLDEN
Bananas
COftJMITICS A
Lbs.
t
Chips & Snacks n;
16�.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 15. 1982
Bicycle Thefts On The Increase
By GREG HIDEOUT
S��H Writer
This week's police
blotter is highlighted by
the theft of four
bicycles. According to
police sources, the
bicycles were stolen at
different areas on cam-
pus. The security
department would like
to remind students that
bicycles are more
susceptible to theft dur-
ing warm weather.
The following are
campus related in-
cidents occuring April 7
- April 12.
April 7. 8 a.m. � An
Umstead dorm resident
reported the larceny of
her bicycle from the
northwest steps of
Umstead Dorm. 12:30
p.m. � A Greenville
resident reported the
larceny of his motorcy-
cle helmet from his
motorcycle parked at
Memorial Gym. 9:45
p.m. � A Jones dorm
resident reported that
his wallet was stolen
from somewhere in
Jones dorm.
April 8. � 9:10 a.m.
- Connie Burgess, Resi-
dent Director of Greene
dorm, reported the
larceny of five shower
curtains from the
nineth floor bathroom.
1:15 p.m. � A Belk
dorm resident reported
the larceny of her bike
from the rack west of
Belk. 1:20 p.m. - An
Umstead dorm resident
reported the larceny of
his bike from the east
side of Umstead.
April 9. 12:01 a.m.
� Officer Watson
reported the vandalism
to a pastry machine in
the Belk basement.
12:05 a.m. � Paul Pat-
terson, a Greenville
resident, was arrested
for damage to property
in Belk. 1:40 p.m. � A
Scott dorm resident
reported the larceny of
his bike while parked in
front of the financial
aid office.
April 10. 2:33 a.m.
� Reserve Officer
Moore reported the
breaking and entering
of a machine in Jarvis
dorm.
April 11. 9 p.m. � A
Slay dorm resident
reported the breaking
and entering and
larceny from her room
of stereo equipment
and a television set
valued at $750.
April 12. 8:10 p.m.
� An Aycock dorm
resident reported the
larceny of two stereo
speakers from his
room. 11:30 p.m. � A
"peeping Tom" was
reported at Slay dorm.
Campus 'Lecture Wars' Continue
Continued From Page 1
designed to' cast some
doubt on the views
espoused by the Moral
Majority explains
Ruth Claveloux, ACS'
research director.
At Notre Dame
recently, for example,
McGovern charged
conservatives with
"distorting the family
image, trying to judge
complex issues with
simple answers, and
detracting from the real
issues the country
should concentrate
on
In response, the
Moral Majority has
launched its own tour
to show students "we
don't measure up to the
stereotypes says Cal
Thomas, the group's
vice president of com-
munications.
"We have as much
right to be doing it as
our liberal friends
Thomas reasons. "I've
spoken at 40 or so col-
leges in the last year
across the country
His schedule, in fact,
rivals the intensity of
McGovern's. The ar-
ticulate Thomas
already has 25 campus
stops scheduled
through June, 1982.
But unlike
McGovern, Thomas
prefers to debate in-
stead of lecture.
Thomas complains
he can't lure McGovern
into a joint appearance.
"McGovern just won't
debate. It's like
teaching boxing, but
not getting into the ring
with somebody. The
liberals go out and lec-
ture and make all these
charges. But there's
nobody there to
challenge them
Students seem to like
the lecture war,
regardless of who
stands in for whom.
The East Carolinian
Striinit ihr campus iommumi
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during Ihe academic
year and every Wednesday dur
mg the summer
The East Carolinian is the ot
ticial newspaper ot East
Carolina University, owned,
operated and published tor and
by the students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate i20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU,
Greenville. N.C.
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carolinian,
Old South Building ECU Green
vilfe, NC 27834
Telephone 757 63At 637, 6309
Application to mail at second
class postage rates is pending at
Greenville, North Carolina
greenvilk'
Your Bonus: Cliniques
'Make It Happen
Yours at no extra charge
with any Clinique purchase
of t.50 or more.
Dramatically Different
Moisturizing Lotion
Han Repair.
Extra-Help Makeup
m Soft Beige
Different Rose 1 ipstick
Rose Poppy 1 ip Pen il.
Onr bonus to a customer
W I
CLINIQUE
Allergy Tested.
100 Fragrance Free.
repar
HAVING PROBLEMS
DRUGS?
with
ALCOHOL? FAMILY?
SCHOOL?

Current under graduate pre
medical students mot now compete
tor several hundred Air Fore
scholarships These scholarships ore
to be awarded to students accepted
nlo medical school as freshmen or
of the beginning ot their sophomore
yeor The scholarship provides tor
��jition. books, lab tees and equip-
ment plus a S530 monthly
allowance Investigate this financial
alternative to the high cost of
medicol education
Contoct-
I � M tO l 111
PR( (HUSSIONS
KM Kl IT1M.
Suite Gil llOONovahoO
Raleigh N C 27689
Phone College.919)755-4134
g.gg�gs�ggag
USED
TIRES
$1Q00
inquire at
Evans Seafood
1002 Evans
Street
758-9584
9

Gl Camouflaged Fatigues and
T Shut, Sleeping Bags
Backpack Camping Equip
ment S'eel Toed Snoes
Disnes and ower '00 D
Items C"bo� Boots ij6 95
ARMY-NAVY
STORE '�
Join Nautilus and get ready for summer. It's that
time again to get back into shape. Nautilus is located
on Evans Street, within walking distance from cam-
pus. Featuring a full line of Nautilus equipment,
Olympic free weights, sauna, whirlpool and locker
room.
Call and ask about our pro-rated smdeni rates and
low summer rates.
Call and schedule a
free introductory workout.
HOURS OF OPERATION:
Mon. Thurs. � 10 a.m. 10 p.m. Friday � 10 a.m. 8 p.m.
Saturday � 10 a.m5 p.m. Sunday � 1 p.m5p.m.
We Can Help
Students helping Students
CAMPUS ALCOHOL & DRUG PROGRAM
301-503 ErwinBidg.
757-6793
iW�s
�dV
ANMEUSER BUSCH, INC � ST LOUIS. MISSOURI
X





3Ue iEaat (Earalitiims
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Jimmy DuPREE. mmurtmcm
Charles Chandler, mmmmemm
Ric Browning, otovtm ����� Tom Hall, Ntm&a&r
Fielding Miller, mm William Yelverton, seom Emm
Alison Bartei , vi�,� mu�u' Steve Bachner, Enwmimwugmm
Steve Moore, mw m Diane Anderson, &�
April 15, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
THE
That Time
When Weather Can Hinder �
It's that time of year again. So,
BEWARE!
It strikes annually like a disease.
It spreads to many unsuspecting vic-
tims. It tantalizes, teases and even-
tually dominates hordes of students
each year.
What are the signs? Shorts,
t-shirts, sandals, sunshine, bikinis,
wide-eyed stares, trips to the beach,
empty classrooms. Yes, they're all
symptons of the disease that, at one
time or another, attacks practically
every student during his or her stay
at this university.
What we're talking about here is
Spring Fever.
When the temperatures begin
reaching the 70 degree mark many
of us begin a revolution.
The men, for example, pay much
closer attention to the ladies. Here's
a typical scene. Two girls, clad in
skimpy shorts, walk by a couple of
gents. "Man, I just love springtime.
Wow Now who hasn't heard that
one?
The ladies; now they get the fever
too. They'll all tell you thye just
love seeing a pair of athletic legs
walk by after suffering through a
long winter. And, of course, most
girls (and guys too, for that matter)
love to subject their bodies to ail the
ultraviolet rays the sun can muster.
All of this is fine and dandy �
when it is kept under control. We all
need to remember why we are here
� that being to get an education.
Spring Fever should not be taken
liahtlv. It can and definitely will do
big-time damage if not kept under
control.
"Oh, I'll just skip this one class
Then it's two, then three, then days
at a time. Granted, not everyone
gets the fever this bad, but it DOES
happen to the best of us.
All of us should keep in mind that
exams are forthcoming. Now is pro-
bably the most vital time of the year
to attend class. Professors drop
many a subtle hint about exam
questions at this time of year. You
can't get those hints if you're out on
the hill or somewhere else enjoying
the sunshine.
We all love the spring. It brings us
back to life. It makes us yearn for
the upcoming summer break. But
let's try to keep it from getting the
best of us.
While we all want a good dose of
Spring Fever, it is wise to avoid an
overdose. Many an 'F' or 'D' for
spring semester have been received
after to a sloppy finish caused by to
"OD-ing" on springtime.
Thank You!
Here's a hearty 'Thank You' to
all who worked so hard to bring us
another Barefoot On The Mall ,
which is taking place today.
Many persons put a great deal of
time and effort into coordinating
the activites. For that, all students
should be grateful.
The good time we all have there is
due to their work.
ON
Wtt4titl'
SON
ZJpZ

New
i��2
Wf,� Nil '1
1
Win!
BRITISH
EMPIRE4?
Junk Mail Entertaining, Annoying
By KIM ALBIN
No more, thank you. I shall be ill if I am
forced to remove another piece of
Washington, D.C. junk mail from my
postbox.
Who does Norman Lear think he is to
write me a letter asking for money? I have
yet to tap his party, the PEOPLE FOR
THE AMERICAN WAY, for funds. And
Katharine Hepburn recently sent me a cor-
dial request, on the behalf of the Planned
Parenthood, for $25-500. I guess the bless-
ing of an Academy Award winner is all one
might need to justify an abortion, and for
those with guilty consciences, that
justification is available for a very low fee.
Send Katharine $25, and she will deem you
a champion of reproductive freedom.
Junk mail, like other literary genres, can
range from schlock to masterpiece. Occa-
sionally I receive an article that is par-
ticularly entertaining, such as my recent in-
vitation to contribute to the Women's
Rights Fund.
It seems that Congresswoman Patricia
Schroeder and the other "ladies" would
like my support; they want me to send my
tax-deductible dollars to the Democratic
Congressional Campaign Committee so
that they can use them to push for
"legislation to give women a fairer
chance
They can forget it. I wouldn't consider
sending them a postage stamp, but I en-
joyed their postal display of marketing
techniques, i.e deception.
Let's see, I got a nice, four-page letter
from good ole' Patty herself, a post-paid
envelope (for my check signing and mail-
ing convenience), a perforated coupon on
which I am supposed to check the amount
sent and whether that's Visa or Master-
card, a flyer picturing seven democratic
women's righters, and another flyer, this
one with seven clippable coupons � a
democratic attempt at humor. The
coupons are "Republican coupons they
feature silly digs on members of the
Republican party and are "Void where
prohibited by Democrats
1 trust that most women out there do not
take these kinds of tricks seriously, but I
w ish someone would make it known to Pat
Schroeder and her feminist friends that I,
for one, am not interested in their most
unfeminine cause. Since when is it a safe
assumption that all women are paranoid
freedom-seekers, struggling to escape from
male dominance and obtain some libera-
tion? I find that most women are perfectly
content being themselves, yet are having
some of their "rights" taken away by
those who espouse liberation of the
female.
For instance, since women have had a
"fairer chance men are having an in-
creasingly difficult time figuring out how
to treat them. I have observed many situa-
tions in which a man on a date did not
know whether or not to open the door for
the woman, whether to help her out of the
car, whether to help her get her coat on.
Likewise, women are often unsure as to
how to act. In this area, many people cite
downtown Greenville as a bad place to try
to meet members of the opposite sex � the
women, out of necessity, are hostile, and
the men (not being allowed to be
gentlemen) are childish.
Since Patricia Schroeder may not get to
read this herself, we may need to bring this
matter to her attention individually. When
Pat sends you a perforated coupon asking
for your money so she can further confuse
your rights, send her back a note (in :he
handy postpaid envelope) informing her
that you are content with the natural, con-
ventional laws of gender that humans were
born to. This will destroy her notions of
popular acceptance, and may restore some
dignity to the dating habits of humans.
Then hit her up for $25, tax-deductible,
payable to your favorite charity. IncluHf a
postpaid envelope.
i-Campus Forum
Kim Albin, Reverend Bragg Draw Mixed Response
I, for one, found Kim Albin's
caricature of liberals quite helpful
("Liberals: All You Wafited to Know
April 8). I know I have a great deal of
trouble (especially in front of the Stu-
dent Supply Store and in Mendenhall)
avoiding those liberals and "Jay Stone
types gosh, they try my patience ter-
ribly, and they make me feel so GUIL-
TY! Thanks to Ms. Albin's article
(which was informative, yet mildly
humorous - those cheeky conser-
vatives!), I can spot them in plenty of
time to remember I needed something in
the opposite direction.
At First I wasn't certain as to whom
Ms. Albin was referring when she spoke
of the liberal's "Dress code" (wide ties,
colorful shirts, bleary eyes). Did people
like that really still exist? It didn't take
long, however, to realize exactly who she
meant: after all, the only bright colored
shirts I'd seen on campus were a certain
kelly green; the only wide ties to be
found in Greenville are those cravats
adorning particular members of the
Legislative Branch oj the SGA around
election time (not counting the aspiring
young executives at the Ramada Inn
happy hour).
Oh and urn, bleary eyes abound - this
is ECU. Anyway, I've always considered
it a good idea to shun people displaying
these symptoms, I'd just never realized
that they were indeed liberals.
One matter troubled me, however, as
I read Ms. Albin's expose - only a small
oversight, to be sure. Apparently, I
could Find no evidence in this all-too-
true rendering of liberals which in-
dicated that liberals are any other gender
thanmale. But then, this is probably
accurate. For in my experience I hav
never known a female - excuse me, girl
who had any opinions whatsoever
(worth defendig or not), only "honor
At any rate, I wish to thank columnist
Kim Albin for a marvelous refresher
course. It's been far too long since
anyone has told me a funny story about
what liberals are like, not since my
seventh grade history class, in fact (that
was in the 60's). However, if there are
any female liberals, I want to know
about it! I can easily guess what their
"cause" might be, and I don't think I
could stand an evening of feeing like a
"pig" in the eyes of my date. Who needs
it? We'd probably end up going to see a
film like Personal Best, certainly
disgusting fare for any sensitive male
who intends to defend his date's honor
all the way to the Cotten blue light.
So, Ms. Albin, if you or anybody
knows how to spot liberal girls, please
clue me in. I look forward to an article
on this topic, which would be quite in
keeping with the trends of the editorial
page of The East Carolinian. That is,
you can get a response from almost
anybody if you say something dumb
enough about them.
RAYMOND SCHMIDT
Senior
She's O.K.
On Thursday, conservative Kim Albin
wrote an amusing article describing the
average liberal as lacking humor. The
following Tuesday, an average liberal, in
a letter to Campus Forum, described
Kim as a "Defeatist - Egotistical -
Assinine - FlybrainObviously a
fellow with a sense of humor.
I don't know why they're picking on
Kim Albin. Aside from her column,
there's absolutely no reason to read The
East Carolinian � unless you want to
Find out what movie is playing at Hen-
drix.
AL AGATE
Grad Student, English
Don't Condemn
I am writing in reference to Reverend
J.M. Bragg's letter which was published
in the April 13 issue of the East Caroli-
nian. In hjs letter he condemned
homosexuality, and in particular the
president of the East Carolina Gay
Community, Mark Zumbach.
Mr. Bragg, you are correct in stating
that "the Bible condemns homosex-
ualism However, I believe that you
have overlooked one very important
fact. The Bible also tells us not to judge.
(Matthew 7: 1-5, Luke 6:36-42)
I'm sure that you are familiar with the
story of the adultress who was brought
before Jesus by the scribes and the
Pharisees. Jesus said to the crowd "Let
the man among you who has no sin be
the first to cast a stone at her The
crowd dispersed and Jesus said to the
woman "Woman, where did they aL
disappear to? Has no one condemned
you?" "No one, sir she answered.
Jesus said "Nor do I condemn you. You
may go (John 8: 3-11)
To my understanding ECGC has ask-
ed for and received money from the
SGA for the purpose of publishing a
pamphlet to try to help others to unders-
tand their "sexual orientation As a
heterosexual and as a Christian I can see
no wrong in this. It is not easy to be a
homosexual in a heterosexual world. If
this publication can bring people to a
better understanding of their homosex-
ual brothers and sisters, then I see no
reason why it should not be pulished.
After all, we are at this university for an
education. .
MARY RIDER
Senior, Computer Science
Defending Liberals
This letter is written in response to
several articles by Kim Albin � par-
ticularly the one entitled, "Liberals: All
You Wanted To Know
First, Ms. Albin, I'd like for you to
know that I'm in complete agreement
with your remarks concerning liberal at-
tire. We liberals wear the same funky old
clothes year in and year out. Conser-
vatives can't buy one outFit without
blowing enough cash to make the down
payment on a mobile home. I think this
says a great deal about which crowd
ought to be handling our national
budget.
Further, you categorize liberals as lazy
and unproductive. Ironically, the goal of
every ambitious supply-sider is to receive
the largest possible amount of pay for
the smallest possible amount of work.
Hence, immediate profit becomes more
important than continued growth and
produ livity. Perhaps now you unders-
tand why the socialistic West Germans
are still selling Volkswagons hand over
fist, while here�in the good old U.S. of
Free Enterprise�my hard-earned taxes
are spent to keep Chrysler out of hock.
Your implication that everyone left of
center abuses drugs is inaccurate, but
understandable. 1 mean with your kind
of paranoia�who needs dope? You ac-
tually think the ECU faculty is crawling
with Marxist sympathizers. Sister, I've
known speed freaks with a firmer grip
on reality than that.
You also compare Alan Alda to G.
Gordon Liddy and imply that we lefties
somehow lack the spine to defend
ouselves. While I am opposed to any un-
necessary violence, I remind you that
liberal presidents held office when this
country fought and won World War II;
launched the Berlin airlift; and faced
down the Soviet missile crisis in Cuba. A
conservative gave us "peace with
honor
Well maybe another time. I'd better
close now. (Gotta jog and stuff
envelopes.) Have fun and say heil to
Gordon for me.
consider gays to be practicing
"perversion
So I won't defend myself. I don't have
to. Because defending myself implies
that I am guilty of something. And I am
guilty of nothing. All I have done is to
realize my sexual and affectional attrac-
tion to men. Big deal. So have millions
of other persons throughout history.
And millions more will do so. So why
should you be upset? Homosexuality is
obviously something you cannot change.
Now, don't even think that I'm saying
you cannot continue to believe homosex-
uality is wrong. You are entitled to that
opinion, as I am entitled to believe that
homosexuality is right for me. But you
should realize that only the God you
profess to support and understand can
judge me or you or any human being.
You do not determine what is right or
wrong for humanity anymore than I
determine society's ethics.
I guess, however, what 1 don't unders-
tand is why you feel the need to judge
other persons. I think I'd get prettv
bored with that occupation. I'd much
rather spend my time getting to know
people who look, act, and think dif-
ferently from me � whether they are
gay or straight; white , black, or another
color; democrat, republican, or com-
munist; Catholic, Jewish, Protestant, or
atheist. For me, it is more important to
understand the differences rather than
condemn them.
JOHN H. BARNETT
Junior, English
RAMON DAVIS
Alumnus, English
Why Judge?
"Here we go again is what I sighed
when I read your letter to the editor in
the April 13 edition of the East Caroli-
nian. I'm really tired of defending
myself and my sexual and affectional
identity to you and all the others who
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed.
A
Bji
Perhaj
ing how
year bee
publicin
budget .
for aian
proposed!
only pro
gress of
fiscal ye
school
allocate
Accon
Financi;
student-
$13 mil)
assistancj
student,
the Sell
but wnej
are incluJ
proxsma
about ot
are part-
The s
bleak a
Financial
stated.
Fl
B
This
freestyle
across tl
come to
Natural
pionship
Da
competitl
ECU Fn
have g
pions, p
coming
and all
The h
Don R!
Felberb
time wi
Selkey
pion, wi
are ali
plained
Also
midwesi
Chris RJ
cued.
C
P
Ne
and busj
GreenviJ
Nest,
nor
tv. it
pace:
tuals f
waitmgj
Who
ner sat
from thl
the fishl
protrudj
buildir
breeze
pa:
C
Con
the E
ment
the
Mende
depart!
dividd
truly ai
Furl
Mendej
covere
scrolls!
what
pack
debatuj
not thj
with tl
the nei
tiss
fragmd
of Th
again
judge
ticity
In
reign
r
5
I





THE EAST CAROLINJAN
stxk
APRII 15, 1982 Page 5
Answers Found For Student Finances
l!
r
U A V
X
11

in-
not
for
the
on
cite
:rs
the
and
he
hen
Mng
fuse
the
her
;on-
ere
s of
ome
ible,
rip
lam
ling
lev
Ihat
that
KU
:an
ng
or
I
rrs-
ige
ich
lov.
lif-
lare
her
)IT!
or
to
lan
TT
lish
Uers
or
)uth

Tiers
and
ber
tiers
By ANGELA ROACH
Miff Wnitr
Perhaps, you have been wonder-
ing how to survive another school
year because of the heightened
publicity surrounding the proposed
budget cuts in education. The time
for alarm has not yet arrived. The
proposed cuts are just that, they are
only proposed cuts. Because Con-
gress operates on an October 1,
fiscal year, the funds for the 1982-83
school year have already been
allocated. The axe has not fallen.
According to figures from the
Financial Aid Office, over 6,000
students in 1980-81 received nearly
$13 million in some type of financial
assistance. Between 1400 and 1500
students per year are employed in
the Self Help program on campus,
but when graduate assistanceships
are included that figure jumps to ap-
proximately 1700. In addition,
about one-fourth of ECU students
are part-time employees.
The situation at ECU is not as
bleak as most suspect. Director of
Financial Aid, Robert Boudreaux,
stated, "These are going to be some
changes but the changes aren't go-
ing to be nearly as drastic as we
think ECU has received its state-
ment of allocated funds for the Fall
semester and these allocations are
on the same basic level as last year.
How is ECU preparing for future
reductions in funds? Dr. Elmer
Meyer, Vice Chancellor of Student
Life, commented, from the
alumni, internally, and maybe
private business Large private
businesses have always contributed
to higher education and are continu-
ing that trend, but the repeated fluc-
tuation between recession and infla-
tion are putting a strain on cor-
porate funds. Once this country
plants it feet on sound economic
ground contributions from big
business will be much more signifi-
cant in the field of education.
Many predominantly black
universities have had serious pro-
blems with funding for some time.
The proposed cuts will not lessen the
situation, of course. To help
alleviate some of the burden the
Ford Foundation contributed $1.1
million in grants to improve minori-
ty students performance in
mathematics and teachers' instruc-
tions in several predominately black
universities.
William Shires, Director of the
ECU News Bureau and Public Rela-
tions, expressed his concern that
minority students realize that ECU
is a good university to attend. He
also said that ECU wants minorities
to continue their upward trend in at-
tendance since the "university ex-
perience" means interacting and
learning from different kinds of
people. Funds for minorities have
not been cut and minorities should
seek out those places to gain
assistance.
As for foreign students, there has
been a steady increase in the
numbers of those a" ending each
year. ECU funds are not available
to foreign students unless they are
part of the graduate assistanceships.
The majority of their money is from
government funds. Many countries
are not on the same educational
level as the US, therefore these
countries provide funds to send
eligible students to the US. The oil
countries, Kuiwait for example,
maintain this policy.
The greatest effect that proposed
reductions has had on foreign stu-
dent services has been in the
Fulbright Program. The Fulbright
Program is the foreign exchange
program which sends American
students to study abroad and places
foreign students in the US. The pro-
gram survived proposed dismantle-
ment only through the public's
backlash of flooding their represen-
tatives desks with letters. The same
strategy may be instrumental in sav-
ing the educational field from fur-
ther proposed cuts.
Dr. C.C. Rowe, coordinator of
Handicapped Services, is very op-
timistic about the future of Han-
dicapped Services, provided for by
the 1973 Rehabilitation Act. All
funds for these services are provided
through the university. The students
do receive federal funds from the
Vocational Rehabilitation or ser-
vices for the Blind. Handicapped
students can rely upon ECU to
regard existing laws that make pro-
visions for the physical or mentally
impaired.
Another factor worth considera-
tion is that "East Carolina has
always had a good collection record
always been in the top three in
North Carolina and below the na-
tional average according to Direc-
tor Bourdreaux concerning loan
repayment. These are impressive
figures when backed against a three
time increase in North Carolina
Direct Student Loan (NCDSL)
within the space of two years. The
amount of repaid interest is now 5
percent.
Some students are opting for the
military while earning a degree.
ECU has the Air Force (AFROTC)
program available to interested
students. An identical program is
offered at over 600 other colleges
and universities in the US.
AFROTC is divided into two areas:
A. General Military Course (CMC)
and Professional Officer Course
(POC). GMC is a four year program
with the first two years exempted
from military obligation. The latter
two years, POC, requires a four
week summer field training session.
The participants also receive $100
per month tax-free during the
school year. Four year scholarships
are available to freshmen who are
pursuing a degree which requires
more than four years of
undergraduate study. Three and
one-half, three, two and one-half,
and two year scholarships oppor-
tunities are available to students
enrolled in scientifictechnical
fields. Students enrolled in certain
nontechnical degree prorams may
be eligible for two years scholarship.
Premedical students may take ad-
vantage of two and three year
scholarships. Students pursuing a
nursing career are eligible for two
year scholarships.
I he important point to keep in
mind is that ECU has all the funds
for 1982-1983. Any reductions will
take affect on October 1; after those
already enrolled have received their
money. No reductions have taken
effect and solutions to proposed
cuts are being dealt with.
Flying Disc Classic Hosts Champions
By DIANE ANDERSON
suit hdilor
This weekend, April 17 and 18,
freestyle frisbee champions from all
across the nation and abroad will
come to Greenville to compete in the
Natural Light Flying Disc Cham-
pionship.
David Wood, an entrant in the
competition and member of the
ECU Frisbee Club, said, "So far we
have got last year's world cham-
pions, past year's world champions
coming in from New York, Texas,
and all along the east coast
The list of participants includes
Don Rhodes of Texas and Jeff
Felberbaum of New York city, two
time world champions. Jason
Selkey, two time European cham-
pion, will also participate. "These
are all freestyle champions ex-
plained Wood.
Also entered in the contest is the
midwestern national champion,
Chris Ryan of New York. "I am ex-
cited, but this is one of the heavier
tournaments this year so there will
be a lot of competition he said.
These champions will compete for
the title of the Natural Lite Classic,
only one of the nine recognized
tournaments on the tour. There is
also $2,000 in cash to be won, along
with trophies and endorsements by
disc manufacturers possible. "There
will be sponsorship that will pro-
bably come out of it for the win-
ners Ryan explained.
The tournament coordinator, the
man most responsible for bringing
the Natural Lite Classic to Green-
ville, is Peter Laubert. He qualified
for the US Flying Disc Team in
1980, and has since gained the title
of NC Free-Style Champion.
Laubert also placed second in the
Canadian Nationals, and seventh in
the World Frisbee Championships
last summer in Pasadena, Califor-
nia, at the Rose Bowl.
Dave Marini, director of the tour,
will also be present as head judge
and freestvle coordinator.
The divisions of the tournament
are the women's freestyle, the men's
open division and freestyle, and the
coop division of freestyle with three
or more players. So far, around 150
competitors are expected.
The tournament is sanctioned by
the National Freestyle Players
Organization and the Field Event
Players Organization, "which are
both national organizations that
coordinate the professional tour
explained Ryan.
"The tournament is being spon-
sored by most notably Natural Lite
beer, Dominoes pizza, and the
March of Dimes. There will be par-
tial proceeds to the March of
Dimes said Ryan.
There are other events besides the
freestyle competition, according to
Ryan, including the distance and
self-caught flight category. Self-
caught flight "is sort of a
boomerang event in two parts ex-
plained Ryan. "The first is MTA,
maximum time aloft which in-
volves throwing the disc into the
wind and getting it to hover. The
current record is about 16 seconds.
The second is throw, run and catch,
which involves throwing the disc up
into the wind, but covering distance
and while catching. The current
record in this event is approxiately
84 meters.
Crow's Nest Cuisine Found
Poor Except Steak And Cheese
B KIM ALBIN
siiff �nirr
Nestled amidst the flashing lights
and bustling Tenth Street traffic is a
Greenville landmark, The Crow's
Nest. As one of the lower priced
non-fast-food restaurants in the ci-
ty, it offers a distinct change of
pace: tasty yet grease-drenched vic-
tuals for those who don't mind
waiting a few extra minutes.
When eagerly approaching the in-
ner sanctum of the Crow's Nest
from the parking lot, be sure to note
the fish-flavored blow dryers which
protrude from the rear of the
building, spewing forth hot, greasy
breezes onto the heads of passing
patrons.
Inside, though charm is restored
somewhat by the miracle of dim
lighting. Red plastic light fixtures
dangle over sticky formica
tabletops. Patrons are arrested at
the door until the seated maitre d'
can produce a spotted, worn
mealcheck for each person, re-
questing that everyone "Hold on to
'urn, or there'll be a five dollar
charge
After selecting a table as far from
the rough-looking crowd of diners
as possible, a patron might
scrutinize the menu in search of
something delicious. This will take
up the few moments before the
waitress arrives, but will prove to be
utterly useless, since the only edible
item on the bill of fare is the steak
and cheese sandwich with lettuce
and tomato, served on an Italian
roll. (One must specify Italian for
the roll.) One might keep in mind,
also, that soft drinks and iced tea
are out of the question. Stick with
water or something alcoholic.
And if one opts to consume some
alcohol, then one should steer clear
of such exotic drinks as a gin and
tonic or a Tom Collins. The house
recipe used for these drinks might
cause one's speech to be replaced by
a low, involuntary whistle.
For entertainment, there is televi-
sion, but the sounds of Hollywood
might well be preempted by the in-
termittent waves of Space Invaders
Pfcotoi By CHRIS LICNOK
Each of these girls received a $100 bill from the managers of Pharos restaurant for eating five "Big Boy" ham-
burgers in an hour yesterday afternoon.
railing to their deaths which escape
from the nearby gameroom.
When one's meal arrives, it is
likely to be hot and rather good as
long as one orders the steak and
cheese. Otherwise, one is taking
one's chances.
One bonus of dining at The
Crow's Nest is the opporunity for
uninteruppted table talk. Seldom is
one's conversation cut into, even by
the waitress.
The diner gets up to leave, finding
good news and bad news at the
door. The bad news is that his feet
are sticking fast to the carpet. The
good news is that The Crow's Nest
accepts checks.
Controversy Continues On Keg Scrolls
By JOHN WALDEN
Stiff �
Conroversy continues to rage in
the ECU Archaeological depart-
ment over the recent discovery of
the Beer Keg Scrolls at
Mendenhall's new bus stop, the
department seems to be biterly
dividd over whether the scrolls are
truly authentic or not.
Further excavations of
Mendenhall bus stop have un-
covered even more findings. More
scrolls were found rolled up inside
what appears to be an ancient six
pack, the aarchaeologists ae
debating with each other whether or
not these scrolls should be included
with the others. After translating
the new scrolls yesterday, the scien-
tiss have labeled these new
fragmants as being from the book
of Thomas. The reader is invited
again to read these new scrolls and
judge for themselves their authen-
ticity. , ,
In the seventeenth year of the
reign of Leo, UNC called forth unto
his prophet. Leo, Leo where art
thou? And Leo looked up to UNC. I
am here oh great one. Why hath
thou called me forth? And UNC
spoke unto him. Ye. Leo pack thy
bags. Thy time is up. And Leo
began to tremble with these words.
No, no wait, I have not gotten the
law school yet. But UNC spoke unto
him again. Ye, Leo go and find thee
a man to take thy place. And leo
knewth that his time hath come. So,
He went out into the Texas desert
and found Thomas to take his rule.
And when Leo hath done this, he
was taken unto the place where all
good chancellors go where ever that
is.
And when Thomas saw that lwo
was gone. He smileth and rubbed
his hands together. And he clled
before hm all the faculty and the
students and saith unto them. Leo
placed heavy burdens on you. I ill
make them even heavier. Leo flogg-
ed you with whips. I shzll flog you
with bullwhips. And when the facul-
ty and students heard these words,
they went back to their jobs grumbl-
ing and with heavy hearts.
And so it was at this time that as
Leo passes on his campus to
Thomas. Ao it was that Pat passd
on his warriors to Ed. And the
Alumni and the students spoke unto
him. Lo, Ed giveth unto us great
victories as Pat has done only in
record time. But Ed looked unto his
tough schedule his young team, and
their list of injuries. And then he
sopoke. Ye, be but patient and all
shall come in time. But the Alumni
and students would not hear it, and
cried back. Giveth us great victories
now or else.
And it came to past that Ed knew
that he wsa in trouble, and would
needeth a mircle. So it was at this
time that Ed turned away from
UNC and looked unto an oracle for
victory, and the oracle spoketh unto
him. Ye Ed, but go and steal the
sacred ram from it's most hly place,
and paint it's horns purple and gold,
and thou shallst be given victory on
the field.
And Ed obeyed the orcle, and in-
struct4ed his men to go and steal the
sacred ram from it's most holy
place, and paint it's horns purple
and gold, But when UNC looked in-
to the holy lace and saw that the ram
was missing. He spoketh unto Ed.
What hath thou done? Hath thou
stolen the sacred ram and painted
it's horns purple and gold? Ed look-
ed upon UNC and verily he spoke.
Who me?
And UNC grew angrier. Hath
thou also sent down spys into the
Philistine camp? And EWd replied I
do not know what ye art talking
about. Thou knowest what I mean
saith UNC, and thou shallst pay for
thy sins with a losing season. And
lo, UNC w?s true to his word, and
ECU suffered a bad season. But,
Ed swore a terrible curse to get even
next year with better recruiting, and
a new game plan.
Thesse were indeed dark times for
ECU. Thomas looked at his peo-
ple's despair, and called forth unto
the Druz a woman seer to perform a
miracle to bring the people out of
their grief. Druz responded by sen-
ding a plague of rats onto the courts
of N.C. State and Chapel Hill. And
in these universities, there became
much weeping and gnashing of
teeth.
And the people marveled at this
miracle and asketh te Druz how she
performed it. And the Druz told
them: ole yeah, it was de defense dat
won de game. But lo, nobody
understood a word she saith, and
the magical words of the Druz re-
mained hidden forever.
At this time, Thomas also gaveth
unto his students a radio station,
and charged his disciples John and
Sam with it's keeping. And lo,
under their direction, the radio sta-
tion flourished, but here soon came
a great rumbling from the peole.
Why does thou not play more
clasics?, some cried. Others would
speak of wanting top forty, or soul
music.
And John and Sam grew
bewildred by the many derq,nds'of
hte people, and prayed unto UNC
for guidance. UNC listened to his
two servants JOhn and Sam, and
sent them the great angel AOR who
struck down their enemies and
threw them into a bottomless pit
where they were forced to listen to
Perry Como's greatest hits for all
time. And there was much rejoicing
within the ECU campus.
The rule of Thomas continued to
be a peceful one, but as time went
on many great qualrrels broke out
etwen the prophet and his people.
And in the third year of his reign,
Thomas betgan to worship other
universities. UNC saw Thomas's
fall from favor and spoke unto him.
Ye, Thomas, hast thou prayed unto
other colleges, but Thomas could
not be reached for comment. And
UNC grew angry with this silence.
And Thomas knew that he hath
madeth UNC angry and he headed
out into the wilderness of West
Virginia never be to heard of again.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 15. 1982
LgAftMfOG AttyJT Coiicgc-7wr Hmp IaJw
tn Oavip aJomis
TKivia ao�ST(oM
CM YOU MM�
THAT bWOVLQ S�
�A$Y �aOvJC�h
MM 5IOL0SY GthV��.
ECU Chess Team Defeated By Four
MMmaw�ANi
By JEFFRY JONES
staff Writer
Chess was the name
of the game last Satuar-
day, april 10th, as the
ECU Chess Team went
board to board against
the Greenville Chess
Team. The Greenville
team, under the
guidance of former
state champion Dr.
AD. Warshwauer,
went down to defeat,
winning only two of the
six matches played. The
two top boards for
ECU Steve Mitchell,
former Maryland
junior champion, and
Frank Necci both
outplayed Dr. War-
shauer.
In his second match
(because there were
four members on the
ECu team and only
three n the Greenville
team, some people had
to play twice), Mitchell
defeated Wade Dudly.
Stuart Long, who
recently placed seventh
in the A.C.U. I. re-
fionals at Blacksburg,
defeated Greenville's
Brian Powell.
The Greevnille
team's only bright
moments cme when
ECU's Blake Noah was
overcme by the double
jeopardy of matches
against Dudley and
Powell. All members of
the ECU Chess Team
are rated above the na-
tional norm.
The ECUGreenville
mini-tournament was,
in a sense, preparation
for the 1st East
Carolina Open, to be
held this weekend in
Mendenhall. Most of
the top ranked playes in
North Carolina (ranks
being determined by
the ratings system of
the United States Chess
Federation) will be
competing for 1st, 2nd,
and 3rd prizes of $100,
$50, and $25. in addi-
tion, there will be a
Novice tournament
open to all with 1st and
2nd prices of $40 and
$20.
The tournaments will
run on Saturday, from
10:00-11:00, and Sun-
day, from 10:30-7:00.
Registration will be in
room 221 at
Mendenhall.
It 9s Here!
ECU Student Residence Association Brings You
The 2nd Annual Battle of the Bands
On the Mall of ECU Campus
Saturday 12-7
6 Bands
Food and Beverages Provided
Bring I.Ds and SRA Cards
No Bottles, Cans, or Coolers permitted on mall.
MOTORCYCLE
FOR SALE
1977 Suzuki 400
MUST SELL
Coll Anytime 758 9646
$2.99
MEAL
DEAL!
A foot long BMT
Subway Sandwich and bag
of chips for only �99
Get a BMT� our Biggest. Meatiest, Tastiest
sandwich. Ada a bag of chips, and you've
got a major meal for a meager price! Bring
this coupon to your nearest Subway today.
-rut o'ieca�jpor' pe cus ��� yood - .
-v nestaurants and not good n combinah � wffr p
er epifes Apr 23
MANDARIN CUISINE
Luncheon Combination "A"
Served with Egg Flower Soup or Won Ton Soup and Fried Rice and
Spring Roll.
Choice of one of the following:
1. Sweet and Sour Pork
2. Green Pepper Beef
3. Chicken Foo Yung
4. Vegetarian's Delight
Only $3.15
5. Kung Pao Chicken (Hot)
6. Twice Cooked Pork
7. Curry Chicken
208 E. 5th St.
758-7979
L k
Luncheon Combination "B"
Served with Egg Flower Soup or Won Ton Soup and Fried Rice and
Egg Roll.
Choice of one of the following: '� Prawns Lobster Sauce
2. Mushroom Beef
Only S3.95 3. Crispy Chicken with Brown Sauce
4. Yu-Shiang Pork with Broccoli
Hours: Sun. through Thurs. � 11:30 a.m9:00 p.m.
Fri. and Sat. � 11:30 a.m. 10:00 p.m.
1112 Dickerson Avenue Greenville
(919) 752-9727
ALL ABC PERMITS
VICTORY
THIS FRI & SAT NT ONLY! 5,7:15,9:30 PM
HE NDR IX THE ATRE,MSCADMISSION: FREE
SPONSORED BY THE STUDENT UNION FILMS COMMITTEE
LAST
CHANCE
SHOP AT
OVERTON'S
ANDSAVE
PIRATE COUPON
5 DISCOUNT
Coupon expires April 17th
Student Name.
on all orders $10.00
or more.
ID Number.
get your
yearbook
picture taken
CALL BUCCANEER OFFICE FOR APPOINTMENTS
757-6501
SITTINGS: APRIL 13-APRIL 16-9-5
Varden Studios, Ine.
Amt. of Purchase.
"Home of Greenville's Best Meats1
Cat!
the
ath
aft
JenJ
As si
has
Cai
nur
as
n oi
J
Soi
seci
and
sea
car
ble
onel
fins
veal
Eas
An)
ball
thai
Sh
was
to
rep
Jor
othl
ath
shel
Eas
scN
di
Al
wm
ach
Sh(
e
draj
Jenl
er
Ed�
1
awi
CoJ
up
Sh
Col
A 111
avi
7 n
stei
shf
m
edl
:alj
ol
tral
dn
far
tac
211 Jarvis St.
2 Blocks from ECU
f





I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
APRIL 15, 1982 Page 7
Pirates Sign
High School
Hoop Star
Bv WILLIAM YELVERTON
sports r dtiot
East Carolina basketball coach
Cathy Andruzzi has casted deep into
the talent-rich sea of North Carolina
athletics and landed a most sought-
after recruit.
Southwest Edgecombe's Brigette
Jenkins, the North Carolina
Associated Press Player of the Year,
has signed to play basketball at East
Carolina after turning down
nurmerous offers from such schools
as North Carolina and Old Domi-
nion.
Jenkins, a 5'8" guard, led
Southwest Edgecombe to two con-
secutive slate 3-A championships
and a 62-0 record during those two
seasons. During her high school
career, the Cougars won an incredi-
ble 90 contests while losing only
one, that coming in the state semi-
finals during Jenkins' sophomore
year.
"We're real excited remarked
East Carolina head coach Cathy
Andruzzi. "She's a quality
ballplayer from a quality program
that hasn't lost a game in two years.
She comes from a winning team and
was a very important part of their
great success. She's the type we need
to continue building our program
Andruzzi says Jenkins could
replace graduated forward Sam
Jones, guard Lillion Barnes or fill
other spots next season.
Even with Jenkins' outstanding
athletic ability, Andruzzi noted that
she was "pleased Jenkins thinks
East Carolina can help her out
scholasticaliy
"She's a very conscientious in-
dividual she continued.
"Athletically, she's a very hard
worker. And she also wants to
achieve the goals she's set in life.
She displays the type of character
we need here
Southwest Edgecombe coach San-
dra Langley has high praise for
Jenkins. "She is probably the most
versatile player at Southwest
Edgecombe
Jenkins has won nearly athletic
award possible in the state of North
Carolina, except being named a
Converse All-America. And she's
up for that prestigious honor now.
She has been named All-State, All-
Conference, All-Area, All-East and
All-Eastern Regional.
As a senior last season Jenkins
averaged 19.8 points per contest and
7 rebounds a game. She also had 100
-teals. 76 assists and 18 blocked
shots while shooting 59 percent �
mostly outside � from the field.
Her career totals show she averag-
ed 14.4 points a game, and she also
tallied 1,601 points.
Jenkins also has lettered in
volleyball and is participating in
track her final year.
As for the recruiting season An-
druzzi says she's "really pleased so
far about the kids we've made con-
tact with
Photo By DAVE WILLIAMS
Standout golfer Chris Czaja will lead his teammates into the Old Dominion Invitational this weekend. Three golfers, Jerry
Lee, Don Gafner and John Derrico will be making their appearances as Pirates in this third annual event. Some of the 15
teams that will be in the race for team honors include the Pirates, Richmond and defending champ Old Dominion. The
tournament will be held in Norfolk at the Seascape Golf Course. Action begins Monday and concludes on Tuesday.
Baird 'Elated' A t 21st Victory
ECU Women
Lose Against
High Point
B CINDY PLEASANTS
�i,imii spur), (dilor
The East Carolina women's ten-
nis team suffered a tough loss
against High Point College Wednes-
day, now making their record 5-5.
After a 3-3 tie in singles, the Lady
Pirates were edged out in three close
doubles matches for a final score of
6-3.
ECU won three of its six singles
matches, with two going into three
sets.
ECU's second-seeded Katherine
Tolson defeated Anneli Kiviniemi,
7-5, 2-6, 6-3 in a well-played match.
Fifth-seeded Tracey Eubank easily
beat Dori Johnson(HPC), 6-2,6-2,
and sixth-seed Hannah Adams
defeated Theresa Regante, 6-4, 6-2.
In doubles, ECU's first-seeded
team, Christine and Tolson fell to
High Point's Medina and Kiviniemi,
after playing a 12-point tiebreaker
in the second set. The set scores
were 7-5 and 7-6.
ECU's Janet Russell and Laura
Redford struggled in the second-
seed match-up, eventually losing
4-6, 6-1, 6-3 to Lynn Sharkey and
Johnson.
The third doubles team was made
up by Adams and Eubank who were
defeated by Gianopolos and
Regante, 4-6, 3-6.
Coach Caroline Brown was disap-
pointed with the loss. "1 felt like we
should have taken two of the
doubles she said. "We had the
potential, but we just made more
mistakes than they did
ECU will face Peace College
Monday at Minges courts, and
Brown said the contest will not be
an easy one. "Peace is a very strong
team she said. "We upset them
earlier this season, but we have to be
prepared emotionally
The match begins at 2 p.m.
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
sport r dilnr
After a thrilling 2-1 victory over
the University of North Carolina in
Chapel Hill Monday, the Pirates of
East Carolina are setting their sights
on an at-large � if not automatic �
bid to the NCAA tournament.
"We were elated the third-year
Pirate skipper said about the team's
21st win of the season against seven
losses. "They (North Carolina) had
a big promotional day; the San
Diego Chicken (Ted Giannicocous,
who attempts to build fan en-
thusiasm), and we played before
three or four thousand people
One large factor in that important
win was the pitching of right-hander
Bill Wilder, who held the Tar Heels
to one hit while striking out 10 in 10
innings of play. "He was simply
outstanding Baird said. "He was
never really in trouble. And they
never really had any good swings off
him
But, the Pirate coach added, "We
didn't exactly tear the cover off the
ball, either East Carolina col-
lected seven hits off two North
Carolina pitchers. Todd Evans was
the main offensive threat, going
three-for-five.
After a mild � very mild � mid-
season slump, the Pirates have
regrouped and bounced back well.
"Baseball is a funny game Baird
says. "Every day is a completely dif-
ferent day. We had gone through a
couple of periods where we didn't
play very well
"But our kids have an idea of
what it takes to win
� � �
The Pirates are suffering from
key injuries. Right-fielder John
Hallow has a mild shoulder sprain;
catcher Fran Fitzgerald has a pulled
hamstring.
"We've got key people hurt
Baird says point-blank. "We're
hoping it won't be much longer
before they're back. We can't be too
successful without them unless we
have outstanding pitching. We sure
would like to have John's (Hallow)
bat back in the lineup
Fitzgerald, at last report, was ex-
pected to see action in Wednesday
night's double-header against
Atlantic Christian. Hallow should
be ready for today's key double-
header with the Wolfpack of North
Carolina State.
The winnner of the ECAC-South
Conference tournament � to be
held at James Madison � receives
an automatic bid to the NCAA tour-
nament. But there is always a
possibility of an at-large berth in the
field.
As for the possibility of that,
Baird says, "We'll have to have a
minimum of 29 or 30 wins.
"But we're capable of doing
that
Pirate Baseball Notes: The most in-
teresting aspect of the 1981-82
baseball season is that the Pirates
have not been shut out In the hit-
ting department, Fran Fitzgerald
leads with a .373 average and also
has a team-high five home runs.
John Hallow is batting at a .340
clip, followed by Todd Evans at
.333, with only three strikeouts in
111 times at the plate. David Wells
is hitting .303. Third baseman Todd
Hendley is hitting .258 but also has
driven in 25 runs. As a team the
Pirates are hitting .294 while op-
ponents are only at a .208 mark.
Shortstop Kelly Robinette has im-
proved his batting average almost
80-some points up to
.297Robinette is also six for
seven in stolen bases but that's se-
cond behind Ricky Nichols' nine
thefts in 10 attempts The Pirates'
well-balanced pitching staff is led by
left-hander Bobby Patterson's 4-1
record and 1.26 earned run average.
He also has 33 strikeouts in 42.7 in-
nings of work. Charlie Smith is next
with a 2-1 mark and 2.04 earned run
average. Freshman Bobby Davidson
is having a good season, winning
four of six games and striking out 30
batters. Bill Wilder is 5-3 with 48
strikeouts in 61.3 innings Hallow
is nearing the career mark in
doubles. He has 12 now and is only
two short of Sonny Wooten's mark
of 14.
East Carolina has scored 177 runs
compared to opponents' 98. The
Pirates have also pounded out 269
hits this season, their opponents on-
ly 183.
Defensively, Todd Evans has made
only ONE error in 270 opportunities
in the field.
Dinner Tues.
The Lady Pirate Basketball
Awards Dinner will be held
Tuesday, April 20 in the
Pagentry Hall at the Ramada
Inn on Greenville Boulevard,
and the public is welcome.
The awards dinner will com-
memorate the 1981-82 East
Carolina women's basketball
team which received a bid in
the first women's NCAA tour-
nament.
There will be an $8 charge
per person, and reservations
can be made by sending checks
to Lady Pirate Basketball Din-
ner, Minges Coliseum, Green-
ville, N.C 27834.
Mimi Senkowski of New
York City's Manufacturer's
Hanover Bank will be the
guest speaker. Manufacturer's
Bank sponsors the largest and
most successful women's
regular-season basketball
tournament each year.
Beckish: Success Will Come
By CHARLES CHANDLER
M�nsging fdilor
Hard-nosed and aggressive.
That's the way Larry Beckish
describes himself.
The new East Carolina offen-
sive coordinator almost has to be
that way. After all, the Pirates
are changing their entire offen-
sive scheme under the former
Clemson and Wichita State aide.
The word has been well-spread
that the Bucs are trading in the
old wishbone attack for the ver-
sion of the 1 formation that
Beckish successfully employed at
Wichita State.
The Shockers did well enough
last season, in fact, to finish
ninth nationally in total offense
with an average of 424 yards per
game. All that has been hashed
and rehashed by the media.
But what about Larry Beckish?
What about the man who is
counted on to make the ECU of-
fense a more productive one?
"I have a very simple
philosophy a stern Beckish said
in his office Wednesday. "1 try to
coach young men the same way I
would want my son to be coach-
ed I want them to be well-
disciplined, well-conditioned,
well-schooled in fundamentals
and hard-nosed
The newest member of the
ECU coaching staff will not
hesitate to make himself heard
with an occasional yell, either.
"If it takes raising my voice to
keep the youngsters straight, then
I'll do it. 1 do that more to grab
their attention rather than for
any other device
Beckish introduced himself to
the Pirates soon after his ap-
pointment. He says he told them
three things at the first meeting.
"I wanted them to know that I
believe totally with all my heart in
theoffensivesystem we developed
at Wichita State. Secondly, 1
wanted them to know there is no
easy way to get the things ac-
complished that we need ac-
complished.
"Lastly, I wanted them to
know that 1 wanted each
youngster on our offensive foot-
ball team to be there September
11 (season opener at N.C. State).
1 knew some of them wouldn't be
there, but I wanted them to know
that I feel every one of them is
important to the East Carolina
footall team
How did the team take their
new offensive coordinator at
first?
"Oh, I got tested Beckish ex-
plained. "1 think some of the
kids said 'I'm gonna find out if
he's hard-nosed, or is it going to
be the same old But we got
that problem straightened out
pretty quick
There you have a good picture
of Larry Beckish � a man who
says respect is of utmost impor-
tance in a coach-player relation-
ship.
"I'm not a ranting and raving
type, though he said. "I don't
believe in threatening youngsters.
I believe I can find a way to
motivate a youngster if he wants
to play. But he must want to
play. I can scream, kick dirt, and
run 'em after practice; that
wouldn't help. A player must en-
joy football. He must say '1 enjoy
this and I enjoy this man � or
these men � coaching me "
Rumors have it that in 1982
head coach Ed Emory must im-
prove on his previous 4-7 and 5-6
records if he is to be granted a
contract extension. Beckish says,
though, that putting too much
emphasis on 1982 would be a
mistake.
"From what 1 know about the
East Carolina football situation,
that wouldn't be sound thinking.
Winning college football does not
come from three-year programs
or five-year programs. Success
comes from a long-term pro-
gram
The shadow cast by past suc-
cess, therefore, is clouding ad-
vances in the current ECU pro-
gram, Beckish said.
"Regardless of the ac-
complishments of Coach (Pat)
Dye, there has been a tremendous
change for the better in the fun-
dumentals of this program. These
have been changes that most peo-
ple want to take place. Now that
we've in Division 1-A we can't ex-
pect to compete with the big-
name schools overnite. Most of
those (I-A) schools have spent
much time, money and resources
to get where they are. That's
what we've got to do
The first step toward reaching
the level of proficiency would, of
course, be a successful 1982
season. "But said Beckish,
"our success or lack of it will be
measured far beyond the won
and lost columns. We want to
win every one and I believe we
will do well, but there are a lot of
things that we can accomplish
next year regardless
�y DAva WILLIAMS
ECU's Larry Beckish
1





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 15, 1982
Classifieds
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST at Moser's Farm: One red
cooler containing a pair of con
tacts. If found, please call Kristy
at 7i�73l.
FOR SALE
TRAILER FOR SALE set up in
Greenville 2 BR. all electric, ac,
excellent condition S?WS call Tar
boro �J3 �8�4
VIVITAR ZOOM LENS 75 210 with
macro for Nikon mount used only
two times SU5 Call 7S7 2210
SKIS FOR SALE: K 2, US comp
110 skis with Soloman bindings.
$125. Call 757 3210 and leave
number
AKC REG LABRADOR PUP
PIES Black $125 males. $100
iemales Call 757 3701 or 750 �42
2 5 CUBIC FEET
REFRIGERATOR Excellentcon
dition $50 or best offer Call
75 9405
WATERBEDS Don t pay retail
tor your waterbed Buy a complete
1st qualify waterbed with a 15 yr.
factory warranty tor as low as
$179 May styles to choose from
Laway and Delivery adv Buy now
and recieve a free set of padded
rails ($39 value) Call David for
appointment 750 2401
LARGE REFRIGERATOR in
Good condition. $40 also 2 mat
tresses for $10 Ph 758 4390
SPACIOUS DORM SIZE
refrigerator $50 or best offer Ph
7 52 3432 after 5 pm
PIONEER STEREO direct drive
turntable. 45 watt amplifier,
tuner, four HPM 100 speakers,
audio rack. $1200. call 752 1993 late
nights.
BETH: Happy 21st from someone
who knows it took a while to get
�here. Just remember who loves
you. MIKE.
WOOL Y: II you shave your face
what's left to be wooly? Keep it, it
makes you look respectable and
some of us need as much respect
as possible. Love ya-A brother.
LAST CHANCE To enter. Beer
Bong contest tonight. Call Alpha
Sigma Phi 752 (073 and prove your
ability.
COME WATCH World Fnsbee
Champions compete for $2000 in
money and prues at the Natural
Light Flying Disk Classic at the
Allied Health Fields across from
Pitt Plata. Preliminaries Satur-
day April 17, Finals Sunday April
It. An intramural van wll
transport you free of charge to the
site. The van will stop at the high
rises, the mall, the hill, then to the
site. Bring a blanket sit back and
watch the world's best Fnsbee
players here at ECU Courtesy og
yhr ECU Fnsbee Club.
BILLY. GEORGE, and GORDON.
Thanks for a great time in
Southern Pines. We wouldn't have
missed it for the world. No wolf
ticket. We only wish Gordon could
have gotten more sleep Friday
night Love, MIMI and CAROL.
GET WILD and Crazy. Come see
the Beer Bong contest tonight at
the Elbo Room.
ALECIA Thanks for a Great
Easter. Sorry about the bathing
suit, but who needs it as long as
you have the BABY OIL
FOR RENT
HELP! FEMALE ROOMMATES
needed to sublease 3 bedroom
townhouse from May through
August Air conditioned, pool and
tennis courts. Call Donna at
7S8 480
$500 mo 752 529
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED
EO for either or both sessions
summer school. I block from cam
pus. Call 754 597.
TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT
available for the summer Fur
nished, air conditioned, great back
porch for sun bathing, good loca-
tion. For more info call 7S8-37S.
SUMMER SCHOOL ROOM
MATES NEEOED: t or 2 room
mates needed for both sessions of
sumer school. Big pool and nice
location at Tar River Apartments.
180month or less, 13 or 14
utilities- depending on number of
roommates. Call Yancey at
7512971 or Sam Boyd 758 8448
anytime
APARTMENT FOR RENT:
Either or both summer sessions.
One or two people, furnished. I
mile from campus. 757 1715
WANTED: Someone to share ex
penses in fully furnished Apt. Rent
$12.SO, includes heat, AC. Ho
and cold water. Opens May 8th
serious enquiries please. Call
758077
COLLEGE View 2 bdrm. apt.
May-Aug. Partlt furn. 1 mile from
campus on bus rt. $15 plus util.
7S22�2
THREE BEDROOM Eastbrook
Apt. to subltet for summer fur
nished, I 12 baths. For more info
contact Mimi or Carol at 752 493
ONE BLOCK From Campus, one
block from downtown, 3 bedroom
furnished apt. to sublease for sum
mer and possible fall. Cheap and
convenient Call 758040. Keep
trying.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Tar
River Estates $l25mo plus 12
utilities. Available in May. all
758051
TWO FURNISHED Rooms
availalbe for rent tor the summer.
4 blocks from campus, call
7S7I�2�.
ROOM FOR RENT: Two blocks
from campus. $100 plus I
utilities. Available both sessions
summer school. Call 7 58097
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED
EO: Neat and responsible, 1st
summer session only. Swimming
pool, $95 mo. plus 12 utilities.
7589742.
ROOMS FOR RENT: Per summer
session in furnished house with
AC, kitchen facilities, TV, fool
table and Party rooms. Call
752 1073.
FURNISHED TWO BEDROOM
Apartment available lor rent May-
August. Scenic setting faces the
River. Air conditioning and within
walking distance to campus.
5250 month Call 757 3052
SUMMER, FURNISHED or un
furnished Apt. Available May
August Une block from campus.
2bdrm. $175 mth. 757 3054.
HELP
WANTED
SUMMER WORK is available
great pay and opportunity to
travel. Interviews: Brewster
D 204 Friday 1:00 or 4:00 pm and
Sat 1000 pm
INTERESTED IN Journalism
Public Relations work? Students
are needed to work in the ECU
Sports Information and Promo
tions Office. Inquire at 757491
Good WRiting Skills necessary
SERVICES
CARICATURES BY WEYLER
Greenville's original personalized
art service. Have cartoon done of
yourself or a loved one a unique
gift idea. $10 for 8 x 10, black and
white or color. Call 752 5775
TYPING: TERM. Thesis,
Resumes, Dissertations, etc. Pro-
fessional quality at lowest rates.
Call Kempie Dunn anytime
752733
NOTARY PUBLIC Call Amy at
757 3734
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST wants
to type thesis, dissertations,
publications, manuscripts or term
papers at home. Call 75 30
TYPIST: All papers; Professional
quality at low rates; 10 years ex-
perience. Call 757 1378.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING Ser
vice, experience, quality work.
IBM Selectric typewriters. Call
Lanie Shire 758 107 or Gail Joyner
75102
Classified ads will be taken ONLY
during the following hours:
Monday � 115 300
Tuesday � 200 300
Wednesday � 1:15 3:00
Thursday � 2 00 3 00
Friday � 1:15 2:00
You must place the ads in person
and pay tor them in advance
Rates are $1 for the first 15 words
and $.05 per word after the first fit
teen
FARR
CAR,
INC.
PERSONALSLARGE HOUSE 2 blocks from
ECU. 6-7 bedrooms. 2 baths,
ABORTIONSWe have one of The largest selections of
1 -24 week terminationsIZOD shirts in the
App'ts. Made 7 Daysarea.
CALLTOLLFREESee Gordon t'ulp
1-800-321-0575GCC
7560504
kABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
(ltalBfi5ABORTIONS FROM 13 1
�ft maP ttWEEKS
� tS mAT FURTHER EXPENSE
BT $185.00 Pregnancy Test, Birth
EjJtControl, and Problem Pregnancy Counseling For fur ther information call 832-0535
�vZ P��i(Toll Free Number
�0800221 258) between 9 A.M.
� � �and 5 P.M. Weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
IHEALTH ORGANIZATION
Hi917 West Morgan St. Raleigh. NX.
Help When You Need It Most.
The Fleming Center has been here for women of
all ages since 1974, offering understanding and
help to anyone faced with an unplanned pregnancy
. . . day or night. Services include:
Free Pregnanc Testing
eekda & Saturday Abortion Appls.
F.ening Birth Control Hours
CALL 781-5550 DAY OR NIGHT
THE FLEMING CENTER
l e 're here when you need us.
CWZMB91.3
FM.
GREENVILLE
WEAR PIRATE GOLD THIS SPRING.
ZOMBIE T-SHIRTS NOW ON SALE
Save 25 on these
Spring Specials with ECU I.D.
AT
Jlpp�e cofidg
ACROSS FROM RAFTERS
DOWNTOWN.
� FUEL FILTERS
OIL FILTERS
AIR FILTERS
� WIRE SETS
SPARK PLUGS
? ROTORS
s POINTS
CONDENSERS
DISTRIBUTER CAPS
PHONE: (9191756-9833
1530 SOUTH EVANS ST REST-GREENVILLE
'A)
V.$
If you're a senior and have the promise of a $10,000 career-oriented job, do you
know what's stopping you from getting the American Express" Card?
You guessed it.
Nothing.
Because American Express believes in your future. But more than that. We
believe in you now. And we're proving it.
A $10,000 job promise. That's it. No strings. No gimmicks. And this offer is
even good for 12 months after you graduate.
But why do you need the American Express Card now?
First of all, it's a good way to begin to establish your credit history. And you
know that's important.
Of course, the Card is also good for travel, restaurants, and shopping for
things like a new stereo or furniture. And because the Card is recognized and
welcomed worldwide, so are you.
So fill in the coupon below and American Express will send you a Special Stu-
dent Application right away. We'll also send along a free handbook that has
everything you need to know about credit.
The American Express Card. Don't leave school without it.M
G Please send me a Special Student Application
for the American Express" Card
G And the free Credit Handbook.
Mail this coupon to:
American Express Company
P.O. Box 923, Madison Square Station
New York, New York 10010
Name
I
Home AJdrc�
Cm
State
Zip
College or University
C American t prm Qfj I9K2

i
, . m





Title
The East Carolinian, April 15, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 15, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.194
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy