The East Carolinian, April 13, 1982






She iast Carolinian
Serving the Eastarolina campus community since 1925
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Thursday's Entertainment Scheduled
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On The Inside
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PholO B OA . I M LI am
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Mi K(.I N I IM W �
Wastes Seminar To Be Heid This Week
B I XHK M KI IN
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kilogram 12,201 Is) ol
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Weather Watch
Inside Index
Opinion
Entertainment
Spof t
will be
News Analysis
i tim
Northarolin
gin managing the
beci '
ed landfills
labama f
peeled, the
AI ! In- Cm
Management li' iard n
Raleigh lasi month.
ed 'Mi pri
tieination in il
ir don a i
ate it li hs
by the cooi dinaiing the membet � of the
i an important I rens in attenda
late s effort to oi d d r ommei
� e publu and the parties the n Board M
� e foi generating and si oner? and I
� H vastes. Muni� ipahties i -
: em disp isal thes assi tciaiions re,
health effects resulting then that
md chronic exposure ticipation grouj

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publ i iardous wastes. The rnironmen
I! I impi es al Pi oteet ion
, the boai d ed its requu � nors ol
: niin lous waste
in the wasi hat becomes ol those wastes
field i Ilv helieve I I' officials said
managed a i requirem i v ould
will po
Health problems ronmeniahsts and
i d w hen aaste is claim t ha t
IK oi improperly "crad rave" monitoi n
I � vii. hae made ird � sought foi in
ress in the fight foi a aw will I i Iv compromised
� � h en M onment situ e Hugh B kaul man a
let dav m Apt 11 19' �' 11 reel or of the FPA Hazardous
i nth Dav was declared and Sitt in o Division, said ih
i to wage an organized lion means that "the onlv
. iealth iii mism giving the agencv mfoi
ni "offuiallv" began mation to prevent midnight dump
laim "the has ing is now being abandoned
. louhlt out efforts in a. Midnight dumping is a term a
. this essential gi plied to illegal disposal of toxic and
h idual's desire to have an lous wastes, w hu h occi
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Beth

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havt '
'With Am
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r a r el ipes t
ost efe
� he lulu-1
ail said she int ite
ses su. �pei
� t lous waste management
Publu pi es at ious lev els ol
government is a majot means
implementing the essential
vironmental regulations seen b a
majority of mericans as desirable,
according to Vail "Publu activism
mportant in defin
Sec SFMINAR, Page 5





t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 13, 1982
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
it you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcement column
please send the announcement (as
brief at possible) typed and
double spaced to The East Caroii
nian in care o the production
manager
For better service, we are now
askmg that you pick up several
copies of our new announcement
application tor your upcoming
events.
There is no charge for an
nouncements. but space is often
limited Therefore we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you want
and suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column for publicity
The deadline tor announcements
isp m Friday tor the Tuesday
paper and 5 P m Tuesday �or the
Thursday paper
This space is ava'abie to an
campus organizations and depart
ments.
MEN NEEDED
The women of the ECU Catholic
Newman Club have a problem �
no' enough men are involved m
Newman's varied interesting ac
tivities. Newly elected Newman
President Mary Rider hopes 'o
correct the problem and wishes to
ex'end an invitation of welcome 'o
everyone Newman meets every
Wednesday evening tor Mass ana
supper at the Newman House AH
students are welcome to attend
Mass begms at 5 p m. at 953 E
10'h St. Sunday Mass is held in the
Bioioqy Building in B 10 at 12:30
p.m Newman will be joining a
sta'e wide group on a "crab
event (campus reach at the
beach) The weekend of April 17
Everyone is invited
OPEN HEARINGS
During the past few months ar.
ad hoc committee composed of
(acuity, staff and students has
been reviewing exis'mg 'ratf'C or
dmances at ECU This committee
will hold a series of hearings on
the proposed revisions The hear
ing schedule is as follows Tues
day. April 13 � 9 11 am , Rawi
130, Wednesday, April U - 3 5
p m Brewster C 103. Thursday,
April 15 � 3 5 p m Aineo Health
101 A copy Ot this document is
available m the offices of each
academic unil, in the office of eacn
administrative supervisor, in the
SGA ofdce. at the Mendenhan in
formation desk. In the Joyner
Library Reserve Room, in the in
termurais office, and m tne ARC
offices m Tyler, umstead, and
Fletcher dorms, if you nave any
questions, please call 'he ECU
Planning Office at 6229
NAACP
NAACP elections will be held
April IS, 19(2. Anyone interested in
running tor an office, contact
Virginia Canton at 757 6942 or
Jackie Rowe at 752450. The
deadline for submitting names is
April 7. 19tt
CAMP COUNSELORS
NEEDED
Therapeutic summer camp for
children with behavior problems
� June and July � includes 10
days of training and 6 weeks of
camp � pays salary plus room
and board � interviews at ECU
campus on Saturday, April 17
Sign up for interview through Co
op Office (6979) Prefer applicants
with experience m csamp work,
work with children, or supervised
work m mental health related set
tings
ECU HUNGER
COALITION
Or OriS Blackwell. professor of
Environment Health will be the
guest speaker at the next meeting
of the ECU Hunger Coalition Dr
Blackwell will speak about his ex
per.ences working in Sri Lanka, a
small 'Slana off the coast ot India
There are no simple solutions to
World Hunger, but it we work
together it can be stopped You
can help by getting involved in the
Hunger Coalition All are invited
to attend Dr Biackweii's presen
tation on Thursday evening April
15 at 7 30 p m at the Newman
house 953 E Tenth Street
WORLD CHAMPIONS
COMING
April 17 and 18. Saturday and
Sunday, the ECU Frisbee Disc
Club invites you lo the Na'ural
Light Flying Disc Classic Come
watch frisbee experts do their
thing, catch some rays, and iom
the fun it you like to throw the
disc, come jom the crowd Mon
days at 6 p m room 247
Mendenhan. andor Tuesdays and
Thursdays at 3 p m bottom of
College Hill Be there or be
oblong!
MUSIC LISTENING
CENTER
Stop 0 Mendenhan and spena
some quie' time m the Music
Listening Center The Center is
open aany from 2,00 p m. until
10 30 D m Bring your own music
or make your selection from the
wide variety available at the
Center Also current magazines
are avaiabie tor your reading
pleasure
PPHA
The professional Health
Alliance (PPHA) will have a
meeting this Thursday. April 15.
This meeting will be held at 5 30 at
the Afro American Cultural
Center. Elections and nomma
tions for new executive members
will be conducted AH members
must attend
PRC DEPARTMENT
The PRC Department will be
having their annual banquet on
Friday, April 16 at the Casablan
ca Prior to the banquet, there will
be a reception in the PRC Building
honoring senior fieldwork students
and the alumni The reception will
begm at 5 00 Tickets are S12 and
will be sold in the PRC Building
everyday until April 15 at 4 00
p m AH are invited
GAMMA BETA PHI
our last spring semester
meeting will be held April 15 at
6 00 p m in the MSC Building In
room 221 We are also organizing
the highly publicized Move A
Thon for Multiple Sclerosis held
Saturday. April 17 All mtorma
tion you need is on the sponsor
sheets which can be found m
Mendenhan at the information
desk Help us stop one of the mam
cnpplers ot young people
NATURAL LIGHT
FLYING DISC CLASSIC
The high flying ECU Frisbee
Club announces that this weekend,
April 17 and 18. the most spec
tacular sporting event ever m
North Carolina will be held on the
campus of ECU Competitors
from accross the East Coast will
be m Greenville to compete for
S2.000 in cash and prizes
Organizational meetings tor those
wishing to help and be a part of
this evem will be on Thursday at
Peter Laubert's house at 620 S
Pitt Street, and Thursday in 247
Mendenhan Both will be at 8 00
p m Staff shirts will be given out
at Thursday's meetmqs so ALL
MEMBERS are urged to attend
Transportation to and from the
tournament Sight will be provided
by the Frisbee Club It will be held
from 10 00 am to 2 00 pm at the
High Rises.The Mail, and the Mill
and end at the sigtiMAllied Health
Fields)
For more information call Peter
Laubert at 758 0375 or Mike Hill at
758 6043
KYF
The King's Youth Fellowship
will hold its final meeting of the
semester in the Mendenhan Stu
dent Center at 8 00 p m on Apri
15iRoom238) Refreshments will
be served at the conclusion of the
meeting
SOCWCORR
The Department of Social Work
and Correctional Services will of
fer courses during the second sum
mer session of 1982. beginning
June 22 July 29 which will be of in
terest to professionals m the
human service field, social
workers, ministers, lay persons
and law enforcement and criminal
justice students preparing to enter
these fields
SocW 4002, "Crisis Interven
tion a generic approach to
recognizing, understanding, and
intervening appropriately in crisis
situations Time 4 20 5 50 every
day m the Aided Health Building
Room 206
SocW 5003, "Processes of Group
Intervention working effectively
with the group, utilizing it as the
change media Four theoretical
approaches will be examined with
emphasis on group constellation,
group dynamics and group pro
cess Time 1 00 2 30 every day in
the Allied Health Building Room
206
For additional information,
please call or write to the Depart
ment of Social Work and Correc
tional Services or call 757 6961
COMIC BOOKCLUB
Fantasy fans and music lovers
will have a chance to meet, mouth
oft and buy, sell or trade their
treasured items on Sunday, April
18 when the ECU Comic Book Club
will sponsor it's annual collector's
convention An added attraction
this year is record collecting The
convention will be held at the Hon
day Inn on 714 S Memorial Drive
from 10 a m. to 5 p m Admission
is free to the public For more in
formation andor dealer's regula
tions. contact The Nostalgia News
tand (919 Dickinson Aveor call
752 6389 between 8 10pm
� J.A. UNIFORMS
SHOP
All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes,
shoes, and hose. Also � used ECU
nurses uniforms. Trade-ins allowed.
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive.
Near Hollowell's Drug and old hospital.
104 Red Banks Rd. (Behind Shoney's) 756-6000
Tuesday Night
ECU NIGHT
BTSW0BLD1
�IB HI in II i IH��maammmmmmAm�
JUST $1.00 wID includes
Skate Rental
7:00-10:00
Every Friday & Saturday Night
ECU Students are admitted for
JUST $2.00 including Skate Rental
FOSDICK'S
1890
Seafood
2311 S. Evans St. Ext. � Greenville
756-2011
EL SALVADOR
The Greenville, ECU Committee
on El Salvador invites one and all
to come Tuesday night at 9 00 p.m.
to the Baptist Student Center to
hear Roya Shokovfan. a ECU stu
dent from Iran, speak about the
similarities between the US situa
tion m El Salvador and our
previous support of the Shah in
Iran Also on Friday April 16,
former Latin American Mis
sionary Gail Phares, co chairman
of the Raleigh, committee on El
Salvador will be speaking to
various classes and a noon Com
munity Meeting m Mendenhan
Ail are Welcome!
BOOK SCHOLARSHIPS
The chapter of Phi Eta Sigma at
ECU announces that applications
may now be received for book
scholarships of $100 to be awarded
to trie most outstanding rising
lun.or and rising senior Only
members ot Phi Eta Sigma may
apply, and service to the local
chapter is a maior criterion Intor
mation and application forms may
be received from Dr John D
Ebbs, Faculty Adviser, in Austin
214
MARSHALL
APPLICATIONS
Marshall applications now being
accepted in the SGA Offic Room
728 Mendenhan (Monday Friday,
from 8am thru 5pm
LAMBDA ALPHA
Lambda Alpha, the An
thropology Honor Society, will
have a meeting Tuesday night,
7 30, April 13 The meeting will at
109 S Jorvis Street (next to Over
ton's) Members and prospective
members are urged to attend. For
more information call Anna,
758 2031
BAHA'I ASSOCIATION
A general meeting sponsored by
the BAHA'I Association of ECU
will be held tonight at 8:00 p.m. in
the MSC Coffee House Anyone m
terested m learning something
about BAHA'I Faith is invited to
come There is no pressure and no
donations will be accepted For
more information call 758 9530, or
7586774
OUTDOOR
RECREATION
RENTALS
The outdoor recreation center
located in room 115 Memorial
Gym is open from 2 3 p.m. each
Monday Friday Reservations
andor rentals for equipment in
cludmg Tents, Backpacks,
Canoes, and a Tandem Bicycle
can be made during these hours
Hand outs are available providing
information relative to Hiking and
Backpacking Trails, Canoeing
Waterways and Camping areas on
the Federal, State, and Local
levels Reservations and rentals
are available to an ECU students,
faculty and staff
CO-OP
60 Clerk Typists positions are
available for the summer in
Washington, DC at the Pentagon
in the OHice of tfH: Secretary o�
Defense The Pentagon, in part,
uses a random selection process to
select clerk typists for the sum
mer Students who have social
security numbers ending in "7"
have been selected for considera
tion this summer Also available
are 36 internship positions for
students majoring in Political
Science, MPA, Computer Science,
Business, and Business Educa
tion Interns will be sected ac
cording to their GPA's and work
experience Interested students
should apply today I Deadline for
applications to be received is April
9
"MR. 10"
The Elbe and the Little Sisters of
Lambda Chi Alpha present the
first annual "Mr 10" Contest to be
held Tuesday, April 13 at 8 30
Contestants wishing to enter,
please contact 757 1638, 758 2799.
or call the Elbo There will be no
entry fee The charge at the door is
V75 before 10 o'clock and Si 00
after Door pmes will be awarded
CIRCLE K
The Circle K club of ECU invites
an students to attend our Tuesday
mght meetings m room 221
Mendenhan We are now initiating
a membership drive for students
who are interested in helping
others through our various service
projects See y'aii Tuesday night
at 6 30
SOCIAL WORK
Students who would like to con
sider changing to a maior in Social
Work or Corrections should apply
now tor Fan 1982 admission by
contacting the Department Offices
(312 Allied Health Building) to
pick up an apiication and make m
terview appointments Ar
rangements should be completed
prior to the end of the spring
semester To be eugibiie to apply
the student must have completed
at least one social work or correc
tions course and is expected K
nave a minimum grade point
average of 2 5 Can 757 6961 'Mrs
Joyner) for additional .nforma
tion
BINGOICECREAM
The next Bingolce Crea Pa'
ty is scheduled tor Tuesday Af �
13 at 7 p m if. Meroeri-irti! v Mull
Purpose Room Students. Faculty
Staff, and their dependeris a �
vited to iOir in or tne fu Vv i
pnjes. eat ice crvarr
an absolutely fral
WALK FOR HUMANITY
The ECU Hunt
wishes to tnar.k every ne �t
helped �
Humanity" ana
terested Students t -
Statt lo jo r r ,r" ' -
Y mee'rrj.
ne�' meeting Ap
Hunger Cca ' ; '
p m in 'he Nf M � �
10'h St
E
PSI CHI
Psi Ch, ECU'S Psychology
Honor Society, held its orgarua
tional meeting on April 6 At that
meeting the society inducted
twenty two new members and
elected new officers Ed Wingtield
will serve as president for the 82 83
school year, assisted by Wayne
Dawson, vice president. Sue
Kruse, secretary, and Lee
Woodard, treasurer Becky Cook
will serve as librarian, and
publicity will be handled by Vca
Geisser We congraduiate these
new officers and wish them sue
cess m tneir endeavors
The ssooe'y also extends a
warm welcome to its new
members, and thank continuing
members for support
POMS PONS
There wil
198) Poms Por girls al
Music Hall eo' esdai ��-
7 30 P m Uniforms flrr:
Poms musi be returned l .
date if rou i annol atti
meet.ng, call Deoors �-� �' -
SIGMA BIG BROTHERS
meet rig
flrothf" on A-
at 5 00 This a-
meeting ad a
plan to attenj'
((
I
peel
count
uni
releaj
Judn
apr
SIGMA ALPHA IOTA
The Sigma Alpha lota Fraterni
ty of the ECU School of Music an
nounces a Composer's Musicale to
be held April 8. at 8 15mAj Flet
Cher recital hall Hear works oF
ECU faculty and students There
will be a reception m Room 105 of
music building following the con
cert
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
Greenville Special Olympics
rescheduled for Thursday April 15
from 9 00 am Mi 2 00pm at trie
ECU Track field needs volunteers
All volunteers should meet Wed
April 14, at 3 00 P m at the ECU
track field
The Fast Carolinian
Serving the campus community
met I92S
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ing the summer
The East Carolinian is the of
ticial newspaper ot East
Carolina University, owned,
operated, and pub' sned for and
by the students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate: S20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU,
Greenville, N.C
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carolinian.
Old South Building, ECU Green
ville, NC 27834
Telephone 757 634, 4347, 6309
Application to mail at second
class postage rates is pending at
Greenville, North Carolina
GRADUATES:
PREPARING A RESUME?
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CALL: P.M. TEXT EDITING
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EDITING:
Correcting grammar, punctuation, spelling.
Improving style, structure.
WORD PROCESSING:
Typing. Proofreading. Revising. Printing
letter-quality copies.
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(
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Hems and Prices
Effective thru Set
April 17. 1962
Copyright 1982
Kroger Savon
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold to Dealers
i i :
u
&
600 Greenville Blvd -Greenville
Open 8 a.m. to Midnight
Open Sunday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
rvi
,BV
A
WM&
v
rsi5Tj2m
TWIN BLADES
REFILLS
Atra
-�-
�M
BEG
OR
Black
LIGHT
label
i t.i
Beer
12-Oz-
Can
DIET PEPO
pepsCoia
iCr SAV!
40
'2-Ltr.i
N.B
KROGER
HAMBURGER OR
lot Dog Bun:
$4 19!
M 8-Ct. I
WmWmm PkgS. �
ASSORTED TOPPINGS
Fox Deluxe
11 To
11 Vi-Oz
Pkg.
LIMIT TWO PER FAMILY
WITH $10.00 OR MORE
ADDITIONAL PURCHASE
10-Ct.
Pkg.
WASHINTON STATE
EXTRA FANCY
Red Delicious
Apples
PLANTERS
COCKTAIL OR
DRY ROASTED
PLANTERS
$1 00
1 OFF COUPON
GOOD TOWARDS ALL ME ALS�
AND ALL YOU CAN !
EAT SPECIALS !
NOT GOOD TOWARDS OUR !
REGULAR SPECIALS
Fried P�
SERVE' N SAVE
Weiners
Peanuts
$959
pEANUTS
12-Oz.
Pkg.
8AOOED
RIPE
GOLDEN
Bananas
Chips & Snacks
L
Lbs.
CMMULTICS A
j jPftACftANCI
r16�,

I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 13, 1982
IITY
tRb
Irvedl
s
J
"F
Educators Predicting
Hard Times To Continue
(CPS) � An overwhelming ma-
jority of state education leaders ex-
pect hard times to continue for the
country's 380 state colleges and
universities, according to a report
released by the Education Commis-
sion of the States.
Over 200 state officials � in-
cluding governors, legislators, agen-
cy heads, and budget chiefs �
responded to the survey. Seveniy-
iwo peicent said they expect state
appropriations for higher education
to lag behind inflation.
Of the 72 percent, almost all (94
percent) believe that tuition will in-
crease as a result of lagging ap-
propriations, and roughly 70 per-
cent expect to see reductions in
staff, maintenance and capital
outlays bv universities.
When questioned on the most im-
portant issues facing higher educa-
tion, the officials listed qualitv of
education, remedial instruction.
physical plant upkeep, tuition and
cuts in financial aid programs as the
five areas of greatest concern.
"We're seeing a real shift from a
focus on the individual to a focus on
the institution observed Bill
Hyde, economist for the commis-
sion. "The emphasis was on the stu-
dent throughout all o' the seventies,
when you had the big grants and the
federal need-based aid programs.
Now, given the fiscal conservatism
pervasive across the country, the
concern is on trying to do more with
less at the institutional level
Students will have to rely more on
their families to help finance their
educations, the report reveals. Due
to the cuts in financial aid and rising
tuition levels, 70 percent of the
education leaders say they expect
parents to contribute more to their
children's education although 43
percent also said they will expand
their state loan programs to help
students.
Shoplifting Rate
Up In Pitt County
Continued From Page 1
store suddenly appear-
ing to be pregnant.
Area supermarkets
are combating shoplif-
ting bv increasing store
security and pro-
secuting offenders.
Still, the majority o
shoplifters go unnotic-
ed, and the merchan-
dise they, steal must be
paid for through a
mark-up percentage on
all items in the store.
An AAP employee
explained that average
customers don't realize
when they see someone
shoplifting that they
pay for the theft at (he
c h e c k o u t c o u n t er
through higher prices.
Rather than get involv-
ed in a minor crime,
they don't report what
they have witnessed �
or at least not until the
shoplifter has left the
store.
If the average
customer would report
the crime immediately
to a store employee,
store managers and
police say shoplifting
could almost be
eliminated.
Correction
Barry Seay, vice
president of the Stu-
dent Residence
Association, was in-
correct in last Thurs-
day's edition when
he stated that there
would be run-offs in
four SRA elections.
Only one vote is
needed to win these
elections. Therefore,
winners in Wednes-
day's elections were
Lee Anthony White,
Central Campus
president; Sulfianna
Jones, Fleming
president; Ginger
Allen. Jarvis presi-
dent; and Jennifer
McQuinlan, Cotton
vice president.
AX&
1ST PA2� 475
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opovsaeS � H4P&A'S UICMIM0G4 C�V7EQ - P0T7 PVTT
OVCPTMJS - PZ2A HUT - CteAT CrP�C7A TrouS
PtPC OfBMS � coePr'S �sas � "
The Best Pizza in Town � Honest
Gome
Machines
Big Screen
TV
Drive-Up
������- - - -��
wnwiw n�r
To Go Orders
lv�ry Day - Buffet 1142402.79
Men. & Tuaa. - BulM MMrtM 2.89
w�d. - "am v- c- t" s��oVat. wmmm92-25
5:0440Twf�rf3.60
-S -
vV,
X
The
Marathon
Restaurant
The Best in
Greek food, Pizzas, and Subs.
Try our delicious Souvlakia
Special only $2.65
FREE DELIVERY
AFTER 540 P.M.
Phone 752-0326
Located Across From ECU
at St� Evans St.
utilus
II : i i i ! x i i z i i i -i i i x i i i i i i i
1002 Evans
Street
758-9584
WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH
FOR:
CLASS RINGS
WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS
AkkGOLD & SILVER
SILVER COINS
CHINA & CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
&RING
Of KEY SALES CO iNe
THE
FITiN
CLUB
Join Nautilus and get ready for summer. It's that
time again to get back into shape. Nautilus is located
on Evans Street, within walking distance from cam
pus. Featuring a full line of Nautilus equipment,
Olympic free weights, sauna, whirlpool and locket
room.
Call and ask about our pro-rated student rates and
low summer rates.
Call and schedule a
free introductory workout.
401 S.EVANS ST. openo-omon sai
(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH) PHONE 752-3866
YOUR PROFUSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER
HOURS OF OPERAT ION
MonThurs. � 10 a.m. 10 p.m. Friday -
Saturday � 10a.m5p.m. Sunday-
- 10a.m. 8 p.m.
1 p.m. 5 p.m.
?�&&��&2&&�&�&&3SS�S&&

mm
X MANDARIN CUISI
i
Served with Egg Flower So
Spring Roll.
Choice of one of the following:
1. Sweet and Sour Pork
2. Green Pepper Bee
3. Chicken Foo Yung
4. Vegetarian's Delight
Luncheon (
Served with Egg Flower Soup
Egg Roll.
Choice of one of the following.
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4. Yu Shiang Pork with Broccoli
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Take left at 1st Light
Located one block down on left
Hours: Sun. through Thurs. � 11:30 a.m9:00 p.m.
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2tye iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Jimmy Dupree, emmmcm
Charles Chandler, ������, �dll,�
Ric Browning, mm � Tom Hall, � �thlo,
Fielding Miller, Huiineu �er William Yelverton. ,�,f��
Alison Bartel. �Juill�� mmm Steve Bachner. -� - EdllUf
Stlvf Moore. cmukuu.n mmm Diane Anderson, tt, mm
April 13, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Island Crisis
Argentine Takeover Draws Response
London's financial Times noted
recently that apart from the 51 U.S.
hostages held for 444 days in Iran
until last January, "no recent case
in diplomatic history has involved
so much negotiating effort for so
few people
� The News and Observer
Sunday, April 11, 1982
A group of islands 255 miles off
the coast of South America whose
4,700 square miles could fit into the
state of Connecticut hardly sounds
like the setting of a global power
struggle. But that's what the
Falkland Islands crisis has the
potential to develop into.
The islands were first discovered
in 1592 by British Captain John
Davis, but the tiny mass has been
under the flags of France and Spain.
Following an attack on three
American seal-hunting vessels in
1831, President Andrew Jackson
sent the USS Lexington which
destroyed most of the Spanish set-
tlement. The islands were proclaim-
ed "free of all governance
In 1833 the British reestablished
control over the Falklands, and it
has � more or less � remained that
way since. Britian and Argentina
have annually negotiated at the
United Nations for a settlement of
sovereignty.
So why all the hoopla over such a
seemingly trite land mass? The
answer is two-fold.
Environmentally, the Falkland
Islands are extremely valuable. The
; �r t 80 times as
tU
islands would lead one to question
COOiMtSBURY
this statement. But there is reason to
believe the waters surrounding the
land are rich in petroleum.
Argentina is 90 percent energy
self-sufficient, with its production
reaching 490,000 barrels a day. Bri-
tian currently exports a million bar-
rels a day. Experts believe the
Falkland Island area may be a
"world-class resource Few ex-
perts have studied the area closely
because high winds and depths of
over half a mile would make drilling
conditions among the most
treacherous anywhere.
The other key point to remember
is the right of a people to determine
self-rule. While globally Argentina
is far closer to the Falklands, their
inhabitants have been characterized
as "more British than most people
in London
Their customs, dialect and mores
remain British in the purest sense.
Insulting the Royal Family is not
wise � to say the least. Ask people
of the islands what they are and
they'll say "British
Critics argue Reagan's sending
Secretary of State Alexander Haig
to London and then Buenos Aires
and back again is a weak response
to a hostile act against an ally. Pro-
ponent of the action call it strict
observance of the Monroe Doctrine.
Whatever the viewpoint, Great
Britian has shown a determination
to repell acts of hostility aimed at its
subjects � whether in Europe or
elsewhere. Such action may be con-
sidered war-provoking, but it's
reassuring to the 1,820 people who
call the Falkland Islands their
home.
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Campus Forum
Liberals Dispute Supposed Image
ByJOHNWEYLER
The liberal's sense of humor. Unfor-
tunately, there is no such thing. Instead,
liberals are endowed with an extra large
sense of concern. This enables them to
shade their fingers at the rest of us for liv-
ing such apathetic, selfish lives.
The above was how Kim Albin ended
her April 8 column on liberalism, another
amazing essay that proves it is possible to
be completely "Right yet still be almost
totally wrong. Liberals have no sense of
humor? Why, the list of left-wing laugh-
makers ranges from Charlie Chaplin to
Groucho Marx to Lenny Bruce to Woody
Allen to every cast member of "Saturday
Night Live Quick, name one conser-
vative comedian � sorry, G. Gordon Lid-
dy doesn't count.
One part of the above quotation is ac-
curate � we liberals are enabled to (and
enjoy) shake a finger (or flip the bird) at
you apathetic, selfish conservatives. You
see, we too can be self-righteous and sanc-
timonious, though in this area we admit
our inferiority to the Right. Y'all have
such bravura virtuosos of the fine art of
hypocrisy as the irreverent Jerry Falwell,
while we have only a few colorless
Pharisees like Walter Mondale.
Campus
Spectrum
The major distinction of the Left is that
we care. We care about the troubled, op-
pressed peoples of the world, including
conservatives. While many right-wingers
may be momentarily in high places, we
liberals are sensitive enough to realize what
torment they live in. The conservative is
engulfed in mental anguish, traumatized
by trying to reconcile his professed
politicalsocial beliefs with his opposing
personal opinions.
The conservative swears by the free
enterprise system and the open
marketplace, but wehn West Germany an
Japan beat the U.S. in free, open competi-
tion, he screams "Throw the foreigners
out The conservative wants the govern-
ment off the people's backs, but wants it in
the people's pants, so he can control
everyone's personal moral judgements.
The conservative loves America, a country
founded upon the idea "freedom and
justice for all but he wants only rich.
white males to have any rights at all.
The conservative is absolutely obsessed
with hatred for Soviet Russia, a nation he
abhors as a spy-ridden dictatorship, yet he
wants to increase the already
unimaginable, insideous power of the
American Gestapo, the FBI and the CIA.
Obviously, it is the stress caused by sup-
porting these irreconcilable ideas that
drives conservatives into committing
bizarre, irrational acitons, such as attemp-
ting to turn this planet into a radioactive
wasteland.
Evidently the average "Righter" is il-
literate (except when concerning beer can
labels). How else is it that such noble,
pious men as Ronald Reagan and his rich
friends never read "Give to him who begs
from you, and do not refuse him who
would borrow from you"? How else is il
that Al Haig and his flock of war hawks
never came across the phrase "Thou shall
not kill"? How else could it be thai such
self-confessed Christians as Jesse Helms
and Strom Thurmond never learned "I ove
thy neighbor" but instead try to pass their
racist views into law?
Thank God for conservatives. Without
them, what would we enlightened liberals
have to laugh about?
El Salvador Involvement Escalated
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
With the election in El Salvador suc-
cessfully stage-managed, the pretext for
escalating U.S. in Central America is set.
Intervention has already taken place, of
course. The millions of dollars in U.S. aid
and the American military advisors in El
Salvador and Hondoras have seen to that.
But now, with the tattered facade of
democracy hastily erected, that interven-
tion will deepen and widen, perhaps
engulfing Nicaragua and, eventually,
Cuba.
ECGC Funding Criticized
In the March 30 issue of The East
Carolinian, the lead article informed the
readers that the "SGA Appropriates
Funds For ECGC Informational Pam-
phlet The essence of the aritcle is that
the Student Government Association at
ECU, which receives funding from
various sources, appropriated money to
the group known as East Carolina Gay
Community, Their president is a student
rlmed Mark Zumbach. This group, ac-
cording to their name, is made up of
Homosexuals. What this amounts to is
that these avowed homosexuals have
received monies from the SGA at East
Carolina Univeristy for the purpose of
attempting to "increse an awareness of
people of different sexual orientations
Mark Zumbach well said it, when in
an interview he stated that this area
(Eastern North Carolina) is in the Bible
Belt and very conservative in its think-
ing. The Biblf Belt simply indicates an
area where the Bible is recognized as the
only set of absolutes in the World. All
else may be relative but the Bible is ab-
solute. It has proven the test of time on
accuracy. It was here before Zumbach
existed and will be here after Zumbach is
gone.
And, yes, the Bible condemns
homosexualism. In fact, ir condemns it
in any of its fourteen titles (fifteen in-
cluding the modern day title which at-
tempts to give credence to it, "Gay").
There are no 'right' sexual alternatives
for any human being. Any deviation
from the standards taught us by God is
perversion. It should not be accepted by
anyone, by nations, governments, cities
or educational institutes. In fact, are we
so blind that we cannot see from even
the animal kingdom that homosexualism
is not natural and is wrong. I have never
seen one homosexual dog, cat, elephant,
large-mouth bass or eagle. That's quite a
commentary on humanity.
I call on the SGA to rescend its ap-
propriation to the homosexuals. I call
upon the administration if ECU to res-
cend the charter for the ECGC as
Georgetown University is doing. I call
upon students of East Carolina Univer-
sity to demand of the SGA that their of-
ficers wake up.
And, lastly, I call on the great citizens
of Greenville, whose life and home this
wonderful area is, not to take this lightly
because this will affect the quality of life
here in Pitt County. These Gay bars
need to be closed. Our police depart-
ment, zoning commission, city council,
county commission, should be unified in
their efforts to manintain the highest
quality of life in our community. Let's
not bury our heads proverbial ostrich.
Stand and meet it.
Albin Scolded
Now we all know a little more about
the mysterious Ms. Albin since her last
column; "Liberals" totally described
herself. The column is not about hard-
working and caring liveral-minded
students. Students who bust their cans
for something more important to them
than designer jeans and imported beer.
Ms. Albin has once again shown 10,000
readers how D.E.A.F. she really is.
(Defeatest-Egotistical- Asinine-Fly
brain).
JOHNBRENAN
Senior, Business
Rev. J.M. BRAGG
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all tetters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted.
I say "facade because the Salvadoran
election � so proudly hailed by the
Reagan administration as proof that the
Salvadoran people reject "communist
subversion" � was entirely for show.
Slashing the number of polling places from
200 to 13 in the capital city of San Salvador
guaranteed the long lines of voters played
so prominently on the TV news, and mark-
ing the mandatory national identity cards
with indelible ink gave junta authorities a
sure way of knowing who voted � and
who didn't. Not voting could, of course,
be regarded as showing support for the
subversives, since the guerrillas of the
FMLN boycotted the election. And we
know what happens to subversives and
their sympathizers in El Salvador.
The high voter turnout reported by
authorities, and gleefully seconded by U.S.
observers, is similarly suspect. From a na-
tion of only 4.9 million people, an
estimated 500,000 are political refugees.
Leftists and centrists avoided running for
public office on the very sensible premise
that they would be killed by the country's
right-wing death squads if they did. These
things have a way of skewing the election
results.
With its limited field of candidates, its
international media hoopla, the seal of ap-
proval from U.S. observers, and the far-
right tilt of the voting, the Salvadoran elec-
tion closely resembles the 1967 balloting in
South Vietnam that set the stage for sharp
U.S. military escalation. It is perhaps coin-
cidental, and certainly ominous, that two
of the six American election observers in El
Salvador � Howard Penniman and
Richard Scammon � also watched over
the elections in Vietnam.
The real purpose of the election is to
provide legitimacy for the U.Sbacked
provisional government that will succeed
the ruling junta, established in 1979 after a
military coup. Then, when the new rightw-
ing coalition government announces that it
could win the war if only the arms
shipments from Nicaragua and Cuba, by
way of Moscow, were stopped,
Washington will have its justification for
pouring in more U.S. money � and maybe
U.S. troops.
To suss out th form that U.S. military
intervention is likely to take, I spoke with
Richard Kallet, an American activist who
has worked for some time against U.S. in-
tervention in Central America. Kallet feels
that an international "peace-keeping"
force, directed by the U.S is a hkelv
scenario for the months ahead. Such a
force, Kalet figures, will involve proxy
troops from military dictatorships such as
Argentina and Chile to spare the U.S. the
onerous task of doing the job itself � and
escalating domestic opposition in the pro-
cess.
Such intervention, Kallet predicts, will
be aimed not only at Salvadoran rebels,
but at the Sandinista government in
neighboring Nicaragua. If that doesn't
work, Washington will send in the
Marines.
Kallet believes the first steps have
already been taken. The attacks on
Nicaragua by the Hondoran naw seem
calculated to provoke the Sandinistas and
draw them into a wider war. "Another
Gulf of Tonkin in the Carribean Kallet
warns, "is an extremely likely possiblity "
Recent news that the CIA has offered ex
Green Berets big bucks to infiltrate
Nicaragua doesn't strengthen
Washington's reputation as an ally of
peace in the region.
The parallels with Vietnam were
underscored even further by an interview
in the Washington Post with ex-CTA of-
ficer Philip Liechty, who said that the
Johnson administration fabricated
evidence that the National Liberation
Front (Viet Cong) received large shipments
?LarT! �?m Sovict-bloc countries in
i5. The CIA, said Leichty also forged a
postage stamp, supposedly made in Hanoi
hat showed Vietnamese gunning dewn a
u.b Army helicopter, to inflame U.S
public opinion. THe stamp showed up on
-wkT UJe- Concl"d Liechty,
What is happening now in El Salvador
looks so similar to what I saw of the agen-
cy role m preparing the groundwork for a
big VS. intervention" in Vietnam. Liechty
worked at the CIA until 1978
"SHC Tfu22y acrial Photographs of
Soviet-style" tanks and "Cuban-style"
Z2fc TSlCad .�f Vietn�� stamps.
Z Cni fS t "I Carribcan 'tead of
�n" �L T�nk,n' contr�Hed elections in
San Salvador instead of Saigon. Yet it all
adds up to the same scenario: another land
Hil�P ub,y P1. �n defense of
2�? EJ W. rSS"? S- a momh if ,h�v
were left alone with their own people
The stage is set. The players are ready
The coming months will tell the tale
i
I
t





w
I'
he
I
ii-
I
and
lotner
llet
hen
the
:ated
ration
lents
le in
ged a
lanoi,
wn a
i s
ip on
:chtv.
lagen
for a
pechty
�hs of
le
imps,
lad of
Dns in
it ail
land
ise of
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ready.
Argentinian Leader
Working For Peace
IHItASUAKOHMAN APkll 13. IW2
Continued From Page 1
1833. However, Argen-
tina has always laid
claim to the islands
Secretary of State
Haig has also been
working extensively �
jetting back and forth
between London and
Buenos Aires � on a
peaceful compromise
to the week-old con
flict.
Esquival said that the
Argentinian people
were not participating
in the political process
as "actors" but rather
"as spectators"
because of the
totalitarian regime in
Argentina.
Conflict and struggle
hae been no strangers
in Esqui vat's peace
work. In April of 1977,
he was arrested and im-
prisoned in Argentina
as a subversive. After
large-scale interna-
tional protests, he was
freed in June ol the
following year, having
suffered from torture
inflicted during his in-
carceration.
According to a press
release, the fasting and
prayer committee has
nearly 20 nations.
The Fellowship of
Reconciliation and the
Resource Center for
Non-Violence are co-
coordinating the U.S.
activities.
Seminar Slated
Continued From Page 1
society at large she
explained.
ECU students and
Greenville residents will
have an opportunity to
get involved. In con-
junction with the
Hazardous Waste Pro-
gram, Dr. Trenton G.
Davis will speak
Wednesday at 8 p.m. at
the Belk Building
auditorium. Two video
presentations dealing
with waste manage-
ment will also be
shown.
Davis, chairman of
the environmental
health department, has
had significant dealings
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with those responsible
for the state's hazar-
dous waste policy pro-
mulgation. "We can no
longer ignore the fact
that proper disposal of
hazardous waste is
necessary to protect the
health of future genera-
tions Davis said.
"We must recognize
that contamination ol
ground water bv im-
proper disposal cannot
be coreected or cleaned
up overnight
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area.
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T





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
AI'Rll 13. IS�82 Page6
Actress Seeking
Brilliant Career
On Wednesday
ByJOHNWEYLER
SUII � nlrr
Around the turn of the century, in
the Australian outback, a young
woman fought in the most ancient
o battles: the battle for freedom.
She wanted to free herself from
poverty, from her close-minded
family, from the constraints of the
over-civilied world which insisted
she become some man's household
slae. Instead, this spirited woman
wanted to embark upon a brilliant
career in the arts. She struggled, and
succeeded.
Tomorrow evening, April 14, in
Mendenhalt's Hendrix Theatre, this
struggle will unfold when the much-
honored Australian film My
Brilliantareer is shown at 8 p.m.
Admission is by ID and activity
cards or MSC Membership. Follow-
ing My Brilliant Career in room 244
of the student center, there will be a
short, informal discussion o' the
film. Coffee and doughnuts will be
served and all interested students.
faculty and staff are invited to at-
tend. The program is sponsored by
the Student Union Films Commit-
tee.
Some eighty years have passed
since the heroine ol the aforemen-
tioned scenario plowed her ground.
In 19S0, another woman warned the
same kind ol liberty and artisile
freedom. She wanted to be a film
director, winch meant overcoming
the unwritten law that says very few
women are allowed to be film-
makers. This modern woman saw in
the Victorian tale a kindred spirit
and she strived to make a movie
about it. She also warred and won.
The first woman was Miles
Franklin, who in 1895, at the age of
16, wrote an autobiographical novel
entitled My Brilliant Career. It was
published in 1901 and was the first
of a list of fine novels written under
various pseudonyms. The second
woman is Gillian Armstrong, who
in 1980 did indeed direct her first
feature film. My Brilliant (areer,
which has achieved high critical and
popular acclaim.
With actress Judy Davis in her
screen debut as the spunky heroine,
Franklin's novel comes vividly to
life. The desolate Australian ter-
ritory, the even more remote at-
titudes and manners of the time, the
vitality and intelligence of the aspir-
ing female writer and the bafflement
of the young man (Sam Neill) who
wants to marry her all seem alive to
the audience.
Armstrong's careful but creative
direction and Eleanor Witcombe's
excellent adaptation of the original
story, together with fine perfor-
mances and exquisite
cinematography, combine io form
an outstanding example o
Australian filmmaking and
cinematic art.
Tickets tor Joan Jett Concert On Sale Today At Area Outlets
Tickets for the Sunday, April 25 concert featuring Joan Jett and The
Rlackhearts are now on sale at the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student (enter as well as all area outlets, Apple Records and hoth
record har locations in Greenville. (All major credit cards will be ac-
cepted.) Prices are especially low for this engagement at $6 for ECU
students and S8 for the general public. Tickets sold at the door on the
evening of the show will be &. Currently, the band's album I ove
Bock ' ' Boll is resting in the Billboard top ten and the single of the
same name is charted at number one. The April 25 show, scheduled Io
begin at 8 p.m marks the only area dale for the group. Plans for an
opening act have not yet been announced. The concert is being spon-
sored by the ECU Student Union Major Attractions Committee.
Dancer Davis Tripping Lightly Into McGinnis
By PATRICIA PERTALION
in j I in. r dit'ir
The following article originally appeared in the Mar-
ch April, 1982 edition of Circa fa journal of the Pitt-
Greenville Arts Council). L se by permission � all rights
reserved.
When you first meet Chuck Davis you are impressed
by his physical sie, a towering 6'7 After being in his
exuberant presence for a short time you realize his
physical sie hardly encompasses the scope of his
creative energy and spirit. On Friday, April 16th, Davis
wiil focus those considerable energies on Greenville as a
key participant in the Eastern Carolina Arts Festival.
Davis will conduct movement workshops in public
schools, teach a master class for teenage and adult
dancers at the Messick Theatre Arts Center (old Wahl-
Coates) in Studio 114, and give a lively lec-
turedemonstration at 8:15 p.m. in McGinnis 1 heat re.
Admission for the McGinnis event will be SI for
students andr43fpT adults Tickejs will be available at
the door and at the Put-Gieenville Arts Council office
in the North State Savings and I oan building
(757-1785).
Participation in the 4:30 p.m. master class will be S
and that will also cover admissions to the evening pro-
gram. Pre-registration is encouraged because studio
space is limited. Call 757-1785 for pre-registration infor-
mation.
Accompanying Davis on African drum will be Philip
Williamson. Davis has observed that "through the use
of drums, the music reaches out and grabs people He
adds gleefully, "l don't think it. 1 know it
A native of Raleigh, Chuck Davis is an exceptional
dancerchoreographer and a master of Atrican dance.
The extent to which Davis has mastered African dance
was evident in 1977 when the Chuck Davis Dance Com-
pany represented the United States in a dance festival in
Nigeria. Some members of the audience thought Davis'
company was composed of Africans and loudly pro-
tested what they thought was an American deception.
A recipient in 1980 of the Distinguished North Caroli-
nian Award, Davis has taught and performed
throughout the U.S Europe, and Africa, and has
received enthusiastic popular and critical acclaim.
Despite his extensive travels (he visits Africa every year
to gather materials to be shared in his creative work).
Davis maintains close family and professional ties to
North Carolina. His parents still reside in Raleigh and
the Chuck Davis Dance Company is an integral part of
the prestigious American Dance Festival in Durham
every summer.
Davis is on the ADF dance faculty; his company ap-
pears on the ADF concert series; and they conduct the
ADF Out-Reach Program. This endeavor has met with
such success that it has led to a program expanded
beyond the summer ADF schedule to a year-round
Community Services Program. The Pitt-Greenville Arts
Council, with the support of Burroughs Wellcome, is
bringing Davis and Williamson to Greenville under the
auspices of the Community Service Program.
But what is the compelling ingredient for such suc-
cess' h is Davis' concern for people aid his expertise in
relating to all people. All his responsibilities, both to his
dance company and io the wider performing arts com-
munity, never seem to dampen his zeal. "I'm a com-
municator. 1 want to help people. I want to show ihem
the io of movement. As a communicator I want io
reach out and touch as many people as 1 can io help
them develop their creative potential through the an o'
dance which is the love of life As a Movement
Specialist for the National Endowment for the .Artsand
as a member of the Education Panel for the NEA. Davis
has worked with school children in pilot projects using
the arts as a tool for enchancing academic achivement.
Grants from the NEA have enabled Davis and his com-
pany to design and implement Learning Through the
Arts projects involving senior citizens, the mentallly and
physically handicapped, and pre-school children. He
has indeed reached out to help people.
The desire to "help" first led Davis to pursue a career
in nursing at Howard University in Washington, D. C.
Looking back, Davis feels as though "dance is the
prevention; nursing is the cure. And I'd much rather be
involved in the prevention His exposure to dance
began during his stint in the Navy. Stationed in D. C
he spent many off-duty hours in a nightclub where a
group of musicians and dancers rehearsed their Latin
show. One night Davis was asked to substitute for an
absent dancer. He was told to "stand on spot A and
when she jumps through the air, catch her. I did what
ihey said and apparently well enough for someone io
suggest that I take lessons and study dance
Davis loves the opportunity to share his love of dance
with people in the community. "Dance is life Davis
says emphatically, adding, "1 have stopped people in
the streets and told them to start dancing
So, if on April 16th, a tall, dark, handsome stranger
tells you to "start dancing you will have been touched
by the magic that is Chuck Davis.
They're Alive
A Night Of The Living Dregs
ByJOHNWEYLER
Mill Wilier
"They were really hot, really good . . .
greatest I've ever seen and I've seen a lot. "
mond.
one of the
- WillRav-
Liddy Slated tor 'Great Debate7 With Leary
Successful novelist, lecturer and he-man G. Gordon Liddy will square-off against psychologist and
renowned psychedelics expert Dr. Timothy Leary in what is now being referred to as 'The Great Debate'
on Tuesday, April 20 in Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix Theatre. Liddy, the former Watergate
"mastermind" and author of the bestselling Will, will speak out on "The Power of the State" while legen-
dary drug advocate Leary defends "The Freedom of the Individual Tickets are $2.50 for ECU students,
$3.50 for faculty and staff and $5 for the general public. Tickets sold at the door will be $5.
The young man quoted above was only one of many
.who gave a highly enthusiastic response when asked his
opinion of a certain subject. The time was last Thursday
night, April 8. The place, the Attic. The topic was one
of the most energetic and artistically-skilled concert per-
formances ever seen in this town. The performers were
the Dregs and 3PM, two of the most powerful yet pro-
gressive bands playing today.
Both bands present a combination of hard-driving,
high-energy rock n' roll with more complex, subtle jazz-
inspired structures. 3PM is a little-known but well-
regarded group consisting of guitarists John Wheliss
and Bernie Petteway, bassist Jerry Peek, and drummer
Doug Morgan. They took the stage at 9:15 and held it
tightly yet smoothly for an hour, entertaining the jam-
packed but jubilant crowd with their accomplished
musicianship. "VIVID . . . Just the way they played it
made it sort of picturesque, you know what I mean?"
� Becky Johnson.
Tunes played included "Banana Daquiri "Knuf
"River of Ears all from their album Better I.ate Than
Sever, plus the unforgettable "Dangerous Pigeons
From Hell
The Dregs, a band which should need no introduc-
tion, took over at 11 p.m. and performed for almost an
hour and a half. Seven albums, the latest being Industry-
Standard, and a busy touring schedule, including many
past appearances at the Attic, have made their shatter-
ing but musically superb style well-known.
Guitarist Steve Morse (who also writes all their
material), bassist Andy West, drummer Rod Morgens-
tein. keyboardist T. Lavitz, and violinist Mark
O'Connor (a new Dreggie, replacing long-time violinist
Allen Sloan) jammed on tunes from several of their past
albums, including the countrified "Bash" from Sight
of the Living Dregs, the dynamic "Rock n' Roll Park"
fromnsung Heroes, and from their latest. Vitamin Q,
a song they drolly described as "one of our more
philosophical songs . . prescribed as a cure for modern
apathy Also from Industry Standard came "Crank It
Up a unusual experiment into vocals from the usually
all-instrumental Dregs. It was "sung" Thursday night
by a "guest vocalist an inert dummy placed at center
stage, the Dreggies wisely deciding not to attempt sing-
ing themselves.
The concert was most accurately described by Donnie
Best who said, "It was fast-paced, a very energetic per-
formance






I i I i I A' ' LINIAN
M
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
12:15 1:00FANTASY
1:00 1:30STEVE FOGELMAN - MAGICIAN
1:30-2:30NEE NINGY BAND'
�0 3:003UDY CARTER, EMCEE
0 3:30.TOUCH, THE MIME TRIO
3:30-4:30NEE NINGY BAND'
10JUDY CARTER
10TOUCH, THE MIME TRIO
5:30 0:0030DY CARTER
30RINADAD TRIPOLI STEEL B
30BLACK FRATERNITY STEP SHOW
10 8:30MIKE WILLIAMS
10BLACK FRATERN
�3MICHAEL ICEBERG
J
MIKE WILLIAMS
MICHAEL ICEBURG





8
mi EAS1 (.A KOI INIAN APRIL 13, 1982
LeA&tJMG Atovr Coll�g�� 7m� Haw iMy
vooocp you UK� 0�i� OF
BY OaIIP A)o�S
tOWT o0�, ftzopiz r
Comic Book Junkies
Can Unite In April
B JOHN WEYI KK
SUM V ritrr
The Great American
Comic Book, li is shun-
ned by some, bin
adored and enthused
over b otheis, mart) ol
whom will be preseni
for the Greenville Col-
lector's Convention
next Sunday, April 18.
Conventions are
gatherings where tans,
professionals, and
dealers ot comic books
and associated lan-
tasv science tut ion
items meet to socialize,
sell and buv their
wares. Comics are the
main feature at most
conventions, but
almost any type ol
mass media materials
may be found, in-
cluding original art
work, limited-edition
prints, posters,
magazines, books, even
bubble-gum cards.
A unique item at this
year's Greenv ille�n
vention is the 1 P, tor
those who want to get
rid of or add to their
musical collect ions.
Music lovei s will have a
special section to
themselves, while the
super hero and sci fi
fans will have the rest
of the place to run wild
in.
The place is the Holi-
day Inn at "14 S
Memorial Drive. The
time is 10 a.m. to 5
p.m with y a.m. open
foi dealers to set up
then displays. Admis-
sion is free to the
general public. Anyone
desiring more informa-
tion is asked to contact
The Nostalgia News-
tand at 919 Dickinson
A v cn ue. or call
1-919-752-6389 bet-
ween 8-10 PM.
A problem plagueing
most fantasv fans is the
fact that their fixation
is not taken seriously.
Though the films Star
W ars and Raiders oj
the I osi Ark are seen as
pioper entertainment
tor millions, the same
tvpe of material in
comic book format is
considered kid stuff1
hv many. Charles
I awrence, manager ol
the Nostalgia Newss-
tand (which deals in
new and used comics)
and president of the
ECU Comics Club
(which is sponsoring
the Convention) has
spoken out about this
problem.
"You've got to
understand when comic
strips first started, thev
weren't a 1 m e d
necessarily for
children. They were for
adults. Cartoons in the
movies were aimed for
adult audiences, not
children, I think
DOAJ'T 5POL TH6 ClOnENT
Ue De(iuev
iVO QUESTIONS ftSHCO
ofty&n&?7�FOOD
MART
A QUALITY FOCD MARKET 7C0.PZ0
NOT A CONVENIECfc STOKE ! llsQ OOOU
MON.THRU FRI.
4-IOPM
51.00 ChAPGE ON ORDERS LESS THAN 35.00-OVER FREE
The C. O. Tankard Company of Washington,
N. C, Miller Brewing Company and the
Department of Intramural-Recreational Ser-
vices congratulate all participants in the Third
Annual Miller-ECU Intramural Softball Tour-
nament and salute the tournament champions
� the VY. B. DODGERS and the TR1-HUMPSL
Qnapr
�MiM tff. B�C�
7 '
i
jrAfjrjpjrjgrjrjpjm jr'jr4


) SERVING A VARIETY OF SANDWICHES AND
BE VERA GES. WE SER VE ONL Y FRESH ME A TS A ND
PRODUCE. OUR FRENCH FRIES ARE FRESH, OUR HOT DOG
IS ALL BEEF, AND OUR HAMBURGER IS GROUND FRESH DAILY.
SANDWICH MENU INCLUDES:
BIG BOY HAMBURGER: DELUXE ALL BEEF
BURGER WITH THE WORKS
REGULAR AND CHEESEBURGER:
CLUB BURGER COMBINATION: 3 DECKS OF HAM,
TURKEY, BACON, LETTUCE, TOMATOES
AND CHEESE.
BAKED HAM COMBINATION
SLICED TURKEY COMBINATION
BACON, LETTUCE, AND TOMATOES
FRENCH FRIES,
FRESH CUT AND FRIED.
BEVERAGES INCLUDE:
YOUR FAVORITE SOFT DRINKS
ICED TEA
MILK
ALSO MANY OF YOUR
FAVORITE GOLDEN BEVERAGES
NEED WE SA Y MORE . . .
HAPPY HOUR AT PHARO'S:
THURSDAYS & FRIDAYS
3 P.M. TILL 6 P.M.
LOCATED IN NEARBY GEORGETOWN SHOPS
OPEN:
SUNDAY-THURSDAY I 1:00 A.M. TILL 1 1:00 P.M
FRIDAY & SATURDAY 1 I 00 A.M. TILL 1:00AM
n
I
I
P
I
an
Wit
to
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f





1
I
I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Wilder Zips
Fast Balls
By Carolina
Sports
APRIL 13, 1982
Page 9
��"
"
CHAPEL HILL � East
Carolina's senior right-hander Bill
Wilder completely stymied North
Carolina's offensive attack as the
Pirates nipped their arch-rivals in a
10-inning, 2-1, thriller at Gary
Boshammer Stadium late Wednes-
day.
The Tarboro pitcher, now 5-3,
outdueled North Carolina's Greg
Karpuk, 2-3. Wilder allowed only a
harmless bloop single in the sixth
and struck out 10 Tar Heels for East
Carolina, now 21-7. The Tar Heels
fall to 17-23.
The Pirates jumped off to a 1-0
lead in the first inning as Ricky
Nichols reached first base on an er-
ror and advance to second on a
sacrifice bunt by David Wells. Mike
Sorrell's single up the middle scored
Nichols.
That one-run lead lasted until the
Tar Heel third when Wilder gave up
two costly walks. Mitch McCleney
led off the inning with a base-on-
balls and teammate Tim Koch also
received a free ticket to first. Tim
McGee then hit a bouncer back to
Wilder who elected to go to third
base, but no one was covering the
bag. With the bases loaded. Bryon
Spooner grounded to short, and
Kelly Robinette stepped on second
and fired to first for a double-play.
But a run had already scored.
The game was lied, 1-1, until the
top of the 10th when the Pirates
rallied � with two outs. David
Wells doubled to left, and Sorrell
was intentionally walked. Left-
hander Ronnie Huffman then
relieved Karpuk, and gave up Todd
Evans' third hit of the game, scoring
Wells.
In the North Carolina half of the
inning, Wilder retired the Tar Heels
in order.
Other than the inning they scored.
Wilder kept the Tar Heels off
balance the whole afternoon.
Bill Wilder: 1 hit and 10 strikeouts.
Photo Ry OARY PATTERSON
Five-Run First
Top Frame
Keys CU
BUIES CREEK � The Camels of
Campbell jumped all over East
Carolina starter Bob Davidson for
five first-inning runs and cruised to
a convincing 13-5 victory Saturday
afternoon
"We didn't play all that badly
coach Hal Baird said. "But it seems
like on the road if we get past the
first inning without trouble, we have
a chance to win.
"If we get off to a poor start,
we're in trouble
Walks played a big part in the
East Carolina defeat. Pitchers
Davidson, Kirk Parsons and Brian
Peterson issued 12 bases on balls
which produced six runs. Many
came when there were two outs in
the inning.
In the Campbell first, Kevin
Barter singled and Bob Posey slam-
med a homerun, giving the Camels a
2-0 lead. And with two outs, Kelly
Hoffman walked, and Bill Wilkes
singled. Right fielder Herb Williams
followed with another homer, giv-
ing Campbell a 5-0 lead before the
Pirates had een come to the plate.
But the Pirates battled back in
their half of the second when Todd
Evans reached first on an infield hit,
and Todd Hendley drove him home
with a homerun.
The Campbell lead was narrowed
to 5-3 in the third. Hendley walked
and designated hitter Jack Curlings
t �� -
"&l;
K
singled. Then Jay Carraway
grounded out, driving in Hendley.
Walks allowed the Camels to
build their lead to 8-3 in the bottom
of the fourth. Barger walked and
stole second, and Posey also walk-
ed. Wayne Dale then singled in
Barger. After Hoffman was also
walked, teammate Wilkes was
issued another base-on-balls, scor-
ing Posey. Steve Regner was given
another free ticket to first, scoring
Dale.
Campbell added four more runs
in the sixth and another in the
seventh on a solo homerun by
Wilkes.
The Pirates scored their final two
runs in the ninth inning on a one-out
homer by Curlings. Ricky Nichols
followed with a single and was
driven in by Kelly Robinette's
single.
Wilkes led Campbell, now 19-10,
with three hits while Barger, Regner
and Dale added two. Curlings led
East Carolina by going three-for-
three, and teammates Robinette and
Robert Wells added two.
The Pirates travelled to Chapel
Hill for a late-inning game with
North Carolina Monday. Tuesday,
the Pirates face Atlantic Christian
College in Wilson for a double-
header and return home to meet the
Wolf pack of N.C. State in a double-
header Thursday afternoon. The
State games begins at 5 p.m.

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Photo By DAVE WILLIAMS
East Carolina golfer Jerry Lee punches his golf
Chapel Hill this past weekend. Lee could have
finished seventh in the tough competition.
ball out of a hole at the Tar Heel Invitational in
taken a drop but chose to swing away. The Pirates
East Carolina
Defeated Twice
In Invitational
By CINDY PLEASANTS
A�wtl�ni spurK � dilor
The East Carolina women's soft-
ball team fell from their victory lad-
der this weekend, losing two games
in a row in the N. C. State Invita-
tional.
Defending national champion
Florida State won the tournament
title and was led by Susan Painter
who pitched four shutouts, in-
cluding a 6-0 win over Northern
Kentucky in the final.
Northern Kentucky started off
the competition with a 13-inning
lost to the Lady Tar Heels of North
Carolina, 7-6, and had to advance
to the tournament finals through the
losers' bracket.
Painter was named Most
Valuable Player in the tournament
and was joined by teammates Toney
Donaldson, Sandy Williams, Jan
Sykes and Darby Cottle on the all-
tournament squad.
The Lady Pirates were defeated
by Florida State in the opening
game, 5-0, and were barely edged
out by N. Kentucky, 6-5 in the se-
cond game.
ECU went into the opening game
with an 0-2 record against the Lady
Seminoles this season.
Florida State jumped ahead 3-0 in
the first inning, and then added two
more in the fifth to defeat the
Pirates.
In the second game, Northern
Kentucky gained a 1-0 lead in the
first, and added two more in the
third. ECU scored once in the bot-
tom of the third, fourth and fifth in-
nings, and N. Kentucky scored one
in the fourth. The Norsewomen
fought back, scoring a couple in the
sixth to go ahead. The Lady Pirates
got two more in the seventh, but
ended up one short.
ECU's Sherri Stout went four-
for-four, and Jo Landa Clayton
went three-for-four against N. Ken-
tucky.
The two losses bring ECU's
record down, 22-6, so far this
season. The Lady Pirates travel to
UNC-Chapel Hill Wednesday.
� .
M
Charles
Chandler
Pirates Singing To
A Different Tune
The East Carolina offense is
singing to a "different tune each
play says Pirate head football
coach Ed Emory.
"We're close, but there always
seems to be something. One play
the guard makes a mistake, the
next play a tackle, the next a
center
It's obvious the Pirates are ex-
periencing growth problems on
offense due to the switch to the I
formation from the wishbone.
Flashes of brilliance are dulled by
oft-seen mishaps.
"I guess the problems are from
lack of concentration and lack of
understanding the new system
Emory said. "I've been impress-
ed with our team attitude,
though. The committment to be
better is there. We just need time
to work the kinks out
How much time do the Pirates
need to get ready for seven away
games? Even Emory wonders if
the clock is not his worst enemy.
Take the September 11 opener at
N.C. State.
"State opens practice a week
before we do, plays a game
before playing us, and we have to
go to their place. Now tell me
we're not at a disadvantage. If
anybody needs to play first, it's
us, especially to get the kinks out
of our new offense
It will get no easier for the
Bucs. They must travel to
Missouri, West Virginia, Florida
State and Temple. The home
games? Not nearly as tough as
the road trips. Central Michigan,
East Tennessee State, Richmond
and Illinois State come to Ficklen
Stadium.
"Many people swim upstream
and win Emory said. "Many
run against the wind and win.
We've just got more wind to
work against than most people.
Our goal during the spring is to
get as prepared for the tough
road ahead as possible
Clearly, one of Emory's main
objectives during spring practice
is to develop a consistent, balanc-
ed offensive attack.
"With our philosophy, we've
got to have a balanced attack.
We've got to be a fine running
team, but the only way to do that
is to also have an effective pass-
ing game
The head coach says he has
been well-pleased with the pass-
ing game so far, but added that
pass protection from the running
backs must get better if the air at-
tack is work at full throttle.
"It seems like (the backs) are
blocking like the worst in the
country sometimes. We've got
the talent, but it seems like
they're thinking about running
all the time. We've got to get
them blocking better
Emory said part of the reason
for the lack of blocking from the
backfield could be due to the fact
that the defense is playing very
well.
"Some of it is certainly
because of the people they're try-
ing to block. Jody Schulz, Jeff
Pegues, J.C. Plott and Curtis
Wyatt are all having great springs
at defensive end
Emory has been extremely
satisfied with the play of his
defenders thus far. About the on-
ly problem has been injuries,
which have sidelined linebackers
Ron Reid and Mike Grant, and
nose guard Marty Carlson, all of
whom were listed as first teamers
before they went down.
About 15 or 16 Pirates are cur-
rently on the injury list. The three
above are the only starters out,
but the absences present a bigger
problem than might be expected,
Emory said.
"We're trying very hard to
develop some depth. It's awfully
hard to do that with that many
people injured
And Emory will need that
depth when he begins to "run
against the wind
Pirates Lose
To Tow son
The East Carolina men's tennis
team dropped three single's matches
and two doubles enroute to a tough
5-4 loss to Towson State in Green-
ville Monday afternoon.
The Pirates are now 10-4 this
season and travel to High Point Col-
lege today before hosting Virginia
Commonwealth Thursday.
Buc Golfers
Finish 7th
CHAPEL HILL � The Pirates
of East Carolina particpated in the
powerful Tar Heel Invitational this
past weekend and finished in
seventh place with a score of 897.
The Wolfpack of N.C. State
claimed a six-shot victory in the
three-day event with a total of 863.
North Carolina's white team finish-
ed in a tie for second with Tennessee
at 869. The Tar Heel Blue team was
next at 893.
North Carolina State's Eric
Moehling fired a 1-under-par 71
Sunday afternoon to claim the in-
dividual championship with a three-
day total of 212 on the Finley Golf
Course.
Moehling fired a 4-under-par 68
Saturday, and teammate Roy
Hunter a 71, as the two went into
Sunday's final round tied at 141 on
the par-71 6,685 yard course.
Billy Pyler of the University of
North Carolina-Wilmington finish-
ed in second place with a total of
212, and State's Hunter followed in
third with a score of 214.
The Pirates, who were in sixth
place after Saturday's round, were
led by Don Gafner, who shot a 75
Sunday and finished with a three-
day total of 221. Chris Czaja was
next for East Carolina with a 226
after a final-round score of 79.
Jim Lee shot an 81 Sunday after-
noon, leaving him at 231 while John
Riddle turned in an 88 and a final
tally of 237.
The best final-round score was a
4-under-par 68 by Tennessee's
Stuart Smith, who finished fourth at
216.
i
f





,
10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 13. 1982
East Carolina Rips
West Liberty State
The East Carolina
men's tennis team
routed West -Liberty
State, 7-2, Friday after-
noon to boost their
record to 10-3.
The Pirates won the
first five matches to
clinch the victory.
"They were tougher
than we expected
assistant coach Alan
Farfour said. "We'll
have to do better this
week because we have a
tough schedule coming
up. I was pleased con-
sidering the limited
practice we've had the
last couple of weeks
The Pirates' schedule
was interrupted last
veek by inclimate
seather.
Summary
Keith Zengel (ECU)
defeated Rick Rhonses,
7-5, 6-2.
Donald Rutledge
(ECU) defeated Todd
Copley, 3-6, 6-3, 6-3.
Ted Lepper (ECU)
defeated Bernie Katko,
6-1, 6-1.
Barry Parker (ECU)
defeated Jay Gespres,
6-2, 6-3.
Paul Owen (ECU)
defeated Randy
Snyder, 6-4, 6-3.
Jeff Baity (WLS)
defeated Tom Battle,
7-5, 6-4.
Copley-Rhonses
(WLS) deleted Zengel-
Parker, 6-3, 6-3.
Rutledge-Owen
(ECU) defeated Katko-
Baily, 6-2, 7-6.
Battle-Galen Treble
(ECU) defeated
Snvder-Gespres, 5-7,
6-4. 6-2.
WHAT'S IT LIKE TO BE
A SINGLE PARENT?
Lots of teenagers tell us it's tough. If
you're a pregnant teen, we'd like to
help.
An experienced counselor can hete
yov think about your options and fnake
a plan for yourself and your baby.
We'll support your decisions.
752-5847
The Chldren's Home
Society of N. C
GET RESPONSIBILITY
WIST.
WE OFFER
�starting salary from
SI8.000 S22 S00 with increases
to 438.000 S4C 000 plus in four
years
�30 days paid vacation annual
iy.
� fully financed graduate pro
grams
�superior family health plan
�more responsibility and
leadership opportunities
�world wide travel and adven
ture
�Prestige and personal growth
potential
�Nuclear Engineering
�Business Management
� AviationLaw Nursing
�Personnel Administration
� Intelligence
�Civil Engineering
�Shipboard Operations
COLLEGE GRADUATES
U. S. Citizens less than 35 years of age interested
in holding challenging managerial positions
Contact by resume or pnone:
NAVY OFFICER PROGRAMS
1001 Navaho Drive
Raleigh, N.C. 27609
1 800 662 7231
&iJ?Ji
�V ,0
e
.vV
e
�" o� cN" �K
&
Oe-$? 4 v� K
F F
s
cO0 c
.6 ;r, 4 .
'
XF
East Carolina Cheerleaders
Two more East Carolina cheerleaders for the 1982-83 schoolyear include kim Bievins (top pholo)
and keith DuBois (right), kim was born in Lumberton, N.C, and is a junior majoring in
computer science, keith is a Goldsboro mative and is a senior majoring in urban planning.
THE SHOE OUTLET
m
m
(Located beside Evans Seafood)
Featuring name brand shoes at bargain prices.
Up To 75 OFF regular prices
Bass Steward-McGuire Brouse Abouts
201 W. Washington St. Within walking distance of campus.
m
M
Persons Wanted for
Public Advertisement
For forther info
contact Carl Bell
at 247-3998
Tired of getting ripped off?
llgJiretteS � all major brands
450&460 per carton
4 per carton � reg. & kings
4 Per carton � 100's
Why buy a pack a day when you
can stock up & save a lot?
Come in & register for COLOR T. V. give-away.
J. D. DAWSON CO.
LOST
rooif
facts
at lit
THAI

OOfO
two t
I
I
PlE5
tit

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f E M
ED

pus
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PC c
SU
loo
sec

2818 10th St.
'� '� �x �� �� �� y. VV �, . V . . �-V 7 . .
752-1600
X V X X V V V.
VXN.XVVVSVVNVN.SXN.NXSNVX-s.VN.VXXXVN
Cliffs Specials
JJ J Located 1 mile past
� Hastings Ford on
10th St. extension
Tues. & Wed.
POPCORN
SHRIMP
2.95
A PLATE
CDI
CHANCE
R
I
G
G
A
N.
s
H
O
E


?
i.
HAVING PROBLEMS
DRUGS?
with
ALCOHOL? FAMILY?
SCHOOL?
W rN hr'T

get your
yearbook
picture taken
We Can Help
Students helping Students
CAMPUS ALCOHOL DRUG PROGRAM
301 -303 Erwln Bldfi.
757-6793
CALL BUCCANEER OFFICE FOR APPOINTMENTS
757-6501
SITTINGS: APRIL 13-APRIL 16-9-5
Varden Studios, inc.
T





THE EAST CAROLINIAN.APRnjSJMO.
11
Classifieds
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST at Mosers Farm One red
cooler containing a pair ot con
tacts It found please call Kn�ty
at ?S8 47J1
FOR SALE
TKAILER FOR SALE set up m
Greenville 3 BR all electric, a c
t .t-ellent condition 42995 call Tar
boro 823 9B94
TAR ZOOMLENS7S2tOwith
macio tor Nikon mount used only
two times S16S Call 7S7 3710
SKIS FOR SALE K 2 185 comp
810 skis with Soloman bindmqs
SU5 Call Til 3210 and leave
numbt'i
AKC REG LABRADOR PUP
PIES Black 112$ males 4100
females Call 757 3701 or 758 9462
CUBIC FEET
f I F RIGER ATOR EncelUnt con
dition iSO oi best otter Call
JOS
AATFRBEOS Don t pay retail
tot vou' waterltef! Buy a complete
s atei bed witn j it yt
lor uvatianiy loi as :ow as
May style
L JAa. and Di"
I a �
it S8
o choOM' trom
, adv Buv now
sl padded
Call David tor
408
PERSONALS
SAME is JIMBOB I'm not a
tha' v not a bunch ol
JUNK I m talk in I nuqht not ot
ou i th F r ,da Ball still
'hat s no riqht to cntisiie at all
� u oni wants a Jewish
is tc bail Beinq wild only
� i r. hiid tryinq lo be
r -a tool sc lak' a
anytime
APARTMENT FOR RENT
Either or both summer sessions
One or two people, furnished I
mile trom campus 757 1715.
NEED ROOMMATE lor summer
option lor Fall 3 blocks trom cam
pus on Woodiawn Individual
bedroom. AC. $70 mo Call
7S8 1662
WANTED Someone to share ex
penses in fully furnished Apt Rent
$126 SO. includes heat. AC. Mot
and cold water Opens May 8th
serious enquiries please Call
7 58 607 7
FEMALE ROOMMATES NEED
ED For summer and or tail $60
plus I 4 utilities Private
bedroom One block trom campus
7S2 8946
SUMMER ROOMMATE NEED
ED to share tully furnished 4
bedioom house Washer dryer 580
plus utrlrties '57 Tail
COLLEGE View 2 bdr m apt
May Auq Partlt turn I mile from
campus on bus rl 4165 plu util
'52 3432
THREE BEDROOM Eastbrook
Apt to subnet lor summer tur
nished I 1 2 baths For more into
contact Mimi or Carol at '52 6963
ONE BLOCK From Campus oni
block trom downtown 3 bedroom
lurnished apt to sublease tor sum
mer and possible tail Cheap and
convenient Call '58 6040 Keep
tr v inq
FURNISHED TWO BEDROOM
Apar tment available tor rent May
Auqust Scenic settmq faces the
River Air conditioning and within
walkinq distance to campus
4250 month Call '5' 3052
SUMMER FURNISHED or un
furnished Apt Available May
Auqust One block trom campus
' bdim 5175 mth '5' 3054
SERVICES
CARICATURES BY WEYLER
G'eenville s oriqmal personalned
art service Have cartoon done o'
your sell or a loved one a unique
qilt idea 510 lor 8 10 black and
white or color Call '52 5"5
TYPING TERM, Thesis
Resumes, Dissertations etc Pro
lessional quality at lowest rates
Call Kcmpie Dunn anytime
'52 6'33
NOTARY PUBLIC Call Amy at
'5' 3734
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST wants
to tvot thesis dissertations
tao BEDROOM APARTMENT pubhci)i,ons manuscripts or ter m
loi the summer. Fur papers at home Call '56 3660
FOR RENT
LARGE HOUSE 2 blocks trom
LCU 6 ' bedroom r oaths
0 '52 52�6
� I ALE ROOMMATE NEED
ED 'or eithei or both sessions
mmer school I block from cam
pus Call 758 Sd�-
ir conditioned qreat back
� oa'h'nq qood loca
nlo can '58 3759
iR SC HOOL ROOM
S NEEDED
. . O. d for C
chooi Biq
Ca
Sam
' 3 or 14
mtoei o
i Y ancey at
Bovd "58 8448
TYPIST All papers Professional
quality at low rates 10 years e�
perience Call '5' I3"8
BIBLICAL ILLUSTRATIONS
people places cents etc 810
unmatted Call Alfred '52 "24
PROFESSIONAL TYPING Ser
vice, experience quality work
IBM Seiectric t,pewriters Call
Latin Sh -e'58 I062or Gail Joyner
'56 1062
H
4
ABCDSFGHUKLMN4
PQ.RSTUVWXY2
j�PQRSTl VVV
�TCiVM,)lSUVV�ttfr
CD
EFGHIJKLMIMOP
MORGTAiM
PRlNTfnS. Inc
Current undcrgroduoC pre
medicot student moy now compft
tor several hundred Air Force
choloshfjps These scholarships ore
to be awarded to students accepted
into medical schools as freshmen or
at the beginning ot their sophomore
year The scholarship provides toi
tuition books lob tees and equip
ment plus o $530 monthly
allowance Investigate this financial
alternative to the high cost ot
medic ai edaCtrttofT"
Contoct
I n Mr XI IH
professions
KM HI IMM.
Suite GL 1, IIOONavoho D�
Raleigh. NC 27689
Phone College 919,755-41 34
HlfiGAHSMKSHOP ,
)W iTH STREET PHONE '58 020
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
: DOORS FROM COX FLORIST
We repair Shoes, Boots, Hand
baqs, Belts and some suitcases.
We now have Leather and
Leather Goods for sell.
lection ol leather fooled belts
U1 one of our desiqns i ,��
y ou one
pr.ee NEA SHOES we ca'
mom , 0. lav.nq your Old ones
w
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 16
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
5185 00 Pregnancy Te&l, Brrth
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling. For fur
ther information call 832-0535
(Toll F ree Number
800 221 25681 between 9 AM
and 5 P.M. Weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
91' West Morgan St
Raleigh, N C
Bausch&Lomb
Soft Lenses
COMPLCTe
Includes initial eye examination,
lenses, care kit, instructions and
follow up visits for one month
ECU student ID. required.
00
OPIOMCTRIC
�t�CAR�C�K1�R
Of Greenville) "
228 GREENVILLE BLVD.
TIPTON ANNEX
756-9404
Dr. Peter Hollis
NOW
LOOKING GOOD COSTS LESS
'Nlii,i'llW'lwlli
FOOD TOWN
LFPINCSCVAGA
Fresh Dally S Lb. Pack or More
Lb.
USOA
CHOICE,
QSM Ciiltt litre Uti
Stew
Frttb Oailf
Ground fliuek
�1$
USDA
CHOICE
Lb.
USOA Choice t��f Cfcewk i�ttUtt
Chuck
Roast
MSP Ck.le. BI ek�k B.M-U .
Chuek Roaetu. 148
579
iP Ein - S�Mt
ellow
�99 05
J Hl.r -B.r ��$M'��;�� � f�k�. .1� � 0 C
ir � Birfiiely,
Htirty Bar�u�dy Rl
Gallo
Wine
Miller
2 Lifer
Package of 12 -12 Ot. Ctn
Schlitz Beer j (Jocg
fST3fei, Packflft of 12 - 12 Oz. Bottles
BeerE�r33 Miller Beer
Large Roll Assorted
Scott
Towels
Why Pay 79
399
16 Ouaee
20 0z. � Frezeo
Shoeitriag Potatoes
Phillips , Tl
Pork BF Taer
Beans S1 B�V
7 REVoumoNAiDf
Large
pork'n
beans
Pizza
Why Pay M.29
Why Pay 49
Why Pay 2S1
4100
6 Oz. - Frtzta Saaaei Bl.
Alo Juice Del Monte Cafrsupigk VXf liquid
32 Oiiei
22 Oaaei
i
Purex
8�eacn
OllUi
5co
6.5 0z. � Mm t Beef Biti-0-Kla'iey Beef t
Hear. Slueeerea' Uffu Cat Feed
luJui
M AVOW AIM
32 Oi. � Miyoaatiia
Duke's
CATSUP.
pjv' neeneip�trn "rr�'
PureK Bleach i Kal Kan
16 Oz. - Criekan
Sunshine
4M00
7.2S Oz. � Food Taafa
Macaroni & Cheese
iJEMQtt
7GQ
not flimsy'
4 Roll Pack Coronet
Toilet
Why Pay M 09
:
V
Coronet
Prints
1 lb. Food Town
49 Ouiea
C400 TWO-PLY


Margarine
Quarters 1

Why Pay 47 Each
irfitt?
eteraent
Why Pay '239
Priees good at Greenville Food Town Store only






12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 13, 1982
Part III in a series to
assist graduating
seniors
Getting
Most out of
Inter-
view
1. Use a strong, firm handshake but don't
try to break the interviewer's hand.
Limp, fishy handshakes suggest
unagressiveness and inferiority.
2. Express yourself clearly. Speak in a
moderate tone.
3. Look the interviewer straight in the eye.
Failure to hold eye contact makes the
interviewer feel as if you're bored or
scared.
4. Do a little research and find out
something about the company and the
position.
5. Express an interest in the industry or
business the company deals in.
6. Answer questions with definite
responses. Some elaboration is accept-
able only if it's a factor in your answer
and is to the point.
7. Do not condemn past employers in any
way. Potential employers will figure that
you might have the same to say about
them one day.
8. Be sure to ask questions about things
such as hospitalization and fringe
benefits. Companies feel that people
who don't care enough to ask about
these things may not be conscientious
enough to serve them well.
oAPmans
MENS WEAR
9. If nothing is mentioned regarding
salary, ask as tactfully as possible
(toward the end of the interview), not
how much you will be paid, but how
much the position pays.
10. Don't be unwilling to start at the bot-
tom. People who expect too much too
soon are usually the last to be hired.
11. If the interviewer does not tell you when
or if he will contact you, ask when you
might expect to hear from him.
12. Be sure to thank the interviewer for his
time.
13. Above all else, use your very best sense
of judgement. Tact and judgement are
the keys to a top-notch performance in
an interview.
?Hot all of these points are applicable in
every situation but it is our hope that they
will be of some benefit to you.
Downtown Greenville
Carolina East Mall
Student Layaways Welcome
,
�IHi�NWilMMHi"1 �fn





Title
The East Carolinian, April 13, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 13, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.193
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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