The East Carolinian, April 8, 1982






She fEaat Carolinian

Vol. 58
No.5
1
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Thursday. April 8. 1982
Greenville, N.C,
10 Pages
Henderson Emerges As SG A President

. 4

ERIC HENDERSON Pho�� B �VE
won SGA runoff by 755-709 tally.
WILLIAMS
By MIKE HUGHES
lakM Vm I diinr
By a tally of 755 to 709, Eric
Henderson has defeated David
Cook in the SGA presidential elec-
tion runoff.
Henderson was declared the win-
ner early Wednesday evening after
the votes were counted by the SGA
Elections Committee.
However, as has been the fate of
many an ECU election, speculation
has risen as to whether formal
charges will be filed against Hender-
son for "illegal campaign prac-
tices
Several "small election pam-
phlets bearing Henderson's name
were found in the Green Mill Run
Apartments' mailboxes. This con-
stitutes a clear violation of the elec-
tions regulations.
But Henderson claims that he
knew nothing of those pamphlets or
how they got into the mailboxes un-
til he was notified by Chuck Blake,
elections chairman, on April 1.
When asked if he knew who had
placed the papers in the mailboxes
or if he had anything to do with the
action, Henderson replied, "Of
course not
Blake said that he has heard no
word yet as to whether formal
charges will be filed against Hender-
son.
Cook could not be reached fo
comment on the election results o
on his immediate intention
(whether he'll file a formal com
plaint).
Likewise, Ken Hooper, ECU
Attorney General, could not b
reached. According to the SGA elec
tions rules, Hooper would have V
be notified of any intent to issue
formal complaint within 48 hours o
when the results were released.
In the event that formal charge
are filed with the attorney general
the SGA Review Board would hoh
a hearing to determine whether th
candidate in question should be dis
qualified. The Appeals Board alst
holds the power to refer the case "t
the appropriate judicial body
"The appropriate judicial body
generally refers to the ECU Honoi
Council. However, tampering witr
mailboxes constitutes a federal of-
fense, and as thus, the case would b
heard in a federal court.
However, it should be repeated
that as of Wednesday night, no for-
mal charges had been filed.
On a somewhat lighter note, the
SGA runoff elections revealed, as
usual, a low voter turnout. Of the
more than 13,000 students at ECU,
1,467 took part in the election. The
two "major candidates received a
total of 1,464, while three students
voted "Neither
1 �
I !
DAVID COOK
may challenge campaign procedures.
Photo By DAVE WILLIAMS
Traffic Rules To Be Revised
By GREG HIDEOUT
A 16-member ad hoc committee
formed to revise the present traffic
regulations has completed its work.
According to Lucy Wright, assistant
to the vice-chancellor for Student
Life and secretary of the group, the
31 pages of reised rules will now be
subjected to public hearings.
The committee, which consists of
12 faculty and staff members and
tour students, was appointed in
November and began meeting on
Jan. 19. "We went over the present
rules sentence b sentence. It was a
very tedious process sophomore
Tory Russo, a student member of
the group, commented.
The most significant charges are
those involving fines, particularly
those for unregistered vehicles. Ac-
cording to Wright, this was done
with concern for students who do
Residence
Elections
purchase parking stickers. Among
the fines increased were: parking an
unregistered ehicle on campus, S5
to $25; driving on campus while
privileges were provoked, $5 to $50;
and illegally obtaining a parking
sticker, $5 to $25.
Russo explained that more severe
penalties were instated because of
people trying to beat the system. A
security department employee add-
ed that non-registered vehicle could
receive 10 tickets before equaling
the price o parking stickers.
Another major revision, accor-
ding to Wright, was the changing of
the time period in which freshmen
can park on campus during the
weekend. They are presently allow-
ed to park from 6 p.m. Friday to
midnight Sunday. The proposed
change would allow freshmen to
begin parking on campus at 4 p.m.
on Friday, but would require them
to leave campus by 8 p.m. on Sun-
day.
"The majority of the changes
were editorial Wright stated. "We
just changed words here and there
Copies of the proposed regula-
tions will be available for examina-
tion. According to Wright, there
will be a copy in each administrative
and academic office for faculty and
staff. Students can find copies in the
library reserve room, Student
Government Office, Area Residence
Council offices, intramural office
and the information desk of
Mendenhall Student Center.
Times and places for the public
hearings on the proposed regula-
tions will be as follows: Tuesday,
April 13, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. in
Raw! 130; Wednesday, April 14,
from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. in Brewster
C-103; and Thursday, April 15,
from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. in Allied
Health 101.
After the hearings are over, the
committee will meet again to discuss
public opinion of the changes. The
final revision will then be sent to the
Board of Trustees for approval. If
approved, the new rules will go into
effect at the beginning of the 1982
fall semester.
"Overall, I felt we did a very
good job considering the time allot-
ted Russo said. "A lot of the
credit goes to Wes (Hawkins, chair-
man of the committee and an Urban
Planning Faculty member) and Joe
(Calder, a member of the committee
and director of security)
Wright added that the committee
tried to make the new regulations as
practical as possible. "The rules
were revised to suit our campus to-
day she said.
On The Inside
Easter Out
Heading tor the beach tor the
long weekend-3 Relaxing at
home? Some ECU organizations
are staying in Greenville � on
purpose � to help make Easter a
little brighter tor others See
Style
Weather Watch
(UPI) - Mostly cloudy today
with a 30 percent chance of rain.
High near 50. Clearing Friday
and fair Saturday and Sunday,
with highs in the 60s and lows in
the 40s.
Inside Index
Announcements2
Opinion 4
Campus Forum4
Style 5
Learning About College -6
Sports 8
Classifieds 10
Tallied
Wednesday's Student Residence
Association elections were marked
rn a mixed turnout across campus,
yet some races were split almost
down the middle.
Elections chairman Barry Seay
said he was pleased with the overall
turnout. Garrett Hall had the fewest
voters � 3i � and Jones Hall had
the most dormitory residents voting
with 108.
The difference in votes was less
than 25 between William Warren
Kirby and Lee Anthony White in the
Central Campus presidential race.
Candidates in area elections must
win by more than 25 votes to avoid a
run-off, Seay said.
Dorm candidates must win by 10
or more votes, and candidates must
request a run-off. According to
Seay, each residence hall will set up
the elections, which will be held next
Wednesday. Three run-offs are
possible, and all of these are on the
central campus.
For the results of the SRA races,
see page 3.
Correction
In the March 23 issue, The East
Carolinian inadvertently overlooked
the name of Robert Messer in a list
of SGA candidates. Messer's plat-
form and his photograph were
printed, however. The East Caroli-
nian regrets the error.
Esg3r: Committee Meets With Go v. Hunt
-As-g jo Discuss Nuclear Proliferation
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Miff Mrilrr
John T. Gardner, assistant to the
vice chancellor of student life, was
one of a committee of six North
Carolinians who spoke with Gover-
nor James B. Hunt in his Raleigh
office on Tuesday.
The committee was invited to
discuss and inform Hunt about the
various activities taking place in
North Carolina concerning the
nuclear arms race.
"He (Hunt) seemed attentive and
he promised to study the issue of
nuclear proliferation further
Gardner said.
"I was pleased with his availabili-
added Dick Welch, volunteer
ty.
coordinator of "Ground Zero
Week" for the eastern part of the
state.
Welch originally contacted Hunt
to encourage the governor's input
and cooperation with ECU Ground
Zero events. Ground Zero is a series
of non-partisan, non-advocacy pro-
grams that will be encouragindg
community-based discussions and
events "designed to educate and in-
volve the American people on the
issue of nuclear war
Others members of the committee
included Dr. Morris A. Lipton,
Kenan professor of Psychiatry with
the University of North Carolina
Medical School, Rev. Charles M.
Smith of the United Methodist
Church, Ms. Pama Mitchell of the
Fellowship to Reverse the Arms
Race and Qiientin W. Lindsey, who
works in Hunt's administration.
Dr. Lipton discussed the work of
the Triangle Area chapter of
"Physicians for Social Responsibili-
ty which is an international group
of Medical doctors who are working
for United StatesSoviet Union
nuclear disarmament. The Physi-
cians group wants to dispel what
they believe to be a myth, that any
nation can survive a nuclear war.
Lipton is also a member of the na-
tional Board of Directors for Physi-
cians for Social Responsibility.
See COMMITTEE, Page 3
Handicap A wareness Week Draws Praise;
Handicapped Students Called 'Achievers'
r
PMto By DAVE WILLIAMS
Whoosh!
Windy weather brings big business for Greenville's haberdashers.
By PATRICK O'NEILL
sun Whirr
"I wish more colleges would put
as much energy in handicap pro-
grams as you do here said Chet
Mottershead, praising East
Carolina's program for handicap-
ped students as one of the best in the
nation.
Mottershead, president of Tri-
County Industries, a training center
for the handicapped, gave the
keynote address Monday night to
kick off "Handicap Awareness
Week" on ECU's campus. He is
also the North Carolina state liaison
for the International Year of Disabl-
ed Persons, iormally proclaimed by
the United Nations. Mottershead
was appointed by Gov. James Hunt.
"What you're really doing (at
East Carolina) is preparing non-
handicaps to relate to handicaps
Mottershead. "That whole
socialization process is important
Dr. John Howell, ECU interim
chancellor, also had strong words of
praise for Mottershead, calling him
a "truly outstanding North Caroli-
nian, both in his professional
achievements and in his civic and
community leadership
Howell also praised ECU's han-
dicapped students and the programs
that support them. "We are proud
that approximately 125 are among
our student body said Howell.
"They are people who are unique
achievers, dedicated to the goal of
receiving maximum benefit and
enrichment from their educational
experiences
Howell sopke of the "long tradi-
tion of success with members of this
university who are handicapped �
both with our students and our
faculty
According to Howell, East
Carolina has "one of the best and
largest" four-year degree programs
for hearing impaired students in the
nation. Only about 10 such pro-
grams now exist. He praised the
work of program director Mike
Ernest for having achieved
"oustanding results" with the hear-
ing impaired program.
As part of "Handicapped
Awareness Week" the Minority
Arts Committee will be sponsoring a
free performance by "Fantasy
See HANDICAP, Page 2
A
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�iiwwii Wwmnii�rMi�
� � A
1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 8, 1982
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
it you or your organization
would like to nave an item printed
m trie announcements column
please send the announcement (as
bnet as possible) typed and
double spaced to Tne East Carol)
man in care ot tne production
manager
For better service, we are now
asking that you pick up several
copies of our new announcement
application tor your upcoming
events
There is no charge tor a
nouncements. but space is often
limited Therefore we cannot
guarantee that your announce
men will run as long as you wanf
ano suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column tor publicity
The deadline tor announcements
is Spm Friday tor the Tuesday
paper and 5pm Tuesday for the
Thursday paper
Tf1'b space s available to all
campus or gar" i ;a'ions a"d depart
n ertfs
WORLD CHAMPIONS
COMING
Apr,l1? ano 18. Saturday and
sironyme ECU Fr.sbee D'SC
Cv'es vou to 'he Natural . ig Disc Classic Come stce coer' cic then 1 f yOu '� lie to 1' i ' 1 i -iTr (Mr me crowd Mm a 1 B p m , room 27
V(tiernan and � Tut sMvS a'0
T' , ' SO,�s if 3 c m bottom of
HANDICAP
AWARENESS
WEEK
Activities are still going on � so
be sure to stop by Menoennaii bet
ween 10 a m. and 4pm today and
take advantage ot our awareness
and simulation activity booths
(You can role play a disability to
increase your awarenessOur
concluding conference begins at 3
p.m m room 348 of Mendenhall
(All of you art mvtted) and a' 8
p m a tree performance by
"Fantasy ECU'S own nationally
reknowned "Song to Sign" drama
troupe in Hendrtx Audt'orium
OPEN HEARINGS
During the pas' few months an
ad hoc committee composed of
faculty staff and students has
been reviewing existing traffic or
dmances at ECU This committee
will hold a series of hearings on
the proposed revisions The hear
irq schedule s as follows Tues
Hdy, April 13 9 11 am. Rawt
130. Wednesday. April 14 3 5
p m . Brewstei C 103 Thursday
April 15 - 3 5pm Allied Health
101 A copy of this document IS
available m the offices ot phi1'
at ademic unit, in 'he office ot each
administrative supervisor ir thr
SGA office, a' me Mendenhall in
formation desk, m tne joynpr
L'brary Reserve Room .r ihe Ir
termurals office, and the ARC
offices in Tyler Umstead. and
Fie'c'ter dorms It you have any
ques'ions please can 'he ECU
Planning Office at 2?v
CAMP COUNSELORS
NEEDED
Therapeutic summer camp for
children with behavior problems
June and July includes 10
days ot framing and 6 weeks ot
camp pays salary plus room
and board Interviews at ECU
campus on Saturday, April 17
Sign up tor interview through Co
op Office (6979) Prefer applicants
with experience m csamp work,
work with children, or supervised
work in mental health related set
tings
MARSHALL
APPLICATIONS
Marshall applications now being
accepted in the SGA Office. Room
728 Mendenhall (Monday Friday,
from 8am thru 5pm
ECU HUNGER
COALITION
Or Or is Blackwell. professor ot
Environment Health will be the
guest speaker at the next meet.ng
ot the ECU Hunger Coalition Or
Biackweii will speak about his ex
periences working in Sri Lanka, a
small island oft the coast ol India
There are no simple solutions to
World Hunger bu' it we work
loge'her it car be stopped You
can help by getting involved in me
Hurgi'r Coalition All are invited
fo attend Or Blackweli's presen
tation or Thursday evening April
15 at 7 30 p m at the Newman
house 953 E Tenih Slree'
BICYCLE CLUB
ECRC was born in March 1982.
founded by former bicycle racers
and by East Carolina Students A
seperate organization from ECRA
but run by the same people, the
East Carolina Road Club has ex
cellent potential as a bicycle
power The names ECRA and
ECRC were chosen to direct atten
tion to Eastern North Carolina,
and specifically to East Carolina
University, as a bicycle oriented
community.
Anyone can Oin, whether they
are enrolled m the university or
not Membership dues are 10 per
year, which go to club operating
expenses, liscensmg, and rovers
the cost of printing the monthly
newsletter Pleasure rider or
Olympian to be. we have
something to offer every serious
cychs'
For more information, coniad
Kip Sloan, at 75 0246 from 8 5 and
757 1680 at ter 6p m or JeH Hotrtom
a'758 8519 The first U.S.C.F race
,s March 28 m Virgm,a Beach
Virginia,
MUSICLISTENING
CENTER
S'op by Mendenhall and spend
somr guiet lime in. the Musk
Listening Center The Cen'er is
open daily from 2 00 p m until
10 30 p m Bring your own music
or make your selection from the
wide variety available a' the
Center Also current maaa.nps
are available for your reading
pleasure
EASTER EGG HUNT
The first service proiect of Kap
pa Upsilon Chapter ot Alpha Phi
Omega was an Easter Egg Hunt
for the preschool on the rjmpus of
East Carolina University Alpha
Phi Omega is a National Co Ed
Service Fraternity APOdoesser
vices to the campus, the communi
ty, and the nation Affiliated with
the Boy Scouts ot America the
motto is to "Be a Leader, Be a
Fri -cl. Be of Service " APO is a
non discriminative organization
Interested? Come to our next
meeting April 8, Thursday, at 4 00
m Erwm, Hall, Room 106
TIME TOLIVE
Beinq college students we all
know about the problems with c�
ams, money, and relationships
with other people Bu 1 iS time
wr let go of these problems and
hve hie to its fullest' Lei s pass
our problems off to 'he one fho
can. handle them all Come to our
fellowship and learn how Goo will
show you how to deal win evei .
Situation in life Co mi
Mendenhall Student Center 5 C I
feehouse 'his Thursday night ii -
p m
NAACP
naacp elections will '�
April 15. 1982 A1 . i � nti rested in
tunning tor 81 " I contact
Virginia Canton at 57 6942 or
Jackie Rowe a' 7 52 8450 The
dradlmr tor submit'mq names is
Apr.i 7. 1982
SOCIAL WORK
Students who would like to con
Sider changing to a maior in Social
Work or Corrections should apply
now for Fall 1982 admission by
contacting the Department Offices
(312 Allied Health Building) to
pick up an aplicatior. and make in
terview appointments Ar
rangements should be completed
pnor to the end of the spring
semester To be ehgibiie to apply
the student must have completed
at least one social work or correc
tions course and is expected to
have a minimum grade point
average of 2 5 Call 757 6961 (Mrs
Joyner) for additional informs
'ion
MEN NEEDED
The women of the ECU CathOlif
Newman Club have a problem
,� men are involved in
Newman's varied interesting ac
livitiet Newly elected N�"wmar
President Mfl'i Rider hopes to
blem and wishes to
. . �. an invitation ot welcome to
� i Newman meets every
day evening for Mass and
I , . v fh Newman House All
� welcome to a'tend
Mss begins at 5pm a' 953 E
Sunday Mass is held m the
BuiW ng ,n B 107 a' 12 30
p m Newmar will be iom,ny a
state w.de aroup on a "crab"
� nipus reach a' 'he
beach) The weekend ot Apr.i 17
. � � . - - . 'ed! '
ECU LAW SOCIETY
All members wanting details on
Washington trip, meeting in
Brewster C 105. at 4 p m on
Thursday. April 8 Trip is planned
for April 16. 17 and 18
BINGOICECREAM
The next BingoIce Cream Par
ty is scheduled for Tuesday. April
i3at7pm in Mendenhall's Mult.
Purpose Room Students, Facgi'r
Staff, and their dependents are r
vited to iom in on the tun Win
prizes, eat ice cream, pla
all absolutely free'
BOOK SCHOLARSHIPS
The chapter of Ph. Eta Sigma a'
ECU announces that applications
may now be received tor boot
scholarships ot ilOO to be a-f.
to the most outstanding rising
lunior and r.smq serifir Only
members of Ph. E'a Sigma may
apply and service to tht
rnap'er is a majoi nti
mation and application forms ma
oe received from Dr
Ebbs, Faculty Advser ' ��
214
Handicap Awareness Week Activities Praised
Continued From Page 1
ECU'S national!) reknowned drama
troupe that puts sign language to
music. Ernest said he was very
grateful to the Minority Arts Com-
mittee for making it possible to put
on a tree show. "I like that much,
much better" than having to charge
admission, said Ernest. Members of
the ECU Sign 1 anguage Club will
be performing the acts and Ernest
said the entire club (28 people) will
be involved.
When the "Fantasy" group
began in 1979 only five or six people
were involved. "If you like music.
have art interesi in mime and sign
language, or if you tike a combina-
tion of visual and auditory perfor-
mances � you'll love it said
Ernest. He welcomed everyone to
come tonight at S p.m. in Hendrix
Auditorium.
1 ike Howell, Ernest praised ECU
for having the "best attitude toward
flaring impaired students in North
Carolina Ernest added that "the
level of awareness" o' the faculty,
students, and "the casmpus in
general is the best I've ever seen
Today is the final day of the Han-
dicapped Awareness Week's pro-
gram and the organizing committee
is encouraging students to visit the
exhibits, awareness booths, and
simulation booths in the lobby of
Mendenhall. These booths will offer
people a chance to learn more about
handicap programs on campus, in
Greenville, and throughout the na-
tion. Informative literature, video
recordings, and chance to simulate
the handicaps of blindness,
deafness, and confinement to a
wheelchair are some of the many
aspects of the Mendenhall program.
Everyone is invited to a service
for the blind-mobility, equipment
demonstration, a tour of the study
room facilities for handicapped
students in the Joyner I ibrary
Media Center, and a "concluding
conference" at 3 p.m. in
Mendenhall.
According to Howell, East
Carolina has some of the nation's
most modern equipment including
the Kurzweil Reading Machine and
the visual TEK televised print
enlarger in the Media Center.
Howell also praised ECU chemistrv
professors Dave I unney and Bob
Morrison for their "invention of a
special science laboratory computer
aid, known as the ultra project
This computer allows sight impaired
students to fully participate in
chemistry lectures and lab ex-
periments.
Mottershead related five specific
points that were proposed by a com-
mittee of Gov.Hunt's office to pro-
mote a more positive attitude
towards meeting the needs and
recognizing the abilities of ban
dicapped people. He said:
ATTIC
Soo'fs
No 6
Rock
Nigh'club
THURS APRIL8
WITH 3 P.M.
FRI APRIL9
DRIVER
t 1Uf �iLLf ir
SAT MARCH 10
LARRY
raspberry &
thf:
h1ghsteppers
oe;j�?m
SUNMARCH 11
TRICKS
EASTER SPECIAL
CASH
FOR COLLEGE
MONEY AVAILABLE FOR NEXT FALL
There is still time & money available
for next fall & EDUCATIONAL
GUIDANCE SERVICES of N.C a uni-
que computerized service designed to
locate sources of financial aid for col-
lege students can help you get that
money.
We know where the money is � we can
tell you how to get it for college next
fall.
For FREE & Complete
Information Write:
EDUCATIONAL GUIDANCE
SERVICES
OF NORTH CAROLINA
P. O. Box 1714 Kinston, N. C. 28501
ACCU
SPECIAUZES IN:
RESUMES
and
THESES
DUPLICATION
Located Across From Campus
In The Georgetown Shops
� Copies Cost 60 to 30copy
� Phototypesetting
� Binding Service
� One Day Camera Work
� Geotype Supplies For Art Students
OPEN 9-7 m-f 9-2 sat.
758-2400
�l verv person should get an oppor-
tunitv for as much education and
training he or she needs.
�Comprehensive medical and
rehabilitative treatment should be
available to all who need it.
�Accessable transportation, housing
and buildings is needed in all com-
munities.
�Handicapped people can take ad-
vantage of recreational and social
activities in their communities, and
�Every handicapped person should
not be stereotyped or labeled "but
can be accepted for his or her own
abilities and qualities
CIRCLE K
The Circle K club of ECU invites
a if students to attend our Tuesda
right meetings r room 271
Mendenhall We are rj nitrating
a memoersh'p dr ve for stud '
aus a'p interested r helping
others through our var.ous ser. �
proiec ts See y a1' T LieSC
a' 6 30
WALK FOR HUMANITY
The ECU Hunger (
A'Snes 'o 'ha every � � '�
helped with the 1982 Wam f �
H imahil i art; r . M-v al
teres'ed Students. Faculty
Staff to iom in the coaltioi
iy meet ngi � ee
rent meeting Apr,I 15!
Hunger Coalit or meets at J 30
p m ,n the Newman House 953 E
10'h S'
POMS PONS
There w u b1 a me '
1981 Poms Por g.ns a' P � ' ' �"
Music Halt Wednesday Ap- I l4ai
7 30 p m Uniforms and Poms
Poms must be returnee
date if ioj ca- �
j � an Denoran a' ?S8 8755
JEWISH STUDENTS
'�. t
f � � eservations pieav �
C her a! 'S7 1155 r Ot B Rei �
a' 756 5640
SIGMA ALPHA IOTA
The Sigma Alpha iota Ft
ot the ECU Srhool ot Mus
nourues a Composer s MuS'f ���
be held Apr 8 at 8 15mA J Flet
��; n�li Heat '� ' � '
�nd studer's fl
will be a reception ir R
musif building following "�
r ei'
"MR 10"

Lambda Cn, Alpha prese
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COMIC BOOK CLUB
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Items and Prices
Effective Wed April 7.
thru Sun April 11. 1982
Copyright 1982
Kroger Sav on
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Each of these advertised items is reguired to be rea
for sale m each Kroger Sav on except as specifica1. " � I
ad If we do run out of an item we wiil offer you you'
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the advertised price wtthm 30 days
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Open 8 a.m. to Midnight
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BEEB
KROGER
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WASHINTON STATE
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IHELASI CAROLINIAN
APRIL 8, 1982
ll man
of a
ot a
ti at
I
.
SRA Election Results
SRA Elections
Total Cast
SRA President
SRA Vice President
SRA Secretary
SRA Treasurer
937
Tory Russo
Mark Neiwald
Edward Dougherty
Charles Wingo Jr.
Central Campus
President (run-off) Lee Anthony White
William Warren Kirby
Sidney J. Rabon II
Lisa Tapp
John Herring Jr.
Vice President
Secretary
Treasurer
Cotton Hall
President Mar Whitley
Vice President (run-off) Jennifer McQuinlan
Alexandria Tatsis
President
Vice President
President
Vice President
President
Vice President
President
Vice President
President
Vice President
Scott Hall
Tyler Hall
David Hawkins
Tony Harris
Alicia Ostrow
Julie Long
Aycock Hall
Carroll Doughtrey
John Holloway
Belk Hall
Jones Hall
Mary Curry
Katherine Swain
Walter Parker
Jeffrey Davis
President
Vice President
President
Vice President
Slav Hall
Umstead Hall
Rick Burke
Brian Ramsey
Tom Bullard
Don Harrod
Fleming Hall
President (run-off) Sulfianna Jones
Nancy Nicholson
Vice President Susan Norton
West Area Campus
President Marion Phillips
Vice President Rhonda Gentry
Secretary Pamela Jo Harris
Treasurer Nanette Brett
Garrett Hall
President Donna Sameck
Vice President
Exhibitionist Is Banned
Jams Hall
President (run-off) Ginger Allen
Sharon Flynn
V ice PresidentLinda Baka
College Hill
PresidentHollv Gilliam
Vice PresidentSammy Hancock
SecretarvJohn T. Thomas
TreasurerDouglas Hamilton
Vivian Bellinger
White Hall
President Rebecca Lane
Vice President Carol Griffin
Clement Hall
President Lynne Wavlon
Vice President Kelly Davis
Fletcher Hall
President Tina McSwain
Vice President Barbara Heath
Greene Hall
President Deborah Nunn
Vice President Lindsev William
By GREG HIDEOUT
A Greenville man
banned from campus
for indecently expjsing
himself and a stolen
German shepherd were
just two incidents
reported to ECU police
this week.
A White dorm resi-
dent told police on
April 3 that a man ex-
posed himself to her,
and Richard L.
Committee
Discusses
Ground Zero
Continued From Page 1
Specifically, Welch
asked Hunt to
"encourage our citizens
to become better in-
formed expecially in
crucial matters" and to
push for more par-
ticipation in, and effec-
tive use of, the political
process.
Welch also asked
Hunt to "help dispel
the myths that it is un-
American to question
or to work to change,
the U.S. foreign or
military policy
East Carolina will be
sponsoring one of the
largest Ground Zero
campaigns in the state.
Numerous discussions,
films and educational
programs are planned
to take place.
Wilburn was banned
from campus for the
act shortly afterward.
David Whitson of
Greenville reported the
theft of his German
shepherd dog from the
bicycle rack at Austin
at 5:45 p.m. April 6.
The following is the
campus police blotter
for March 31 - April 6.
It includes all campus-
related incidents.
March 31. 7 a.m. �
Sgt. Reich stein
reported the breaking
and entering and theft
of items from a vehicle
registered to a Fleming
dorm resident.
April I. 1:43 a.m. �
A Jones dorm resident
reported the vandalism
of his room door. 2
p.m. � An Aycock
dorm resident reported
vandalism to his car
while it was parked
south of Scott dorm. 8
p.m. � A Tyler dorm
resident reported the
larceny of a ring from
the third floor
bathroom.
April 2. 10:55 a.m.
� James Richard
Hughes of Greenville
was served with a sum-
mons to appear in court
for having an
unregistered vehicle on
campus.
April 3. 7:30 a.m. �
A Jones dorm resident
reported the larceny of
the battery in his car
while it was parked in
� the 14th and Berkeley
Streets lot. 5:58 p.m. �
Gregory Story reported
the vandalism to two
Aycock basement win-
dows. 11:54 p.m. � A
Fletcher dorm resident
reported the attempted
larceny of the battery
of her car while it was
parked in the Fifth and
Reade Streets lot.
April 4. 2:10 a.m. �
Dennis Carrigan Jr. of
Charlotte was arrested
for possession of mari-
juana in Aycock dorm.
12:50 a.m. � A Flem-
ing dorm resident ad-
visor reported seeing a
"peeping Tom" look-
ing into a room at
Fleming.
April 5. 2:30 a.m. �
Robert Kent of La
Habia, Calif and
David Waldrow Jr. of
Silver Springs, Md
were arrested for
breaking and entering
the Fleming dorm can-
teen. 2:50 a.m. � A
Scott dorm resident
reported the larceny of
his bicycle west of the
dormitory. 9:29 p.m.
� A Slay dorm resi-
dent reported the
larceny of $20 from his
room.
April 6. 2:20 p.m. �
A Garrett dorm resi-
dent reported the
larceny of her purse
form the Minges Col-
iseum pool area.
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 1
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
S1IS.00 Pregnancy Ttsl. girth
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling. For fur
ther information call 132 0535
(Toll Free Number
M0221 25M) between � A.M.
and 5 PM. Weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
�U West Morgans
Raleigh. NX
Don't Miss the
Biggest Easter Bash
on the Beach
Purdy's
at the Sand
Fort Macan Rd.
AM ABC Permits
Membership Applications-
Available at Door
Congressman To Speak
U.S. Congressman
Walter B. Jones of the
First Congressional
District will be coming
to Greenville next Mon-
day evening to address
the regional monthly
meeting o the Sierra
Club.
Jones, who is the
chairman of the House
Merchant Marine and
Fishery Committee, is
planning to speak
about the Barrier
Islands bill that is
presently in House
Committee.
The bill, if passed,
would prohibit the use
of federal funds for the
purpose of developing
previously
underdeveloped coastal
islands such as Bogue
Bank and Hatteras
Island which are con-
sidered barrier islands.
The Sierra Club is sup-
porting the bill.
"He's (Jones) is a
very powerful man on
anything to do with
coastal affairs, in a
federal sense said
Sierra spokesman and
ECU History professor
Dr. Philip J. Adler.
Adler noted that the
meeting would be held
in the First
Presbyterian Church at
Elm and 14th Streets
and was open to the
public.
MH
k
WHAT'S IT LIKE TO BE
A SINGLE PARENT?
Lots of teenagers tell us it's tough. If
you're a pregnant teen, we'd like to
help.
An experienced counselor can help
you think about your options and make
a plan for yourself and your baby.
We'll support your decisions.
752-5847
The Children's Home
Society of N. C
Spend Your Summer
at
UNC-UUIIMINGTON
Register for Summer Sessions
For information contact:
Director of Summer Sessions
P.O. Box 3725, UNC-Wilmington
Wilmington, N.C. 28406
or call (919) 791-4330 ext. 2195
If you're a senior and have the promise of a $10,000 career-oriented job, do you
know what's stopping you from getting the American Express� Card?
You guessed it.
Nothing.
Because American Express believes in your future. But more than that. We
believe in you now. And we're proving it.
A $10,000 job promise. That's it. No strings. No gimmicks. And this offer is
even good for 12 months after you graduate.
But why do you need the American Express Card now?
First of all, it's a good way to begin to establish your credit history. And you
know that's important.
Of course, the Card is also good for travel, restaurants, and shopping for
things like a new stereo or furniture. And because the Card is recognized and
welcomed worldwide, so are you.
So fill in the coupon below and American Express will send you a Special Stu-
dent Application right away. We'll also send along a free handbook that has
everything you need to know about credit.
The American Express Card. Don't leave school without itC'
SHOP AT
OVERTON'S
AND SAVE
PIRATECOUPON
5 DISCOUNT
Z Please send me a Special Student Application
for the American Express" Card
D And the free Credit Handbook.
Mail this coupon to:
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P.O. Box 923, Madison Square Station
New York, New York 10010
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on all orders $10.00
or more.
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Home of Greenville's Best Meats1
Supermarket, Lac
211 Jarvis St.
2 Blocks from ECU
m m





3Ufe �tt0t atarolitiian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Jimmy DuPree, mcm
Charles Chandler, ymmmemm
Ric Browning, n,reii,��i �� Tom Hall, v mm
Fielding Miller, � tw William Yelverton, �, emm
Alison Bartel, w� Steve Bachner, cmimimmmem
Steve Moore, cm mmm Diane Anderson, �-��
April 8, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
The Party
Unfair And Vengeful
party � a group of people work-
ing to promote a political platform
or slate, a cause, etc.
�Webster's New
World Dictionary
For a number of years there has
been a provision in the Student
Government Association election
rules for "any organization whose
sole purpose is to promote a full
slate of one or more candidates or
issues" to form a political party.
The Coalition For Better Student
Government was formed under
these provisions. Its slate of can-
didates was announced and faired
reasonably well in the elections two
weeks ago. Becky Talley was vic-
torious in the race for treasurer,
while David Cook was the front-
runner for the presidency.
The entire idea of a group of
"concerned" students being able to
form a "party" and thus spend an
additional $50 per candidate per
election is ridiculous. Attempts to
buy an office must not go without
notice. Surely the right to spend
SI50 more than any other candidate
gives someone an unfair advantage.
Nevertheless, justice seems to have
prevailed.
With Eric Henderson � an in-
dependent � within the specified
three percent of Cook, a run-off
was declared. The students went to
the polls yesterday and chose
Henderson bv a 755-709 tally.
IOW W
1
knov
ho will be
$2 83 term,
So
prcMt
right? Well, maybe.
It seems the wolf, i.e Coalition
For Better Student Government,
has taken off its sheep's clothing.
Now that final (we hope) results are
in, the party has become a machine
of vengeance.
With sparks fanned by out-going
Treasurer Kirk Little and would-be
politico Tim Mertz, it now appears
charges of campaign violations will
be brought against Henderson. Oh
what a tangled web we weave.
Charges of campaign violations
are nothing new to these crybabies;
they're old pros at stall tactics. And
you have to admire them for their
cavalier "never-say-die" attitude.
Well, maybe not.
Supposedly Henderson, or so-
meone working for his campaign,
circulated pamphlets in an apart-
ment complex's mailboxes � clear-
ly a violation of campaign rules. If
Henderson were going to try to
manuever around this rule, it's not
likely he would do so near Little's
apartment building � which is ex-
actly what he is being accused of.
So now it's off to the Review
Board if the SGA attorney general
finds the charges to be in order.
Then what will happen? Usually
nothing, but never forget Murphy's
Law when dealing with campus
politics at East Carolina. What's
logical and fair to some is not
necessar 1 logical and fair to the
powers that be.
According to interpretations of
the election rules, which were
granted "symbolic approval" by
the legislature at a recent meeting, it
would have to be proven that Eric
Henderson either distributed the
material himself or had prior
knowledge of the action.
In either instance, it's not likely
sufficient proof exists. But then,
anything's worth a try � right?
" Campus Forum
Barwick In Defense
The general manager of WZMB
would like to respond io Kim Albin's ar-
ticle titles "Columnist Looks Inside at
WZMB
First ot all, the title of her article is
fictitious. Ms. Albin, either through in-
competence, forgetfulness, or a will-
ingness to present a biased point of view,
failed to look inside at WZMB enough.
You see, she never contacted the general
manager to ask him about his ideas and
philosophies. The general manager
would have been delighted to explain
AOR to her, which she obviously does
not comprehend. If Ms. Albin would
have looked at back copies of The East
Carolinian, she would have realized that
the spokesperson for the station has
been the general manager; yet this evil
and conniving foreigner was never con-
sulted.
Secondly, who are those "concerned
students"? What is "much student
dissatisfaction"? The complaints we
hear about he station are minimal. Of all
the letters we have received, the letters to
Campus Forum, and the calls we get at
the station, the positives outnumber the
negatives by ninety percent. Most of the
complaints we get are from people who
sued to listen to WUNC. It seems that
our signal is blocking out WUNC's
reception; several faculty members are
miffed. There is nothing that can be
done about this phenomenon.
Thirdly, when did Ms. Albin become
an expert on AOR? What does Ms.
Albin want to listen to? We play albums
and songs that are on the AOR charts of
trade magazines. The jocks also play
three oldies an hour, and the oldies
usually represent the jocks' individual
tastes. Eric Sandburg likes to play Euro-
pean rock. The general manager likes to
play classics of the 70's. Jay (The
Animal) Nichols likes lick-ass-belt-your-
mother rock and roll. Lou Graham is
living in the 60's. All of these musical
tastes fit into the AOR genre. There are
also several degrees in which to provide
an alternative. We are providing a basic
need of AOR, which is unavailabe on
this campus and is what the majority of
the students want. The student station at
Chapel Hill, WXYC, plays mostly new
wave, reggae, blues and jazz. They pro-
vide an alternative for their area because
ther are several AOR stations in th area.
So, Ms. Albin, alternative is based on
what is and is not available in a certain
region.
The general manager hopes that Ms.
Albin has been enlightened as to what
AOR really is � a concept that was
scrambled in her mind when she took
pen in hand to give the student body the
inside scoop on WZMB.
The general manager would like to
suggest that Ms. Albin strive to become
a competent columnist before she
criticize another organizaiton's modus
operandi.
Also, send regards to ms. regards to
Ms. Albin's sidekick, Patrick O'Neill.
The general manager, a resident of Cen-
tral America for 16 years who still lives
there, will soon write a letter to refute
and destroy Mr. O'Neill's Marxist
rhetoric and misconceptionss about
Central America.
JOHN (SAM) BARWICK
General Manager, WZMB
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s).
(fl)eMlet'5
QBE�
V�
�mmm
i
TEACHES �Y THE
BOOKREAPER'S
DIGEST CONDENSED
JOKES' WISHES HIS
CLASSROOM WAS'THE
TONIGHT SHOW:
NEVER QUITE SURE
IF STUDENTS ARE
LAUGHING AT HIM
OR WITH HIM.
B2-THE EAST C A HO U MAN
Liberals: All You Wanted To Know
By KIM ALBIN
One of the most amusing classes of peo-
ple 1 have encountered in my college years
has been the downtrodden, cause-happy
liberal. Yes, these folks still exist � in alar-
ming numbers � on college campuses,
where some liberals are created, some grow
into freakishly paranoid activists, and
some, thankfully, grow out of their liberal
ways.
From the numerous encounters I have
had with individuals so persuaded, 1 have
drawn some striking conclusions about the
heretofore inexplicable liberal lifestyle. 1
shall catalogue them here, so that in the
future liberals will be easily identifiable
and therefore, avoidable.
The liberal look. There is a distinct
mode of dress for liberals, just as for most
other coteries. Liberal attire is easily
spoted in a crowd, since one need only
look for the peson who seems to have
maintained his 1960's wardrobe for cur-
rent wear. Imagine the wide ties, colorful
shirts, corduroy suits, and Wallaby shoes
which went out of style ten years ago, and
one might gain a menta! picture of a
liberal. In addition, liberals tend to have
bleary eyes, if not from folding pamphlets
all night for no pay, then from the bong
hits that they like to have for breakfast.
f2 liberal stance. Whether walking, stan-
ding, or sitting liberals are often slumped
from head to toe, a bearing which is sym-
bolic of their mental posture. Although,
unlike normal people, seemingly pained by
simple physical motions of their bodies �
like walking to school, getting up to
change the channel, and especially, work-
ing � liberals tend to take jogging as a
hobby, an occasion for which they must
adopt a whole new suit of liberal attire.
Liberal forms of entertainment. Basical-
ly, liberals like the same types of entertain-
ment as the rest of us, except that they
often prefer movies, plays, and books
which feaiure weak, undesirable specimens
of humanity. This gives the liberal a
chance to look down on someone secretly
and a chance to demonstrate his human
compassion by feigning pity for the weak
character.
The liberal sense of duty. Liberals are
born feeling guilty and as if they owed a
debt to each generation but their own. This
explains why a liberal may not even dream
of buying a dozen South American-grown
flowers for his mother � since the growers
of those flowers rob the natives of their
land. It does not, however, explain why the
same liberal might beg, borrow, and steal
for a chance to buy South-American
drugs.
The liberal as a martyr. This is the most
common form in which liberals exist. It is
the state most liberals struggle to attain
and seldom escape from. If there is any
practical way for the average liberal to
stick his neck out on the behalf of welfare
recipients, women's groups, or a host of
entities whose plights we are already aware
of, then the liberal will not only stick his
neck out, he will do it loudly so as to gain
as much public attention as possible. These
actions, after all, will come in handy dur-
ing his future political career � the next
level of liberal martyrdom.
Liberal proclivity to indulge. Webster's
defines "liberal in part, as "tolerant of
views differing from one's own; broad-
minded if that is so, then a new defini-
tion for "tolerant" must be found im-
mediately, for I have encountered no at-
titude even remotely akin to tolerance in
my conversations with liberals. Liberals
would have one believe that they have cor-
nerd the market on broad-mindedness
also, yet they are in fact referring to a
sneering indulgence that they may grant to
an opponent in argument hen the liberal
cause is lost. Rather than accept defeat, the
liberal has a gift for making it seem as
though he could certainly win the argu-
ment if, indeed, his opponent were worth
convincing.
The liberal as a productive individual.
C'mon, forget it. Not only are liberals. b
and large, unproductive, they tend to stand
in the way'of productivity at every turn,
claiming that reformaton of the "greedy
capitalists" in this country will be our only
salvation. Who, then, I'd like to ask. is ap-
propriate to run the industry of this coun-
try? Certainly not the government workers
who, if given the power, would be just as
corrupted by that power as any "greed
capitalist Or have the liberals unearthed
a species of human immune to the axiom
of "Power Corrupts?"
The Liberal on a date. Although liberals
claim to be highly sensitive, cognizant peo-
ple, these myths are automatically dispell-
ed by the simple observation of a liberal on
a date. Never expect such a "sensitive"
fellow to stand up nd be willing to fight
your honor; he's too busy protectng tree-
near Boise, Idaho. Face it girls, who would
you rather have walk you back from the
art building at 2 a.m Alan Alda or G.
Gordon Liddy? Besides, the liberal's
choice of nightspots leaves much to be
desired. Recently one suggested to me that
I go see the movie Eraserheud, which turn-
ed out to be disgusting fare, hardly ap-
propriate for "sensitive" people.
The liberal's sense of humor. Unfor-
tunately, there is no such thing. Instead,
liberals are endowed with an extra large
sense of concern. This enbles them to
shake their fingers at the rest of us for liv-
ing such apathetic, selfish lives.
Sampling Of Today's Activists
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
As the White House war machine shifts
into overdrive in Central America and
elsewhere, a still-small but growing
number of political activists are stepping
up their efforts to step on the brakes.
Pacifists, feninists and leftists, politicians
nad clergy, celebrities and unknowns, they
comprise a broadly bgased, informal net-
work�a moverment in embryo. Together,
with their varying priorities and degrees of
commitment, they represent humanity's
last, best hope to stop the machine from
flattening us all.
Herewith is a sampler of today's leading
activists�counterforces to the rogues'
gallery of military machiavellis and
duplicitous diplomats at the controls.
CISPES (Committee in Solidariy with
the People of El Salvador). CISPES
describes itself as "a national organization
of solidarity, religious and human rights
groups opposed to U.S. intervention in El
Salvdor The organization leads protests
demonstrations, provides humanitarian
aid to Salvadoran rebels and revolu-
tionaries and works to educate Americans
about the nature of the war in that coun-
try. Most recently, this estimable, year-
and-a-half-old organization coordinated
nationwide protests against the stagee-
managed elections in El Salvador. CISPES
has 300 local chapters and seven regional
offices. Their national office can be reach-
ed at: P.O. Box 12056, Washington D.C.
20005, telephone (202) 887-5019.
U.S. church groups offering sanctuary
to Salvadoran refugees in this country. On
the second anniversary of the assassination
of libveral Archbishop Oscar Romero by a
rightwing death squad, some 100
American churches announced they would
provide sanctuary to Salvadorans here who
face torture and death if they are deported
to their homeland. The interfaith network
cannot prevent the arrest of Salvadorans
by U.S. authorities, but it does hope to
"dramatize the inhumane policies of the
U.S. Government
Ed Asner. TV's "Lou Grant" recently
helped form Medical Aid for El Salvador,
a private, non-profit organization that
hopes to raise $1 million in medical aid for
people in rebel-controlled territory. Ex-
paining that previous medical shipments
were seized by the ruling junta, the new
group plans to funnel sunds through a
group of exiled Salvadoran physicians in
Mexico City. Asner has taken a lot of he
for this from the likes of that old centurion
Charlton Heston, but he's been hanging
tough.
Costa-Gavras. The Greek-born, Paris-
based filmmaker has turned out another
trut and timely political thriller based on
the true story of th murder of U.S. jour-
nalist Charles Horman during the Chilean
coup of 1973. Missing, starrring Jack Lem-
mon and Sissy Spacek, pints a finger of
complicity directly at u.S. diplomats, who
stalled Horman's real-life father and wife
for weeks with excuses and assurances that
Charles was OK. When Missing was releas-
ed Feb. 12, the State Dept. took the
unusual step of denying everything in a
three page letter, but the dental wasn't ter-
ribly convincing.
Draft registration resisters. Half a
million young men, says the government,
ovr a million according to activists, have
refused to register for the military draft.
After Ronald Reagan reversed his an-
tidraft stand in January, administration of-
ficials said resisters would be prosecuted
for a felony. Resisters are hoping to close
ranks to make mass prosecution unlikely-
and an xtended land war uising I v
draftees impossible. Further information is
available from: Draft Counseling.
RECON publications, P.O. Box 10602,
Philadelphia, PA 19134.
Dr. Helen Caldicott. head of Physicians
for Social Responsibility and co-founder
of the Women's party for Survival.
Caldicott gave up her pediatric practice at
Harvard to stump the country, warning of
the impossibility of winning�or even sur-
viving�a nuclear war. PSR's success in
focusing public attention on the reahtiev ol
hte nuclear nightmare has done much to
rouse the peace movement here to join the
already-large opposition to the arms race
in Europe. While they're not concerned
with Central America as such, Caldicott
and PSR belong n this list, since a war
there could very well mushroom
Nuclear Freeze Initiative. Backers of this
grassroots effort to pressure the U.S. and
the Soviet Union to freeze their develop-
ment of nuclear weapons also understand
that war in any part of the world has
potential to become global and nuclear.
According to recent press reports, 12 state
legislatures have passed or are considering
nuclear freeze resolutions, and 17 senators
and 122 Representatives are sponsoring
freeze resolutions in Congress. Nuclear
freeze supporters also say they'll be out in
force in New York this June 12 to
demonstrate their concern at the United
nations conference on international disar-
mament.
If there were Congressional Medals of
Honor for valor in the defense of social
justice and peace, these people would sure-
ly be among the winners.
Next week, in the third and concluding
part of this series, what lies ahead for Cen-
tal America: a likely scenario.
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Style
M'kll k. W2 to
ECU Hosts Family Life Conference
Bv niNt XMHRsON
silr � dHM
" U oholism is the thud cause ol
illness And death in the country, And
son think it the first
stated Man Casey 1 add. marriage
and family counseloi with the
Johnson Institute in Minnesota.
1 Add was the main speakei foi
the twenty second annual Family
Life at ECL A
Ihe conference was entit 'A
I am I) ffa N Drink
H
cus was the effect
ism, not on
family And
. hole I he purp �s� � the
?i once, a
mplexity ol alcoholism, not
only looking at it from the stand
pOV mi that is alcorv
but the standpoint of how the entire
famih is effected by alcoholism,
how the community is etlected h
alcoholism
1 he Johnson Institute, founded
in Minneapolis in 1966, made an
attempt to eel alcoholism out ol
the realm ol being a moral problem
an emotional problem. I p 'o that
time alcoholism had been explained
as something that had to do with
moral detects explained 1 Add.
Since that time, the institute has
been effective in creating innoatie
responses to needs in the communi
as well as unions and corpora
public and pmate proles
siona croups, and the school
I he emphasis on the
that alcoholism, oi
� ise, is a communit
concei
Will
he corporate system.
an
s inadi. v 'he employ ei
the economic drain caused by the
alcoholic, the loss ol production
and overall cost, and encourage
some kind ol positive intervention.
rhese intervention and recovery
processes need to be supported by
the community, rraining programs
are set up by the Johnson Institute
foi professionals, social workers,
etc and on-sight training seminars
sunilat to the one held on campus
this week are arranged. Information
referral systems are also established
to help with intervention.
1 add explained that these training
programs arc set up throughout the
country to educate people about the
hows and whys ol intervening both
at a family level, a community level
and educational level
Cause and effect was discussed,
and such problems as loneliness,
depression, and peer group rejection
were described as some reasons foi
people to turn to chemical abuse.
Many negative results ol
alcoholism in the family were
discussed such as relationship pro-
blems, sexual abuse and com
munication process dysfunctions.
I hen. there is always the problem
ol drunk drivers. 1 Add described a
Saturday night with one out ol two
cars on the road driven by someone
who has had loo much to dunk like
�;a lot ol bullets coming at you
Besides her work with the
lohnson Institute, I Add is also a
consultant and therapist with the
prestigious Hazelton Institute, and
the Parkview treatmententer. She
got her undergraduate degree al the
i ollege ol Si. C athei me, and did
her graduate studies at the I niver-
sities ol Wisconsin and Minnesota.
She holds a masters degree in mar-
riage and family therapy, and is
workinii on hei Ms al the I niver-
sit of Minnesota.
Coming from an alcoholic lamily
her sell, 1 add has a firsthand
knowledge ol the problems involv
ed. "I think that growing up in an
alcoholic family, 1 was aware from a
er young age about the kind ol
personal trauma and tragedy thai
my family was experiencing, and so
' think 1 was a born little helper "
However, 1 add goi into the
II I1,1 it, I r ith.T ritiiMit-
counselling field
about way
in a lather round
went to my firsi
biology class and was terrorized by
this teacher, so I went to my advisor
and said what majot can 1 gel into
and not have to take biology And he
said social work, but I ended up tak
ing biology the next year she said
I hi oughoul het disc ussions,
I add emphasizes that the problem
ol alcoholism, or chemical abuse, is
a social problem, not one o t ne in-
dividual. "The challenge to
community is to com
creatively and
said "It's in to in
community leadei
She also
dire, t ness in appi a
with hi oi hei drinl
Regarding tin
� help an al oh li u
ready I add aid
true
" void a �
lal oi selt righteous
tinued. " Y u art p�wei ,
meone else' rinl D
beconu upied w T
Bui the mam
ference remained ihai th I
a whole needs
alcoholism, because every me'
ol the family is involv
feeted bv ihe i
Greeks Spread The
Easter Season Spirit
B, D�vE WIUi�
Beginning with
( arolinian will
Pictured aboe
this issue through Ihe last issue of the vear. Ihe fast
run pictures of the 1982-83 K I varsitv cheerleaders
areindv Batson and Marcus Brock.indv is j junior
business major from Carv. and Marcus, from
iphomore majoring in occupational therapy.
avettevilk, is
Bv NGELA ROACH
sljll Wrllrr
hile many students are flocking
to the beaches or having parties,
there are others who are engaging in
various community service activities
during the faster weekend Some
students' strong religious beliefs are
reflected in the way they spend
faster. A few ol the Panhellenic
societies are sponsoring activities
for the under-pnvHedged or the in-
stitutionalized.
The Junior Panhellenic C ouncil
usually has an Eastei egg hunt but
the unseasonal weather resulted in
its cancellation Windy weathet
not halted all Panhellenic activities,
howev ei
Beta 1 heta pledge sisters ol the
Alpha Phi Sorority visited those in
the childi en's ward ol P
Memorial's Hospital Six eii Is I
part in an effort to lift the sagging
spirits ol the little ones. Ihe sisters
plaved various games with the
children.
Chi Omega adopted a child
Cherry Hospital in October. I he
child has been able to enjoy
rhanksgiving and Christ mas
through! he efforts ol this group,
rhanksgiving goodies, Christmas
presents, and holiday cards have
been provided. Eastei will be no ex
ception. A few of the members will
provide slutted I astet baskets and
plenty ol cards.
An Faster egg hunt will be held al
Jthe Delta .eta sorority house Satur-
day tor underprivileged children.
These children are from the second
and third grades ol Ayden Elemen-
tar Schoi
:
be to
Pur Memorial by tin
I ambda Chi lr
throughout the yeai I ui
sions aie given
SchooU dui ing the wei k. 1 a
Chi Alpha was
111 ' - �� atei nities '
program.
Pi Kappa Ph il
keeps � I
whole yeai round. A
children wii
I isses
� � disable �
Pi Kappa PI
coor
i
Two of imp
� I
ise inter es
; � Student l nil
bv Bob lyde, will
ni( n
I hursday at 7 p.m. rh� k i
t. athol I d by I i
S cone, will have an I a
Si i a) els on Sa n I
this Vigil will be the Ble
Fires which represents (. -
ol the W orld and I
thai 1 ight. -
Service (Mass) will b
day al s Peters.
Campus radio is
voKed in the Eastei happeni
broadcasting a full day on Frid
Programming will then
weekend but will resun c
schedule on 1 uesday
Sierra Club Opposes Reagan'sPolicies
Bv PATRICK O'NKH.l wide ignation ol which was donated to Greenville ci- Adler's only words, of �Pm's� uon him (Reaaan) or more soon Congress foi often.
petitions ,y by a gravel mining company lor the environment were that ,ts look n K ; Reagan is attempti
Bv PATRICKO'NKll I
i membe
nal ' '
on a!
million membe
"The
Administration's 11 i -
environmental policies ted
n j very f apid me i I
� �� ' said sierra e retary and
i history prol r D
Adler
Adler loins I 1
fessor l)r Robert B Graham wl �
president of the club and Mr
Robert Woodside ol the math
department who performs treasurer
duties Ihe regional ui i 240
membei and covers an area which
lastal counties all the
jvay to Morehead City.
The Siena Club was foundd in
1892 and has its head uarters in San
Francisco. California I hey deal on
a national level with issues pertain-
ing to natural resource pre ei nation
which includes wildlife, natonal
toresi. hazardous waste disposal,
and mining, which "have all been
put in jeopardy" bv the present
policies of the Reagan administra-
tion said Adler
"People are concerned con
tinued Adler. "about the rapini,
the natural resources that is present-
ly takng place "
In response to Reagan's selection
of James Watt as Secretary of the
Interior the Sierra Club collected
over one million signatures nation-
� he resignation
Dump V att" petition
d were completed
hs and presented
III Ills
� cress.
"he club w as � ipposed to
actically everything" that W att
warned to do, said Adlei 'I he
weakening ol thelean An Act, a
,ery rapid increase in the cutting of
national forests, totally un-
justifiableno money whatsoever
tor national parks continued
Viler.
(n the local level a chapter ol the
Sieri ib called " 1 he ypress
Group" meets monthly in Green-
Most recently, th
sponsored a survey
local chapter
�f Greenmill
Run. a stream thai runs through
Greenville and empties into the lar
River I he club has submitted a pro-
posal to the Greenville Citv Council
to make a "Gteenwav" or path
which would be alongside Greenmill
Run as a "strip park " I his would
be open to the public and keep the
area sate from development and in
its "natural state" said Adler.
dler credited the regional club as
being "instrumental" in the open-
ing and creation ol Goose (reek
State Park on the Pamlico River
outside of Washington. North
Carolina. This park is now "open to
the public" said Adler. and can be
used tor "boat launching, camping,
nature trails, swimming, and pic-
nic's
"We're pushing for constructive
usage of River Park said Adler.
River Park is a 350 acre tract of land
on the north side of the Tar River
wnicn was donated to Greenville
ty bv a gravel mining company
about S vear s ago.
" e'd like the city to leave large
. in the untouched natural
slate said Adler. "so people can
se nature up close
( urrently much ol the area is
fenced off and due to a "lack of
money" and low priority status
given to th land by city officials, not
much action is being taken on the
River Park project.
Greenville has some low area that
are "subject to occasional heavy
flooding said Adler. Ihe Sierra
c lub supports a "Floodplain Zon-
ing Ordinance" which prohibits
building permanent structures in an
area most prone to Hooding. Many
times rhese ordinances are not
followed and people who build are
"counting on the federal govern-
ment to bail them out continued
Adler I he club is lobbying the city
government to adopt a stricter or-
dinance on binding in these areas.
Despite all its work on en-
vironmental and political issues, the
Sierra Club spends plenty of its time
enjoying nature and participating in
various outdoor activities. 1 he club
is really for "college kids" said
Adler. He adds that the group goes
on outmgs twice a month and par-
ticipates in canoeing trips frequent-
ly, Adler says its not necessary to be
a Sierra Club member to come along
on day trips and outings. "We also
go on wildlife and botanical trips,
bud watching, and hikes con
tinued Adler. "All ECU students
are alwavs welcome
in an oh
vious reference to the possibility oi
a C presidept being ele
will be more receptive to
�ted who
the con-
cerns oi environmentalists. "We
look on him (Reagan) or more so on
Ins programs, as sheer death" said
Adler. "It's a giant step backwards,
sacrificing the future for the pre-
sent
Adler vo
c ongress foi ol u
Reagan is attempt:
ed the
on.
public
kS"

Pholf B� CHRIS UCHOK
I he "Steelwheelers" basketball team performed at the (.reenville Gymnasium last night as part ol the activities in-
cluded in Handicapped Awareness Week.
t





Ml ! s7 K. i i
I
Test On Bodies Bizarre
Knoxvtlle, Tcnn. I Pi
Dr. William Ba
wishes devotees ol the
bizarre and i h e
gruesome would suck
to horroi movies mw
quit hanging around his
experiment.
The problem is Bass
experiment is the most
gruesome show n town.
He's got five human
bodies rotting in a
fenced-in area behind
I imersiu Hospital try-
ing to come up with a
timetable tor decom
position.
"We don't kvani peo-
ple l ramping around up
there said Bass, an
thr professoi ai
the I niersit ol 1 en-
nessee Aid the state's
c pathologist
i rsi, it's on private
v, and second,
it's behind a fence.
We've encouraged I I
police to keep a check
on it hen people get
up there and walk all
on ei it. the 're destrov
ing the experiment
Bass said Mondax
Bass said the bodies
m o idina some ol
the hist data on how
ii takes tot a
cada ei to deca
"The t pe ol flies
that are on the bod at
i Me moment and the
t pe ol beetle 01 insect
that you have is pro-
babl the best indica-
tion H.h said.
Bass said he decided
to seek the infoimation
a m stei ious coi p
se was found neai
NashilU i d �
gra e Bass m.
the case ai
ed the bod had been
dcAd foi less than a
yeat
Bui �hen he look the
bones back to Ins
know die laboi atoi
lot analysis, the scien
tist learned the bod
had been dAd 112
vears.
Ii was the bod ot
i on federate Col
W illiam Sh shot to
deal in the . i ii W at
Battle ol Nashville in
! S64 ii was in good
shape because n I
been embalmed, a rari-
for Coil W .u v i�.
tims, and hiiiied n a
cast-iron col tin thai d.d
eak
"I l
���112
lit He
stai ed nt
last pnl In wood
frame coffin-like struc-
tures co ei ed with
quarter-inch chicken
w ire are the bodies, in
various stages ol
decomposition
I v o e r ad ua i e
students make tegular
isiis to the experiment
but the giis scene also
has attracted its share
ol the cm ious.
I he ! n si K d w as
placed outside I a si
pril. Nil that i- leu ot
it is the skeletal re
I I e lasi bodv
began ihe experiment
last (v lobei It decaved
slowh durini the cold
month bin has b.
tod � apidlv
�a 11 h the v a i m e i
weal hei
w died to us specificatl
tor this purpose said
Bass "We don't ran
dotnlv pick up bodies
I he professor said
his research team hopes
to end up with a
checklist so police ot
licets can estimate how
lone a bodv has been
dcd
"B looking at the
, lu klisi and the bodv
von should be able to
come up with a fairly
accurate estimate ol
when the individual
died Bass said
Bass said a paper
compiled b t he
graduate students will
be submitted to the
American lournal ot
11 �rensu s lentists fi �i
publication.
For
DAD
GRANDMA
DOY FRIEND
SISTER
Courses In Basic Sailing, Crisis
And Group Intervention Offered
Sa by Man Departmei I S about these and othei Work and Correctional
Brown rhe ses Work and nal social work and correc- Services, School ol
rhe fundamental ' sions � 'lace on Services this summer. ttonal services classes is Allied Health and
the sport ol sa ill several boats, fhe are "Crisis In- available from the Social Professions,
be offered in "Bask in sie Iron i - to 26 ion" (SO W . artment ol Social telephone 757-6961.
4002) and "Pi cesses
Beatrice ol Co our Iniei
� � e I i. I ;�" (SOCW 50031
. ex 1 ach meets dail
sailing ! .lie 22 to lulv 29
"(, i
ntormat ioi � .
i
I :
Sailing a non-credu teet.
evening and weekend In-
class scl : I i I � Chauno
Carolina I isk lacu
prine. pet
rhe .lass i iude teacl
classroom sessi ns, Furtl
rhursdays, pi s tn
prtl 15, 7:30 l art i i �
and ret " ' ss
kveeke I atc es Pi
sions, sei for Sat ut Co I
days, pril 1 i and Kl . ret
24. 1:30 4 M)
1 ei minoh .�
king.
m d s a t e i
THE YEARBOOK etc
your
picture takgn
CALL BUCCANEER OFFICE FOR APPOINTMENTS
757-6501
SITTINGS: MARCH 25-APRIL 16 � 9-5
V;irl'ii Mmlio. Inc.
�;a�:a'Ja a�& � � �
v�� v�; �v�i�7:a�; . v�v�i�7.a�.�� ��'
�12
i SERVING A VARIETY OE SANDWICHES AND !
BE VERA GES. WE SER VE ONL Y ERESH ME A TS A ND
PRODUCE. OUR ERENCH ERIES ARE ERESH, OUR HOT DOG
IS ALL BEEE, AND OUR HAMBURGER IS GROUND ERESH DAIL Y.
SANDWICH MENU INCLUDES:
BIG BOY HAMBURGER:
DELUXE ALL BEEF BURGER WITH THE WORKS
REGULAR AND CHEESEBURGER:
CLUB BURGER COMBINATION:
3 DECKS OF HAM, TURKEY, BACON, LETTUCE,
TOMATOES, AND CHESES.
BAKED HAM COMBINATION
SLICED TURKEY COMBINATION
BACON, LETTUCE, AND TOMATOES
FRENCH FRIES, FRESH CUT AND FRIED.
BEVERAGES INCLUDE:
YOUR FAVORITE SOFT DRINKS
ICED TEA
MILK
ALSO MANY OF YOUR FAVORITE
GOLDEN BEVERAGES
HAPPY HOUR AT PHARO'S:
THURSDAYS & FRIDAYS
3 P.M. TILL 6 P.M.
NEED WE SA Y MORE . .
LOCATED IN NEARBY GEORGETOWN SHOPS
OPEN:
SUNDAY-T HURSDAY 1 1 00 A.M. 1 ILL 1 1:00 P.M.
FRIDAY & SATURDAY 1 1 00 A.M. TILL 1:00 A.M.
7Y;rei7�V.T'tnrt�7l
7� feVYM 'fa! Wl
h





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRI1 X. 1982
LCANMG ABOUTCou-�Q�THriMpjAl
M Pvip A)orti
to stop SMOKfOC rr ,
WO OviCf SvAOJCC AT
rr P�0j�� CMZ1 ,$&-
Kaufman Defeated By Wrestler
l PI - Comic Andy
Kaufman was
mulct cited against
women wrest lets hut
his firsi tr with a pro-
fessional male wrestler
put him m traction.
Kaufman was in
stable condition Tues-
day, and doctors plann-
e d to k e e p h i m
�spitalized another
wo to three days tor
cervical strain, a
spokesman for Si.
Francis Hospital said.
I he 160-pound ac-
tor, who portrays a
confused mechanic on
the television show
" Taxi Ia on the mat
for 20 minutes after his
bout with 232-pound
Jerrj " 1 he ktngj"
1 aw lei Monday night,
before being taken
awa on a stretcher and
hauled to a hospital in
an ambulance.
It was the first loss
for Kaufman, who has
wrestled onl women
for the past five years,
as part of his nightclub
act And his writer said
it would be Kaufman's
last loss because he was
quitting the ring.
"He's a comedian,
he's not a professional
wrestler said Bob
Zmuda. "Andy will
never wrestle again, not
even women
I awler has challeng-
ed Kaufman to a match
atter the comedian beat
a 1 awl e r-coac h e d
woman m one of his
acts in which he offers
SI.000 to any woman
who can beat him in a
wres!ling match.
1 awler. claiming he
saw Kaufman make an
unfair move, jumped
into the ring and dared
the comic to face him in
a real bout.
It took Kaufman a
while to make up his
mind.
"He's much bigger
than me. Of course, I
didn't want to wrestle
him Kaufman said.
"But, a couple of
weeks ago I was in a
crazy mood. 1 decided
maybe 1 should accept
the challenge
"I'm going to run
from him he said
later. "He was saying
he was going to treat
me like a pro wrestler.
Show me no mercv
Finally, Lawler quit
trying to catch the
scrawny Kaufman,
dressed in his tradi-
tional wrestling
uniform of white long
johns and black trunks,
and told him: "Stand
still and you can get a
headlock on me
That
match.
ended
Current �.���'�' t��'t
matficai t�u4tti may "� com
tor icin! mn4n4 Air Fore
tcrtotonropv TWw �cr�olor�r�nM or
to W �warM to trwtontt occmfrnd
rote mttttat tefcooh at trlm�A or
� to ��stnnMig or toair ijprionHlw
rar Tk� icfcotonkie �re��J�� tor
rwtwn, hoots lab ran and aaaia-
m�r�t plul o $S30 morttklir
atlowarx Iroatttoato to" hnaooal
atrr�arrr� lo too !��� coil at
�noo'rcal roocorw"
ChM
I .S VF HEALTH
PROFESSIONS
RtCRUTIM.
Sana GL 1 1100 Ha�ahe t
t�toa NC 276tf
�fcoiw Coitea (� 1 �i7 SS-4134
USED
TIRES
$1Q00
inquire at
Evans Seafood
I T Sftirlt, Sl���lnfl � ���.
I ftckpackt Curium �a�to
�want, SUll Tod Ska.
D.�h�i artd avar 1.1�1
Ifamv Cowboy looli SM.M
ARMY-NAVY
STORE ��������
k.
Help When You Need It Most.
The Fteminq Center has been here for women ot
all ages since 1974. offering understanding and
help to anyone faced with an unplanned pregnancy
. day or night. Services include:
Kree Pregnancj resting
jetlLy &vUurda, Abortion Appts.
KvrtHtfc'inrtti Control Hours
CA1 1 781-5550 DAY OR NIGHT
THE FLEMING CENTER
We're here when you need us.
104 Red Banks Rd. (Behind Shoney's) 756-6000
Tuesday Night �
ECU NIGHT
JUST $1.00 wID includes
Skate Rental
7:00-10:00
Every Friday & Saturday Night
ECU Students are admitted for
JUST $2.00 including Skate Rental
mw
PRESENTS
AIR BAND
COMTEST
THURS, APRIL 8, 1982
ADMISSION $1.00
7-9
MANDARIN CUISINE
ND
$50.00 CASH
PLUS 1 YEARS FREfc PASS
$1 5.00 PLUS ONE CASE BEVERAGE
PLUS 1 YEARS FREE PASS
PRIZES PROVIDED BY SPONSORS
PLUS I YEARS PREE PASS
PRIZES PROVIDED BY
TODD'S STEREO
APPLE RECORDS
FREDDIE'S
FAMOUS PIZZA
BOND'S
HAPPY STORE
Luncheon Combination "A"
Served with Egg Flower Soup or Won Ton Soup and Fried Rice and
Spring Roll. Only $3 15
Choice ot one of the following:
1. Sweet and Sour Pork 5. Kung Pao Chicken (Hot)
2. Green Pepper Beef 6. Twice Cooked Pork
3. Chicken Foo Yung 7. Curry Chicken
4. Vegetarian's Delight
Luncheon Combination "B"
Served with Egg Flower Soup or Won Ton Soup and Fried Rice and
2 �'i ?� ,���� I. Prawns in Lobster Sauce
Choice of one of the following:
2. Mushroom Beef
Only $3.95 3. Crispy Chicken with Brown Sauce
4. Yu-Shiang Pork with Broccoli
Hours: Sun. through Thurs. � 11:30 a.m9:00 p.m.
Fri. and Sat. � 11:30 a.m10:00 p.m.
1112 Dickerson Avenue Greenville
(919) 752-9727
ALL ABC PERMITS
PATIO
PARTY
THURS
APRIL 8
NO COVER
3-5 p.m.
FREE
BEEF RIBS
BATTLE OF
THE BANDS
�IK
HE SECRET
AGENTT
SOUTHWII
GLISSON
THRESHOLD
.LAUGHING MATTEI
TEZZER
The Student Residence Association proud-
ly brings to the students ot ECU 'The 2nd
Annual Battle of the Bands 6 quality bands
will battle it out to see just who is the best.
This major event takes place on the mall, on
the campus of ECU, all day long on Sat
April 17th. Starting at 12 noon the battle
begins. There will be lots of your favorite
beverage, free prizes, food and immense hap-
penings. (Make sure and bring your SRA
cards and ID's)
Be ready,
and be there!
No bottles, cans or coolers will
be permitted on the mall.
1002 Evans
Street
758-9584
Join Nautilus and get ready for summer. It's that
time again to get back into shape. Nautilus is located
on Evans Street, within walking distance from cam-
pus. Featuring a full line of Nautilus equipment,
Olympic free weights, sauna, whirlpool and locker
room.
Call and ask about our pn rated student rates and
low summer rates.
Call and schedule a
free introductory workout.
HOURS OF OPERATION:
Mon. Thurs. � 10a.m. 10p.m. Friday � 10a.m. 8p.m.
Saturday � 10a.m. 5p.m. Sunday � 1 p.m. 5p.m.
SSncH-5
a fccOonalrf
'It
11 Rrina in any compJrabte
SrmCH-rr for comparao
products.
It
Limited to valid coupons from any Fast Service
Restaurant in our area Limit one coupon per person per
visit Please present when ordering Not sood with
other offers. Customers must pay sales tax.
Good only at McDonald's
10th and Cotanchc St
Greenville; NC
Offer valid thru April 30,1982.



MM MPMINMi





I"
"V'
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
APRIl 8. 1982
Page 8
M ana hair. Team
Play Comes First

,� . � � , , , r
� � � �
, . jl , ; . , � .
� ' � � J � ' -

By CINDY PLEAS A NTS
4uilaal Spoil Miiur
"The team has been willing to
work very hare sacrificing personal
goals for team goals
That's what head coach Sue
Manahan believes has made the
Lady Pirates softball team so suc-
cessful thus far.
With a present 22-4 record, the
Lady Pirates have ousted out every
opponent except one
(UNC-Charlotte), since the beginn-
ing of the season.
First-year coach Manahan came
to ECU without having to build a
team. Ranked number one national-
ly at one time, last year's team had a
44-8 record with a team batting
average of .382.
But Manahan was looking for-
ward to continuing the degree of ex-
cellence that had already been
established.
"I sat down with the team, and
we created some goals she said,
"and one of those was to win the
national championship This goal
is one every team desires, and ECU
is no different.
"We decided to set our goals
high, knowing we have to work for
them
Manahan, who describes herself
as a team-oriented coach, came with
certain expectations .
"1 expect us to do the best we can
as a team, and not be concerned
with personal goals she said.
"They will come as a result of the
team's success
Even though personal goals have
been sacrificed this season, some
players are having outstanding
years. This season junior Mitzi
Davis has a batting average of .500,
knocking four triples and three
homeruns, along with 28 runs bat-
ted in.
Shirley Brown and Cynthia
Shepard are both hitting over .400,
with Shepard leading the Pirates
with nine homeruns. Twelve out of
the 19 team members are presently
batting over .300.
Sophomore Jo Landa Clayton
has 60 assists for ECU, and second-
baseman Ginger Rothermel is close
behind with 44. Cindy Stout has
dominated defensively, individually
responsible for 98 outs.
Manahan said she is especially
pleased with the people coming off
the bench.
"Everybody's not going to be a
starter she said, "that's the
hardest position to play because you
never know when you're going to be
called on
Manahan added that when the
usual starters get in a slump, she can
count on her strong bench.
Rothermel, a member of last
year's A1AW National Tournament
team, believes the team is
strongeroffensively and the team
spirit has continued from the
previous year, but there is one ma-
jor difference.
"We peaked too early last year
she said, "but I can tell that we're
still improving this season � even
more so as we go along
Rothermel was just as excited as
Manahan at the mention of the up-
coming nationals, but Manahan
quickly added, "Our immediate
goal is to win the N.C. State Invita-
tional this weekend (April 9-10)
The Lady Pirates have performed
exceptionally well in tournaments,
winning two out of three and plac-
ing third in the Florida State Invita-
tional.
Manahan said the Lady Pirates
will have to be ready for the
wolfpack. "They always give us a
good game she said, "and right
now, everybody's after us
The N. C. State tournament
begins Friday. The Lady Pirates
face powerful Florida State in their
opening round game. The Lady
Seminoles have beaten ECU twice
this season.
Stewart On
Top At QB
Spring Football Notes:
East Carolina's spring football
drills are about half over now and it
appears that the all-important
quarterback position is becoming
more settled.
Greg Stewart has taken well to the
new I formation, which has replaced
the wishbone in ECU'S offensive
plan of attack. Stewart has thrown
the ball extremely well and is cur-
rently well ahead of the other two
signal-calling candidates, Kevin In-
gram and Larry Brobst.
ECU'S Cynthia Shepard
Charles
Chandler
Bucs Sweep State
The Pirates of East Carolina
received what coach Hal Baird call-
ed "two solidly-pitched games
sweeping a double-header from
arch-rival N.C. State, 2-0 and 3-2,
late Wednesday, boosting their
record to 20-6.
Bob Patterson was masterful in
the first game, allowing only two
Wolfpack hits as the Pirates picked
up one run in the fifth and an in-
surance run in the seventh. The
senior left-hander, now 4-1, struck
out 10, including five in a row at one
point.
In the second game behind Bill
Wilder (4-3), the Pirates rallied
from a 2-1 deficit in the last inning,
collecting RBI singles from Fran
Fitzgerald and David Wells.
"It was just a great day for us
Baird remarked. "It's tough to go
up there and win
The Pirates travel to Campbell
this weekend before going to Chapel
Hill Mondav.
AT TAILBACK, rising
sophomore Jimmy Walden has
looked superb. He ripped off an im-
pressive 70-yard run in a scrimmage
this past Saturday.
THE FULLBACK SPOT,
however, is much less settled.
Earnest Byner, Reggie Branch,
Scott Lewis and Marvin Cobb are
all in contention. The coaching staff
says all are still legitimate starting
possibilities.
A BRIGHT SPOT thus far has
been receiving. Stefon Adams, a
converted tailback, and Stuart
Ramirez, a junior college transfer,
have looked good at flanker. The
split end spot is being aptly manned
by former quarterback Carlton
Nelson.
Nelson seems a natural for the
position. He possesses all the
necessities it requires � good
hands, speed and good open field
running. The Portsmouth, Va.
native should provide lots of excite-
ment during his senior season.
Nelson's main competition for
the split end job is sophomore
speedster Ricky Nichols. Nichols is
playing baseball and is not par-
ticipating in spring drills.
THE OFFENSIVE LINE, poten-
tially the strongest area on the team,
has been marred by injuries. It all
began with the news that former
starting center Tony Hensley would
not be able to play again after a
serious neck operation.
Hensley's replacement, Tim Mit-
chell, is also hurt, making center a
real question mark at this point.
Tackle Johnny Robertson and
guards Terry Long and Norman
Quick have all played well. All three
seem destined for starting roles in
the fall. The other tackle starter
should be either Tom Carnes or
Barry Smith, a junior college
transfer. Both, however, are cur-
rently ailing.
THE DEFENSE is well ahead of
the offense at this time, says ECU
head coach Ed Emory. He pointed
out over the weekend that the switch
to the "I" was going well, but that
there have been difficulties. He add-
ed that the first team offense is
struggling to move the ball on the
second team defense.
No real surprise there. Changing
offenses is very complex and time-
consuming. Time and practice
should cure the current offensive
ills.
Battle For Green Jacket
Watson, Pate, Kite Favorites tor Masters Title
p
Hale Irwin
By The Associated Press
AUGUSTA, Ga. � Their records for the seaon
are sharply contrasting. One is the only two-time
winner on the 1982 PGA Tour; the other has miss-
ed the cut in his last two appearances.
It is natural that Tom Watson, whose career
achievements insist that he is the best of his time,
be accorded careful consideration going into the
46th Masters tournament, which begins today in
the famed Augusta National Golf Club course.
It is equally impossible, despite a recent lapse,
to assess this prestigious event without a close look
at Jack Nicklaus, whose record insists he is the
best of all time.
Watson and Nicklaus will be joined by 73 of the
game's other great players, who will gather at the
white, colonial clubhouse at the end of Magnolia
Lane to compete in perhaps golf's most revered
tournament.
More than a dozen men from this elite, invita-
tional, international field come in with the proven
ablity and the temperment to demand a positon
among the list of serious contenders for the famed
green jacket.
Among them are Hale Irwin, Tom Kite, Bill
Rogers, Ray Floyd, Bruce Lletzke, Craig Stadler,
Jerry Pate, Severiano Ballesteros of Spain.
Johnny Miller, Greg Norman of Australia, PGA
champion Larry Nelson, Lanny Wadins and U.S.
Op en titleholder David Graham of Australia.
There are all winners of regular tour events
from the past 12 months, and 10 of the world's
best amateurs.
Over them all, however, loom the talents of
Watson and Nicklaus.
Watson is the defending champion hin this, the
first of the year's four major tests of golfing
greatness. He had finished first or second in four
of his last five Masters starts. His game is in gear.
He won his last time out, becoming the first dou-
ble winner of the season. It was just what he need-
ed.
"I feel I'm tournament-high and tournament-
ready he said after his last comp etitive ap-
pearance.
Nicklaus, on the other hand, said nothing, ex-
cept a terse, tight-lipped "no comment after his
last competitive appearance.
He had missed the cut for the final two rounds.
It was the second time in as many weeks he had
suffered that embarassment. It was the first time
in his career that he had missed twice in a row.
And negative as that may be, it could be just
what he needed.
"The one thing you don't ever want to do Lee
Trevino warned years ago, "is waking up the Bear
(Nicklaus nickname). If he's sleeping, let him
sleep. If you wake him up, he's liable to wake up
mean
There is no doubt that Nicklaus was jolted, even
angered, by his poor performances. But it remains
to be seen whether the aging Bear, now 42, can
again "wake up mean
He's had a career history of doing just that.
Prior to his two starts, the last time Nicklaus had
missed the cut was at Atlanta in 1980. He won the
U.S. Open in his next tournament appearance.
Some of the problems he encountered in his last
two starts were his own fault. After an excellent
start to the season � he was in title contention in
his first first tournaments � Nicklaus allowed
himself to be coaxed into some additions to his
schedule, a carefully contrived slate designed to
bring him to a peak for the Masters, annually his
first big goal of the year.
As a result of those additions, he went into his
last two tournaments in less than maximum form.
He admitted to being mentally tired at Inverrary
and said he wasn't properly prepared at the Tour-
nament Players Championship.
But that was two weeks ago. Since then, he's
had a break from competition.
I'm me 'ally and physically ready said
Nicklaus, winner of the Masters a record five
times and runner-up on four other occasions.
"At the Masters, you can never ignore Jack
said Watson, who also pointed to two foreign
stars, Ballesteros and Norman, as strong threats.
"They're such long hitters; it's a par 68 course
for both of them Watson said.
Length off the tee is an asset for Floyd, a
former Masters winner, who has played well
despite not winning this season, and Lietzke, who
stated slowly but seems to be bringing his game to
a peak.
Kite, Pate and Stadler have each won once and
played at the most consistently high levels this
year.
Although Stadler's credentials may not be as
readily accepted as the others, he is considered by
his peers, perhaps the most dangerous of the
three. Kite, however, has ben sixth or better in five
of his last six Masters appearances, pate, with two
seconds to go with his TPC title, tops the money
winning list.
Irwin and Miller, ech the owner of two major
titles, have shown flashes of brilliance this year
and cannot be overlooked.
Among the others sure to draw great gallery at-
tention are national seniors champion Arnold
Palmer, Trevino and South African Gary Player,
three of the more popular players the game has
produced.
There's also Tom Weiskopf, a four-time
Masters runner-up but not yet a winner.
As is traditional, the purse will not be announc-
ed until this weekend.
The first two rounds will be televised by the
USA Cable Network Thursday and Friday while
CBS will carry portions of the last two rounds
Saturday and Sunday.
Tom Watson

A



"��iw ni�in� i i�"





THE LAST CAROLINIAN
APRILS. IW2
I
Pirates Win Ninth
The East Carolina
men's tennis team won
their ninth match of the
year Tuesday after-
noon, defeating Camp-
bell, 5 1. There were no
doubles played.
"Considering the
weather conditions, our
guys played really
well said assistant
coach Allen Far four.
"We lost three of our
last live matches, so
this
win.
was a
necessary (ECU) defeated Kddie 6-1,6-2.
Summary
Keith Zennel (ECU)
defeated Billy
Williams, 6-3, 7-5.
Peter (iemborys
(Campbell) defeated
Paul Owen, 2-6, 6-3,
7-6.
Galen Treble (ECU)
Barry Parker (ECU) defeated Don Cordon,
1 uck, 6-0, 6-2.
Ted Lepper (FCC)
defeated Frankie
Delconte, 6-3, 6-4.
Donald Rutledge defeated Steve Davis, 6-3,6-3.
Classifieds
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST IN MINGES March 16. a
198' class ring, blue stones, initials
JAA on inside It tound. please
contact Joe at u� Slav l'S8 8485)
FOUND Ladies watch on the mall
in front ot the inlirmiry Contact
Fielding Miller at the East Caroh
man
REWARD White gold class rmq
Lost North Staudv High 1981 In
itiats TMt Please call 758 ��22
LOST at Moser's Farm One red
cooler containing a pair ot con
tacts It tound please call Kristv
a' '58 6731
ATTENTION
Classified ads will be taken ONLY
during the following hours
Monday � I. IS 3 00
Tuesday - 2 00 3 00
Wednesday � � 15 3 00
Thursday - 2 00 3 00
Friday � I 15 2 00
You must place the ads in person
and pay for them m advance
Rales are � tor the first 15 words
and S 05 per word after the first fit
teen
Do you know someone with ill in
terestmg ot unique hobby or
cralt? It so contact the Buccaneer
757 6501
FOR SALE
TRAILER FOR SALE set up m
Greenville 2 BR all electric a c
ecellent condition �2�l)5 can Tar
boro 823 �8�4
VIVITAR ZOOM LENS 75 210 will!
macro for Nikon mount used only
two times SU5 Call 757 3210
SKIS FOR SALE K 2 185 comp
810 skis with Soloman bindings
SI25 Call 757 3210 and leave
number
TEN SPEED racmq bike 25'
Irame Call 752 �300
AKC REG LABRADOR PUP
PIES Black S125 males 4100
females Call 757 3701 or 758 V462
25 CUBIC FEET
REFRIGERATOR Encellentcon
dition S5C or best otter Call
'58 '405
WATERBEDS Don t pa retail
tor your waterbed Buy a complete
it quality waterbed with a 15 yr
lador, warranty for as low as
I7 Mav stv Ir to choose from
laa. and Delivery jrj. Buy now
and reciewe a free set oi padded
raiH S3? vaiut i Call David lor
' appointment 758 2406
PERSONALS
TELL US how outstanding youi
organization is It it has won an
award anytime during the
academic year type up the mtor
matron, keep t briete. and mail it
to the East Carolinian office in
care ot the News Editor Deadline
is Monday April 12
To Kelly J Thank you so very
much tor the othermqht I shall
never forget it Love Johnny W
WOMACK Still can I be your
P E B Have tun in the sun Chop
Chop
HI PHI TAU S I lust wanted to
tell al ot you "thanks for helping
me out with the election cam
paiqn you men arc ternlic Let
me know il you ever need
anything Go easy on the beaches
over Easter and have tun Love
you Carlei
THE PHI TAUS would like to ,
thank those sponsers that made
our 5th annual Spring Flmq 82 a
most successful event Please
patronize these sponsors listed in
our ad in this issue Thank you
sponsors Thank you ECU
Special thanks to Geep Johnson
and N.cky Harris band and Papa
Katz for the music Lonq livt
Rock Look tor our Battle of the
Band scheduled lor ne�t semester
Be there Chops
HAPPY BIRTHDAY GINA Hope
you get some at Myrtle Beach
Love. SLUTS INC
NOETZEL S mom was warned
When she was born There's no
place Amy won t suck face Her
birthdays today and she will say
Hey boy come play
A FIGHT did start As I took the
mischeivious part you cought my
slack and brought it back, let s
lace it you re sunk You Lambda
Schlunk
AGC - Just a tew more weeks and
I II be the happiest girl in the
world Can t wait Soon to be
cwwc
JIMBOB Davis Friday was great
You re such a dependable SUB
And I wasn't the only one you
after 5 leave message tor Dee
TWO BEDROOM Furnished
mobile home 3 4 miles c'l campus
5160 monthly Possibly no lease or
deposit Call 758 7724
CANNON COURT Apt to sublet
lor summer spacious partially
furnished lownhouse 2 bedrooms,
1 I 2 baths on ECU bus route Call
758 5809 lor more info
LARGE HOUSE 2 blocks Irom
ECU 6 7 bedrooms. 2 baths,
5500 mo 752 5296
EASTER WEEKEND Cottage in
North Myrtle Beach Sleeps 7
Available Thursday thru Monday
5200 Call 758 6588 oi 758 0206
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED
ED lor eilher oi both sessions
summer school I block from cam
pus Call 758 5697
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 2 bedroom apt begmnmq
May I Available lor Fall also On
bus route Pets allowed 1 7
deposit 1 2 rent Call 758 6642
TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT
available foi the summer Fur
mshed an conditioned, gt eat back
porch for sun bathing, good loca
tion For more info call 758 3759
SUMMER SCHOOL ROOM
MATES NEEDED I or 2 room
mates needed for both sessions of
sumer school Biq pool and nice
location at Tar River Apattments
580 month or less, 13 or 1 4
utilities depending on number ol
roommates Call Yancey at
758 2971 or Sam Boyd 758 8448
anytime
APARTMENT FOR RENT
Either oi both summer sessions
One or two people, furnished,
mile from campus 757 1715
NEED ROOMMATE lor summer
option lor Fan 3 blocks Irom cam
pus on Woodlawn Individual
bedroom AC. 570 mo Call
7 58 1662
WANTED Someone to share e�
penses in fully lurmshed Apt Rent
5126 50 includes heat, AC. Hot
and cold water Opens May 8th
serious enquiries please Call
758 6077
FURNISHED TWO BEDROOM
Apai tment available for rent May
August Scenic setting faces the
River An conditioning and within
walking distance to campus
4250month Call 757 3052
SUMMER. FURNISHED or un
lurmshed Apt Available May
August One block Irom campus
? bdrm $175 mth 757 3054
HELP
WANTED
GOOD SUMMER JOB Swim
coach needed Salary negotiabk 6
wk 3 hr day Only those looking
lor seuous employment need app
ly Contact Swim Chairman c'o
782 Beverly Drive Concord N C
28025
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICA
TIONS lor Positions at WZMB
FM Assisant General
Manager Program Director,
Music Director and Business
manaqet For more information
on positions come by the Studios
on 2cd floor Joyner or call 757 6656
SUMMER Employment Top Pay,
Good Experience towards career
interviews Rm 306 B Brewster.
3 30 Or 7 30
SERVICES
CARICATURES BY WEYLER
Greenville's original personalized
art service Have cartoon done ol
yourself or a loved one a unique
gilt idea HO lor 8 10, black and
white or color Call 752 5775
TYPING TERM. Thesis.
Resumes, Dissertations, etc Pro
fessional quality at lowest rates
Call Kempie Dunn anytime
752 6733
NOTARY PUBLIC Call Amy at
757 3734
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST wants
to type thesis, dissertations
publications, manuscripts or term
papers at home Call 756 3660
TYPIST All papers, Professional
quality at low rates 10 years ex
per.ence. Call 757 1378
HEBREW LESSONS Biblical and
contemporary language Ex
penenced, qualified Israeli
teacher Group or individual
classes Call Carmela 752 0083
TERM PAPERS TYPED All
lengths tor more information call
758 9798
BIBLICAL ILLUSTRATIONS
people, places events, etc 8�I0
unmatted Call Allred 752 7724
dropped last week How 'boutJhe FEMALE ROOMMATES NEED
ED Foi summer and or tail 560
ones you dropped at tryouts You
should feel damned bad the
didn t make it Love and Kisses
FOR RENT
SHARE SPACIOUS Apt in Latqe
house lemaies call 756 5650 (work i
plus 1 4 utilities Private
bedroom One block Irom campus
752 8946
SUMMER ROOMMATE NEED
ED to share fully furnished 4
bedroom house Washer dr,er 48C
plus utilities 75 36H
COLLEGE View 2 bdrm apl
May Auq Partll turn I mill Irom
campus on bus it 5165 plu ut
752 3432
NEED KXTRA INCOME?
Consider a BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY that you
car, develop at home at office or from
COLLEGE DORM.
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� NO INVENTORY NECESSARY. Merchants,
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DRASTIC SAVINGS ON PERSONAL PUR
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Single quantities sold
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ROANOKE RAPIDS, N.C 27870
We have one of largest selections IZOD shirts inthe of the
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THE SHOE OUTLET
(Located beside Evans Seafood)
Featuring name brand shoes at bargain prices.
Up To 75 OFF regular prices
Bass Steward-McGuire Brouse Abouts
201 W. Washington St. Within walking distance of campus.
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0
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U. S Citizens less than 35 ears of age interested
in holding challenging managerial positions.
Contact by resume or phone:
NAVY OFFICER PROGRAMS
1001 Navaho Drive
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We also cam Faster
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757-6793
THE
PHI TAU'S
WOULD LIKE TO
THANK THOSE SPONSORS
WHO MADE
SPRING FLING '82
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HWY.58
EMERALD ISLE, N.C.
Beside Bogue Inlet Pier
WATCH FOR SIGNS
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LIVE ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY
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�"
10
IHt" b-VSrCAROl IMAN XI'RIl S. ls�s:
The Course
The following is a description of the par 72,
7,040 yard Augusta National Golf Course, the
sue ot the Masters.
No. I � Par 4, 400 yards. Uphill with tree to
righl and traps in fairway. Most dangerous trap
jusl left of two-level green. Requires fairly ac-
curate drie. Considered good warm-up hole.
No. 2 � Par 5, 565 yards. Longest on course.
Dogleg left with trees on both sides. Trap thretens
short drive. Green guarded by traps and series of
bunkers. A birdie hole for most pros but green
tnckv.
No. 3 � Par 4. 360 yards. Trees to right, fair-
wax on trap on left. Green small and elevated.
Requires accurate second shot to assure par.
o. 4 � Par 3, 220 yards. Elevated, slanting
iireen protected by front bunker. Dip deep in
from of green makes shot difficult to guage,
especially when wind blowing.
No 5" par 4, 450 yards. Dogleg left with
trees on both sides and fairway trap at bend.
Gigantic green with severe contours. Aggressive
first putt often leaves long second putt.
No. 6 � Par 3, 190 yards. Old-timers
remember as scene of Billy Joe Ration's hole-tn-
one in 1954. the year an amateur almost won the
Masters. Downhill shot but green slopes up caus-
ing ball to roll back.
No. 7 � Par 4, 365 yards. Tree-lined fairwax
leads 10 small plateau green in nesi ot bunkers.
Premium on long drive because hole plays longer
than yardage indicates. Pros happx with par.
No. S � Par 5. 530 yards. Uphill climb all the
vxay. Considered toughest par 5 on course. Irap
blocks preferred fairway path. When pin at back
ot sharplx mourned green, requires perfect ap-
proach shot to get down in two putts.
No. y � Par 4, 440 yards. Dogleg left with
downhill drive and trees at bend. I phill approach
to elevated sireen favors shots to riehi of flag. Pin
placement crucial.
No. 10 � Par 4, 445 yards. Downhill with
slight dogleg left. Fairway edged with trees on
both sides. Trap in front o! small, elevated green.
Considered one of the prettiest par 4s on PGA
tour.
No. 11 � Par 4, 445 yards. Rae's Creek close o
the left side of the green. Requires cautious ap-
proach shot and extracts more than share of
bogexs. Rated toughest par 4 on the course.
No. 12 � Par 3, 155 yards. Shortest hole on
course but water in front of green and steep buk
behind. Cross wind makes for touchy shots. Yerv
few holes-in-ones here. Tom Weiskopf suffered a
13 here two years ago.
No. 13 � Par 5,485 yards. Sharp dogleg left.
Creek across fairway and across front and right
ol green. Can be reached with two good shots. In
I9S, Japan's Tsuneyuki Nakajuna had a 13 here.
No. 14 � Par 4, 420 yards. Drive has sidelull
feeing. Undulating green is 150 feet wide, MX) feet
deep and partially hidden bv mounds, hard to
figure because of contours. A stroke stealer.
No. 15 � Par 5, 520 vards. Straight fairway
with no hazard until reaching water immediately
in front of green. Requires cautious second shot.
Another conversation piece for old-timers since
this is scene of Gene Saraan's 1935 double-eagle.
No. 16 � Par 3, 190 vards. Water from tee 10
green. Water also left of large green, bunket
right. I it tie room for error. Was President
Eisenhower's favorite hole.
No. 17 � Par 4, 400 yards. Uphill to heavily
napped green. Placement o drive is kev. Shot
must thread narrow gate between rows ol trees.
Gren slopes to rear and penalizes aggressive ap-
proaches.
No. 18 � Par 4. 420 yards. Finishing hole is
uphill drive with dogleg left. Tilting green trapped
10 front and heavily bunkered on both sides.
fans Change 'Route'
. Vrnn �.a- INlASt AR'S Schedule
ECisJerrvl.ee
ROCKINGHAM,
N.C. (UP1) � Angry
fans have prompted of-1
ftcials at the North
Carolina Motor Speed-
way to change the
American 500 from 500
kilometers back to the
traditional 500 miles.
The race had been
listed on NASCAR's
1982 Grand National
schedule as a
500-kilometer race, but
fans angry over the
change bombarded of-
ficials with irate
telephone calls and let-
ters about it.
Herman Hickman,
public relations direc-
tor for the speedway,
said people were pass-
ing out pamphlets at
the track asking fans to
boycott the October
event to show officials
they wanted a 500-mile
race.
The American 500
has been a 500-mile
race, or 492 laps, since
it started in 1965 and
normally takes between
four and five hours to
complete. A
500-kilometer race
would be 312 miles or
306 laps.
"We started getting
complaints right after
the schedule came
out Hickman said.
"1 got some telephone
calls and L.G. DeWitt
(the speedway's presi-
dent) received some.
Some of them were
rather stern. They got
to the degree where
some said, 'You are a
damn fool
Track officials never
made a formal an-
nouncement saying the
race had been changed
from miles to
kilometer, but the
distance was listed as
kilometers on
NASCAR's schedule
released before the end
of last year.
Speedwav officials
announced Sundav
during the Carolina 500
the fall race would be
switched back lo a
500-mile event.
Officials first
thought the complaints
were coming from "a
few old timers who
would come and spend
the weekend. But thai
was not the case. The
phone calls and tetters
kept coming in
Hickman said.
The speedwav had
received more than 200
letters and over a thou-
sand telephone calls
from racing fans com
plaining about the
kilometer race.
Hickman estimated Ik
said officials received
only about two letters
saying the shorter race
was a "good idea
VIRGIMI
Golfers At UNC
B THOMAS BRAME
The Fast Carolina
golfers will be in
c hapel Hill for the se-
cond annual Tar Heel
Invitational this Fri-
day .
Some of the top
schools of the 12-team
field, according to
Ev I coach Bob
Helmick, are defending
tournameni champs
I NC, N.C. State.
CI em son, and the
I imersitv of Ten-
nessee. There are six
rial ionally-ranked
teams in this tourna-
ment.
Although the com-
petition is tough
Helmick believes "we
should finish in the top
five in the i earn
honors
"We need to play
well both as a team and
individually to be con-
sidered for the NCAA
tournament coming up
in May Helmick said.
ECU'S Don Gainer
and Don Sweeting hope
lo press for individual
honors in this tourna-
ment . Also. Eric
Moehling of North
Carolina State and
Norm Chapman ot
Clemson are expected
to challenge foi the in-
dividual honors.
Defending tournameni
champion is Charlie
Boiling o( Duke
I niversity, who has
since graduated.
The other Pirate par-
ticipants are Chris (7a-
la. Jerry 1 ee and Jon
Riddle. Helmick said.
"I feel we've got five
good goiters going into
this tournameni.
"We need to plav
well this weekend he
continued, "and 1 look
for us to plav preitv
consistent as a team
The Pirates will have
iheir last match of the
season at Old Domi
nion in Norfolk, Va
April 18.
TEACHERS WANTED!
Positions available for college graduates with
bachelors or graduate degree in math, physics,
chemistry or engineering, (minimum GPA of
3.2, U.S. citizenship, under the age of 29).
Teaching undergraduate and graduate level
courses at the Navy's Nuclear Power School
in Orlando, Fla. Complete benefits package
including the opportunity to pursue an ad-
vanced degree. Starting salary � $18,000 and
projected salary after four years � S27,OO0.
Send transcript or call:
It. l.arry Taylor
Nuclear Programs Officer
1001 Savaho Dr.
Haleigh. V I . 276(W
l-8MM�fi2-756X
20 off
Spring & Summer Merchandise
Easter Weekend
following lines not included
Lanz, J. H. Collectibles, Ralpb Lauren, Herman Geist,
Gordon of Philadelphia, Koret, and Uz Oairbome
H
756-9955
MasterCharge, Visa, American Express, or
Lay-Away Plan
Tired of getting ripped off?
xlgJiretteS � all major brands
450&460 per carton
4 per carton � reg. & kings
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Why buy a pack a day when you
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Come in & register for COLOR T. V. give-away.
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752-1600
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NOW ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS
FOR POSITIONS AT
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DEADLINE:
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FOR MORE INFORMATION, COME BY WZMB STUDIOS
WKHKtBH0MHHRHl& '
4 'Pre-Exam Jam
Joan Jett& the
BLACKHEARTS
Sun April 25
8 p.m.
Minges Coliseum
ECU Students � $6.00 (in advance)
Public � $8.00
All tickets � $8.00
on day of show
Tickets on Sale 10:00 A.M.
Tuesday, April 13
Mendenhall Student Center

�WMIMMlMMINNIM'��MMl





Title
The East Carolinian, April 8, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 08, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.192
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57473
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