The East Carolinian, April 6, 1982






She lEaat (Earnltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 58 No.54 5 H
Tuesday, April 6, 1982
Greenville, JN.C
12 Pages
ECU Major Attractions Books
Joan Jett For April 25 Concert
By MIKE HUGHES
The ECU Major Attractions
Committee announced Monday that
they hae scheduled Joan Jett and
the Blackhearts to appear in concert
at Minges Coliseum later this
month.
Jett. whose album Love Rock
TV" Roll and the single by the same
name are currently atop the music
charts, will perform in Greenville on
Sunday, April 25.
Jerry Dilsaver, chairman of the
committee, said that he is still trying
to book an opening act for the Jett
concert. "There are a few bands
we're thinking of he said, "but
nothing has solidified as yet
According to Dilsaver, tickets for
the concert will probably go on sale
April 13 at a cost of $6 for students
and S8 for the general public. All
tickets at the door will be S8.
Students must hae a valid l.D.
and activity card to purchase tickets
at Mendenhall Student Center.
Despite the fact that there has not
been a concert this semester,
Dilsaver says he and the rest of the
committee have been busy at work
with various prospects.
In January, for example, a con-
cert with the Cars at Minges almost
became a reality. Likewise, Dilsaver
said that two shows in February
were lost because of "a problem in
scheduling with athletics
The same held true in March,
when scheduling difficulties kept the
committee from finalizing a concert
with Hall and Oates.
Dilsaver explained that it is dif-
ficult enough to book "big-name"
rock bands at Minges. "Large
bands cannot make money at a
6,000-seat auditorium he said.
"We really hate to do a show that
late (April 25) Dilsaver said.
"Our last show is usually the first
weekend in April but the timing
is almost excellent
He was referring to Jett's current
popularity on the record charts. Her
hit single tops the Billboard top-40
singles chart, while the Blackhearts"
first LP effort checks in at third on
the album list.
She made her debut in the rock
world in 1976, with The Runaways,
one of the first all-female rock n'
roll bands.
After the group released five
albums, it disbanded in 1979, and
Jett put an ad in a Los Angeles
newspaper for musicians. Those
who responded � guitarist Eric
Ambel, drummer Lee Crystal and
bass player Gary Ryan � became
The Blackhearts.
As a performer, Jett has receded
rave reviews in several magazines
and newspapers, including the New
See JETT, PaRe 5
Handicap A wareness Week Focuses
On Recognizing Potentials, Abilities
By PATRICK O'NEILL
" 'Focus on ability' � that really
says it all said Christine Boyd,
assiatant professor in special
physical education, speaking about
the activities and hopes of
"Handicap Awareness Week"
(April 5-8).
"Focus on ability" is the theme
for the four-day program sponsored
bv the Handicap Awareness Com-
mittee, the Student Union, The
Minority Arts Council and the
S.G.A
"We want people to focus on
what the (handicapped) individual
can do, their potentials as in-
dividuals, as employees and as com-
munity members said Romona
Lopez, who, along with James War-
ren and Sharon McClung, is coor-
dinating the weeks activities.
All three are ECU gradute
students in rehabilitation counsel-
ing. Lopez adds that many people
often focus on a persons disability
instead of "looking at the person as
a total person
Being handicapped doesn't
always mean a wheelchair, blind-
ness, or deafness says Warren,
referring to the various Mendenhall
Awareness Booths dealing with
alcoholism, lung disease and cancer.
"Alcohol is the number one pro-
blem for impairing people in the
work area, let alone the problem it
causes on highways and for
families said Mr. Dan Kelly,
Director of Training at the Walter
B. Jones Alcohol Rehabilitation
Center (ARC of Pitt County). Kelly
adds that while active, alcoholism is
a disability but with treatment
"the handicap can be removed
Alcoholism is a disease and will
always be with a person continued
Kelly, and "the only known treat-
ment for alcoholism is abstinence
Boyd, who thought up the
"Focus on ability" theme, is co-
organizing the "Special Olympics"
with Bill Twine of the Greenville
Recreation and Parks Department.
The "Special Olympics another
one of the many events planned for
the week, will take place on
Wednesday at ECU's Bunting Field
at 9 a.m. Most of the officiating at
the Olympics will be conducted by
handicapped students from ECU.
Programs will take place all day
long today, Wednesday and Thurs-
day at various locations around the
campus. The awareness booths,
along with handicap simulation
booths, will be set up in Mendenhall
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Other awareness booths were set
up by the American Cancer Society,
American Lung Association.
Regional Rehabiliation Center ol
Pitt County Memorial Hospital,
East Carolina Vocational Center,
Inc the ECU Sign Language Club.
North Carolina Council for the
Hearing Impaired, Adult Develop-
ment Activities Program with Mar-
tin County Community College and
the Pitt County Mental Health
Center.
Booths designed to simulate
blindness, deafness and wheelchair
use are also being used. ECU com-
puter science freshman Susan
Freeman, took part in a blindness
simulation. "It was frightening; 1
kept running into things A pair of
blinders and a long cane (used for
object location) are issued to each
participant. Then, a guide walks
with the participant around the lob-
by of Mendenhall. Freeman noted
that the experience helped her
"appreciate and admire" the
abilities that handicapped people
have with coping.
Free screening for audiology im-
pairment and rubella (German
See HANDICAP, Page 5
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
"This iheater is a fining monu-
ment to John Messick. If is im-
portant, however, that we keep in
mind that the even this magnifi-
cent structure is secondary to
ECU'S largest purpose � the
education of our youth. "
I eo H . Jenkins
Photo By MARIANNE BAINES
Messick Theater Arts Center Dedicated By
Namesake And Former Chancellor Jenkins
B TOM HALL
Nt� fdilor
East Carolina University thanked the man who
helped change ECTC into a full-sized college with the
dedication of the John Decatur Messick Theater Arts
Center Saturday.
Dr. Messick, 85, told an audience of family,
friends, educators and students, "I know why 1 have
lived so long � to hear you speak those good things
about me
The former university president, who served from
1947-60, was acknowledging the praise given him by
his successor, Dr. Leo W. Jenkins.
The new $3 million-plus center includes what was
the Wahl-Coates Laboratory School and McGinnis
Auditorium plus several additions.
Five-year-old Sarah Willets, Messick's great-
granddaughter, unveiled a new portrait of the former
president painted by Wilmington artist Dot
Daughtry. Board of Trustees chairman Ashlev
Futrell accepted the portrait in behalf of the universi-
tv.
In the new center are classrooms and laboratories
for speech and drama classes, costume and scenery
workshops, acting and dance studios and a flexible
studio theater for experimental drama.
McGinnis Theater, no longer an auditorium, has a
quadrupled stage area, an orchestra pit and expanded
seating. Total cost of the renovations to the center
was $3,129,516, with $150,000 going to a computer-
operated lighting center. Another $60,000 has been
spent for equipment.
During Messick's tenure, enrollment at the small
East Carolina Teachers College tripled and became
Fast Carolina College in 1951.
Jenkins said Messick's "tactics (were) more
favorable to politicians than to educators As the
college pushed for more classrooms, faculty
members, library resources and housing space,
Messick wheedled the campus's first theatrical facili-
ty out of state legislators.
The dedication coincided with the third day of the
run of Show Boat, the first ECU Playhouse produc-
tion in the renovated facility. The musical, inspired
b a floating theater in Washington, is directed by
Drama and Speech department chairman Edgar R.
Loessin.
Jenkins came to the university as dean of instruc-
tion with Messick. In addition to obtaining theatrical
facilities, Messick's tenure was marked by the addi-
tion of 200 scholarship programs, television and
radio facilities, extension and Air Force ROTC pro-
grams, and the approval for the School of Nursing.
Presidential Runoff To Be Held Wednesday
By DIANE ANDERSON
suit Milor
The Student Government
Association will be holding a run-
off election for the position of SGA
president Wednesday. The can-
didates are Eric Henderson and
David Cook. Students eligible to
vote in the election are reminded
that they must present their student
See Candidates' Platforms,
Page 4
l.D. and activity card to be allowed
to vote.
In their regular meeting Monday,
the SGA appropriated $2,488 to
various campus organizations.
A $600 appropriation was award-
ed to the SGA's student welfare
committee for the printing of 3,000
ECU informative posters.
Mitch Daub, chairman of the
committee, explained that the
posters will be especially helpful to
freshmen and even even older
students in answering questions
about drop-add procedures and
even what to do if a car is towed.
The information will be nut in
poster form so that students can put
them on the walls in dorm rooms,
Daub said.
Funds in the amount of $1,170
were approved for the Gray Art
Gallery in the art department
building. The money will provide
showcases and help pay for com-
munication and other various ex-
penses of the gallery.
The ECU Reserve Officers Train-
ing Corps received a $500 ap-
propriation for registration fees, of-
fice supplies, printing and other
general expenses.
The Phi Sigma Tau national
honor society, an undergraduate
society in philosophy, received $218
in funds.
An appropriation to the Ground
Zero Committee, a national com-
mittee which attempts to educate the
people on th? issue of nuclear war,
was brought before the legislature
for consideration, but the motion to
suspend the rules and bring the bill
to the floor was defeated.
Constitutions were approved for
the ECU Marching Pirates and the
Visual Arts Forum.
Liddy and Leary To Debate At Hendrix
�On The Inside-
By TOM HALL
New Mitor
In what promises to be a "very
hot program Timothy Leary, pro-
fessor of the psychedelic drug
culture, and Watergate mastermind
G. Gordon Liddy will square off at
Mendenhall's Hendrix Theater.
The debate is scheduled for Tues-
day, April 20 at 8 p.m. Liddy will
address "The Power of the State"
vs. Leary's "The Freedom of the In-
dividual
"This is going to be a very hot
program said Student Union pro-
gram director Ken Hammond. "We
are very, very lucky to get this one
in" , k-
Liddy refused to reveal his
associates in the Watergate break-in
� even after more than four years
in prison that included 106 days in
solitary confinement. He has been
termed "a thoroughly dangerous
man" by historians and "a brilliant
mind" by newswoman Barbara
Walters.
Leary was director ot the
Psychedelic Research Project at
Harvard. He was a founder of the
Timothy leary
"humanistic" psychology move-
ment, and reportedly refused the
chief psychologist's post at Boston
General Hospital in exchange for
playing down his drug research.
Liddy, an assistant district at-
torney in 1966, presided over
Leary's arrest for transporting one-
half ounce of marijuana over the
U.SMexico border. After another
drug-related arrest, Leary was
C, Gordon Liddy
sentenced to two consecutive
10-year sentences. He escaped from
prison and left the country, but was
extradicted from Afghanistan in
1973. Leary was released on parole
in 1976.
Liddy, once an unsuccessful can-
didate for Congress, was a staff
assistant in the first Nixon ad-
ministration. He later served in the
special investigative unit that
became the "Plumbers" and as
general counsel to the Committee to
Re-elect the President, from which
he directed the Watergate break-in.
Leary and Liddy had been touring
college campuses successfully for
some time before their lecture-
management company booked them
together last fall.
Leary, quoted in The New York
Times, said he warmed up for the
first debate by appearing with
Moral Majority leaders. "I love to
eat Christians for breakfast he ex-
plained.
Liddy has been applauded across
college campuses as he talks about
his indomitable will. In Will, his
best-selling autobiography, Liddy
tells how he once ate cooked rat's
flesh to overcome a childhood
phobia.
Additional information about the
debate is available at the Central
Ticket Office or by calling 756-6611,
extension 266. Tickets cost $2.50 for
ECU students, $3.50 for faculty and
staff, and $5 for the public. All
tickets sold at the door before the
debate will be priced at $5.
Hommerstein and Kern's
magical Show Boat (left)
floated into the renovated
McGinnis Theater Thursday
night. For The East Carolinian
review, see Entertainment.
You'll also find the latest on
ECU athletics, with.full coverage
of Pirate baseball and softball
victories. It's in Sports.
All this and more in today's
East Carolinian.
Weather Watch
(UPI) - Windy and mostly sunny
today with highs in the mid-60s.
Lows m the 40s. Fair Wednesday
with highs in the 60s.
Inside Index
Announcements 2
Opinion
Campus Forum 4
Entertainment 6
Learning About College 7
Sports 9
Classifieds10
r
T
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 6, 1982
Announcements
i
ILO
The I L O is meeting at 2 50 on
Wednesday April 7 We will be
meeting m from ot the depart men
tal offices, Department of Foreign
Languages and Literatures. The
purpose of the meeting is to nave a
group picture taken for next
year s Buccaneer The picture will
be taken at 3 p m
BINGOICECREAM
The next Bingo, ice Cream Par
ty is scheduled for Tuesday. Apr.
13 at 7pm m Mendenhaii's Wuiti
Purpose Room Students. Faculty
Staff, and their dependents are In
vited to 0in m on the fun Wli
prizes, eat ice cream, play bingo
an absolutely tree!
EL SALVADOR
A meeting to discuss, study and
plan further activities of the
GreenviiieECU Committee on El
Salvador will be held tonight
(Tuesday. April a) at 9 p.m. In the
Baptist Student Center at S11 East
10th St All Greenville residents,
and ECU Students. Faculty, Staff
are welcome to attend For more
information call 75MOOJ
GAY?
If you are gay or know someone
who is and would like to talk about
It. come to the ECU Gay Com
munlfy meeting on April 6 at 7 30
at the Newman House Bring a
friend and loin in the conversa
tlon. Members don't forget your 13
deposit tor the Self Awareness
Workshop
Free Rubella Screening To Be
Included In Weeklong Activities
B PATRICK
O'NEILL
staff Writer
"Attention � Hop-
ing to have children
someday?" This is the
opening line of a flyer
appearing all over cam-
pus during "Handicap
Awareness Week The
sign pertains especially
to all women of
childbearing age,
because they belong to
a group with the
gieatest likelihood of
acquiring Rubella,
more commonly known
as German Measles.
If it occurs during
pregnancy, rubella can
cause anyone of a long
list of handicaps and
een death. "You may
not even know you
have it said Leigh
Dickens, a registered
nurse in the Pitt Coun-
ty Hospital emergency
room. Dickens is con-
ducting -a "Free
Rubella Screening" for
all the women of
childbearing age on
campus.
Rubella has few
symptoms and is not
usually considered
dangerous to the reci-
piant, but unborn
children of a recipiant
mothers can develop
various disorders such
as deafness, congenital,
heart defects, cataracts,
kidney disease and
blindness.
"You get it once ana
you acquire an immuni-
ty to it said Dickens.
So women who have
had it once will not
need to get a screening.
From 1963 to 1965
the United States went
through a "Rubella
Epidemic" and there
was "A great big baby
boom of handicapped
kids said Dickens.
Those handicapped
children are now ap-
proaching college age
or starting to enter the
workforce, and job
placement is particular-
ly difficult for them.
Rubella has a tenden-
cy to run in 20-year
epidemic intervals, and
rubella screenings are
one of the efforts being
made by the health
community to preven
another outbreak. Ap
proximately 30,00(
children were born with
"multiple handicapps"
during the last
epidemic. "We have
the means of preven-
tion said Dickens,
"and we must work
hard to prevent another
epidemic she added.
The Rubella screen-
ing is a quick, simple
and painless procedure.
"It takes five minutes,
and the results can be
picked up in two
weeks said Dickens.
The screenings are
offered at the ECU in-
firmary throughout
"Handicap Awareness
Week" from 2 to 5
p.m. on the second
floor of Mendanhall in
Room 114.
"People in health
professions are re-
quired to get a rubella
screening said
Dickens. However, she
added it is an equally
good decision for all
women to take these
simple preventative
precautions. All ECU
students, faculty and
staff are invited.
AED
There will be a meeting of the
premedical predental honor
society on Tuesday. April 6 at 7 30
p m . in room 307 Flanagan
Building Elections will be held for
officers for the 82 83 school year
All members should plan to at
tend!
WALK FOR HUMANITY
The ECU Hunger Coalition
wishes to thank everyone who
helped with the 1982 Walk For
Humanity" and invites all in
terested Students. Faculty and
Staff to Oin in the t oaltion's week
ly meetings (no meeting this week
next meeting Apr.I 151 The
Hunger Coalition meets a' 7 30
p m In the Newman House VS3 E
10th St
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like tn nave ar, ,tem pr
in the announcements rolumn
please send the announi emenl tas
brief as possible i typed and
double spaced to The East Caroli
man m rare of tht pi � ��� ' �
manager
For better irri . .
asking that you p ip several
copies ot our f-ew announcement
application tor your upcor-
events
There is no charge f( I
nouncements. bu' spar �
limited Therefore we cannot
guarantee (ttal r'lur arrounie
ment will run as long as ou ��
and suggest that you no not
solely on th1s column mr puni
Theoeadi I ements
s 5 p m Fi lay tor thi ' � sit
paper and S p m t . I
Thursday papei
This si . �
campus organ .�,(�
men's
N. C. Council Of Churches
Sponsors Nuclear Convocation
B PATRICK O'NEILL
Muff Wrllrr
"Even the most hawkish of hawks would agree
that a nuclear war would be holocaust said
Bishop James Armstrong during his address to an
ecumenical convocation. The address, titled
"Security, Peace, and the Arms Race was spon-
sored by !he North Carolina Council of Chur-
ches
Armstrong is the president of the national
c ouncil of Churches and a resident bishop of the
United Methodist Church in Indiana. He has
written several books on social justice and had
done much work in the area of human rights.
Armstrong is just one of the many religious
leaders who have been speaking out and deman-
ding nuclear arms reduction. "Today there are
more than 50,(XX) nuclear weapons deployed and
stockpiled�Armstrong told an audience of more
than 300 ministers and church members gathered
at the United Church of Christ in Greensboro.
"Once it (nuclear war) comes, life will never be
the same again he continued. "Life as we know
it will cease to exist
According to Armstrong, thousands of today's
nuclear weapons are 50 times more powerful than
the ones the United States dropped on Japan in
1945.
"Ever major city is targeted with deaths ex-
pected to number over 100 million each for the
United States, the SovietUnion, and Europe,
Armstrong said. He added that "35 nations
possess the knowledge to manufacture nuclear
weapons and that the bomb technology could
easily fall into the hands of terrorists and organiz-
ed crime.
Armstrong called the arms race "primitive
morality" and said thaf'the belicose rhetoric
(and) the radical increase in military spending in
this country are not deterrants (but) rather they
feed the flames of fear and irrationlity All of
these fears, coupled with human error, could lead
to "global extinction Armstrng said.
Armstrong addressed what he called the
"Biblical basis for nuclear disarmament" when
he quoted Isaiah 9: "Nations shall beat their
swords into plowshares, their spears into pruning
hooks. Nation shall not lift up sword against na-
tion, neither shall they learn war anymore
He also mentioned the "Sermon on the
Mount" where Jesus said, "Those who live by the
sword shall perish by the sword
"Those who live by the bomb will perish by the
bomb he added.
"In a dark time can their eyes see?" Armstrong
said, speaking about the leaders who were not
"seeing" the need for nuclear disarmament. "I
do believe in uni-lateral initiatives based on good
faith and trust he said, adding that uni-lateral
disarmament was not a practical option at this
time.
"The taproot of violence in our society today is
our intention to use nuclear weapons Arm-
strong said, quoting a Jesuit priest at Georgetown
University, Father Richard McSorley. "Once we
have agreed to that, all other evil in minor incom-
parison
Armstrong also announced that Billy Graham
and Pope John Paul II were among his long list of
religious leaders who were calling for disarma-
ment.
"Nuclear disarmament is a risk-taking ven-
ture he said. "How much greater is the risk
forced upon usthat insists that our security can
be found in a balance of nuclear terror or in winn-
ing an unwinable Nuclear Arms Race?"
Armstrong called on the participants to "stick
with it, do your homework, make your plans, and
return to your several spheres of influence better
prepared to do that which the day calls for, the
hour calls for, and reality calls for
The Last Carolinian
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yeat and every W lat ' '
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The East Carolinian oftices
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Application to mail at second
viass postaqe rates is pendinq at
G-eenviile. North Carolina
WORLD CHAMPIONS
COMING
April 17 and 18. Saturday and
fjnday, the ECU Fnsbee Disc
Ilub invites you to the Natural
.ight Flying Disc Classic Come
?ratch fnsbee experts do their
fling, catch some rays, and join
he fun If you like to throw the
lisc. come Oin the crowd Mon
lays at 8 p m , room 247
Mendenhall, andor Tuesdays and
fhursdays at 3 p m , bottom of
toiiege Hill Be there or be
b long!
MARSHALL
APPLICATIONS
Marshall applic at ions now being
B i epted m the SGA Office. Room
228 Mendenhall (Monday Friday,
from 8 a rn thru 5pm
ALPHA PHI
On Wednesday. April 7 at 8 X
p m there will be a rush party for
- . Alpha Pni Big Brothers m the
Tar River Club House Plenty of
good times, good people and cold
beverage Make plans to iom in on
fun!
SUMMER SCHOOL
ROOM RESERVATION
Residence hall room deposits tor
Summer School 1982 will be ac
n the Cashier's Office,
Room 105. Spilman Building.
. r p . pg April 1 Room
inments will be made m the
respective residence hail offices
pr.i 5 and 6 Thereafter, they
w.H be made m the Office of Hous
ing Operations. Room 701.
Whichard Bu'lding The rentier a
term of summer school is $.120 'or
room and $180 tor a
private room Additional rcnl m
" - amount ot $20 is required
Han
Students who wish to reserv
N � t presertly occupy, pro
! such rooms are to be in use
Summer are 10 make reserv a
� Monday April 5 Another
s'udep.ts may reserve rooms or a
� � � � . � oasis or
April 6
Residence halls to De u'j I i
er are Greer, siar and Jar
. s Mi-p will be housed n Gan I
Hans
ECU LAWSOCIETY
� ig deta-is on
� � : mee t i ng in
er C 105 a' 4 p �
- Trip is planned
-
IVCF
iei
I
meet ngs on
' 30 .n Room
hall t f s a- � �
i � � . , . � a ead our
"MR. 10"
The Elbo and the Little Sisters of
Lambda Chi Alpha present the
first annual "Mr 16" Contest to be
held Tuesday. April 13 at I �
Contestants wishing to enter.
please contact 757 163�, 7Si 2799.
or call the Elbo There will be no
entry tee The charge at the door is
$.75 before 10 o'clock and $1 00
after Door prizes will be awarded
CIRCLE K
The Circle K club of ECU invites
all students to attend our Tuesday
night meetings m room 221
Mendenhall We are now initiating
a membership drive for students
who are interested m helping
others through our various service
proiects See y'all Tuesday night
at 6 30
AEDELECTIONS
Elections for Alpha Epsilon
Delta pre med honor sry i a
be held on Tuesday. April 6 at 7 30
p m in Flanagan 307 Tn.s
meeting is mandatory for an
members A cookout will be held
on Saturday April 24. at 'he f im
St park from 4 to 7 p m
RUGBY CLUB
The ECU Men's RugDy Cluo will
hold an organizational meeting on
yVeanesdar April 7 at 7 p m In
Memorial 104 Elections of new of
ficers and plans for the 'an tourna
ment will be on the agenda
Anyone interested m playing m the
fall is welcomed to attend Return
ing players should make a con
scious effort to attend this mpor
lap' meeting
SOCIAL WORK
Studer a" would likf 'o con
Sider changing to a maior m . �
Work or Corrections should apply
now for Fall 1982 admission by
contacting the Department Ott es
1312 Alhed Health Build .
P'Ck up an aplication and maki �
����A app" n t me n t s Ar
ments should be con
prior To the ena of 'he spring
semester To be eligible to apply
the student must have completed
at leas' �ne socia a� �� -
tions course ano is expected to
nave a minimum gi
average of 2 5 Can 757 6961 Mrs
JOynerj for additional ��
BOOK SCHOLARSHIPS
�: '�
ECU announces ,f"a- -
may now tx tot ooofc
' � i - f $100 I " � �a �
� jt u's'apc; pq i s ng
' s ps sen Of Orir
Eta S'gm
appw anc
mation and appi
h m D' JOhrl O
rths Faculty Arjv-se" A
214
COOP
60 Clerk Typists positions are
ava able tor the summer lit
Washington, DC at the Pentagon
m the Office of the Secretary of
Defense The Pentagon, in part
uses a random selection process to
select clerk typists tor the sum
mer Students who have social
security numbers ending in "J"
have been selected tor considera
tion this summer Also available
are it internship positions KH
students maioring in Political
Science. MPA. Computer Science
Business and Business Educa
tion interns w.H be selected a'
cording to their GPA s and work
experience interested students
should apply todaf1 Deadline tor
applications to be re' e v. o s April
9
SOCWCORR
The Department of SOCi
and Correctional Services wi! of
fer courses during the second '
mer session of 1982, befliru
June 27 July 29 which will be O in
'eest to professionals if
human service ' �
workers, ministers, lay persons
and law enforcement ar
� re students pr. ;
these fields
SocW 4002. Crisi!
tion a getter11 apr- i
recognizing, undersMrd rcj and
intervening approp' 'iS'S
Situations Time 4 20 5 50 �
day in the Aii.ei Hea" B.
Room 206
SocW 5003 "Pi
mterver'
with 'he groul
change media Four ��
approaches will Re e�a- � ed a ft
emphasis on group constellat
group dypan- CS and group
I r me i 00 2 30 everf ;��
the Alhed Health Building Room
206
For aoc '
please call r a
ment of Social Wort
1 696'
COMIC BOOK CLUB
�an'asy tans ani
a ha � �� a chance to met
"� irrj Our
treasurea terns op Sup- �
IS whep the ECU Com,c (' �
a sponsor it's anr j
corventior Ap aodei
this rear is record cone' I
con oe neic a' the Hoii
nay Inn op 714 S Memorial D
I'Orri 10 a m 'c 5 P m A
. JbliC FO'
�a'lor. ano
� �
51� D �'
-T 6389 befwet r - l(
SIGMA ALPHA IOTA
T he '
� . � � - �-�
oounces a C .
oe helo Apr i 8 a' 8 15

ECU faculty ar-a studi
-
music Ou'ic ' . � a . " �
PSICHI
Psi Ch. the rational honor socie
ty tor psychology maiorj wii' nav
their initiation of new members
ano elections tor new officers or
Tuesday Apr at 7 00 p m at
the Three Steers Restaur�r- a
members ana new initiates art
urged to attend
JEWISH STUDENTS
Ther. DC a Passove
i , . � as o Va'�
Cohen at 757 1155 or Or B C-
a' 756 5640
BICYCLE CLUB
E CRC a M ,y82
. � � ' ' i .� - 'i
and by anhj A
ate oat ia' yt fron ECU
Eas' Caroi r.a Road Clots hai �
as a D" �
I � u c ana
ECRC wet
10 Eas'e-
and spe- ' any 1 ! -
. ersify. as a D
comm
Ar . '�
are
� Met : ��� Q'
yea' a-
expe- �

I r f e o e e ' I
� �
146 ft n '
6H ��� � � .
-
S March 21 � '
. " 4
NAACP
a

-
'52 845C
dear
MUSIC LISTENING
CENTER
Stct � - v.

ope
10 30 p n � r-r ft
� n .

POMS PONS
198"
A- � � 4 a-
� s must be
� ��� innot attend
"X'Oorsh at '58 -
NAACP Supports
for SGA President
VOTE
DAVID COOK
SGA PRESIDENT
Encourage more minority representation
in SGA
Reexamine all SGA salaries
vs Revamp refrigeration rentals
Full support of Art, Drama and
Music Bills
Support campus-wide referendums
tKeep intact SGA loan programs
DAVID COOK
ENDORSED BY:
Kirk Little � SGA Treas. ('808182)
Gary Williams � SGA Speaker ('8182)
Brett Melvin � SGA Pres. ('79 80)
Tim Sullivan � SGA Pres. ('76'77)
Jay Nichols � Former SGA Pres. Cand.
Bobby Pierce � Former SGA Pres. Cand
Coalition for Better Student Government
Becky Strine � Fresh. Class Pres.
Becky Talley � SGA TreasElect
Sarah Coburn � SGA SecElect
Mike Hitchcock � V.A.F. Pres.
Dasha Little � Former SGA Elections Chairman
Julie Fahrbach � Chair S.U. Art Exhibition Committee
Russell Parker � Pres. SOULS
SGA ELECTIONS RUN-OFF WED APRIL 7
I
i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRU 6. IV82
liters
on
�1
All
Is are
IS
Supreme Court Rules 5-4
For Seniority System Immunity
WASHINGTON (UPI) � The
Supreme Court, splitting 5-4, made
it harder Monday for minorities and
women in the labor force to fight
discrimination in job seniority
policies.
The justices ruled that seniority
systems are immune from job
discrimination suits � even if
statistics show the system tends to
favor white males � unless actual
intent to discriminate can be pro-
ven.
The broad protection applies no
matter whether the seniority system
was put in place before or after the
nation's civil rights laws were
strengthened in 15, the high court
concluded.
Justice Byron White, writing for
the sharply divided court, said that
drawing a distinction between
seniority systems based on when
they were put into effect "would be
contrary to (the law's) plain
language, inconsistent with our
prior cases, and would run counter
to the national labor policy
But William Brennan, one of the
four dissenting justices, called his
colleagues' ruling "truly
remarkable" and protested that
Congress never intended to protect
"the byproduct ofdiscrimination
The ruling is a setback for a group
of blacks who work in two Rich-
mond, Va tobacco plants. They
had argued that seniority systems
adopted after enactment of Title VII
of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 must
rigidl) conform with the law's man-
date against discrimination on the
basis of race, color, religion, sex or
national origin.
When Title VII of the Civil Rights
Act went into effect in July 1965, it
became illegal for an employer to
discriminate in hiring, firing and
pay. But the act granted special
treatment to seniority systems,
allowing them to continue to treat
employees differently to protect
workers' accrued rights to promo-
tions and wage benefits.
The law provided that a bona fide
seniority system could not He
challenged in court under Title A
unless the system intentionally
discriminated.
The exemption made it harder to
throw out seniority systems, but it
had been unclear whether Congress
meant to protect only those seniori-
ty systems in operation before 1965
or any future seniority systems.
Monday's high court ruling sets
aside a lower court order that con-
demned an employee promotion
system adopted in 1968 by the
American Tobacco Co. and the
local union in two Virginia tobacco
plants. The plants, until 1963, had
openly discriminated through
segregation by race and sex in job
assignments, cafeterias, restrooms,
lockers and plant entrances.
At issue was a 1968 "lines of pro-
gression" promotion system requir-
ing an employee to work a certain
lower level job to advance a top
position still excluded blacks from
the better, higher-pavine iobs.
A federal district court found the
policy violated Title VII because it
discriminated against blacks by
keeping them in the lowest-paying
jobs.
Between 1968 and 1973, only one
black was appointed to fill 30 vacan-
cies in the top jobs, which were
usually reserved for whites. The two
lower-paying departments within
the plant were 81 percent and 92
percent black.
Pboto By SCOTT LAKSON
Over The River And Through The Woods
Two well-prepared coeds start the long trek to Moser's Farm Saturday to
celebrate the finale of ECU's Greek Week.
GREETINGS
&.
A
,f
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 H
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
S1IS.O0 PregmiKy Tetl, airtti
Control. and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling. For fur
ther information call U2-OS35
(Toll Free Number
�00 221 25; between � A.M.
and 5 p M Weekdays
ABORTIONS
v� ��� femmatt��
App'ts. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
l-WO-321-0575
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
? 17 West Morgan St
Raleigh, N.C
Phone 752-0326
The
Marathon 1
Restaurant
The Best in
Greek food, Pizzas, and Subs.
Try our delicious Souvlakia
Special only $2.65
FREE DELIVERY
AFTER 5:00 P.M.
Located Across From ECU
at 506 Evans St.
PRESENTS
air Band
COMTESr
THURS, APRILS, 1982 7-9
ADMISSION $1.00
- 1ST & $50.00 CASH
JET PLUS 1 YEARS FREE PASS
N D 515 �� PLUS ONE CASE BEVERAGE
PLUS 1 TIARS F REE PASS
RD
PRIZES PROVIDED BY SPONSORS
PLUS I YEARS FREE PASS
PRIZES PROVIDED BY:
TODD'S STEREO
APPLE RECORDS
FREDDIE'S
FAMOUS PIZZA
BOND'S
HAPPY STORE
U
Oi Caieeni� Patlfii aarf
T-Sbirts, Sleeping tegs,
��cfcawck. Camping �����-
neat. Steel Teed IDmi.
Otsfce and ever rag rttar�t
I
ARMY-NAVY
STORE �'
VY I
USED
TIRES
10
inquire at
Evans Seafood
$
oo
Bausch & Lomb
Soft Lenses
COMPLETE
includes initial eye examination, lenses, care
kit, instructions and follow up visits for one
month. ECU student l.D. required.
9900
a � euoon and
?
OPTOMETNC
�Y�CAR�C�H1�R
Of Greenville PA
228GREENVILLE BLVD.
TIPTON ANNEX
754-9404
Dr. Peter Hollis
�sow
LOOKING GOOD COSTS LESS
BnnS � V
$?CH-rT for comparaoi
products. �5
nald
Limited to valid coupons from any Fast Service
Restaurant in our area. Limit one coupon per person per
visit. Please present when ordering Not good with
other offers. Customers must pay sales tax.
Good only at McDonalds�
10th and Cotanchc St
Greenville, NC
Offer valid thru April 30, 1982.
"& J.A. UNIFORMS
SHOP
All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes,
shoes, and hose. Also � used ECU
nurses uniforms. Trade-ins allowed.
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive.
Near Hollowell's Drug and old hospital.
� SOUTHS (6 I ROCK NIGHTCLUB
G&
ROCK NIGHTCLUB
1 1 I i i i 1 x x i i i i i i r : i r i i r i i
Every Day
11:00-11:00
300 E. 10th St.
750-4121
The Best Pizza in Town � Honest
Gome
Big Screen
TV
Drive-Up
Window for
To Go Orders
TUESDAY
LIGHTNING
BLUES BAND
WEDNESDAY
X-RAVES
ECU 13 PRICES AOM
THURSDAY
Jtf THE DREGS fc
3 P.M.
FRIDAY
DRIVER
, SATURDAY
If LARRY RASPBERRY &
THE HIGHSTEPPERS




1
SUNDAY
TRICKS
EASTER SPECIAL
TUES APR. 6 - LADIES' NITE
wBRIAN HUSKEY
FRI APR. 9 - HAPPY HOUR
4-7 FANTASIA &
WALTER LYERLY
SAT APR. 10 - FANTASIA
wWALTER LYERLY
TUES APR. 13 - LADIES'
NITE wBRUCE FRYE
�C
USI� f$L�L
THURSDAY
NEW WAVE NITE
LADIES' SPEC.
FRIDAY
THOMPSON-
PARNELL BAND
HAPPY HOUR
MATINEE
EAST CAROLINA S
PARTY CENTER
TUESDAY
MALE BEST CHEST CONTEST
WEDNESDAY
HUMP NITE
THURSDAY
COLLEGE NITE
BULLPEN NITE
1st beverage � JSc w ticket stub
from ECU baseball game � Thurs . March 4
FRIDAY
END OF WK. PARTY
SATURDAY
BEST IN DANCE MUSIC
SUNDAY
LADIES' NITE
IT TAKES 12 INCHES
TO MAKE AMMO .
Every Day - Buffet 110O-2HW2.79
Men. & Tuei. - BufM 540-8:00 .2.W
Wed. - "All Yoy Om. Eat" Spaghetti 5000 2.25
Thurs. - LaiagiHl 540-80Twefer3.60
Open
Man. Sat.
l:10a.m.
l 00 a m
Deli Sor-doicht
Vg�aran Sand�icKi �
Homemade Sonet � Heroes om tret hly baked roll
Thursday,
April 8
DAVID GARRY
NOW OPEN
ON SUNDAY
Good Food � Good 7 imes
VIDEOGAMES
Altitude Adjustment Daily � � p.m. 7 P m
(HljajiirrX
"Eastern North Carolina's
No. 1 Beach Club"
TUESDAY
Zoo Nile � 25C ponies
WEDNESDAY
Ladies' Night
Free Draft for all ladies
THURSDAY
Ladies Lockout
8-10 Free Draft
For Ladies' Men's Thighs
Contest
FRIDAY AFTERNOON
END OF THE WEEK
BUCKET PARTY
SUNDAY
NICKEL NITE
Call 7Si �7�5 lor mere info.
-fJTRfl�
10? E. 5th St. 752 131
GOOD TIMES
Darts
Mon. at 8:00
Free Pinball
3-4
Happy Hour
4-7
Largest selection
of imports
Now open 7 days a wee � 1 p.m. 1 a.m.
frtUUU.lt
Cartoon Contest
Call for details � 752-8711
NOW OPEN FOR
HAPPY HOUR
DAILY AT 4:30
Not open to the general public.
Illllll'IIIIIIfllllllll
!

T
i





SUfe iEaat (Earnliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Jimmy DuPREE, mmam
Charles Chandler, �� �.�,
Ric Browning. n.m m ntmrnm ToM Hall- �"�tii,Mr
Fielding Miller, b, ��. William Yelverton. m mm
Alison Bartel, nii�� Steve Bachner, &MrmMi �-
r Campus Forum
Steve Moore, )& Manager
Diane Anderson, stsmm
April 6, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Run-Off Time
Platforms Similar, Yet Choice Exists
Surprise, surprise!?!
It's SGA presidential run-off time
and there has been no controversy
� none during the five-way election
two weeks ago and none during the
Henderson-Cook challenge to be
decided tomorrow.
Voter turnout was higher this
year than in several previous cam-
paigns, but will it remain high
through the run-off. Only time will
tell, though student interest remains
unusually high.
Both candidates seem to be well
recognized by the students they wish
to serve. Both have managed to
garner support from a variety of
factions. One claims support from
numerous past and present SGA
leaders � but then, so does the
other.
No sooner does one candidate
come out in favor of better lighting
on campus and an escort system for
coeds than the other establishes the
same desires.
One candidate touts the support
of the current SGA secretary; the
other has the endorsement of the
1982-83 secretary-elect. One enjoys
the support (financial and strategic)
of a political party; the other does
not. One ran with a full ticket of
candidates for other offices in the
original ballotting; one stood alone.
Both candidates have distinguish-
ed themselves through their service
in the SGA legislature; despite
anything which may be rumored,
neither candidate has established
what could be termed an
"exemplary" legislative record.
One boasts the "Most Outstanding
Legislation" of the 1980-81 term,
while the other has introduced an
abysmal amount of legislation in re-
cent weeks.
Henderson and Cook are both
politically intelligent. Both have at-
tempted to appeal to as many vital
publics as possible � fraternaties,
sororities, SOULS, NAACP, music
and art groups, etc.
So what are we trying to illustrate
here? Political clones!?!
It's not quite that bad.
Cook supports the use of wheel
locks on vehicles parked in violation
of campus law, while Henderson
counters that the university should
purchase its own tow truck and
pocket the profit. The latter plan
would still insure cars illegally park-
ed could not occupy needed spaces.
Henderson also proposes to in-
stall a book rental system in order to
save students money. Books would
be used for several semesters with
students paying a minimal fee for
their use, though they would still
have the option to buy their own.
Cook suggests installation of a
Xerox copier in the Student Supply
Store would be of significant conve-
nience to the students and faculty at
East Carolina.
As we have previously stated, The
East Carolinian has taken no active
stance in favor of one candidate
over the other. Some staff members
have shown a preference for
Henderson, while others show sup-
port for Cook.
Previous administrations have
shown that no matter how bad a
president appears to be, the system
is adequately provided with checks
and balances to counter any unwise
or illogical political ploys.
The important thing � as always
� is to vote. Whether you cast your
vote for Eric Henderson or David
Cook, you have no right to com-
plain later if you don't at least par-
ticipate in the selection process.
DOONESBU�Y
wubzucn wanA
atmiumm nenoos
OKAY?
smaw HGArmws
nnoimx tsuwsae ex
Tnem&m OFtiesuti cuse
AHtuc&rr tanlux test'
VOtSXTI7M� He PIP
lOus&KNou- lemwT
mFCKKN&j neaw uh
ABOUTMAmX IS COM- SX?
NAPViC�' Pisrt Hmo
HHffr WATS1HE
fin- KEZIPefiOK.
ni 5COKH0H
nemcxs?
by Garry Trudeau
Eric Henderson
My name is Eric Henderson, and 1 am
running for SGA President. I am a
junior, majoring in Chemistry .and
minoring in English.
Having served as freshman class presi-
dent, sophomore class president, SGA
executive chairman and Scott Dorm
representative, 1 feel that I am the most
experienced candidate for the office of
SGA president.
Since East Carolina will be getting a
new chancellor, experience is a very im-
portant factor. The new chancellor will
need as many experienced people work-
ing with him in the administration as
possible.
With my knowledge of SGA and East
Carolina University, I feel that I am
qualified for the office and will be an ef-
fective representative for the students to
the new administration.
Since the SGA president serves on the
ECU Board of Trustees, I feel that he is
the students' voice to the administra-
tion.
Without you, the students, there
would be no need to have a Student
Government Association. Therefore, I
encourage more student input.
As president, I would extend my
cabinet to have representatives from the
large organizations on campus, in-
cluding SRA, Panhellenic, Inter-
Fraternity Council, arts, music and
minorities. If elected, I encourage any
student with suggestions or complaints
to come and talk to me.
In past elections issues concerning the
students have been neglected; as presi-
dent, I plan to deal with these issues.
Political Endorsements
As a student who is concerned for the
well-being of the SGA and student in-
terest, I would like to recommend Eric
Henderson as president of the SGA.
I feel that Eric is the most experienced
candidate since he has been involved in
the SGA for the past three years as
freshman class president, sophomore
class president, executive council chair-
man and Scott Dorm representative. He
also introduced the best SGA legislation
for the year 80-81.
Since ECU will be getting a new
chancellor, experience is a very impor-
tant factor. With Eric's background in
the SGA and ECU, 1 feel he is most
qualified for the office and will be a
good representative of our student body
to the new administration.
I would like to remind everyone that
there will be a run-off Wednesday, April
7 for the office of SGA president and
would like to encourage each and every
one of you to vote for the most ex-
perienced and devoted candidate: Eric
Henderson.
OUSSSAHHAR
Junior, FrenchSpanish
Henderson Backed
The run-off election of this Wednes-
day presents students here at ECU with a
rare opportunity � a chance to vote for
an honest, experienced candidate who
always has the needs of the students in
mind. This candidate is Eric Henderson.
As a member and chairman of the
ECU Honor Council, 1 have had
numerous opportunities to work with
Mr. Henderson, and I have never seen a
more serious, hard-working person in
my life. Candidates with Eric's integrity
and ability are seldom found, and the
students here would be doing themselves
a great disservice if they fail to recognize
just what kind of man Mr. Henderson
really is.
Eric has brought out many issues of
great concern to the students, such as a
book rental service at the Student Supp-
ly Store, better lighting on campus
especially around the women's dorms,
and in general a presidency which will
cater to the needs of the individual stu-
dent.
The opportunity is available; so vote
Eric Henderson for experience, integrity
and the students.
MIKE SW AIM
Junior, History
Cook Supported
For the second time in two years, I
have seen the SGA spring elections forc-
ed into a run-off. Being very much
aware of the public records of both can-
didates in this run-off, I feel that it is im-
perative for the students to make the
correct choice. It is my personal opinion
that David Cook is the only choice in
this instance. As a recent graduate of the
School of Art, I can unequivocally state
that he will serve the best interests of
students in art, drama, and music.
Please remember to vote for David
Cook on Wednesday.
DASHAEFIRD LITTLE
ECU Alumnus
Book Rental
Being a recent graduate of Western
Carolina University, I was exposed to a
book rental service. This service allowed
the students to rent their books for a
minimal cost of $30 a semester.
Attending graduate school at ECU
and having to purchase all my books, I
can say that a book rental service greatly
reduced my school expenses.
Eric Henderson, a candidate for SGA
president, proposes to install a book ren-
tal service for the students of ECU. The
service will be similar to that of Western
Carolina's in that it will be available to
all students for all books. The student
also has the option to buy the books.
I would like to remind you that
Wednesday, April 7 is the run-off day
for the office of SGA president. I
recommend Eric Henderson for
presidesnt as someone who will work for
the best interest of the students at ECU.
KADY GRIFFIN
Graduate Student
Refrigerator Service
This letter is in answer to presidential
candidate David Cook's allegations that
the SGA refrigerator service needs to be
revamped. Upon questioning Mr. Cook
about his grounds for making such a
statement he claims to have received
some type of "report" about the
refrigerators in the legislature at the
beginning of the semester.
After talking with some of the SGA
legislators it seems that none of the ones
I conversed with had ever seen this
report. If such a report did exist, why
didn't Mr. Cook step forward and take
some type of action to see that ap-
propriate changes were made.
Since taking office as manager of the
SGA refrigerators in May 1981, each
one of the suggestions made by the state
auditors have been carefully and cons-
cientiously employed. 1 do not know
what David Cook's educational
qualifications are but 1 seriously doubt
that as an undergraduate he could offer
any suggestion that the state auditors
have not previously made.
When asked what type of changes he
would incorporate Mr. Cook stated that
he had "no specific changes" that need-
ed to be employed. A very odd reply for
someone who claims that the whole
system needs to be revamped.
My suggestion to you Mr. Cook,
would be that before you go making idle
(or as in this case false) statements, see
to it that you do your homework and
have some qualified grounds for making
such accusations. It seems that using
such statements as a foundation for a
politicl platform makes for a very shaky
platform indeed. The winds around
Greenville blow very hard.
CLYDE JOHNSON
SGA Refrigerator Manager
Campus Escorts
Being a resident, R.A and recently
chosen as head R.A. in Tyler Dorm, 1
feel that there is a great need to improve
the lighting system around the campus.
Eric Henderson, a candidate for SGA
president, sees the need to improve this.
He also proposes to develop an escort
service for girls walking on campus late
at night. With these improvements I feel
the number of attacks on campus will be
reduced.
I would like to remind you that a
runoff election for SGA president will
be held Wednesday, April 7. I highly
recommend Eric Henderson as a
representative of the students' needs.
MARY CORBETT
Junior, English
Best Candidate
As the secretary of the Student
Government Association, I would like to
recommend Eric Henderson for SGA
president. No. only does Enc deal with
relevent issues and student needs, he a so
has the experience necessary to fulfilthe
position of student government presi-
dThave worked with Erie for the pas.
two years, and I have seen the effort he
puts forth in accomplishing his dut.es
He has been successful as freshman class
resident, sophomore class president,
chairman of the SGA Executive Coun-
cil and Scott Dorm representative.
Eric's enthusiasm and experience
make him the best candidate for the
position.
Words are not necessary to convey
Eric's qualifications for the job; his
record speaks for itself. Vote In,
Henderson for SGA president on April
7.
DENISEPHTH1SK
Senior. Busin
'Extremely Competent'
Good leadership comes from cod
fidence and support. You have sup
ported and have shown your confidence
in me. I will work diligently in fulfilling
my campaign pledges and promises. But
I am just one officer.
Serving all of the students of LC !
going to require the combined efforts ol
all the executive officers. The SGA ex-
ecutive officers need someone to guide
them in coordinating efforts. This needs
to be someone who is level-headed, com-
passionate, and decisive. No. only is
David Cook all of these, he is also ex-
tremely competent. 1 have confidence in
him.
1 hope that you will join me in suppor-
ting the one candidate that possesses all
of the best in leadership qualities re-
quired of a SGA president. Displa) your
confidence and support tomorrow b
voting for David Cook in the SGA
presidential run-oft.
BECKY 1 Al1 I V
Sophomore, Accounting
Communication Gap
Wednesday. April 7 there is to be a
SGA presidential run-off. One can-
didate, David Cook, expemlifies the
qualities needed for SGA president.
During his time in the SGA legislature,
David has shown himself to be a hard-
working individual. He has the
knowledge, expertise and leader shjr
necessary to effectively act as SGA presi-
dent.
David Cook is concerned about the
welfare of the students and is dedicated
to working for them. He is also concern-
ed about the lack of communication bet
ween the SGA and the student body, and
supports campus wide referenda, to help
resolve this. In addition to this Daid
supports more minority involvement in
the SGA. He is a strong supporter of the
arts and realizes how important they are
to the university. In short, he wants the
best for the student body, and I know he
will work his hardest to achieve it.
In closing, I want to urge the student
body to go out and vote on Wednesday.
April 7. This run-off election is just as
important to the students as the regular
elections are. Make the effort to vote,
and vote for someone that cares. Vote
David Cook for SGA president.
Wednesday April 7.
SARAH E.COBLRN
Sophomore, English
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view.
For example, I propose to install a
book rental system which would prevent
students from being required to puchase
their books. Appalachian State Univer-
sity uses a rental system which costs the
students $30 per semester for books.
Also, the student has the option to buy
the book. This will encourage the Stu-
dent Supply Store to use the books for
several semesters instead of one or two
semesters.
With the increasing number of girls
getting attacked, I feel that more lights
should be placed around dorms and
other dark areas on ca npus. An escort
service should also be put into effect.
This and better lighting will reduce the
chances of student being attacked on
campus.
In closing, 1 would like to remind
everyone that a run-off for SGA presi-
dent will be held Wednesday, April 7.
1 encourage everyone to vote and to
keep in mind the points which 1 have
presented.
Once again, I am Eric Henderson �
your candidate for SGA president.
David Cook
As you know, run-off elections for the
president of SGA will be held tomorrow,
April 7. 1 would like to take this oppor-
tunity to thank everyone that supported
me in the elctions two weeks ago.
Because of your support, my campaign
has been a great success.
During the past month while cam-
paigning, many students have stopped
me to inform me of various problems on
campus and where improvements need
to be made. Inadequate lighting in park-
ing lots is a major concern of many
students. The possibility o' placing a
Xerox copying in the Student Supply
Store was suggested by several students.
Female students arc interested in the for-
mulation of an escort service so that
crossing campus at night will be safer. I
encourage all students to stop me on
campus and let me know what they
would like to see changed or where im-
provements can be made. After all, the
SGA is your student government and we
need your input!
I am not a smooth-talking politician; 1
am a concerned student who cares about
what happens at this university. 1 am
willing and able to dedicate myself to
you and the SGA to fulfill the duties and
responsibilities of SGA president.
Above all, I pledge to you my honesty,
sincerity, objectivity, fairness and con-
cern. I want to work with you to best
represent you so that together we may
secure the best possible student govern-
ment.
Thank you for your support tommor-
row � vote David Cook for SGA presi-
dent!
C
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 6. 1982
III
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CROP Walk Said Successful
The 1982 "CROPWalk for
Humanity" drew mor than 100 par-
ticipants for the 20-kilometer (12.4
mile) trek through the streets of
Greenville.
High winds prevailed throughout
most of the walk, which had con-
siderably fewer participants than
last year.
Sister Helen Shondell of the
Greenville-ECU Hunger Coalition
called the walk a success and thank-
ed everyone who participated in the
17th annual event.
No figures are yet available on the
funds raised because of many dif-
ferent walkers, sponsors and
donators involved and an invariably
long collection process.
Sister Shondell asked that the
funds be deposited at Wachovia
Bank and Trust in the Walk for
Humanity account or brought to the
Newman Center on 10th Street.
Collection tables will be set up on
campus latr this week.
Greenville police were positioned
at various locations alonf the Walk
route to stop trattic and help with
directions.
ECU nursing student Katie Gillis,
who coordinated first aid for the
Walk, said "nothing major" was
needed in medical care except
"pretty many had blisters She
also reported that "not many drop-
ped out
Ed King, coordinator of the
CROP Church World Service en-
couraged people to carry signs and
bring out the many issues that are
the related of hunger. King blamed
increases in military spending as one
major cause.
Many walkers wore T-shirts
printed especially for the event that
read "Put a Little Heart in Your
Soul" and had a small heart in a
footprint.
The walk ended with a sandwich
lunch at the Baptist Student Center
and a sigh of relief for all � par-
ticularly ECU student Karen Akers
and Peter West, who were the first
man and woman finishers.
Akers raised $450, which was the
most pledged for any walker.
SUMMER JOBS
Opening in N.C. and Virginia
Earn $7.10hr. if qualified
Minimum of $1,278.00 guaranteed
Part and Full-Time
On Campus Applications taken on
April 6 and 7
TUES APR1L6 WED APRIL7
Brewster B103 Brewster B104 � 9 a.m p.m.
10 a.m4 p.m. Brewster D102 � 2 p.m. 4 p.m.
Jett And The Blackhearts
Receiving Favorable Reviews
Continued From Page 1
York Times and Village Voice.
Robert Palmer of the Sew York
Times wrote about Jett and her per-
formance on stage: "Energetic and
engaging aggressive attack ap-
pealing melodies Ms. Jett pro-
vides a commanding visual focus
According to The Fridav Morning
Quarterback, I Love Rock TV" Roll
is currently the most-requested
album in the country.
Earlier this year, Joan Jett and
The Blackhearts replaced the Go-
Go's as the opening act for the
Police. Record sell-outs for those
concerts became a nightly event.
Handicap Awareness Week
Activities And Events Slated
To All Honor,
Service, and Social Groups
If your organization is interested in being
represented in the yearbook, please call
757-6501 or 758-8015. Pictures will be taken
through April 15. Contact us as soon as
possible!
BTSWOMJl
104 Red Banks Rd. (Behind Shoney's) 756-6000
Tuesday Night �
ECU NIGHT
Continued From Page 1
measles) are also available in the
ECU Infirmary. The audiology
screening will be conducted from 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. in room one, and the
rubella screening is from 2 p.m. to 5
p.m. in room one. Rubella frequent-
ly occurs among college age young
adults and can be especially
dangerous to pregnant women and
their babies.
"Beep Ball a revised version of
baseball for the blind will be played
at the bottom of College Hill Drive
at noon til 2 p.m. on Tuesday, and
all are welcome to join in this in-
teresting experience.
Other events will include a perfor-
mance by the "Caswell Choir"
from the Kinston Caswell Center, in
Jenkins Auditorium from 7:30 to 8
p.m. on Tuesdsay. This will be im-
mediately followed by a film festival
at 8 p.m.
Also to be held are a tour of
Joyner Library's Media Center
Study Room, a wheelchair basket-
ball game, various workshops and a
"concluding conference open to
the public at 3 p.m. on Thursday in
Room 248 of Mendenhall.
The final event of the week's pro-
gram will be a "free performance"
by ECU's "Fantasy" drama troupe.
"Fantasy" has been recognized na-
tionally for its "song-to-sign" per-
formances. They can be seen in
Hendrix Theatre at 8 p.m.
Monday's program included the
film "A Different Approach
which dealt with the lighter pro-
blems of the "attitudinal barriers"
that frequently surround handicap-
ped people.
Interim Chancellor John Howell
introduced N.C. State Liaison for
the International Year of Disabled
persons, Chet Mottershead. who
gave the keynote address.
Tar Landing Seafood
ResUuriat
-Af
4
ir F.ui
rt lent CusUta
Help Prevent
Birth Defects -
The Nation's
Number One
Child Health
Problem.
Support the
VOu e put a lot of time
and care into your Senior
how to make it your best
Popcorn
Shrimp
499
All you can eat
Bob Hearing �
Manager
Phone 758-0327
Cross Green Street Bridge
Take left ot 1st Light
Located one block down on left
JUST $1.00 wID includes
Skate Rental
7:00-10:00
"Every Friday & Saturday Night
ECU Students are admitted for
JUST $2.00 including Skate Rental
Ae at Morgan Printers.Inc
rea.ze your poste: ���
-� 1 jce and rpec ,
� �. Ae also unflerstanc
.1 �, 1 be e.e HJI
� -� -Mrds will meet yours
MORGAN PRINTERS INC
Good Tuesday
& Wednesday
ONLY
FOUNDATION
This space contrfcwted
by the publisher
utilus
1002 Evans
Street
758-9584
PUTT-PUTT
GfXF COURStS
THE
ii!w:iiiii�Mi
113 W�TH STREET PHONE 7S 0704
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
2 DOORS FROM COX FLORIST
We repair Shoes, Boots, Hand-
bags, Belts and some suitcases.
We now have Leather and
Leather Goods for sell.
Large selection ol leather tooled belts.
Come bv. P'tk out one ot our designs. Let
us make you one
With me price ol NEW SHOES, we can
save you money by having your old ones �
AVt� v
CLUB
Join Nautilus and get ready for summer. It's that
time again to get back into shape. Nautilus is located
on Evans Street, within walking distance from cam-
pus. Featuring a full line of Nautilus equipment,
Olympic free weights, sauna, whirlpool and locker
room.
Call and ask about our pro-rated student rates and
low summer rates.
Call and schedule a
free introductory workout.
HOURS OF OPERATION:
MonThurs. � 10 a.m10 p.m. Friday � 10 a.m8 p.m.
Saturday � 10 a.m5 p.m. Sunday � 1 p.m5 p.m.
COME ON OUT
THE PUTTINGS FINE . .
THIS COUPON GOOD FOR
FREE GAME of putt putt
on Tuesday 4-6-82, or Wednesday 4-7-82
Putt Putt Golf & Games
758 1820
10th St. gj
� Limit one per person per day
1
Henderson States Views
On SGA Run-Off
Eric Henderson,
ECU junior, faces a
run-off election for
SGA President on
April 7th. The
21-year-old chemistry
major has served as
president of both his
freshman and
sophomore class.
With three years ex-
perience in the Stu-
dent Government
Association, Hender-
son states he feels he
brings the most ex-
perience to the office
he seeks.
More student input
into the college is one
of Henderson's goals
as president. He adds
that student services,
SRA, Panhellenic,
Inter-Fraternity
Council, arts and
minority groups
should be positions of
the President's
cabinet.
As SGA President,
Henderson wishes to
see the initiation of a
book rental system,
reduction of drop-add
lines, and solutions to
campus lighting pro-
blems.
Eric has served on
the Executive Council
of the SGA and was
awarded last year for
best legislation. He is
deeply interested in
the university and the
Student Government,
and hopes to bring
benefit to the office
through his involve-
ment and experience.
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i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
APRIl 6, 1982
Page 6
'Show Boat' A
Musical Worth
The Build Up
B KATHYWEYLER
sitff Wnier
Sightseers sing and dance on the
Photo Bv GARY PATTFRSON
Midway Plaisance at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair in this scene from Show Boat.
The long-awaited grand opening
of McGinnis Theatre at ECU took
place on April Fool's Day, Thurs-
day April 1, with the first public
performance of Hammerstein and
Kern's Show Hoar, but there was no
evidence of trickery in the newly
remodeled theatre � only a packed
house filled with excitement and an-
ticipation.
When the curtain rose, the crowd
was not disappointed. A stunning
panorama of beautiful sets, lights,
costumes and chorus met the eye
and continued to do so throughout
the musical. Edgar R. Loessin,
Mavis Ray, Gregory Buch, Joseph
Distephano, David F. Downing and
Patrice Alexander (with the aid of
Eves-Brooks Costume Company)
are deserving of a standing oation
for their contributions to the
musical in the areas of direction,
choreography and musical staging,
scenic design, music direction,
lighting design and costume design.
Show Boat, for those of you who
are unfamiliar with the storv, is bas-
ed on a novel by Edna Ferber, in-
spired by a real showboat from our
own Washington, N.C. The story
centers on the problems and
pleasures of the performers and
crew on Captain Andy's "Cotton
Blossom The audience sees not
only their story but the entertain-
ment they present as well, creating
almost a play-within-a-play effect.
Buch's set designs take this into con-
sideration and never quite let us
forget that we are watching a play,
and a play about actors and singers
at that.
In fact, the sets are one of the best
features of the ECU production of
Show Boat. Sometimes elaborate,
sometimes amazingly simple, they
are always effective and remarkably
well done � the best this reviewer
has ever seen in any college or
university production anywhere.
But the sets are only part of the
production. Life and realism are ad-
ded by creative ligh'ing (a sunset is
beautifully simulated t the first act)
and, of course, the cast.
Against the background of an ex-
See SPLASHY, Page 7
Weisberg Could Play His Magic
By KAREN WENDT
staff Writer
Tim Weisberg is not a stereotypical rock musician.
The stereotype drinks and smokes heavily (possibly il-
legally), is uneducated and basically abuses his body un-
til collapse at an early age. None of these fits Weisberg.
"1 was a chemistry major. I ended up with a
bachelors in cultural anthropology, a masters in
psychology and I got accepted to Berkeley for a PHD
program in psychology but what happened was that in
the middle of graduate school all of a sudden it dawned
on me that I loved to perform. That's what did it. The
audiences did it. 1 started jammin' while 1 was about a
sophomore in college says Weisberg.
"1 started in Junior High school basically as a flute
player in the orchestra and played in the marching
bands and played in a couple of Rose parades. That's
about all flute players end up geting to do
Weisberg is also very health conscious. His favorite
activities are beach volleyball and biking (the former he
once did with Wilt Chamberlain, the latter about 200
miles per ueek when at home). He once did San Fran-
cisco to L.A. in three and a half days (about a 400 mile
trip). He neither drinks nor smokes.
But his music is his first priority. Still, he expresses
uncertainty about just what his music is. "I don't know
what it is. It's a classical flute player (myself) and four
or five musicians, a drummer from the Dave Mason
Band, a keyboard player from Manhatten Transfer, a
bass player from various rock and roll groups and the
same with percussion and guitar. So 1 don't know what
it is. I mean it's pretty energetic and by the same token
some of the stuff is really rnellow and sensitive
He is a determined performer also. Sound checks
Music
don't end until everything has the best sound it possibly
can, which is difficult when you are playing different
clubs every night.
He is also unsure of just what he would consider sue
cess in the music business. "After 10 years and 13
albums I don't think that my definition of success is
static. I think that everytime I achieve some success my
goal keeps going further up so I'll probably never reach
it. I think it's like a carrot out in front of me and I think
that something inside of me keeps it just out of my reach
and maybe that's good becasue I'll always keep trying to
improve and reach for something that is slightly unat-
tainable
Tours Always Prove Grueling
He tours extensively and the tours are grueling. The
tour which brought him and his band to Greenville's At-
tic night club began in Miami, went to Fort Lauderdale,
to Greenville, to Blowing Rock, to Raleigh, to Clemson,
S.C to Atlanta, GA, and to Gainsveille, FL with no
breaks or nights off scheduled. The next day they flew
back to LA for 10 days and after that they began a four
week tour in the Midwest.
"What's a personal life?" he replies to a question
about the tour's effect. "I like touring and I love to per-
form. It's difficult sometimes. The hardest part is when
you're tired if you get sick or you get the flu or
something (which he did in Atlantabefore you have a
show to do They did do the show in Atlanta (two ac-
tually) and Weisberg's solo's recieved standing ovations
in both shows. No matter what prevails, quality perfor-
mances are brought forth.
"I like to get up and perform and I'll do this probably
all my life I like all the positive reinforcement
His music being misunderstood is a problem that
bothers Weisberg. Most of the music that he has record-
ed is instrumental, and by many radio stations that
classifies U as jazz. But W eisberg does not like the jazz
label. Though he is unsure just what the music is, as
traditional genres go, he does not classify it as jazz and
forbids promoters from using the term to promote his
concerts.
And what new directions will the industry be headed
in? "I haven't the faintest idea . . . and I don't think
anybody else does either
Double Feature Looks
At The Sporting Life
By JOHN WEYLER
si�ff W rtWT
From Harold Lloyd's The Freshman (1924) to
Sylvester Stallone's Rocky series, athletics have been a
popular subject for film. While boxing, probably"
because it is such a simple sport and therefore easy to
See BASEBALL, Page 8
'VictorVictoria'
Brash New Film Reminiscent
By JOHN WEYLER
M�f( Wriltr
Florida, late 1920 's . . . a speeding motorboat bearing
Jour strange passengers: three female musicians and one
elderly male millionaire. Sugar (Marilyn Monroe)
realizes that Josephine is not really a she but a he, Joe
I Tony Curtis). Daphne confesses to Osgood (Joe E.
Brown), the aging lecher who has been ardently pursu-
ing her, that she is also a he, Jerry (Jack Lemmon). Says
Osgood: "Well, nobody's perfect. " Fade to black on
the final scene in Billv Wilder's Some Like It Hot
(1958).
. . . Fade in on Blake Edward's new film, VictorVic-
toria. Paris, early 1930's the triumphant singing
debut of Victoria, sexy soprano. The act over, she
reveals herself to be a he, Victor. Later, he confesses :o
a smitten admirer, King Marchan (James Garner), that
he is really is a she, Victoria (Julie Andrews). Says King,
as he kisses her, "I don't care what you are
VictorVictoria, now playing at the Buccaneer
Theatre in Greenville, is the cinematic descendant of the
classic Some I,ike It Hot. Like it's predecessor, VV is a
very funny farce that mixes slapstick with sly commen-
tary on sexual identities and attitudes. Like it's
ancestor, VV introduces stereotypes including dumb
blonds, macho men on the make, and Chicago hoods,
then pushes them into a whirlwind of sexual reversal
and confusion. Unlike Some I ike It Hot, whose jazz-
inspired title Edwards pays homage to in a production
number entitled "Hot Jazz this new film Lts it all
hang out, at least out of the closet.
While the 1958 film could only hint at homosexuality,
and even then only at the very end, VictorVictoria
openly explores alternative lifestyles from the opening
scene, as Toddy (Robert Preston), performer at a seedy
gay nightclub, awakens to find his male lover leaving
him. Alone, Toddy soon finds company in the person of
Victoria, a penniless singer he takes pity on. Seeing her
in his former love's suit, Toddy has a brainstorm: pass
Victoria off as a Polish count turned transvestite enter-
tainer, producing the world's first female female imper-
sonator.
Cinema-wise, it's no surprise that the ruse works, and
VictorVictoria becomes an instant star. The surprises
are in store for King, who is first attracted to the pretty
young performer, then dismayed to find out she's
acutally a man, then delighted to discover her true
gender. Next, he's baffled, by how to uphold his
machismo image while remaining what the world thinks
is a man.
Garner gives his long-practiced, laid-back he-man
routine. Preston is perfect in his patented highly
theatrical way, equalling his doped-up Dr. Feelgood in
S.O.B Edward's last film. Andrews is fine in her dual
role (those who saw S.O.B in which she also appeared,
will want to know if she goes topless again � 'fraid not,
folks). Alex Karras gives a surprising performance as
Squash, King's beefy bodyguard who admits to being
gay after mistakenly believing his boss is. About the on-
ly stereotype that is not destroyed is the numbskulled
blonde broad, well-played by Lesley Ann Warren.
Edwards wrote and produced Victor Victoria, and
directed it with a flair for farce finely tuned through
years of practice: the Pink Panther series, "10 S.O.B.
He is at the top of his form with this film, deftly infus-
ing slapstick with some substance, provoking thought as
well as belly-laughs.
VictorVictoria is not quite as incisive or
sophisticated as Some Like It Hot � especially, it lacks
the other's climactic twist, substituting instead a funny
but unoriginal drag queen routine. Nevertheless, Ed-
wards' entertaining investigation of The Games People
Play is one of the best American film comedies in recent
years.
Runaway Jett Rapidly Approaching Minges Coliseum
Leather-rocker Joan Jett and her band The Blackhearts will appear in concert at Minges Coliseum on Sun-
day, April 25 at 8 p.m. An opening act has not yet been announced. The date marks the only area
pearance of the petite Ms. Jett, a former member of the devastating all-girl group The Runaway ml k
presently perched atop (he Billboard charts with her smash single "I Love Rock W Roll " Tkli� , ITn.
sale next Tuesday at the Central Ticket Office. Mendenhall Student Center as well as all area outlet. Ami
Records and both Record Bar locations in Greenville. (Major credit cards will be accented 1 TiTk'Ju !
specially priced at $6 for ECU students and $8 for the general public - admission the eveidna of ihfhow
will be $8. The concert is being sponsored by the Student Union Major Attractions Committee

k






LCAt0�OG jgOUT Cocc�rfe- ThC HaP WH
6V QAMW AWl5
THfcl ASI C ARO! INIAN
APR II 6. I WO
CGfA�T1t Sk)C�
CAST W��K
(M0�a);M0 THAT'S
mmw!
Splashy New Start For Theatre
l onlinued Krom I. 6
cellent chorus, the pun
ers stand oui
well Captain Andy,
played bv Dick St
is perhaps the
bes man of the
�up with a strong,
asani voice and ital
presence on the stage
His stage-wife, Parthy
v Hawkes (Karen
I ana Gunther) brings
force and a touch oi
med to her role as
owboat captain's
- - - ggish be:
I he main cha
Viom Boat arc (
ndy's daughter,
Magnolia, and her
� -hand, the
gamblei Gay lord
Ravenal. I a net P.
Noyes and I redeiick
Johnson portray the
young couple and both
are to be applauded foi
then fine singing
voices, though Ms.
Noyes' speaking vo
wa- occasionally
almost inaudible in the
back oi the theatre.
Ms. Noyes brings a
charming naivete and
outhtulness to the role
ol Magnolia, but, un-
?rtunately, a com
parable compliment
cannot be given to Mi.
Johnson 1 hough he
looks the part ot a
dashing river gamblei
able to win the heart oi
innocent Miss Hawkes.
he seems to do very lit-
tle on si age except
stand there Perhaps
because ol this, the
relationship between
the iMi is never quite
believable. Indeed, as
he woos Magnolia dur-
ing the song "Only
Make Believe he is
singing directly to the
audience most ol the
time.
Ihe i eal show -
stealers are I ori Mahl
and Rodney Freeze as
I Ihe and I rank (later
Schultz and Schultz), a
singing-dancing
d namic duo. With Ms
Mahl's perky Bet
nadette Peters-style
cute and squeaky-sex)
voice and Ml I teee's
exceptional dance
abilities, these two real-
K should consider a
professional team-up
off-stage as well.
Also worthy of men-
tion are several actors
in smaller, but never-
theless important parts.
Jackie Vn. Games br-
ings a warm voice and
gentle manner to the
tragic showboat star
Julie Laverne, and
Lyndon R. Fuller
deserves praise for his
line performance as
Julie's husband, Steve.
Furthermore, the
two black leads, Anita
R Beamon as Queenie
and Anton T. Wesley
as Joe. deserve to be
commended for bring-
ing dignity and realism
to their roles. In the
world of Show Boat,
the 1880s to 1920s,
racism runs rampant,
and Queenie and Joe
could have easily been
portrayed as offensive
Aunt Jemima and Un-
cle Tom types.
Thankfully, Ms.
Beamon and Mr.
Wesley did not allow
this to happen.
All too often, the
music behind the
singers, so to speak, is
overlooked � especial-
ly in non-professional
productions where it is
sometimes best
overlooked. However,
this is not the case with
Show Boars orchestra.
i
Coalition for Better Student Government
Urges You to Vote For
91 �IH�
SGA PRESIDENT
RUN-OFF ELECTIONS �APRIL7, 1982
SHOP AT
OVERTONS
AND SAVE
mraTe'coupon
5 discount
Coupon expires April 10th
on all orders $10.00
or more.
I Student Name
I
ID Number
Amt. ot Purchase
I
L��-
"Home of Greenville's Best Meats1
i
ip
IS
M
lie
Ire
Supermarket, Inc.
Though small, they
produce a marvelous
sound. The interludes
between songs were
especially well-done �
effective but unob-
trusive. So here's a
round of applause for
the people in the or-
chestra pit � unseen,
perhaps, but not
forgotten.
McGinnis Theatre,
then, has had a truly
grand opening with Us
first production.
-I I.it tie Hit Xtra (Xtra)
tra lra lead sinter Kdle Jeffreys and bassist lac jhu art shown
during Ihe hand's second set at II' Music Hall last Wednesday.
211 Jarvis St.
2 Blocks from ECU
t
r





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 6. 1982
Baseball Film & Comic Hockey
Epic 'Slapshot' Are Teamed Up
t ontinued From P. 6
film, has been by far
the sport most fre-
quently transferred to
celluloid, nearly every
organized physical ac-
tiit has been tackled
by Hollywood.
Tomorrow night we
will all have an oppor-
tunity to see the in-
dustry's best sports
films, Bang the Drum
Slowly (tuned to coin-
cide with the opening
o f baseball's n e w
season) and Slapshot
(coming neatl on the
heels of pro hockey's
regular season). Hani;
the Drum Slowly is the
fust half of the Student
Union Films Commit-
tee's "Sporting Life"
double feature and will
be shown at 7 p.m.
Slapshot will follow at
9 p.m. Both films will
be shown in the Hen
dn Theatre and ad-
mission is b II) and ae-
tiit cards oi MSC
membership.
Hum; I he Drum
Slowly is John Han-
cock's 1973 visualiza-
tion oi Mark Harris'
1955 noel about a
dim wit ted. mediocre
member ol the New
York Mammoths, the
butt of all his team-
mate's jokes, who is
slow I dvine of
Hodgkin's disease. On-
ly the Mammoth's star
pitcher knows that fatal
fact, and he strives to
keep it secret and to
comfort the stricken
catcher. Eventually the
entire team rallies
around the poor fellow
i n a display of
brotherhood and sup-
port .
Someone who should
know, Jim Bout on,
former New York
Yankees pithcer turned
writer, wrote that
though the dying man's
thick-skinned and
thick-skulled team-
mates would likely have
remained insensitive to
him even after the
knew the truth, the film
is highly effective in its
e v oca t ion of the
baseball mileu:
"So the storv is cor-
ny and the players"
reaction to death may
not be a quite true, but
Hang The Drum Slowly
works because of the
marvelous perfor-
mances bv Robert
DeNiro as Pearson, the
dving catcher, and
Michael Moriarty as his
friend Henry VYiggen,
the pitcher
While the above film
is about athletes who
overcome their natural
harshness, Slapshot
concerns sportsmesn
who deliberately
become as brutal as
possible. Paul Newman
stars as Reggie Dunlop,
the aging player-coach
of the third-rate
Charlestown Chiefs ice
hockey team. To save
his team he urges the
once clean-playing men
to raise hell and smash
heads on the playing
field.
Dunlop's painful
plan works, of course:
their highly violent and
eccentric playing
methods win the Chiefs
games and audiences.
As Vincent Canbv o
the ?' ork Times
once put it, "Slapshot
dramatizes the age-old
contest between good
and evil as clean versus
dirty, and its dirty that
wins hands (and pants)
down Expertly
directed by George Roy
Hill Hutch C assidy and
the Sundance hid. The
Sting), Slapshot is
athletically accurate,
hilarious, thought-
provoking, very violent
and very profane. Can-
by discussed the heavy
use of profanity in the
script by Nancy Dowd:
"She knows the
favorite word that can
be used as a noun, verb
or adjective, sometimes
all in one sentence. She
also knows the favorite
sexual image that
haunts the language of
these hockey players as
if all living had been
reduced either to com-
mitting a sexual act or
to preventing one,
which is more or less a
reflection of what the
guys are doing out
there on the ice with
their hockey sticks and
the puck. If you don't
invade the enemy ter-
ritory, the enemy will
invade yours
THE SHOE OUTLET
(Located beside Evans Seafood)
Featuring name brand shoes at bargain prices.
Up To 75 OFF regular prices
Bass Sleward-McGuire Brouse Abouts
201 W. Washington St. Within walking distance of campus.
EPS??
SK
SORDW
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irSp
ntfte
bo
:or
f!��"
BV30
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con
test
vce9aVuaV3te
and Ke9
Races

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ITtMPOUCV
Ec ol these advertised items is required to be readily available to sale a
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PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT , APRIL 10, AT AAP IN GREENVILLE, N C
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHERJRETAiL DEALERS OR WHOLESALED
703GREENVILLE BLVD.
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Happy
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From A&P
A&P Will Be Closed
EASTER SUNDAY
Easter Holiday
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IMPORTED
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A GREAT VALUE AT A GREAT PRICE!
A 20-Pc. Service
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CHOOSE FROM 3 BEAUTIFUL
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� fiz� To Oven To Table Convamanca
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THIS WEEKS
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SEE STORE DIS CXIMPLI DETAH
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m
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Whole (2E�
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Meat Franks
(Beef
ST 1"7
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pkg.
TTsSTINSPECTED FRESH "V
Box-0-Chicken
lb.
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JFG Mayonnaise
32oz
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890
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GREAT VALUE!
ANN PAGE GRADE "A"
Greer Peaches Medium Eggs
29 oz.
can
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ASSORTED
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2 big I
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SUNSHINE
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16 oz.
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59J
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COMBINATION
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pkg-
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TAB SPRITE
MELLO-YELLO
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1
2 Litre
Plastic
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FSESHWrTHQlMLtTT
FIRM FRESH�LOW IN CALORIES
California
Asparagus
US. 1 EASTERN GROWN
Russet Potatoes
fast
in the I
off a
forma
Mahnl
lr-
record
did to
Baud,
forma
"( ;
well
thing
�a on
games
days !
we di
stretel
game'
begin
with
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wrap
Kit
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hits fi
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team
than t
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signal!
a couf
have
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feno
bee
basei
I
,





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
ECU Holds
Sports
APRIL 6, 1982
Page 9
Off Tri
Host Heels
East Carolina picked up five runs
in the first two innings and then held
off a two-home run, four-rbi per-
formance by Catawba's Ken
Mahnken for a 9-6 win at Harr-
ington Field Friday afternoon
The victory pushed the Pirates'
record up to 18-6 on the season but
did totally impress head coach Hal
Baird, who termed his team's per-
formance as "lackluster
"Catawba swung the bats very
well he said. "The only good
thing I can say about it is that we
won.
"We've really got to get our act
together. We have a number of
games coming up in the next few
days that could kill us if we play like
we did (today). It's the toughest
stretch of the season. Many of these
games are on the road and against
good people
That stretch was supposed to
begin this past Saturday, but a game
with James Madison was post-
poned due to rain. The Pirates face
the University of North Carolina
tonight at Harrington Field.
Catawba used four homer, two
by Ken Mahnken, to earn an even-
tual 5-5 tie before East Carolina
Ncored three runs in the seventh to
wrap up the win.
Kirk Parsons relieved Chubby
Butler in the second inning and
earned his third victory against no
losses as the Pirates banged out 10
hits for nine earned runs.
Baird said he felt Catawba's pit-
ching wasn't that strong and his
team should have scored more runs
than they did. "We didn't execute
he pointed out, "and we missed
signals. Had we played a team with
a couple of more horses, we would
have gotten beaten
Catawba forged ahead in the first
inning when Mahnken hit his first
homer over the right-center field
fence for a 1-0 lead that could have
been more if not for second
baseman Mike Sorrell's fine play on
a grounder by Rick Izze that was
followed by a double.
The Pirates tied the game in the
bottom of the inning when, with one
out, David Wells walked and scored
when John Hallow banged a dou-
ble. It was his 12th double of the
season, only two short of the record
14 by Sonny Wooten.
The Indians rallied in the next in-
ning, though, scoring once alter
Greg Stadther walked and stole se-
cond. Terry Radford then singled ro
right with two ou and a single by
Mahnken scored Stadther for a 2-1
lead.
East Carolina then bounced back,
scoring four times in the second for
a 5-2 lead. With two out, Ricky
Nicols was hit by a pitch and stole
second, bringing up Kelly Robinette
who singled him in. Robert Wells
walked and scored along with
Robinette when Sorrell tripled to
center field. Sorrell crossed on the
plate on a double by David Wells.
But Catawba again rallied to tie
the game at 5-5 after a third-inning
homer by Charles Beatty and two
more runs in the fourth. With two
outs, Radford reached first on an
error and was driven home by
Mahnken's second homer of the
game.
The Pirates finally took the lead
for good in the seventh, scoring
three runs. David Wells led off with
a walk, and Todd Evans singled.
Todd Hendley followed with
another hit, scoring Wells. Jay Car-
rawayalso singled, and Robinette
slammed a two-run double for a 8-5
lead.
Stadther's eight-inning home run
for Catawba made the score 8-6.
The Pirates scored the last run of
the afternoon when Evans reached
first base on a field's choice and ad-
vanced on a wild pitch. He scored
after Hendley singled to center.
David Wells, Evans, Robinette
and Hendley had two hits for East
Carolina. Mahnken and Stadther
added three and two, respectively,
for the Indians, who are now 6-8 on
the season.
East Carolina's contest with
North Carolina begin tonight at 7
p.m. The Pirates travel to North
Carolina State for a double-header
Wednesday, beginning at 1 p.m.
In the top photo, ECU'S Rkky Nichols speeds down the first-base line in an attempt to beat out an infield hit
in the 9-6 win over Catawba. Jay Carraway swings away in the bottom photo while a teammate takes his lead
off first. (Photos by David Williams)
Lady Pirates Big
Hit A t Charlotte
Women Upset UNC-C
Tough ACC
Sweeps Past
Home ECU
The East Carolina men's tennis
team met a strong Atlantic Christian
College squad Monday afternoon,
coming out on the short end of an
8-1 score.
The Pirates are now 8-3 for the
season.
The East Carolina women
defeated a powerful UNC-Charlotte
squad Friday afternoon, 5-4, after
splitting the singles and taking the
number one and three doubles.
The win enabled the Lady Pirates
to push their season record to 5-1
while the Lady 49ers fell to 7-2.
Saturday, the Pirate men whipped
UNC-Charlotte by a 6-3 margin for
their eighth win of the spring.
In the Atlantic Christian match,
East Carolina was defeated in the
opening match, but teammate
Donald Rutledge bounced back to
defeat Johan Sturen. That was the
onlv win of the day for the Pirates,
as Bulldogs took the next seven.
The Saturday match with
Charlotte saw East Carolina win
four of the six single's matches and
two of the three in double's com-
petition.
"It was a great win considering
the circumstances said assistant
coach Allan Farfour. "The wind
conditions were terrible. We lost
two straight so we needed a good
win.
ACC Summary
Keith Zengel (ECU) d. John Holl-
ingsworth, 6-0, 6-1.
Ed Caldwell (UNC-C) d. Don
Rutledge, 4-6, 6-3, 7-6.
Ted Lepper (ECU) d. Todd
Stewart, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4.
Barry Parker (ECU) d. Dan
Holland, 7-5, 7-6.
Norman Bryant (ECU) d. Rick
McElreath, 6-3, 2-6, 6-3.
Zengel-Parker (ECU) d.
Caldwell-Jose Acosta, 7-6, 6-3.
Lepper-Bryant (ECU) d. Bill
Holden-Mark Allen, 7-6, 6-1.
McElreath-Hollingsworth
(UNC-C) d. Paul Owen-Rutledge,
1-6, 6-3, 6-4.
Women's Summary
Susan Romeo (UNC-C) d. Debbie
Christine, 7-6, 6-3.
Kathrine Tolson (ECU) d.
Dorothy Brown, 6-2, 6-3.
Dawn Maybank (UNC-C) d
Laura Redford, 6-0, 6-3.
Janet Russell (ECU) d. Kelly
Kauton, 6-3, 6-7, 6-3.
Tracey Eubank (ECU) d. Renn
Ruff, 7-5, 6-2.
Patricia Dunlop (UNC-C) Han-
nah Adams, 4-6, 6-2, 6-2.
Tolson-Christine (ECU) d.
Romeo-Brown, 7-5, 7-6.
Maybank-Kauton (UNC-C) d.
Redford-Russell 6-3, 6-1.
Eubank-Adams (ECU) d. Ruff
Dunlop, 7-5, 6-4.
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Aublanl Sport Kdilor
The East Carolina women's soft-
ball team gained another tourna-
ment title over the weekend, winn-
ing the UNC-Charlotte, Invitational
softball tournament.
The Lady Pirates downed UNC-
Charlotte, 10-3, in the champion-
ship game Saturday after meeting
the Forty-Niners twice before on the
same day.
The score was tied 3-3 in the bot-
tom of the third inning, but the
Lady Pirates drove in five runs in
the fifth inning and added two more
in the sixth to win.
ECU had seventeen hits in the
game, with Shirley Brown driving in
four runs and Cynthia Shepard with
two. Shepard, Brown, Mitzi Davis
and Jo Landa Clayton were all
three-for-four, and Davis and
Clayton both had one run batted in
against UNC-C.
The Pirates, now 22-4, were
followed behind UNC-C for second
place and N. C. State finished third.
ECU's Yvonne Williams was
named the Most Valuable player in
the tournament. Brown, Shepard
and Williams were all named on the
all-tournament team.
Head coach Sue Manahan said
the team gained more confidence
after each game, and hitting im-
proved all day.
"Our hitting and defense really
came together in the last
game(championship)
The Lady Pirates opened the
tournament Friday, playing round-
robin style. Their first game was
against North Carolina A&T, easily
defeating them, 11-3. Angie Hum-
phrey(5-l) was the winning pitcher.
ECU won the next game by a
forfeiting Mars Hill College, and
went on to face N. C. State for a
third victory, winning 3-2.
On the last day of the tournament
play, ECU went up against Ap-
palachian State, now in a double
elimination contest. The Pirates
dominated, beating ASU, 3-0. ECU
scored singles in the first, third and
fourth innings to ensure a lead.
The Pirates' only loss in the tour-
nament was in the next game against
hosting UNC-C. The Pirates were
defeated 5-2 in nine innings.
The game was scoreless through
four innings, but UNC-C scored
twice in the fifth to jump ahead.
ECU cut the lead to one after
scoring in the bottom of the seventh
to send the game into extra innings.
UNC-C came back, scoring three
runs in the top of the ninth to win.
Williams was two-for-two, slam-
ming a homerun and having two
runs batted in. Maureen Buck went
two-for-three and Davis went two-
for-four.
With one game away from being
eliminated, ECU confronted N. C.
State for a 7-3 victory.
ECU scored three runs in the first
to take the lead. N. C. State trailed
by one. 3-2, scoring two runs in the
top of the third but the Lady "Pirates
scored three runs in the bottom of
the the inning to guarantee the win.
Williams, Shepard, and Davis
were all two-for three, with Shepard
hitting a homerun and Williams a
triple.
ECU met UNC-C once again.
The Lady Pirates jumped out to a
2-0 lead in the first inning but ECU
tied the game with two runs in the
bottom of the inning. They went on
to take a lead they never lost, scor-
ing two runs-in the third, for a final
score of 4-2.
Shepard, Brown and Clayton
were all two for three for ECU.
Brown and Shepard both had
doubles and Brown had two runs
batted in.
Jeanette Roth(16-3) pitched in
every game except one in the tourna-
ment.
Manahan praised Roth for her
performance in the invite.
"She did a good job pitching con-
sidering how windy it was
Manahan said.
The Lady Pirates travel to Camp-
bell Tuesday.
ODU Elects
To Join Sun
Belt League
ByANNESAKER
NORFOLK, Va. (UP!) �
Athletic officials at Old Dominion
University unveiled their worst-kepi
secret Monday � the school wil join
the Sun Belt Conference.
Athletic Director Jim Jarrett said
the affiliation provides a "great
marriage" of television coverage
and the cities in which the circuit
plays will enhance recruiting.
"This is the beginning of a new
era; the next step in a plateau for us
to reach excellence he said.
ODU drops its affiliation with the
ECAC-South to become the eighth
member of the Sun Belt, one of the
nation's youngest collegiate basket-
ball leagues.
The conference includes Western
Kentucky University, which has
fielded winning teams in recent
years, and the University of
Alabama-Birmingham, piloted by
former UCLA coach Gene Bartow.
UAB gained attention when it
knocked off Virginia in the recent
NCAA tournament.
Other members are intrastate
rival Virginia Commonwealth
University, Jacksonville, South
Alabama, South Florida and the
Univeristy of North Carolina at
Charlotte.
Old Dominion and conference of-
ficials have talked about the move
for three years. Jarrett said he and
his staff evaluated other conferences
before picking the Sun Belt.
"We've been discussing a variety
of conferences over the last two and
a half years, and we have had some
time to evaluate our decision. I'm
plesed that we have made the right
one Jarrett said.
Basketball coach Paul Webb told
reporters he is anxious to join the
league.
"I'm excited about joining the
Sun Belt Conference because it is
another step forward toward mak-
ing the Sun Belt Conference the top
basketball league in the country
he said.
Also on hand at the news con-
ference was conference commis-
sioner Vic Bubas, who said "it just
seem logical for ODU to join us in
the Su Belt Conference, and this
will push us into prominence
Despite Rough Weather
Pirates Perform Well
The East Carolina Pirate
tracksters competed in the Duke In-
vitational last Saturday and, despite
windy conditions, placed well in
several events as well as posting
three new IC4A qualifying times.
The IC4A is one of the most
prestigious track conferences in the
United States. The Pirates were
finally admitted to the powerful
league after a long seven-year wait.
Both the mile relay squad and the
4 X 100-meter relay unit captured
second-place honors. Michael
Goins, Tim Cephas, Terry Ford and
Jeff Golden clocked a 41.1 in a
photofinish race with winner St.
Augustine's in the finals of the 400
meter relay. Keith Clarke, Shaun
Laney, Carlton Frazier and
Lawrence Ervin combined for a
3:13.1 for second place in the mile
relay.
Standout Cephas was orginally
supposed to run anchor but suffered
a pulled hamstring in the 200 meter
race. Laney substituted for usual
second-man Ervin, who moved to
fill the anchor spot in the race.
Ford, a freshman from Fayet-
teville, qualified for two 1C4A
Championship Meet events. The
sprinter ran a : 10.48 in the semin-
finals of the 100 meter dash only to
be disqualified in the final heat due
to a false start. Nevertheless, his
time bettered the 10.8 required for
the IC4A's. Needing a :21.75 to
qualify for the conference, Ford
took fourth place in the 200-meter
race with a :21.3 clocking.
Pirate newcomer Michale Goins
clocked the third new IC4A require-
ment as he ran a :10.5 for fourth
place in the 100-meter event.
Freshman Goins, also from Fayet-
teville, enrolled at East Carolina
and joined the Pirate thinclads just
this semester.
Frazier and Ervin placed second
and third, respectively, in the
400-meter contest with a :48.21 and
48.3 times. Neither managed to post
the IC4A qualifying requirement of
:47.70.
Coach Bill Carson will take his
track sq?:ad to the Carolina Relays
in Chapel Hill this Saturday.
ECU'S Debbie Christine
ECU Tennis
Program
Improving
By THOMAS BRAME
Aiuiwi Storti Mttor
The East Carolina men's tennis
team is off to an impressive beginn-
ing to their spring. The Pirates were
7-0 before a tough loss to the
Wolfpack of N.C. State Tuesday
afternoon.
East Carolina is now 8-3.
Pirate head coch Carolina Brown
explains this surge. "There are three
reasons for our success this spring.
One reason is that the players feel
there is concern for their program.
This attitude has helped the players
emotionally
Brown is in her second year as
head coach. She coached the AIAW
squad to a 5-4 record last spring and
is a graduate of Furman University.
She is also a former player on the
Avon Future's Qualifying Tennis
Circuit. .
She also says that having one
coach for both the men and women
creates stability and a program in
which players can tnan by.
These aspects have motivated the
players, according to Brown, to per-
form better and more as a team. The
new system has challenge the per-
formers to better the'r persona)
games.
The addition ot a tennis staff has
improved the program, too, she
says. Along with Brown, the staff
includes assistant coach Alan Far-
four and Dean Weant, a volunteer
coach, who have brought experience
and knowledge to the East Carolina
tennis program.
"Basically, everyone on the team
has improved some emotionally,
physically and mentally she says.
The Pirate men are winning mat-
ches by larger scores than the past
years squads. "These traits indicate
imrovement Brown says.
CA

!
V- . "�





10
THE EASTCAROl 1NIAN
APRIL 6, 1982
Classifieds
LOST IN MINGES March u. a
'��) class ring, blue stones, initials
"JAA on inside II found please
contact Joe at 149 Slay 7M (485)
FOUND Ladies watch on the mall
in tront of the infirmiry Contact
Fielding Miller at the East Caroli
nian
FOR SALE
TRAILER FOR SALE set up in
Greenville I SR all electric, a c.
eicellent condition S2WS call Tar
boro 823 894
VIVITAR ZOOM LENS 75 JlOwith
macro for Nikon mount used only
two times H5 Call 757 3210
SKIS FOR SALE K 2 185 comp
BIO skis with Soloman bindings
II2S Call 757 3210 and leave
number
DORM SUE REFRIGERATOR
Good condition Price Negotiable
Call Odile now at 758 3688
TEN SPEED racing bike 25
frame Call 752 '300
AKC REG LABRADOR PUP
PIES Black 5125 males 5100
females Call 757 3701 or ?58 �462
1 5 CUBIC FEET
REFRIGERATOR Encellentcon
dition 550 or best offer Call
"8 9405
WATERBEDS Don t pay retail
lor your waterbed Buy a complete
l$1 quality waterbed with a IS yr
lactory warranty tor as low as
U7 May stvlt to choose irom
taway and Delivery adv Buy now
.no recieve a tree set oi padded
�ails 153 value) Call David tor
appointment ?i8 :408
PERSONALS
Do you know someone with an m
terestintj or unique hobby or
c raif it so contact the Buccaneer
'V 6SOI
PSl CHI Members and new in
� ates vote Cathie Murensky
President April 6 Be there Be
�nown Vote right P S Who is Ed
A iqiield
i NEED a bicycle it you have one
�or ale Call 758 46 5 latter 5 pm or
Before 10 am weekdays I
TAERP It is a rare and special
�n.nq to tind a friend who will re
riam a friend forever TWIT
TO THE SIG EP BROTHERS
you raiders of the night How
ed we wire to find our lawn
Dinq covered m white So here s a
i of caution as you can surely
e are going to get even and
PAYBACK is always hell
T E i US how outstanding your
inization is II it has won an
aard any time during the
�� mic ,fji type up the mlor
� 'on keep t bnefe and mail it
the East Carolinian oltice m
care ol the News Editor Deadline
5 vonda April 13
��SS KiMBv Ha.e a happ.
'y second We re thinking
dDOot you in Cnapi'i Hill Love.
John and Hussev
A BiG D D welcome to Bob
Kim E ame Brtnda Karen Lyn
Ardie �� Jim and David
You're all brothers now. so now
the real work begins Be active
and stay active
FOR RENT
APARTMENT FOR rent May
Aug Furnished, one block from
campus Deposit reguired Cheryl
752 1959
AVAILABLE FOR summer school
and nent tall if desired 3
bedroom 2 lull bath Furnished
Ouple walking distance from
campus 5245 Call 757 1917
SHARE SPACIOUS Apt m Large
house females call 75 550 (work I
after 5 leave message tor Dee
CHRISTIAN FEMALE roommate
needed to share double room in
an apartment 50 plus 13
utilities One block Irom Jenkins
building call 752 20
TWO BEDROOM Furnished
mobile home 3 4 miles off campus
510 monthly Possibly no lease or
deposit Call 758 7724
TWO BEDROOM Trailer mostly
furnished 5140 per month plus
utilities, wai to wall carpet One
mile irom campus More info call
752 3372
FOUR BEDROOM House Fully
furnished and -arpeted May 15
Aug 15 5225 p us utilities Call
7S2 1727
CANNON COLIR' Apt to sublet
tor summer spacious partially
furnished fownhous 2 bedrooms
i l 2 baths on ECU bus -rote Call
758 S809 lor more into
APT FOR RENT starting in May
Two bedroom fully carpeted, close
to campus Air conditioning and
pool Call 757 110 alter 9 p.m.
LARGE HOUSE 2 blocks from
ECU � 7 bedrooms. 2 baths.
5S00 mo 752 529
COMPLETELY FUR Nl SHED, air
conditioned apartment tor one
across Irom College 758 258S
EASTER WEEKEND Cottage HI
North Myrtle Bead Sleeps 7
Available Thursday thru Monday
5200 Call 758 4588 or 7 58 020
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED
ED lr wither or both sessions sum
mer school I block irom campus
Call 758 597
FURNISHED APARTMENT for
rent One block Irom campus May
through August Deposit required
Cheryl 752 1959
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 2 bedroom apt beginning
May i Available lor Fan also On
bus route Pets allowed l 2
deposit, 1 2 rent Call '58 �442
TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT
available lor the summer Fur
nished an conditioned great back
porch for sun bathing good loca
tion For more info call 758 3759
ROOMMATE NEEDED One or
two to share 3 bedroom
doublewide lor sum mer Available
immediately No deposit required
Nice yard For more into call Con
nie 75 734.
FURNISHED TWO BEDROOM
Apartment available tor rent May
August. Scenic setting- faces the
River. Air conditioning and within
walking distance to campus.
5250month Call 757 3052
SUMMER. FURNISHED or un
kmiatmt Apt Available May
August On. block Irom campus
2bdrm 5175 mth. 757 3054
HELP
WANTED
TRUMPET PLAYER
WANTED�top 40 Beach group
Weekend work. Vocal ability
preferred Call 75 49S
GOOD SUMMER JOB Swim
coach needed Salary negotiable. �
wk. 3 hr day Only those looking
tor serious employment need app
ly Contact Swim Chairman, co
282 Beverly Drive, Concord. N.C
28025
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICA
TIONS tor Positions at W7.MB
FM Assisant General
ManagerProgram Director
Music Director, and Business
manager For more information
on positions come by the Studios
on 2cd floor Joyner or call 757 5
SERVICES
CARICATURES BY WEYLER
Greenville's original personalized
art service Have cartoon done ol
,ourseli or a loved one a unique
jilt idea 510 for 8 i 10. black and
white or color Call 752-5775
TYPING TERM Thesis
Resumes, Dissertations, etc Pro
lessional quality at lowest rates
Call Kempie Dunn anytime
752 6733
NOTARY PUBLIC Call Amy at
757 3734
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST wants
to type thesis, dissertations
publications, manuscripts or term
papers at home Call 75 360
TYPIST All papers Professional
quality at low rates, 10 years ei
perience Call 757 1378
HEBREW LESSONS Biblical and
contemporary language E�
perienced. qualified Israeli
teacher Group or individual
classes Call Carmela 752 0083
TERM PAPERS TYPED All
lengths for more information call
758 9798
RIDERS
RIDERS NEEDED to
DC Norfhri nVa Area for Easter
Weekend iApr 9) Call Keith
758 931"
RIDE NEEDED to Virginia Beach
or anywhere near Thursday April
8th Cheryl 752 I9S9
WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH
FOR:
CLASS RINGS
WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS
AkkGOLD& SILVER
SILVER COINS
CHINA & CRYSTAL C
FINE WATCHES

Cv
&RING
OF �V SALES CO ,H�
401 S.EVANS ST open 9 30-5 30 mon-sat
(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH) PHONE 752-3866
'YOUR PROF! SSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER
XXXXXXXNXXXXXXXXXXVN
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Located 1 mile past
Hastings Ford on
10th St. extension
Tues. & Wed.
POPCORN
SHRIMP
2,95
A PLATE
SURE HIT!
Tonight
Harri
Harrington Y
II Fit
7F
Field
7 p.m.
Stul
C01
WE SEW
LEATHER COATS
Duality Repair
SAAD'S
SHOE REPAIR
113 Grande Ave
758 1228
Current undergraduate pre-
nedial ttodenM mot now compete
tor several Hundred Air Force
scholarship These scholarships ore
o be awarded to students accepted
into medical schools as freshmen or
ot the beginning o the� sophomore
eor The scholarship provide for
tuition book lab fees and equ
mt. plus o S530 monthly
allowance Investigate this financial
alternative to tKe high cost of
medicol education
Contact
� S.A.F. Mr i IH
PRUrrSMONs
KM Rl IIIM,
Su.te GL 1 1 100 Novaho Dr
Raleigh N C 27689
Phone College i919V5V41 34
Coalition for Better Student Government
Urges You to Vote For
�jlVai �wsrsn
SGA PRESIDENT
RUN-OFF ELECTIONS �APR.L7,1982
Ok)
and j
Dcpar
Fling'
p m
mitor
indue
to be
"HoH
petit'
Char
vunn
f '
meet
Root
the I
Inf
Items and Pr.ces
Effective Wed Ap-
thru Sun Ann! 1 1 19Q2
Cop jht "982
Kroger Sav on
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold to Dealers
?
A
rO
2
,ot
'
In n
13
�;
wSSt

ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each pi these advertised items is required to be readily ava
?� ?? ,reach Kr�9er Sav on e�ceDt as specifically noted
ad r we do run out of an item we will offer v . your cno-re �.
compare .tem hen available reflect.ng the same sav rigs or a
t.tte you to purchase the advertised .tern at
- a n 30 days
600 Greenv-iiie Bivrj Greenville
Open 8 a.m. to Midnight
Open Sunday 9am to 9 p m
7
XXXSXVXXXXXXVNNXXSNXXN.X
MARSHALLEN
18" HANG UP
-
irr.
BEER
Klittef
li.
12-Oz.
Cans
KROGER
HAMBURGER OR
Hot Dog Bun
2 $1�
� Pkas I
Reg
$9.95
�.
�te&k
Coca-Oo�a
09
SAVE
& � 30
��CEK
ASSORTED TOPPINGS
Fox Deluxe
Pizza's
11 To
HV2-O2
Pkg.
�rf
WASHINTON STATE
EXTRA FANCY
ted Delicious
Apples
tni
138-
Size
Each
10V2-
pkg
KROGER ALL MEAT OR
ALL BEEF
Wieners
98
12-Oz.
Pkg.
wtse
i MATU1AL
. FLAVOt
i imui �
w�T�rniM
WISE
SOUR CREAM OR REG
Twin-Ridges
7-7
Oz
Bag

Vx.
1
juicei
BAGGED
Orange
Minute
Maid
lOO' JX
0
o
Off
SUOQ
MET A11
COSMITICS A jJ
raAGRANCIS
12-Gat-
C
�o
16
i





Students Encouraged To
Compete In 'Spring Fling'
Sports-N-Shorts
By
Gregg Melton
Co-Rec. Spring Fling
Okay guys and gals. Get your groups together
and join in the fun as the East Carolina Intramual
Department is sponsoring the first 1982 "Spring
Fling" on Wednesday, April 14, starting at 3:30
p.m. at the top of College Hill beside Tyler Dor-
mitory. This will be a team competition and must
include three males and three females. Activities
to be included in the program are "Target-Golf
"Horseshoe Toss "Pressure Free-Throw Com-
petition" and the ever popular "Tug-O-War
Championship T-shirts will be awarded to the
winning team, so join the fun!
Entries will be accepted until 5 p.m. on Tues-
day, April 13, and there will be a Captain's
meeting on that day at 7 p.m. in Memorial Gym,
Room 102. A representative from each team must
attend. For more information, you can come by
the Intramural Office or call 757-6397.
Homerun Derby Results
On Wednesday, March 24, the East Carolina
Intramural Department sponsored its first
Homerun Derby Competition. The event drew
over 60 contestants to the women's softball fields
where they tried to knock a softball over the fence
some 260 feet away. Those hits not clearing the
fence were scored as to the distance they were
from the home plate. Contestants were allowed to
supply their own pitcher or use the one provided
by the IM office.
Well, after the dust had settled and all of the
would-be Caseys had delivered their might blows,
the following students had finished as the top 5 in
their respective divisions.
Men
1. Whit Bradham 740 pts.
2. Dwight Tart 660 pts.
3. Garland Thomas 670 pts.
4. Martin Holloway 570 pts.
5. Keith Golden 570 pts.
Women
1. Judy Ausherman 345 pts.
2. Stacy Weitzel 325 pts.
3. Gail O'Brien 295 pts.
4. Kathy Kokiko 185 pts.
5. Angela Pepe 140 pts.
Contratulations go to all of the above students
and also to the other people who helped in mak-
ing the event such a good time for everyone.
RESEARCH
PAPERS
10,278 on file � all subjects
Send $1 00 (refundable) for your up-to-date.
340 page, mail order catalog.
We also provide research - all fields.
Thesis and dissertation assistance available
RESEARCH ASSISTANCE
11322 Idaho Ave.206F
Los Angeles. Calif 90025
(213)477 8226 or 477-8227
CASH
FOR COLLEGE
MONEY AVAILABLE FOR NEXT FALL
There is still time & money available
for next fall & EDUCATIONAL
GUIDANCE SERVICES of N.C a uni-
que computerized service designed to
locate sources of financial aid for col-
lege students can help you get that
money.
We know where the money is � we can
tell you how to get it for college next
fall.
For FREE & Complete
Information Write:
EDUCATIONAL GUIDANCE
SERVICES
OF NORTH CAROLINA
P. O. Box 17S4 KHuton, N. C. 21501
tmmsmsm
Whole or Shank Portion
FOOD TOWN
LFPINCSCVAGA
16-20 Lb.
Average WeioM
Butt Portion Smoked Ham
Lb.
IS Lot. ft Pom Sllooei Free, SeeolSeuoiet
Dinner Bell
USDA
choice:
USW Cbolee Bool Cheek Beeeo
Chuck
Roast
ftoiH ft Shook Molf Soeoi-BooeloM
Dinner Bell Ham
Silted Froo
u. 1" Swiff Hoctett Horn
Potatoes
�7�
Pookofe of 12 -12 Oz. BoHlo
Miller
15 Liter - Ckiooti Buroudf Ckeblit,
Siutoroo Hotter Roto. Rhine
Almaden
Beer f Mountain
Peekofe of 12 -12 Oz. Cone
Sehlitz
2 Liter
h
sc
Shasta
Drinks

44 Ounce
Wesson
tfhf Pee '2 69
6.5 Oz. - LlaM Cheok In Oil
Star
1 Pound
Zesta
1 Lb. - Mer�orine Quartan
StarKist
ira
wesson
m Premium tp�
Shedds-
tfky Pey 99

4 Roll Peek - Coronet
Toilet Tissue

Crackers J
489
t
v
m
Coronet
Prints
�Voo two MT
LeVfO
Jeno's Pizza!
aovNnuncMBKza
3 Oz. - Lihby'e
Potted Meat
49 Onnoo
�22 Oinee
Lux Liquid
S Oz. � Lihhy i
Vienna Sausage Rally Towels

lirt till
SO�I
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ABSORBED-
niwitsV
Cold Power
Quart � Meyoeoeiie
JF6
MayonnaBej
Lorej Oreeo
Peppers or
Lone, Green Slielne.
Cucumbers
96 Oz. - 40 OH Oeofoy
Fabric
Softener
WbyPoy�99 I
Prices good at Greenville Food Tovrn Store
32 Ounce
Del Monte m
A JK&i
Why Poy M 19
I TOMATO
CATSUP j






Prominent Pro Players
Practice Rain Or Shine
l Li I sl , Gj cond many times Defcndinj pion pte �
il PI) Bad weather, and feel I just need .1 Waison was out on the
- been plagu little t �� o make a practice tee Monda last nun
PGA foui evei run at I afternoon despite the yi en lu-
reached the Fast Miller, who will be continuing rain par, wind
. weeks ago, 5 lati rhe field foi this Sunda
a . this week's Masters, strol
Masters He w S5(X) IXX1 , h duled
idav
b
ban sdas. retnai
Hea un bega x oneent 76 Monday when tl
when v �. Vfnca and has addition ol Damn I J
h a n w a r d s w I '
SI 12.(XX he States Gn Gi
. Na � � San L)ieg open Sunda wa ot'l
�I b " iwal tmu I
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DON'T FORGET!
ERIC HENDERSON
s
VOTE APRIL7th
Part III in a series to
assist graduating
seniors
Getting the
Most out of
the Inter-
view
? oursell . � � in a
m
k th the eyi
tl
int 1 1 f you're I
ired
find
itu am

ivith d
response 5 Som ition is a t ept
abli i a fat tor n n inswet
md , V ' point.
7. Do 1 ' � � mn past employi m
' t ' 1 mploy rs will figun thai
might ' m the same to sa aboul
them one day
H Be sure to ask questions about things
such .is hospitalization and fring
tw nefitsompanies feel thai peopl
wh ire enough to ask about
tin se thing ��� not be 1 onsi ienti ius
enough to servi them m II
oPPmans
me n . m
thing
salary a- �
you
mui position
� �
torn Pi �ple who expeel
ire usuall) th lasl
l i it the intt rv it tvei does in I
il he willontd
mighl i npe t to heai h
12 Bt sum to thank thi inti
timi
i 5 At)�'v all else use youi ver besi sens
nt judgem nt l.n t 11 merit an
the keys to a top not h pi rl
an interv iew
,N,Dt all ol these points an applit abli
every situation but it is out hop that
will be ol some tx nefit to you
Downtown Greenviis
Carolina East Mall
Student Layaways Welt ome
Let 2U?c �aat Carolinian
write home for you every
Tues. and Thurs.
Every Tuesday and Thursday you can read the most
informative stories about the news events of the day
at ECU and in Greenville the best sports coverage,
and Interesting features about the people, places and
things surrounding you so can your parents For $25
your parents can get a one year mail subscription to
the East Carolinian
Serving the campus community since 1925 the East
Carolinian provides valuable insights into student
life at East Carol;nia University for your parents.
Twice weekly, we can tell your family about the
most current campus and loca1. news Student free
flicks, concerts and sports events are all covered in
the pages of the East Carolinian as wen as state and
local news that affects the lives of E -tudents
Our experienced, award winning news staff can br
ing your parents the news whereve happening
in eastern North Carolina, plus the most dynamic
behind the scenes investigative reporting
Our features section will bring them fascinat g and
often humorous human interest stories about the peo-
ple of the university and the surrounding area It also
covers the cultural events that enrich student life, as
well as presenting interesting slices of area fiavor
Spanning the ent-e spectr ac
tivity, our well trained staff o! usiastic sports
writers will bring your fair prehensive
coverage of ECU'S exciting t ad
dition to highlighting the re ssive sports
program.
Our remarkable staff works around the clock to pro
duce the best possible newspapef g the
most essential news, features sports of ;nterest
not only to you, but to your parents and friends as
well, wherever they may be The East Carolinian
let us inform them
Your parents, friends, and relatives can subscribe
to the East Carolinian for one year by sending a
check for $25 to: George Hettic jrculation Dept
The East Carolinian, Old South Building, East
Carolinia University, Greenville, N.C 27834
If you wish, you may subscribe for them by mailing
a check for $25 along with the coupon below to the
East Carolinian, or just drop by the East Carolinian
office.
Site last (Carolinian!
SUBSCRIPTION FORM
Ni
t

RATE:$20pcryrar
iEast
(Earnlinian
1





Title
The East Carolinian, April 6, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 06, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.191
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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