The East Carolinian, April 1, 1982






�hz
Carolinian
A.
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 58
Noy�
Thursday, April 1,1982
Green ville,N.C
10 Pages
Selective Service Begins Prosecuting
By MIKE HUGHES
For all males born between 1960
and 1963, failure to register with the
Selective Service is a federal crime
punishable by a fine of up to
$10,000, a term of imprisonment of
up to five years or both.
Until now, these penalties have
not been enforced.
According to the state Selective
Service director, William H. Mc-
Cachren, approximately 91 percent
of North Carolina men born bet-
ween I960 and 1962 have registered
for the draft.
But of those state residents born
in 1963, only 71 percent have
registered.
McCachren feels that their failure
to register may be due to uncertainty
as to current federal policy on
registration and enforcement.
On Jan. 7, President Reagan an-
nounced that a grace period would
be granted to allow those who had
not already registered to do so.
However, the grace period ended
on Feb. 28, and the Selective Service
System, in accordance with the
Department of Justice, has an-
nounced that it will now begin to en-
force all current registration laws.
Legislation now requires that all
U.S. men, upon reaching their 18th
birthday, must register for the draft
within 30 days.
According to national Selective
Service reports, approximately
927,000, or nearly 21 percent of
American men required by law to
register, have not done so.
Another million registrants have
failed to inform the Selective Service
of a change of address.
Under the registration laws, both
offenses will be treated as felonies.
The announcement that the
Reagan administration would begin
to enforce the laws has been met by
complaints by the members of at
least one opposition faction.
Dr. Warren Hoover, executive
director of the National Inter-
religious Service Board for Cons-
cientious Objectors (NISBCO), says
he feels the prosecution efforts will
be "selective and unfair
Hoover feels that the Selective
Service System will "single out"
religious non-registrants for punish-
ment, because they will be the
easiest to prosecute and gain a
favorable ruling against.
Associate Director for NISBCO,
Shawn Perry, explains, "We have
seen that the people who have been
selected for prosecution so far have
been religious. This is selecting peo-
ple who are religious over those who
are not
Perry says that those who failed
to register for the draft for religious
reasons are the first to be prosecuted
because they pose the greatest threat
to the Selective Service System.
According to Perry, NISBCO is
an organization which offers legal
aid and guidance to draft objectors.
The group also lends aid to those
who classify themselves as conscien-
tious objectors, those who have
registered but who want their objec-
tions to the draft to be placed on
record with the Selective Service
System.
Although Perry says NISBCO is
opposed to the draft, he adds, "We
don't advise people to not register,
but if they don't, we give as much
support as possible, legal and other-
wise
Student Sentenced
To Three-Year Term
Roger William Creech Jr an
ECU student, pleaded guilty to four
counts of breaking and entering and
larceny in Pitt County Suprerior
Court on March 15. The thefts oc-
cured during the Thanksgiving
holidays in Jarvis dorm.
According to Detective Sgt. Gene
Mv bee he was holding more than
$9,000 in stolen goods when ar-
rested on Nov. 27. 1981.
The stolen items had been ac-
cumulated during Creech's last two
years at ECU.
He was senteneced on March 19
bv Judge David Reid to a three-year
split sentence. It consists of a
ninety-day active sentence, to be
served this summer, and two years
nine months probation. In addition
he was banned from all campus
buildings except for when attending
class and ordered to pay the costs of
court.
Creech is a former resident of Jar-
Poet Norris
Recites Tonight
At Jenkins
� Any poet alive or dead, or in
any language, would sell half his life
lor I eslie Norris's convincingness
of tone says James Dickey of the
distinguished British poet who is
visiting East Carolina.
Mr. Norris will be giving a public
reading at Jenkins Auditorium on
the East Carolina campus tonight at
8:30. On Friday morning at 10:30,
room 221 Mendenhall, he will be
conducting a poetry workshop.
Anyone interested in poetry and
wants feedback on their work
should bring 20 copies of the poem
to be discussed if planning to at-
tend.
His most recent work is Walking
the H hire Fields and has had poems
and short stones published in The
Atlantic Monthly, The New Yorker,
vis and is still attending school.
In an unrelated incident, three
Aycock residents were each sentenc-
ed to 50 hours of labor to be deter-
mined by the Director of the
Physical Plant, James Lowry. Peter
Spuller, Jonathan Thayer and
Avalon Swain III, all 19, pleaded
guilty to charges of vandalizing
school property in district court.
According to Assistant Security
Director Francis Eddings, they were
arrested on March 4 for damaging
three street lights in the mall area of
central campus. One light was
broken.
Eddings added that these
sentence were givien in an attempt
to curtail vandalism on campus.
Security Director Joseph Calder is
offering a $100 standing reward for
information leading to the arrest
and conviction of people caught
tampering with the blue light securi-
ty system.
Photo Sy SCOTT LARSON
It's All Greek To Me
the line forms in front of the Sigma Tau (.amma fraternity house for activities celebrating ECU Greek Week.
Walk To Be Held This Saturday
I eslie orris
Harper's and many other
periodicals. He was recently
honored by being invited to read at
Poets Corner in Westminister Ab-
bey at the unveiling of a memorial
to Dylan Thomas.
B PATRICK O'NEILL
si�fl Mriirr
Local organizers from the Green-
villeECU Hunger Coalition are
working on the final details for this
S a t u r d a v' s 1 11 h Annual
CROPW'alk for Humanity.
ECU Interim Chancellor Dr.John
Howell, has teamed up with Mrs.
Nancy Jenkins as the volunteer co-
chairpersons of the "Walk which
had over 200 participants last year.
The walk, as in recent years, will
cover a 20-kilometer (12.4 miles)
course, beginning at Green Springs
Park on East Fifth Street, then win-
ding through Greenville city streets,
until the last stop at the Baptist Stu-
dent Center on 10th Street.
This year CROP (The Communi-
ty Hunger Appeal of Church V0rl4l
Service) will be the promotional
organizaton behind the walk.
CROP promotes many similar
walks throughout the United States
for hunger relief.
Re. Graham Nahouse, the East
Carolina Lutheran campus minister,
said the walk is "visible" to
everyone as a powerful witness to
the needs of the poor. "The walk
shows that there are people who
care enough and who will take the
time to participate he added.
Reb. Nahouse said the problem of
hunger, both locally and interna-
tionally, is worsening.
Funds collected by the par-
ticipants in the walk will be used for
both local and international hunger
relief projects. Twenty-five percent
of the funds will be split between the
local Salvation Army and Catholic
Social Services, which both give
yearround food assistance to poor
residents of Pitt County.
Rev. Nahouse said that federal
budget cuts will be increasing the
numbers of people who will need
food assistance in Greenville. "As
government assistance, in many
areas, is being phased out, there will
be less resources available for the
poor he said, which will place
more reliance on the private sector
and volunteerism" as the "major
sources" of help going for the care
of the needy.
CROP gives each person who
sponsors a walker the opportunity
to "designate" his or her donation
to a specific international organiza-
tion doing hunger work. CROP lists
over a dozen different organiza-
tions, including CARE, Project
Hope, the Southern Baptist Foreign
Mission Board and Lutheran World
Relief, to which an individual may
specify the other 75 percent of his
funds is to go to.
Ed King, director of CROP for
North Carolina and South Carolina.
Paratroopers Killed In Desert Winds
said on a recent visit to Greenville
that 50,000 people die each day
from "dramatic starvation"
throughout the world.
"I think it's your Christian duty
to help people who are starving"
said Karen Akers, an ECU early
childhood education major, who is
coordinating the CROPW'alk for
Humanity for Jarvis Memorial
United Methodist Church. "I
almost think we're commanded to
do it I don't think we can ignore
what Christ said. Feed the hungry,
clothe the naked, visit those in
prison and take care of the oppress-
ed "
Akers feels that many Christians
don't respond to the cry for help
from the poor and that people want
to "make it (Christianitv) too com-
fortable
See CROP, Page 2
-On The Inside-i
FORT BRAGG (UPI) � One of
156 paratroopers injured in a desert
parachute jump in which four men
died blamed high winds for the in-
juries Wednesday, saying troopers
were unable to control their chutes
in the air and unable to get out of
them on the ground.
"You had no control at all, none
whatsoever said Spec. 4 John
Painter who fractured his collar-
bone. "You just went down hoping
you would make it
The soldiers were among 2,500
paratroopers participating in a mass
parachute drop in California as part
of "Gallant Eagle 82 a series of
maneuvers designed to test the
readiness of the nation's Rapid
Deployment Force. Although
reporters on the scene said winds
were gusting up to 40 mph as little as
an hour before the jump, Army
Gen. Robert Kingston, commander
of the Rapid Deployment Force,
said the wind was within the 15 knot
limit when the paratroopers
jumped.
But Painter, a veteran of 40
jumps and the last man out of the
plane, said he knew the wind was
too high before he jumped.
"This was over 30, I know that
for a fact he said. "You could tell
because the bird (the transport jet)
was shaking so much
Painter said soldiers were dragged
across the desert after landing.
"Some of them got completely
dragged out of their parachute
harnesses and out of their
uniforms Painter said.
Painter said he lost consciousness
on the way down but awoke when
he hit the ground and his chute
began dragging him.
"You couldn't collapse your
chute he said. "I had to cut
mine
Painter was among 58 injured
soldiers flown back to Fort Bragg
Wednesday. Most of the soldiers
returning had fractured bones or
sprains.
Troopers more seriously injured
remained in California hospitals
while 84 of the injured were treated
and sent back to their units.
About two-thirds of the injured
soldiers who returned Wednesday
came back on stretchers. Many had
casts on their arms or legs and
Painter said several of the injured
suffered friction burns and cuts
when they were dragged by their
parachutes.
Painter said the commanding of-
ficer in the drop should not have let
it happen.
"If he had gone through the
dispensary, 1 don't think he would
have gotten out of it alive he said.
Painter said the officers should
have realized the wind was too
high
They definitely should have
known something when they drop-
ped the heavy equipment and the
chutes wouldn't unfold so many of
them came down upside down he
said.
Pfc. David Baxter, a paratrooper
who knew four of the injured
soldiers, said they also told him the
wind was to blame for the injuries
and the jump never should have oc-
curred.
"Those parachutes don't have
engines on them he said. "You
can't pick you spot, you've got to go
where the wind takes you and those
guys died because (officers) made a
mistake.
All day Wednesday, relatives
telephoned public affairs officers at
Fort Bragg to get the names of the
injured.
Post spokesman Mike Shutak
estimated his office had answered
800 to 1,000 calls for information by
midday Wednesday.
Spec. 4 Louis Ortiz, who handled
many of the calls, said several of the
people inquiring were distraught.
"The older wives, they know how
to handle it he said. "But, with
the younger ones, you just have to
be real calm
Rape Case Brings Cooperation
By GREG RIDEOUT
M�ff Writer
The police departments from East
Carolina and the city of Greenville
work in conjunction in certain in-
stances. One such occasion was the
rape of a Greenville woman on Jan.
1.
According to Detective Pete
Lavin of the Greenville Police
Department, a bulletin was posted
on campus with a description of the
assailant. "This was done because
of the chance that the suspect might
be a student. It also increases the
number of calls by people who think
they've seen the suspect he said.
Then, according to Detective
Sergeant Gene McAbee of the ECU
police, students who believed they
had seen a person who fit the
description called the Greenville
Police Department. "They
(Greenville police) then called us
and we in turn questioned the
suspect McAbee said, "and in
some cases asked for a picture line-
up
Lavin commented that of the 88
pictures already shown to the vic-
tim, approximately 34 of them have
been students.
The cooperation not only exists in
special cases. According to both
detectives, assistance is given to one
another in routine matters as well.
The two departments often ex-
change information and talk over
cases with each other.
"There is good communication
Sec POLICE, Page 2
In for the stretch, the ECU
women's tennis team smashed
Atlantic Christian Tuesday. See
Sports
Weather Watch
(UPI) - Mostly c�nny today with
highs in the mid-70s. Partly
cloudy Friday through Sunday
with a chance of showers by late
Saturday Highs in the 70s
through Saturday; cooling Sun-
day. Overnight lows tor the
weekend in the 50s.
Inside Index
Announcements2
Opinion 4
Campus Forum4
Style 5
Learning About College6
Sports 8
Classifieds10

?
'

t





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL I, 1982
'�-
?
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
It you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcements column
please send the announcement (as
brief as possible) typed and
double spaced to The East Carol
man m care of the production
manager.
For better service, we are now
asking that you pick up several
copies of our new announcement
application for your upcoming
events
There is no charge for an
nouncements, but space is often
limited. Therefore we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you want
and suggest thai you do not rely
solely on this column for publicity
The deadline tor announcements
Is 5 p.m Friday for the Tuesday
paper and 5pm Tuesday tor the
Thursday paper
This space is available to all
campus organizations and depart
merits
WZMB
BICYCLE CLUB
ECRC was born m March 1982.
founded by former bicycle racers
and by East Carolina Students A
seperate organization from ECRA
but run by the same people, the
East Carolina Road Club has ex
cellent potential as a bicycle
power The names ECRA and
ECRC were chosen to direct atten
tion to Eastern North Carolina
and specifically to East Carolina
University, as a bicycie oriented
community
Anyone can Oin. whether they
are enrolled m the university or
not Membership dues are S10 per
year, which go to club operating
expenses, liscensmg. and covers
the cost of printing the monthly
newsletter Pleasure rider or
Olympian to be, we have
something to offer every serious
cyclist
For more information, contact
Kip Sloan at 756 0246 from 8 5 and
757 1680 after 6 p.m or Jeff Horton
at 758 8519 The first US C F race
is March 28 In Virginia Beach
Virginia
BLOOD DRIVE
Give Blood: Give so that others
may live, Tuesday, April 6, 10:00
4:00 and Wednesday, April 7,10 00
400 at the Ledonia Wright
Center Sponsored by your Inter
Fraternity Council
PSICHI
Psi Chi, the national honor socie
ty tor psychology majors will have
their initiation of new members
and elections for new officers on
Tuesday, April, 6 at 7.00 p.m. at
the Three Steers Restaurant. All
members and new initiates are
urged to attend
The 'Electric Rainbow Radio
Show 'S on WZMB Saturday and
Sunday nights from 10 to 1 This
week Saturday's feature album
w.ii be "Led Zeppelin 1" The
album Sunday will be new
"Starfighters" Tune in and enioy
NAACP
NAACP elections will be held
April 15, 1982 Anvone interested m
running for an office, contact
Virginia Carnon at 757 6942 or
Jackie Rowe a' 752 8450 The
deadline for submitting names s
April 7. 1982
CAR WASH
NAACP will sponsor a car wash
Saturday. Apr.I 3. 1982 from 10 un
til 3 p m at university Exxon Sta
tion on Fifth St The price is SI 00
per car
CO-ED FRATERNITY
The organizational meeting of
the National Serv.ce Co Ed
Fraternity, Alpha Ph. Omega will
be held at 3 30 p m on Friday,
April 2. '1982, ill the Conference
Room I Room 210) of Erwm Hall
The Fraternity is nationally
as'Xiated with the Boy Scouts of
America The Meeting is open to
all students
MUSIC LISTENING
CENTER
Stop by Mendenhall and spena
some quiet time in the Music
Listening Center The Center is
open daily from 2 00 p m until
10 30 p m Bring your own music
or make your selection from the
wide variety available at the
Center Also current magazines
are available tor your read.no
pleasure
PHI ETA SIGMA
Students who are to be initiated
into Phi Eta Sigma, national honor
society for freshmen, are remind
ed to be at the multi purpose room
of Mendenhall by 7:15 p.m. on
Thursday, April 1
REFUNDS
All refunds of individual tickets
for the Elly Amelmg Concert,
cancelled from February 23 and
March 2, must be completed by
April 2 There will be no refunds
after that time Refunds are
handled at the Central Ticket Of
tice, MSC, Mondays Fridays, 10
am 4 p.m � We regret the in
convenience of the cancellation.
AHOY MATES!
Enroll in the basic sailing class
Two classroom sessions and three
weekend afternoons on 19 26 ft
sailboats on the Pamlico River
Tuition is S60 and a required text,
Invitation to Sailing is available at
the student bookstore. Class
begins April 8, and registrations
should be received by April 1. Con
tact the Division of Continuing
Education in Erwin Hall for
details (phone 757 6143)
"MR. 10"
The Elbo and the Little Sisters of
Lambda Chi Alpha present the
first annual "Mr. 10" Contest to be
held Tuesday, April 6 at 8:30. Con
testants wishing to enter, please
contact 757 1638 or 758 JW There
will be no entry fee. The charge at
the door is S.75 before 10 o'clock
and �1 00 after Door prizes will be
awarded.
CIRCLE K
The Circle K club of ECU invites
all students to attend our Tuesday
night meetings in room 221
Mendenhall. We are now initiating
a membership drive for student
who are interested in helping
others through our various service
projects. See y'ali Tuesday night
at 6 30
CO-OP
60 Clerk Typists positions are
available for the summer in
Washington, DC. at the Pentagon
in the Office of the Secretary of
Defense. The Pentagon, in part,
uses a random selection process to
select clerk-typists for the sum
mer. Students who have social
security numbers ending in "7"
have been selected for considera
tion this summer Also available
are 36 internship positions for
students majoring in Political
Science, MPA, Computer Science,
Business, and Business Educa
tion. interns will be selected ac
cording to their GPA's and work
experience. Interested students
should apply today! Deadline for
applications to be received is April
9
ACM
The ECU Chapter of ACM
will meet this Thursday, April 1 at
3 30 in Austin room 132 This week,
Mr David Sowell, Research
Associate and software engineer
to the ULTRA Project at ECU, will
speak on the last segment of
designing and building your own
microcomputer Anyone in
terested is invited to attend.
THE WALK
"The Walk" is only 2 weeks
away. Sign up to "walk" or spon
sor a friend. The Uth Annual
"CROP WALK FOR HUMANI
TY" will be held on April 3 at 8 30
am. The money raised will be us
ed to help poor countries become
self sufficient Church world Ser
vice and The ECU Hunger Coali
tion are working together on the
"walk" signup cards will be
available from ECU campus
ministers or from tables to be set
up on campus next week. More
more information call 752 4216 or
come to our meetings at 7 30 p m.
on Thursdays at the Newman
House.
CROP Walk This Saturday
SOCWCORR
The Department of Social Work
and Correctional Services will of
fer courses during the second sum
mer session of 1982, beginning
June 22 July 29 which will be of in
terest to professionals in the
human service field, social
workers, ministers, lay persons
and law enforcement and criminal
justice students preparing to enter
these fields.
SocW 4002. "Crisis Interven
tion a generic approach to
recognizing, understanding, and
intervening appropriately m crisis
situations. Time 4.20-5:50 every
day in the Allied Health Building
Room 204
SocW 5003, "Processes of Group
Intervention working effectively
with the group, utilizing it as the
change media Four theoretical
approaches will be examined with
emphasis on group constellation,
group dynamics and group pro
cess Time 1.00-2 30 every day m
the Allied Health Building Room
206
For additional information
please call or write to the Depart
ment of Social Work and Correc
tional Services or call 757 6961
MARSHALL
APPLICATIONS
Marshall applications now being
accepted in the SGA Office, Room
228 Mendenhall (Monday Friday,
from 8 am thru 5 p .11
OUTDOOR
RECREATION
RENTALS
The outdoor recreation center
located in room 115 Memorial
Gym is open from 2 3 p.m each
Monday Friday. Reservations
andor rentals for equipment in
eluding Tents, Backpacks,
Canoes, and a Tandem Bicycle
can be made during these hours
Hand outs are available providing
information relative to Hik.ng and
Backpacking Trails, Canoeing
Waterways and Camping areas on
the Federal, State, and Local
levels Reservations and rentals
are available to all ECU students,
faculty and staff
FRIDAY NIGHT
ACTION
Fun filled Friday nights will
continue at Minges Coliseum for
Volleyball and Badminton Addicts
on March 26 and April 2 and 16 All
equipment will be supplied for you
and your friends This is and ex
cellent opportunity to beat the
boredom of staying home or it
could be the way for that In
tramurai Team to get in a Little
X tra Practice
JEWISH STUDENTS
There will be a Passover Seder!
For reservations please call Mark
Cohen at 757 1155 or Or B. Resuik
at 756 5640
Continued From Page 1
"Jesus got killed for
saying God is not just a
God of the rich she
added.
According to a
leaflet from CROP
distributed on campus,
people should "walk
because we can make a
difference � the dif-
ference between life
and death
"We walk because
they walk adds Akers
referring to CROP'S
statement that "women
and children in poor
rural villages all over
the world often spend
half their waking hours
walking to obtain
water
Many local churches,
schools and organiza-
tions will be joining
together with ECU par-
Police Departments
Working Together
ticipants to help make
the "Walk" a true
community event, ac-
cording to member of
the Hunger Coalition.
Greenville Police and
volunteer medical pro-
fessionals will also be
on hand to direct traf-
fic and fix-up sore feet
respectively.
T-shirts are available
for sale to promote the
walk with the theme
that has become
synonymous with the
"Walk' � "Put a Lit-
tle Heart in Your
Soul
The Hunger Coali-
tion said that they will
be distributing walk
sign-up forms for
latecomers at the
Mendenhall Student
Center organizational
booth on Thursday
evening and invite all
potential walkers or
sponsors to call
752-4216 or come to
their Thursday night
meetings for further in-
formation.
Support the
Continued From Page 1
between us said
Detective Lavin. "I've
known Gene McAbee
and (Detective) Wig-
gins a long time. We're
good freinds
"When they
(Greenville police) ask
for assistance
McAbee said, "we help
them He added that
there has always been
"mutual cooperation
between the two
departments.
Detective Lavin said
that the description of
the rapist is similar to
the description of a
man who has recently
been exhibiting himself
between First and Fifth
streets. "We,
although, have four
suspects on the case
he explains. Art
students were par-
ticularly susceptible to
this assailant.
Detective Lavin also
commented that a rape
occured early Saturday
morning in the
downtown area. It was
committed by a person
who fined the descrip-
tion of the Jan. 1
assailant except for the
hair color.
Both departments
urge all women to
report any assault that
occurs.
Support me
March�
BIRTH DEttCTS FOUNDATION
SUMMER SCHOOL
ROOM RESERVATION
Residence hall room deposits tor
Summer School 1982 will be ac
cep'ed in the Cashier's Office.
Room 105. Spilman Building,
beginning April I Room
assignments will be made n the
respective residence hall offices
on April 5 and 6 Thereafter, they
will be made m the Office of Hous
.ng Operations. Room 201.
Whichard Building The rent for a
term of summer school is $120 for
a semi private room and $180 tor a
private room Additional rent in
the amount of $20 it required for
Jarvis Han
Students who wish to reserve
rooms they presently occupy, pro
vided such rooms are to be in use
th,s summer, are to make reserva
t,ons on Monday. April 5 All other
students may reserve rooms on a
first come, first serve basis on
Tuesday. April 6
Residence hails to be used for
women are Green. Slay and Jar
vis Men will be housed in Garrett
Slay and Jarvis Hails.
GET
ACQUAINTED
OFFER
BOOK SCHOLARSHIPS
The chapter of Phi Eta Sigma at
ECU announces that applications
may now be received for book
scholarships of $100 to be awarded
to the most outstanding rising
junior and rising senior Only
members of Phi Eta Sigma may
apply, and service to the local
chapter is a major criteri n. intor
mation and application forms may
be received from Dr. John D
Ebbs, Faculty Adviser, In Austin
214.
BAHAMA MAMA 1982
The 1982 Kappa Sigma and
Stroh's Bahama Mama Beach
Party and Raffle will be held
Tonight, from 8 p m. untill mid
mght, located across from
Umstead Dorm on Tenth Street.
This is presented fc 1 Kappa Sigma.
Hallow Distributing Company, Ac
cu Copy, University Book Ex
change and Hodges Sporting
Goods The Grand Prize drawing
will be held at midnight for an
ALL EXPENSE PAID TRIP TO
THE BAHAMAS FOR TWO, all for
iust one dollar Tickets are on sale
in front the Student Store, or from
any Kappa Sigma member For
more information call 752 553 Be
There Aloha
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 1J-1
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
$185.00 Pregnancy Test, airtti
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling. For fur-
ther information call 832-0535
(Toll Free Number
800 221 2548) between A.M.
and 5 P.M. Weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, NX.
plaza Bgang
cinema
PITT-PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER
HELD OVER!
WINNER OF 4 ACADEMY
AWARDS.
INCLUDING BESTJMCTURE!
� COStume � si�-w
faRWfe- �Original
� Original jj . � Screenplay
Score
CHATOTSOTFIBE

SPECIALIZES IN:
RESUMES
and
Shows MonFn
3:00-7:00-9:15
Sat. Sun.
2:30-4:45
7:00-9:15
Starts Tomorrow!
HE'S TRYING TO BE FAITHFUL,
AND FALLING HILARIOUSLY.
m
THESES
DUPLICATION
Located Across From Campus
In The Georgetown Shops
little
A LOT OF LAUGHS!
Shows MonFri. 3:00-7:10-9:00
Shows SatSun. 3:30-5:20-7:10
DOhTnUK "RICHARD F-
IVE ON THE SUNSET
� Copies Cost 60 to 30copy
� Phototypesetting
� Binding Service
� One Day Camera Work
� Geotype Supplies For Art Students
OPEN 9-7 m-f 9-2 sat.
758-2400
f
Current undergredwore pre
medical itudenrt may now com�it�
tor teverol hur�dr�d Air fort
KholartHio. TWe �cholarthia i
to be awarded ro ttwdoan accepted
into medical tcfcoolt at fte�nmen or
a rk� beginning at rfcoW loofcomoroi
year. The �crtotartrup pioridei
tuition, books, tab taei and eoutp-
m��i plat a �J30 monthly
oHowanco Investigate Htit financial
oltarnotiv to tfee nia cost
medical education.
Contact
I S.AJT. HEALTH
PROFESSIONS
�KM ITIN,
Suite GL-1,1100 Movoho Or
totsa, N.C. 27MV
Phone Co�eoe(�i9l75S-4134
SWIM IN STYLE!
Brody's swimwear makes a high fashion
splash with new sleek, shape-showing styles.
All in sophisticated stripes, patterns and
solids. All in lightweight, quick-drying
fabrics that never leave you dripping. Except
with style. . . . D
Lightning Bolt
Swimwear Shown: $20 50
Ocean Pacific Sun Dek
23.00 22.00
"Like no other men's store. � �
bradu
pitt plaza J
formen
SUMMER JOBS
Opening in N.C. and Virginia
Earn $7.10hr. if qualified
Minimum of $1,278.00 guaranteed
Part and Full-Time
On Campus Applications taken on
Cr
I M
1
April 6 and 7
m
I


I
I
4
I
TUESAPRIL6
Brewster B103
WED APRIL7
Brewster B104 � 9a.ml p.m
10 a.m4 p.m. Brewster D102 � 2 p.m4 p.m
15
DISCOUNT
ON ALL PURCHASES
WITH THIS
COUPON
IGREENVILLEI
FLOWER
SHOP
1027 Evans St.
758-2774
MasterchargeVisa
If you're a senior and have the promise of a $10,000 career-oriented job, do you
know what's stopping you from getting the American Express Card?
You guessed it.
Nothing.
Because American Express believes in your future. But more than that. We
believe in you now. And we're proving it.
A $10,000 job promise. That's it. No strings. No gimmicks. And this offer is
even good for 12 months after you graduate.
But why do you need the American Express Card now?
First of all, it's a good way to begin to establish your credit history. And you
know that's important.
Of course, the Card is also good for travel, restaurants, and shopping for
things like a new stereo or furniture. And because the Card is recognized and
welcomed worldwide, so are you.
So call for a Special Student Application or look for one at your college
book store or on campus bulletin boards.
The American Express Card. Don't leave school without it.SM
Call today for an application:
800528-8000.
r





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 1, 1982
you
We
er is
you
for
and
Uege
Convicted Nazis File Lawsuit
ASHEV1LLE (UPI)
� Five people � in-
cluding four Nazis �
convicted of plotting to
blow up public areas in
Greensboro have filed a
$15-milIion lawsuit
claiming three U.S. of-
ficials tampered with a
grand jury and
obstructed justice.
The civil suit was fil-
ed Tuesday in U.S.
District Court in
Asheville by Frank
Braswell and his wife,
Patsy Braswell, of
Penland, Joseph Gor-
rell Pierce of Walnut
Cove, Raeford Milano
Caudle of Winston-
Salem and Roger In-
gram of Arden.
All the plaintiffs ex-
cept Ingram were con-
victed in 1981 of con-
spiring to bomb public
areas of Greensboro.
The lawsuit also claims
the plantiffs' civil
rights were violated by
the defendants.
Named as defendants
are Charles Brewer,
U.S. attorney for the
Western District of
North Carolina, Jerry
Parnell, assistant U.S.
attorney for the
Western District and
William French Smith,
attorney general of the
United States.
Braswell said the suit
stemmed from actions
of former U.S. At-
torney Harold Edwards
and former Assistant
U.S. Attorney Jerry
Miller during the Nazi
trial in Asheville.
During the trial, pro-
secutors contended the
four and two other
defendants conspired
to blow up a shopping
center, a gasoline tank
farm, a fertilizer plant
and the Guilford Coun-
ty Courthouse if six
Nazis and Ku Klux
Klan members had
been convicted of kill-
ing five communists in
a 1979 shootout.
The defendants in
the Greensboro trial
were acquitted and no
bombing took place.
Braswell aid he and
the four other plaintiffs
had askeu a grand jury
to investigate allega-
tions against Edwards
and Miller.
"We are filing
against these pro-
secutors because they
told the grand jury if
they returned indict-
ments against Edwards
and Miller and the
BATF (Bureau of
Alcohol, Firearms and
Tobacco) agents, they
would refuse to sign or
frame an indictment
Braswell said.
Each plaintiff is
seeking $3 million in
actual, substantive and
punitive damages.
"NO
MORE
MR.NICE
guy:
"I'm not my old lovable
self when I'm around
cigarettes I get real
cranky So I want all you
smokers to quit once
and for all And who
knows9 You might even
put a smile on my face"
Photo By DAVE WILLIAMS
Greenville mayor Percy Cox (center), shown here with NASW co-presidents Yvonne Pierce and Ruth
I.ytle, proclaims National Social Work Month.
NASW 'Just Getting Started'
577 ANNUAL PHI KAPPA TA U
SPRING FLING '82
Although East Carolina has the oldest
undergraduate school of Social Work, the univer-
sity chapter of the National Association of Social
Workers is "just getting started according to
student Ruth Lytle.
Lytle. a Social Work major, is running for the
�uudent representative's position on the North
Carolina NASW, and the state association has
hired its own lobbyist to get N.C. legislators to
make licensing mandantory for social workers in
the state, Lytle said. The ECU branch of the
association, with Lytle and Yvonne Pierce as co-
presidents, has raised funds toward that cause.
FRIDAY AFTERNOON
APRIL 2 FROM 3-6:00 P.M.
Larceny Highlights Blotter
A BEACH WEEKEND FOR 2
WILL BE RAFFLED OFF AT THE PARTY
MUSIC PROYIDED
BY CAROLINA ARTISTS
THE NICKY HARRIS
BAND
BROUGHT TO THE ENTIRE CAMPUS BY OUR SPONSORS AT:
By �iRE(i RIDF.Ol T
staff V rilrr
The following are
dorm reports and
related incidents occur-
ring between March 24
and March 30.
March 24. 1 p.m. �
A Greene dorm resi-
dent reported the
larceny of a necklace
from her residence.
4:20 p.m. � A Jones
dorm resident reported
that his vehicle had
been vandalized while
parked in the Third and
Reade streets lot.
March 25. 1:38 a.m.
� A Jones dorm resi-
dent reported the van-
dalism of his room by
person(s) unknown.
9:30 a.m. � Steven
Baker of Raleigh was
arrested for the larceny
of supplies fom the Stu-
dent Health Center.
4:15 p.m. � An
Aycock dorm resident
reported the breaking
and entering of his
residence and larceny
from same. 4:15 p.m.
� An Aycock dorm
resident reported the
larceny of his class ring
from his residnece. 5
p.m. � Carlos M.
Irvela of Scott dorm
was served a warrant'
for simple possession
of marijuana. 11:30
p.m. � Cpl. Anderson
reported the larceny of
the cover to the
telephone of Greene
dorm.
March 26. 12:30
p.m. � A Belk dorm
resident reported the
larceny of his wallet
from his room. 1 p.m.
� An Aycock resident
reported that his
motorcycle had been
vandalized while park-
ed north of
Mendenhall. 5 p.m. �
A Greene dorm resi-
dent reported that her
wallet had been stolen
from her room.
March 27. 2:55 a.m.
� Jonathan Oleska, a
Winston-Salem resi-
dent, was arrested for
damaging a sign north
of Fletcher.
March 28. 12:53 a.m.
� William Bondurant
of Umstead dorm was
arrested for assault by
Cpl. Pollock. 12:35
a.m. � A Famous Piz-
za Delivery man
reported the larceny of
a pizza he was deliver-
ing to Belk dorm.
March 29. 1:37 a.m.
� A Jones dorm resi-
dent reported the van-
dalism of his door by
person(s) unknown. 5
p.m. � Sgt. Lawler
reported the breaking
and entering of the coin
changing machine
located in the canteen
of Tyler dorm. 7:23
p.m. � A White dorm
resident reported the
larceny of a battery
from her vehicle parked
in the Ninth and James
streets lot.
March 30. 12:10 a.m.
� Paul Bullock of
Raleigh was banned
fTom campus for
assault. 6:50 p.m. �
An Aycock dorm resi-
dent reported the
larceny of his class ring
from his room.
GREENVILLE BODY SHOP
DOMINO'S PIZZA
INTER-FRATERNITY COUNCIL
MARATHON RESTAURANT
KING'S SANDWICH
GENERAL HEATING & PLUMBING
PHARO'S FINE FOODS
BISSETTE'S OF GREENVILLE
PANTANA BOB'S
SHIRLEY'S CUT & STYLE
DAN WISEHART
RAFTER'S
CLARKE-BRANCH REALTY
UBE
JB'S ISLAND SEAFOOD
ATTIC
OVERTON'S SUPERMARKET
GROG'S OF GREENVILLE
MORGAN PRINTERS
CHRIS LICHOK
HAPPY STORE
PAPA KATZ
TACO CID
THE WASH HOUSE
EDGEWATER MOTORS
PIPE DREAMS
FOR HEADS ONLY
ELBO ROOM
FAMOUS PIZZA
SPORTSWORLD
The East Carolinian
V�(C �
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during Trie academic
ear and every Wednesday dur
,ng tne summer
Tne East Carolinian is 'he of
ficia! newspaper of Eas'
Carolina University, owned,
operated, and published tor and
by trie students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Hate M0 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
art located in the Ofd Sooth
Building on the campus of ECU,
Greenville, N.C
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carol.n,an.
Old Soutn Bunding, ECU Green
ville, NC 27834
Telephone 757 3. 437. 6309
Application to mart at second
class postage rates is pending at
Greenville. North Carolina
fcftRBfTiF'S
Draw the
Wizard Contest
$100 Grand Prize
also
1st, 2nd, 3rd prize winners
in 3 age group catagories.
Come in and pick up your
official entry form at
Gandalf's
SHOP AT
OVERTON'S
AND SAVE
PIRATE COUPON
5 DISCOUNT
Expires April 3 1982
on all orders $10.00
or more.
kEASf
OPENING SOON
, -? FINE
QfOS FOODS
FEA TURING A MENU OF
SPECIA LTYSAND WICHES
AND GREENVILLE'S BEST FRIES.
LOCATED IN GEORGETOWN SHOPPES.
WA TCH FOR US SOON!
Student Name
I
ID Number
Amt. of Purchase.
"Home of Greenville's Best Meats1
Supermarket.
211 JarvisSt,
2 Blocks from ECU
-i' ama�tini �i�uli iiHMwM
I
I





&kt �a0t (Ewwlinmn
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Jimmy DuPree���
Charles Chandler, umemw
Ric Browning, ���.�� 4,iiwm� Tom Hall. ���
Fielding Miller. n0mn.MMvr William Yelverton. sPomEd�or
Alison Bartel, m. Steve Bachner, ���,����, frf�or
Steve Moore, ruo� v Diane Anderson, $&��
April , 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Editorials
Purpose Often Mistaken
The editorial page.
It is the subject of much confu-
sion, not only on this campus but
across the nation. Many simply are
not aware of its purposes.
The editorial page is, simply put,
a place where opinions are express-
ed, where objectivity is thrown out
the window.
Today's journalists are taught to
strive for objectivity. This certainly
is the goal of The East Carolinian.
Hopefully it is the goal of every
newspaper in America. One hun-
dred years ago this was not the case,
though. Very non-objective stories
could be found on most any page of
the paper.
Nowadays, though, all pages ex-
cept the editorial page are supposed
to be objective. News stories are not
supposed to be slanted in any way,
shape or form.
When the change to complete ob-
jectivity in news came about many
years before our time there was the
problem of where to express opi-
nions. Face it; publishers, editors
and journalists will always be opi-
nionated. They needed an outlet to
express their views and hence the
editorial page was born.
The editorials that appear here
each issue reflect the views of this
paper as a whole. In most cases,
topics are discussed in editorial
board meetings and a staff opinion
is developed. The editorials are then
written by whatever party the staff
elects to do so.
DOONESBURY
doopewwb topwvp
KONOMC APWSOR PHILLIP
SLACX&EXB�C4M�7fe
I LATBS1' AOWNftmfiON
' OFFIQAlTO RETURN 10
e PKwm secxx this
WASTHE SCENE AT THE
HUH7
Each week we print columns from
two syndicated columnists, Art
Buchwald and David Armstrong.
We even have our own political col-
umnist of sorts in Kim Albin.
Occasionally, there are guest col-
umnists, as is the case today with
Patrick O'Neill's contribution.
We would like to stress that any
student on this campus can submit a
guest column. These columns ap-
pear under the "Campus Spec-
trum" logo.
Whatever Ms. Albin or other col-
umnists express does not necessarily
jell with the overall opinion of this
newspaper. Those columns � like
Albin's and O'Neill's today � are
written by individuals and reflect
the opinions and views of those in-
dividuals.
Of course, what would an
editorial page be without a political
cartoon? In this paper, the cartoons
that appear are very similar to col-
umns in that they reflect the views
of the artist and not necessarily the
entire staff.
Besides columns, students may
express their views on this page by
writing letters to the editor to ap-
pear in "Campus Forum This is a
superb avenue to speak out on
issues that may be of concern to the
student body.
Don't hesitate to take advantage
of the opportunities presented you
� the student or faculty member �
by this page. It is, in short, your
sounding board as well as ours.
by Garry Trudeau
MR SlACKMFiCR.
ARE YOJRESI6H-
!Nb BECAUSE-OF
the disparity be-
tween- your rosy
FOtEOAStSANV
the current
recession?
HOT AT All PM
RESI6NIN6 BE
cause of rue
p&wrrdamn
MYEARHIN6SPC
1ENTIAL AND MY
OJBNT SALARY.
ACTUALLY my wife
AND I COULD PROdA-
BLY MAKE DO WITH
MY GOVERNMENT
salary, but rr's
NOT FOR. US THAI
I'M RESIGNING.

I'M DONG IT
SOMYSON
CAN STAY WHAT
iHcau&e i
aavisn
TRuerYOUHB
RESIGNING?
m
BU17HATSMAJ&I
HOW COME YOU
PIPNTlETME
KNOW?
I PIP. I
FX3URWY0U
umyePTte
NEWS. SO IAN-
VXHCEVrnO
THE PRESS
couLcm
YOU HAVE
JUSTPHONEV
Me" i
TWS064PR
to use themecxa
YOU'RE NOT STAY-
ING FOR DINNER.
ARE iWT I
"AFTER VU FINISH HERE WHITEWASH If. JEFFERSON DWIS UBW. DUST TrlE RIGHTEOUS
RACISM W8PW MID STRNflHTEN TIE WHITE MW5 BURDEN �T CILLERY"
M
BITTER m
ILLS DIET B0OKT- mother
' TERESA
a mmw,
(denier!
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MOVE TO ANV
POOR NATION
60 NATIVE"
SLOWLV STARVE
TO DEATH
NOW BEING
uset gy
MILLIONS
WORLP-WbEl
Columnist Looks Inside At WZMB
By KIM ALBIN
Several weeks ago, in a column on the
Ebony Herald, I referred to the issue of
minority airtime on WZMB. I stand firmly
by what 1 said then, but it has since been
brought to my attention that my words
were ambiguous.
My intention was not to exclude
minorities from airtime on our radio sta-
tion but to comment that these gorups
must act in their own behalf. In order to
obtain minority airtime, minorities must
be willing to contribute their services to the
station.
At the request of several concerned
students, however, I set out to investigate
WZMB to discover the exact reasons for so
much student dissatisfaction with the new
station � to find out whose musical tastes
were being indulged.
To begin with, I found no evidence of
discrimination against minorities. Of the
30 or so disk jockeys employed by WZMB,
three of them are black students. This is
appropriate for a student population
whicn is roughly 10 percent black. Still, I
bothered to ask why there were not more
minorities represented, and was told that
there had not been more minority ap-
plicants.
At any rate, dissatisfaction with WZMB
is hardly confined to minority students.
The programming of the station has been
described, far and wide, as "ineffective
"slanted" and "confused Having listen-
ed to the station, my own choice, or words,
would have to be something stronger, like
"narrow "random" and "useless To
each his own, but public radio should
strive not to offend any of its listeners.
Obviously, whoever spent two hours last
Friday spinning AC-DC, King Crimson
and Rush albums is unaware of that. But
the responsibility for programming the sta-
tion's music is supposed to rest not with
the disk jockeys but with the program
director. According to several sources, the
program dirctor's "hands have been tied"
since he took office, and he has not been
able to do his job.
In short, souccs say the station's pro-
gramming has been "ineffective" for the
following reasons:
1) A general lack of organization at the
radio station,
2) A lack of communication between the
program director, Elton Boney, and the
general manager, Sam Barwick,
3) The prescriptive format that the sta-
tion is licensed to play, which is 80 percent
album oriented rock (AOR), 15 percent
jazz and five percent educational airplay
(this includes classical music and news),
4) Misunderstanding on the part of the
general manager of the definition of album
oriented rock, which led to the fifth ex-
cuse, and
5) A lack of understanding on the part
of the disk jockeys about what exactly they
are supposed to play. This causes them not
to stick to the format they have.
I was told that AOR is playing the tracks
off LP's which contain hit singles, thus
giving the audience a more comprehensive
view of a popular artist's works. It does
not necessarily refer to programming
predominantly obscure, painful acid rock
from the early 70's. There are no other
AOR stations in this area, which would
justify WZMB's "alternative" label, if in-
deed the station were playng true album
oriented rock at this time.
One point on which the WZMB staff
members seemed to agree was that Sam
Barwick, despite the problems of program-
ming, has done a remarkable job of getting
WZMB off the ground and on the air. His
efforts were applauded by many, yet it
seems that his time as general manager is
almost over. In April, a newly appointed
GM begins his term.
Students are instructed to hang in there
and watch for changes in WZMB's pro-
gramming. What is important, though, is
student participation. I do not think that a
group of would-be communications ma-
jors can possibly represent the tastes of an
entire university, but unless they receive
some student interest in the station, no one
will have the right to complain.
Defending A 'Willfull' Stand
By PATRICK O'NEILL
The United States of America vs Patrick
O'Neill, who "did wilfully stand and sit
upon the street in such a manner as to im-
pede the regular flow of traffic" at Fort
Bragg, North Carolina. So states the com-
plaint I received on my birthday this past
Saturday.
It's the long way of saying I was arrested
for trespassing at a military base that
"willfully" trains a division of El
Salvadoran military officers" in such a
manner" that they will be better prepared
to terrorize and murder their own citizens.
I went to Fort Bragg to commit civil
disobediance (or more appropriately,
divine obedience) as a last resort. Despite
the persistent cry of the American people
to "stay out" of El Salvador, U.S. military
aid to the murderous ruling junta goes on.
Religious leaders throughout the world
and many United States representatives are
also speaking out in opposition to U.S.
military aid.
Enormous suffering and bloodshed con-
tinue, as thousands of innocent people are
killed at the hands of the
U.Sbacked-and-supported "military
death squads
The meaningless rhetoric of Reagan and
Haig has not fooled the American public.
Opposition to their policies is mounting
daily, as Americans realize the obvious
potential for another "Viet Nam in the
making" in El Salvador.
Soviet and Cuban brands of com-
munism are repulsive, but ironically, pre-
sent U.S. policy in El Salvador is clearly
forcing the people into the communist
camp.
Seventy-five percent of all children suf-
fer from malnutrition in El Salvador, one
out of four dies before reaching the age of
Five.
Eighty-five percent of all families have
no running water or sanitary facilities. On-
ly 16 percent of the population have year-
round employment. And the two percent
of the people who own 60 percent of the
land use it for growing cash crops, which
provide no benefit for the poor.
The poeple of El Salvador want basic
human needs and comforts. They don't
want their children to go to bed hungry! If
the Communists are the only group willing
to make these overtures toward economic
security, then indeed El Salvador will be a
communist nation and the self-
determinaton of the people will be achiev-
ed.
United States missionaries living in El
Salvador have continually called on the ad-
ministrations of Carter and Reagan to stop
their military assistance to El Salvador and
to provide the means to sustain life � not
kill it. Archbishop Oscar Romero died for
peace, and U.S. Ambasador Robert White
resigned in protest for it; but it's all to no
avail.
Public protest and jail are dramatic ways
for us to make our voices for justice heard.
It was my intention to go to jail, because,
as a person of faith and believer in "The
Prince of Peace I can't "sit or stand"
silentiy by, as my country supports the kill-
ing of innocent El Salvadorans. The call to
Christian Action takes priority over any
human laws. A law supporting death must
be broken. Our training of Salvadoran
soldiers at Fort Bragg is a crime against
humanity.
During my time in the "holding cell" at
the Federal building in Fayetteville, I asked
one of the military personnel who was
recording data on mv case what his per-
sonal feelings on the El Salvadoran situa-
tion were. He responded. "We should
have left 'em alone
When my three cellmates and I were
brought before Magistrate F. Stuart
Clarke for arraignment, the military pro-
secutor appealed to him to hold us in lieu
of $250 cash bond. Clarke allowed us to
address the court with any "facts" we
believed to be pertinent to our cases, and
soon after he announced his decision to
release us on personal recognzance � no
bail!
Court was ajourned, but before he left
Clarke mentioned that our case reminded
him of the time when he was in law school
and "everyone was saying, 'go to
Washington, go to Washington (to pro-
test Viet Nam), and after a pause and a
friendly smile of admission he said "and
maybe I went, too
-Campus Forum
Reagan Out For Peace
For decades the Soviet Union has been
bent upon a policy of world domination.
Usually the Soviets do not overtly attack
a country such as in the case of
Afghanistan. They work by supporting
subversive Voups, thus breeding in-
surgancy and instability in a country.
The United States' policy in El
Salvador has the same rationale as its
arms build up � world peace El
Salvador is not a Vietnam; it's virtually
on our doorstep. A Soviet-dominated
Central America would be a serious
threat to United States Security.
By the use of their excellent propagan-
da, Russia has done very good job of
breeding western pacifism. I wish
Patrick O'Neill, the Greenville Peace
Committee and the other "liberal in-
fested" groups would WAKE UP and
realize the real truth. United States in-
telligence has undeniable evidence of
massive flows of weapons to the rebels
in El Salvador from the Marxist coun-
tries of Nicaragua and Cuba. Sticking
one's head in the sand, such as Mr.
O'Neill and pretending "it will go
away" will not solve the problem.
The Reagan administration is on a
steadfast and realistic course to ensure
world peace. The Soviets understand on-
ly one thing � force. If the U.S. feels
that troops should eventually be sent to
El Salvador, so be it. Yes, Mr. O'Neill,
it's time for you and your "leftist
cohorts" to wake up.
KEITH BRITTAIN
Senior, Finance
01
"I
tk
wil
VV'I
nal
Ju
is
nal
fuJ

1 M





HMMMSHR
I I N 1 S
Style
i'K II
NCSL: Students Getting Involved
-
i
he pn 'i
h rm
pai
f 01
ed u
aboul �hai
governmeni
� i on to Sci
f
i
-

i i
i
Mi ��'
.�. ell I'
N( SI ilumni are G
P ' i
M
m 1(1

�1
This Years ECl
Academy Awards
Predictions Close
Bv JOHN WM II H
� I
it (,rt i
uii




.t h





ivenile Court Volunteers Needed

:
nteei
niitnie to tun
Is in ihe h
r

ill
'
, , tined
mteei must lei
ained a
( t l major, Glenn
: � Mauuhan, ha
?
.i �
ntle wl
per,

�ti he
while ai the
business He eniovs
work
meone's pai met again M �
has worked with recreai
ev is aimed al detoui ing lei
ti om the road of desti ik
I here are numei oils reasi
kids become involved
Maughan attributed peer pies
broken homes, ai
the wrong crowd as the h

Nt-t H I i I I
Cayman Island Trip Planned
. � � ti.i

vs i
I � . � I er
in I
' I m n
alls
� glad
a ,ked to maintain
h relationship wth
ire ei
keei � touch with couri
IU I K .K ated on
ure of 75 to
It I ai i (Mind
i he islands are located about 500
a y m ' Miami. I la . and
, , nheast ol Cuba In fact, the
must th ovei uba to get
It's nearest netghot is
ayman lamaica which is 200 mi
ld in ,n) , ih, t of the ayman Islands
an v.v1 I he island are fairly secluded from
I hrough Ra hai I �ho rc eni ihi �f i iviliati
ly re is HI vimn �rdin to v harf, the trip was
i, a originally planned foi scuba divers.
t,on and hi the PC I quatics but there is plenty for the non-divei
pr0j iba diving classes t � ipate in "the non-diver can
planning a trip to (.rand go .ailing, snorkeling, diving, and
I �cj � fishing V harl 'and night
th ipulous ol th. � : diMng is really beautiful with the
m Mso the
I he main an poi � hi.
h 2S light b l w i h watei
1 here is also a separate pi u
the iion divei u. ho wants to usi
a nice suntan, swmi, ot maybe wmd
suit Scuba diving lessons
available at an extra cosl
Scharf said thai he has been thi
before and th.it this is "probably
one ol the best places in the world to
dive I he watei is so clear, you
probably got anywhere from
100 :i feel visibility
Sk hart mentioned the fa. I thai
"good (scuba) divers don't have to
be good swimmers You jusi nee.
be able to take good care ol yourself
in the watei and feel comfortable
I here is a s uba di ing i lass ol
fered here al the I imet sity vv hii h is
taught by Scharl I his class started
in 177
dun
mosi p
nlable
This 11
trips w hu '
scuba divers s I �
mote trips
his � tudents n
side ol and �
(iue again.
v irand av n
Holidays. ,
mghi 4da
Raleigh
should conta.
possibl - om.
also needs to kn
v many
him on the trip





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRII 1, 1982
Ten Students Travel To Morocco
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Ten East Carolina
University students
have been selected to
participate in ECU's
first annual summer
study program in the
northern African
kingdom of Morocco.
Under the direction
of Dr. Robert E.
Cramer of the ECU
Department of
Geography and Plann-
ing, the program will
offer seven semester
hours of academic
credit and "a unique
opportunity to know
Moroccan people and
to travel in their coun-
try
Morocco, located in
northwestern Africa,
offers both diverse and
blended French,
African and Arabic
cultures, Cramer said.
"In this country, the
modern world exists
beside the traditional
jellaba dress, veiled
woman and vast areas
where nomads roam
the desert with the
sheep herds and tents
he said. "Here, the
camel may still be seen
as a beast of burden
Beginning May 11
and extending until
June 26, the program is
a cooperative project
between ECU and the
Experiment for Inter-
national Living, based
in Brattleboro, Vt. The
Experiment office in
Morocco will arrange
for the students to live
with local families in
Rabat, the capital city,
and assist in ar-
rangements for
scheduled field trips,
which are an integral
part of the program.
Instruction for the
university courses will
be in English and will
emphasize the culture,
geography and interna-
tional relations of
Morocco.
In addition, a non-
L�A&niv& Aeoor Cott�fcC Tht Haup vtj
M Omiv AJorhis
Of SrtOKJOG THCSfc
Pl5&sr,JG ciCAitfrnrs

fH�PPl�,l'fA GJIaJ6TD
61UIT SV0KJ�06 f
cm i hav�� -rue tCST
Of tyU PACK 7
fiJgT: mAtSp. I
credit course in prac-
tical French conversa-
tion will be required of
all students in the pro-
gram.
The 10 students par-
ticipating in the pro-
gram represent a varie-
ty of major fields of
study: history,
geography, art, home
economics, political
science, geology and
urban planning. They
are Pamela Sumner,
Carolyn Boiter,
Michael Diaga, Wayne
King Jr Michael
Monahan, Donna
Glisson, Jama Jill
Parker, Mary Denkler
and William Colightly.
ECU Offers Program For Deaf
B KRANCEINE
PERRY
Getting through col-
lege and finding a job is
rarely easy these days;
for a deaf young person
who must live and work
alongside the hearing,
it's particularly dif-
ficult.
Yet the five deaf
graduates of East
Carolina University, all
of whom received
special services through
ECU's five-year-old
Program for Hearing-
Impaired Students,
have succeeded, justify-
ing a firm belief of pro-
gram director Michael
Ernest that, given a
chance, young deaf
people can achieve.
Ernest cites as an ex-
ample ECU alumnus
Edward Nelson Bur-
chette, formerly of
Wmston-Salem, who
receive the BA degree
in geography last May.
Burchette, one of just
two deaf geography
graduates in the nation,
is now a nautical car-
tographer for the U.S.
defense department's
defense mapping agen-
cy.
Being a cartographer
(mapmaker) fulfills a
lifetime ambition for
Burchette, who
transfered to ECU
from Gallaudet College
in Washington, D.C
to enroll in ECU's
geography program.
Gallaudet is the only
liberal arts college for
the deaf in the world.
"Fewer than a dozen
other campuses in the
United States offer ser-
vices for deaf students,
and ECU is the only
campus in the UNC
system which has this
kind of program
Ernest said.
"The goal of our
program is to provide
classroom sign
language interpreters
and other support
which will allow
hearing-impaired
students to participate
fully in academic pro-
grams he added.
"Traditionally, deaf
students are steered in-
to vocational or
technical training, even
the very bright ones
who have an aptitude
for the sciences or the
health professions,
areas not covered at
Gallaudet
This year, 20 deaf or
severely hard-of-
hearing students are
participating in the pro-
gram. They receive sign
language interpreting
for class lectures and
laboratory sessions,
and if they desire, they
can get note-taking
assistance, tutoring,
counseling and
speechhearing testing
and therapy at ECU's
Audiological Evalua-
tion Clinic.
"The deaf students
who come to ECU
generally leave the pro-
tected environment of
the residental school
for the deaf and have to
adjust to living and
learning in the 'hearing
world " Ernest ex-
plained.
"It's naturally a con-
siderable shock for
them, but we have
found that most can
handle the adjustment
as well as other
freshmen adjusting to
campus life
The program spon-
sors a very active Sign
Language Club, which
is designed to offer
social outlets for deaf
students and their
friends as well as stu-
dent interpreters. The
club's major project
has been making people
on campus and in the
community more aware
of how deaf persons
can interact and com-
municate.
A popular club ac-
tivity is the weekly
"silent supper held in
loc?' -estaurants, dur-
ing which the entire
group sits together and
communicates totally
in sign language and
finger-spelling.
The club also spon-
sors Fantasy, a per for
RESEARCH
PAPERS
10,278 on file � all subjects
Send $1 00 (refundable) for your up-to-date,
340 page, mail order catalog.
We also provide research all fields
Thesis and dissertation assistance available.
RESEARCH ASSISTANCE
11322 Idaho Ave.206F
Los Angeles, Calif 90025
(213)477 8226 or 477-8227
3UB
IHJ -
ARTISTS!
ENTER OUR
WALL PAINTING
CONTEST
ioo
50
$25
PRIZES!
- 1st
- 2nd
-3rd
COME TO SUBWAY
FOR RULES & REGULATIONS.
208 E. Fifth 758-7979
SunThurs. � n a.m2a.m.
FriSat. �11 a.m3a.m.
sign language classes
and presents programs
upon request to civic
and school groups in-
terested in deafness u�id
manual communica-
tion.
President of the Sign
Language Club is John
Welch, formerly of
Chevy Chase, Md
now of Washington,
N.C whose identical
twin brother is deaf.
ductions, in the
libraries, in the lecture
rooms of just about
every academic depart-
ment and even on local
television news broad-
casts.
A positive by-
product of the program
has been the intensive
training and experience
offered part-time stu-
dent interpreters, many
of whom have
m
R
T Sktrtt. �(���!at �i
� ��I, ���! T- Mill.
W.M
ARMY.NAVY
STORE ������
t
USED
TIRES
$Q00
Inquire at
Evans Seafood
Tonight is opening night for the ECU Pliyhouse
production of Show Boat, which will run through
April 8.
Thurs. April 1st
Thunder Thighs Contest
Ladies' Lockout
from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m.
Doors open to general public at 10:00 p.m.
PRIZES - 1 st - $50
2nd - $25 3rd - $10
for information call 355-2615
or 752-9745
�6iasa���a�a8tf6isai&��&����feii&ss
��'
VWVSOVSi
Welch is a sophomore graduated and are
speech, langauge and working in jobs in
auditory pathology ma-
jor and works part-time
as one of the 14 sign
language interpreters
on campus.
Vice president is
Keith Stephens, an
English major from
Annapolis, Md.
Secretary is Rebekah
Ottaway of Man-
chester, England, and
Joe Admire, a deaf stu-
dent from Springfield,
Va is treasurer.
Admire is also a
member of ECU's stu-
dent legislature,
representing Slay
Residence Hall. A sign
language interpreter ac-
companies him to the
weekly legislative ses-
sions.
During its five years
on campus, the Pro-
gram for Hearing-
which sign language
skills are necessary.
There is a "critical
shortage" of manual
communication inter-
preters, Ernest noted.
For the immediate
future, however, ECU
has no plans to ac-
celerate its interpreter
training program, he
said. Its present goal is
to supply enough train-
ed interpreters for the
campus' deaf students.
"By the end of this
semester, we will have
graduated eight deaf
students, a record of
success we're very pro-
ud of said Ernest.
"With just a little help
and a means of com-
munication, our deaf
students can and do
achieve.
NOW ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS
FOR POSITIONS AT
WZMB-FM
�ASSISTANT GENERAL MANAGER
PROGRAM DIRECTOR
�MUSIC DIRECTOR
�BUSINESS MANAGER
DEADUNE:
5:00 P.M. - THURSDAY, APRIL 8th
FOR MORE INFORMATION, COME BY WZMB STUDIOS
ming ensemble who in- Impaired Students has
terpret the lyrics of been highly visible,
popular songs by use of Sign langauge inter-
mime and sign preters have appeared
language, arranges a on stage at campus lcc-
series of free evening tures and drama pro-
oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
o
o
Attention
Summer School Students
S. G. Wilkerson & Sons, Inc.
is looking for bright, mature
young man to work part-time in
exchange for free room.
Must be available all summer.
Please apply in person at 5th St.
o
0
o
0
o
o
o
o
0
o
"Fortunately, ECU
has created the kind of
climate of acceptance 5
which the deaf need to
adjust to the hearing
world
The SGA Transit will be accepting ap-
plications for bus drivers for Summer
School and Fall Semester.
�All applicants must have driven
a bus in high school or been employed
driving a vehicle of similar
size.
�Juniors, Seniors and
Graduate Students preferred.
�Apply by appointment only.
Call 757-6611, Ext. 218.
GRAND OPENING
"EASTER WEEKEND"
APRIL 9� 10� 11
BURNIE'S
ON THE
BEACH
HWY.58
EMERALD ISLE,N.C.
Beside Bogue Inlet Pier
WATCH FOR SIGNS
WEEKEND
ENTERTAINMENT
FriSat. Night
THE POOk SOULS
Sunday Night
THE CHAIRMAN
OF THE BOARD
FEATURING: GENERAL JOHNSON
BEER PERMITS � LG. DANCE AREA
GAME ROOM � FREE PAVED PARKING FOR 500 CARS
DRAFT HAPPY HOUR � 7:00-8:30
OPFN DAILY 9:00 A.M.
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY
o
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
o
o
0
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
0
0
o
o
o
0
0
0
0
0
c
c
0
0
o
o
o
0
0
o
o
o
o
0
0
o
o
0
0
o
o
o
0
0
0
o
o
0
o
o
o
o
o
0
0
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o

o
0
o
o
boOOOOQOOOQOQQQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO(
C ontii
Th
progrj
kids
One
the 1
partic
"It's
verv
Then
mg n
parti
grarr.
Big B
Green
a vic
tioni
mine
for
is cor
a laci
a j
B
Vej
v. ate
heigi
moui
"Lo
dim!
a higl
platq
It
I
aboul
afai
medu
to r
it
Leal
Card
geogi
the
RoraJ
Gran
Venei
Le
mg
ex pec
to
studvi
"T
e x
heautl
I
Leah
desci
Rorai
inspi
famol
L(
Pnnj
Pnnl
thml
haunl
Englj
coun
said
Tl
the
of
thei
sumr
betwl
millij
26- b
nea;
tow
t
ST





mist
niuh
,
O
3
o
o
o
0
0
D
0
0
0
0
0
1
D
0
0
0
o
0
0
J
0
0
0
0
u
0
0
0
o
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
o
0
0
0
o
o
0
o
o
o
o
o
0
o
o
o
0
0
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
�OOd
lMt i AM t AROI INIAN
APRIL I, 1982
Juvenile Program Needs Minorities
Continued F.om Page 5
The Big Brothers
program works with
kids from ages 4-16.
One problem has been
the lack of black male
participants. Teel says,
"It's a big problem, a
very big problem.
There is an overwhelm-
ing need for blacks to
participate in the pro-
gram Although the
Big Brother Program in
Greenville has not been
a victim of dispropor-
tionate number of
minorities, the appeal
for minority volunteers
is constant. Teel blames
a lack of awareness for
a significant portion of
this problem.
Another calamity is
getting private
businessmen engaged in
the Juvenile Court
Volunteer Program.
"They are unaware
that they have the time
and resources Teel
stated. Businessmen are
needed to be positive
role models for the
juveniles. They will be
instrumental in expos-
ing the offender to
another side of life.
Funds is an issue but
not the primary one.
Big Brother's will be
overjoyed if these
businessmen would just
donate some time and
energy. Teel commend-
ed Governor Hunt for
his volunteer work
the school system.
in
The Pitt County
Community Services
Restitution Program is
another area project to
aid youth offenders.
The program provides
jobs for those who have
committed crimes
against property. Work
hours and pay are in ac-
cordance with all
government regula-
tions. The offender
works to pay back the
victim of this crime.
Cookie Rodgers is the
coordinator of the pro-
gram. The system is us-
ed as a deterrent. The
youths learn that he is
responsible for his
criminal acts. In addi-
tion, he gains valuable
work expericne that
may make the dif-
ference whether or not
the offender will con-
tinue a life of crime.
Private businessmen
are responsible for pro-
viding many of the jobs
these youths participate
in.
The Greenville Pre-
Release and Aftercare
Center (PRAC) has
conducted one class to
help juvenile offendes.
This trial session was
oriented to build self-
concept and produce
individual motivation.
It also dealt with how
to respond to different
types of relationships,
the job market, and the
community.
PRAC is a branch of
te North Carolina
Department of Correc-
tion's Division of Adult
Probation and Parole.
The Department of
Corrections was "very
well pleased with the
responsevery positive
nd wants to continue
it according to Matt
Brewington, assistant
pre-release training
coordinator. PRAC's
director is Pat Higgins.
The center is located on
108 Dexter Street
(behing the Beef Barn).
PRAC consists of
534 community
volunteers among 26
counties. Its object is to
aid inmates to suc-
cessfully reenter socie-
ty. There are six ex-
isting centers in North
Carolina that serve all
one hundred counties.
To be eligible for this
program, an inmate has
to be 18 or older;
however, the majority
of the clients are 20 or
older. Counseling
begins within one year
of the inmates uncondi-
tional release date.
The Community Ad-
justment Training Pro-
gram (CAT), which
was housed in the same
building as PRAC, was
discontinued in
December because of
the federal budget cuts.
This program was
started to handle a vast
amount of ihe juvenile
cases and as diversion
from the active sentenc-
ing method.
Most juveniles enter
the correctional process
not because they com-
mitted serious crimes
but because they com-
mitted status offenses.
Status offenses include
truancy, running away
from home, or disobey-
ing a curfew. These acts
are only crimes because
they are committed by
a minor. There is a
wide assortment of
names given to status
offenders: PINS
persons in need of
supervision, CH1NS-
children in need of
supervision, MINS-
minors in need of
supervision or JINS-
juveniles in need of
supervision.
Recent developments
in juvenile courts have
allowed the juveniles
more rights. The first
courts were very
punitive. Two cases did
more to transform the
system than anv other.
They are Kent v. US
(1966) and In re (iault
(1967). These cases
brought about the
child's right to: (1) a
hearing on a motion of
waiver; (2) representa-
tion by counsel; (3)
District Attorney's
right to access to all
records and reports us-
ed to reach a waiver
decision; (4) written
statement of reasons
for waiver decision; (5)
notice of charges; (6)
confrontation and
cross examination of
witnesses, and (7) right
against self-
incrimination. A mo-
tion of waiver is th
transfer of a juvenile
offenders to criminal
courts. The right
against self-
incrimination is when
an alleged offender
pleads the Fifth
Amendment which in-
sures that right.
World
By WILLIAM A.
SHIRES
K I Nr�n Duma
Veiled by cascading
waterfalls, covered
with cloud on its
heights, the mysterious
mountain of a fictional
"Lost World" rises
dimly in the distance on
a high South American
plateau.
It beckons, but as yet
scientists know little
about it.
"When I saw it from
afar, I knew im-
mediately that I wanted
to return and explore
it says Dr. Edward P.
Leahy, an East
Carolina University
geographer who viewed
the mountain, Mt.
Roraima, in the remote
Gran Sabana region of
Venezuela last year.
Leahy now is plann-
ing a full scale return
expedition this summer
to climb, map and
study the mountain.
"The whole area is
extraordinarly
beautiful in a bizarre,
primordial way
Leahy says. Vague
descriptions of Mt.
Roraima served as the
inspiration for Sir Ar-
thur Conan Doyle's
famous science-fiction
novel, "The Lost
World in which the
author fantasized a
flat-topped mountain
existing in biological
isolation where
dinosaurs survived.
"There are no
dinosaurs on Mt.
Roraima, but it is that
kind of place, suffi-
ciently remote and eerie
to kindle such
thoughts Leah said.
Gold and diamonds
are found in the alluvial
sand and gravel of
streams flowing from
the base of the moun-
tain. But the entire
20,000-square-mile
Gran Sabana, in
southeastern
Venezuela's Bolivar
Province, is populated
only by Indians and a
few prospectors.
Leahy last summer
met the only two
Americans in the
region, prospector
George Elledge of San-
ta Elena de Urairen, a
town some 50 miles
from the mountain,
and a diamond buyer,
Floyd Park, who pro-
mised assistance on the
exploration project.
Elledge has spent 15
years in the interior,
engaged in mining and
prospecting. "He
knows the country; he
has the equipment, and
he knows how to cope
with the rigors of
wilderness living
Leahy said.
Also, the Explorer's
Club of New York has
awarded Leahy a $600
grant, which is the
maximum amount it
allots to a project, and
other support is being
sought.
Leahy's expedition
plans include Dr. Don
Steila, also an ECU
geographer, and a
graduate assistant,
Boyce Cheek of
Kinston, N.C who is a
husky, strong
outsdoorsman, camper
and climber. Leahy
himself is an alpinist,
having made ascents of
Mt. Blanc and other
peaks, mostly in the
Alps and is a Latin
American specialist,
having made a number
of trips into the upper
Amazon.
"Once we leave San-
ta Elena, we will be on
our own. Full camping
equipment will be re-
quired Leahy said.
Only a dirt road,
north and south,
crosses the high rolling
grassland of the Gran
Sabana. Flat-topped
mountains rise sheer
from the plain.
"Clouds hang over
the mountains. Water-
falls cascade down the
cliffs. Stands of
greenery reach up the
lower flanks Leahy
says, describing the
area as he found it last
year.
"The area is utterly
deserted. Not a sound
is to be heard.
"Geographers have
ignored this whole
area he says. "We
hope to examine it
from the viewpoint of
its physical
characteristics and its
development potential.
As of now, the region
supports only a few In-
dians and some miners
who work the streams
for diamonds and gold.
A question Leahy
hopes to answer is why
the rolling grassland
has not been found
suitable for cultivation
and the possibility that
the plateau was a
prehistoric lake before
the shifting of con-
tinents.
"We will examine
the mesa on top of
Roraima for evidence
of frost shattering and
possible glaciation, as
we are interested in the
effect of the
Pleistocene (age) at that
elevation in the
tropics Leahy said.
"We will bring back
soil samples for carbon
dating. At the same
time we will look for
evidence of such ig-
neous masses as might
serve as the source of
the alluvial diamonds
and gold found in the
area
Eventually, Leahy
said, he would like to
do a book on the Mt.
Roraima area and the
Gran Sabana. He has
published an earlier
work, "Venezuela:
Search for a Middle
Ground and is the
author of numerous ar-
ticles on Amazonia.
Leahy holds a degree
in engineering from the
University of Virginia
and a PhD in
geography from the
University of Florida.
THE SHOE OUTLET
(Located beside Evans Seafood)
Featuring name brand shoes at bargain prices.
Up To 75 OFF regular prices
Bass Steward-McGuire Brouse Abouts
201 W. Washington St. Within walking distance of campus.
ABORTIONS
l-M week terminations
App'ts. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1-800-321-0575
Help When You Need It Most.
The Fleming Center has been here tor women of
all ages since 1974, offering understanding and
help to anyone faced with an unplanned pregnancy
. day or night. Services include:
Free Pregnano Testing
Weekday & Saturday Abortion Appts.
Evening Birth Control Hours
CALL 781-5550 DAY OR NIGHT
THE FLEMING CENTER
We 're here when you need us.
H !
104 Red Banks Rd. (Behind Shoney's) 756-6000
Tuesday Night �
ECU NIGHT
JUST $1.00 wID includes
Skate Rental
7:00-10:00
Every Friday & Saturday Nighr
ECU Students are admitted for
JUST $2.00 including Skate Rental

;
May
Prince and Princess
Move To Haunted House
LONDON (UPI) �
Prince Charles and
Princess Diana are
thinking of moving to a
haunted mansion in
England's Robin Hood
country, the Daily Mail
said today.
The newspaper said
the Prince and Princess
of Wales, expecting
their first child this
summer, had offered
between $4.5 and $5.4
million for a stately
26-bedroom mansion
near Nottingham, the
town of "Robin
Hood" folklore, some
110 miles north of Lon-
don.
The mansion, Belton
House, is being sold by
Lord Brownlow, who is
going into tax exile in
Ftjance this week. The
house is full of
tapestries and fur-
niture, some of which
Charles is keen to have,
but local superstition
says it is also haunted.
Cleaning women at
Belton insist on work-
ing in twos and fre-
quently complain of
seeing a woman dressed
in period costume and a
man wearing a long
black cape, wandering
through the house.
Buckingham Palace
denied the househun-
ting reports, saying the
royal couple was "very
happy" at the present
home, Highgrove,
which Charles bought
in 1980.
"There is no truth in
the story a
spokesman said.
One source with
royal family connec-
tions said, however,
that the pregnant
princess was unhappy
at Highgrove because
with only nine
bedrooms, it was too
small and too
vulnerable to the public
eye.
Belton House is sur-
rounded by 600 acres of
parkland. It is near the
farm of Diana's elder
sister, and her father
and the royal residence
Sandringham are but
an hour's drive away.
the future in style!
Wear a College Ring with
diamonds from ArtCarved.
On campus now, exclusively with your
ArtCarved representative, is the beautiful and
very affordable Designer Diamond Collection.
Don't miss it! You can choose from
three exquisitely crafted styles, all set
with diamonds, in 10K or UK gold.
(All styles are also avaiiable in the
elegant diamond-substitute Cubic Zirconia).
Your successes speak for themselves.
Let your college ring speak for you,
and eloquently, for all the successful
years to come.
TONIGHT
The 1982
Kappa SigmaStroh's Bahama Mama
Beach Party and Raffle
presented by
Hallow Distributing Company
AccuCopy
University Book Exchange
Hodges Sporting Goods
8 p.m. till midnight
featuring Alan Handleman
from WITH
Location � Across from Umstead Dorm
An All expense paid trip to the
Bahamas For just$1.00
TICKETS ON SALE NOW!
For more information call 752-5543
Be There,
Aloha!
DEPOSIT REQUIRED MASTERCARD OR VISA ACCEPTED
t






IHt fcASI t AROl IN1AN
Sports
M'KI
'Pack Stops
ECU Streak
ie Pirates oi I ast v aroh
to Raleigh 1 uesday aftei
7-0 t, ollegiate ten
an into national
� i na stale, who
a's Kent Zengle was
l 2 6 A a
e singU tion
. ! . li V
ed 1 ast v ai olina's
H aid R 6-3, 6-2 �
was beaten by N t
4, 6 ;
a k a on then tot
when Brad Smith
: Pail b 2. �
�5!fcX'
'�
Ml
� � ,
�-
ftSft'fck f"
tt eat
.6-1.6-0
� ' -
Pai kei . 7-6. 7-5.
Norman Bry
va Ifpack Ray
'������-


Lady Bucs
Rip ACC
At Home

i

lu
In The Swing Of Things
1 astarolina's Debbie Christine certain!) �as in the swiny of things in a match with Atlantichristianollege
1 �� I uesday in Greenville, she defeated her opponent 6-1, 6-0, helping her team to an overwhelming 9-0 victory.
(Photo b Dave N illiams.)
W ill- -
w
Katl
dett
Brown Hitting Star
����������������������������������������������������������������
Pirates Rip
Wilmington,
Now 15-3
BvIM) PI I sMs

4
L N Wilm

II
4
I �
id then
I and
N
its
'the
� in-
stil
ible i at ead.
d in the
: i ing in
I Yv
but t Pirates w ei e
i . 20 hit
' �! carters
� 500 m that it: i
Mitzi Davis
i �� Shepard also
. and Davis
1 eslie Bunn
B hree-1 foui.
homei in the
mnetteRoth(l
t he
ond game, II
i idy Seahawks, 6 5.
;d twice in the
I he Pirates then wain

: N( -
sixth tor a
Yv 11 h
i ady
the
.
1 v 1 - Mai - nnger
md 'i vonne Yv illiams
went I M three. Shepard had a
le, And Dav
- � � '
nioi Angie Hump
the w mi pitcl r foi I Pira
Head coach sue Manahan s i
she was proud o( the team's perfor-
linst I fNC-VN ilmington.
"Offensively, the team executed
she sa
Manahan said she feels like
'earn is play ing above a erag
pomt in the season. "Sometimes
you can peak too soon she aid,
"but 1 don't thmk we're reached
our full potential yet
Manahan added that the Softball
team is playing unselfishly and
that v she likes.
"They're finding out what I ex
pect out oi them she said, "And
re learning to sacrifice then
batting averages and persona! goals
km
I he 1 ads Pirates will play in the
ICharlotte tournament this
Friday and Saturday. I he other
eleven teams participating in the
tournament are: Appalachian State,
lion. UNC-Chapel Hill, UN(
Wilmington, Mars Hill, A&l, N. C.
State.amphell, Pembroke, I N(
Charlotte and Western Carolina
I niversity I he first game begins
Friday ai 12 p.m.
Just A I ittic I ate
I astarolina second baseman Ginger Rothermel � 1 1� waits tor a late-arriving throw from shortstop Jo 1 an lalavion in
a recent victory over the I adv Wolfpack of V Male. I he I ady Pirates are now 15-3 heading into this weekend's
tournament at I'M -( harlotle.t Photo by Dave Williams)
Pirates Rally To Out slug Cavs
( H kl ui 11 s n l I . Va
1 he Pirate- ol I astarolina spotted
the University ol Virginia i avaliers
ighl i un lead only to rally to
theii 14th game out ol the last 15,
i 8 10, ruesday afternoon.
I he Pirates are now t 4 while
Virginia dropped to 6-10.
1 ast arolina collected 15 hits but
the C avaliers banged out 14 ol then
on in a contest that saw nine dil
ferent pitchers waltz to the mound.
I reshman Brian Peterson started
the game foi the Pirates but nevei
made n past the first inning. Chub-
by Butler, another first-year pitcher,
entered the game and pitched for
tour innings, eventually earning the
victory. He is now 3-0 foi the
season.
I ett hander Bobby Patterson pit-
ched the last tour and two-third inn-
- to record the sae
Virginia's stai ting � i
Scott 1 aporta, but he only managed
a little oer three innings before five
more pitchers followed him l1
Erbaugh, who lasted only a
an inning received the loss,
cowd in two decisions.
Virginia started quickly, scoring
three runs in the first inning Brad
Miller singled to left with one out,
and �. ilenn Hai i is stroke a double to
right field, scoring Miller. Ge
Priftis then reached on an ei i oi. and
Harris scored when Joe L.ange
grounded out. Donnie Meeks then
singled, driving in Priftis
1 he Cavaliers added tour more in
the second inning alter a double b
David 1 ynch followed two base hits
and a sacrifice, giving the home
standing team a lofty 7-0 lead
.
v
Ha
bases
me in Wells (
� then sin m
Hallow Rick
in Hend
mm
I he Pira
ebaek in the I
game

sm. Ha S
- ed, brii u t
reached first
I YV
grand dam i,
I he t avaliei s tied
the bottom i

The Matchup: 'Everything One Could Desire'
hup
. is much overus
: thi vorld I ports M
imes gel the la be,
lon'l deserve it. Mon
S A A basketball cham-
: between North
fa na md ieoi getown has also
praise I his time,
label is more ttian ap
1 at Heel Hoya matchup had
"tie could desire in a
. ame 1 rom the
to a last-second
shot, the action was
fast-pa ed and tension filled
vs led bv more than four
Charles
Chandler
were numerous
p int
Both t tm played all out foi 40
minutes Both came to win and both
played well enough to take the big
trophy home
Northarolina won the title thai
had. for 21 ve.ir . eluded head coach
Dean Smith. 1 he Heels certainly
deserved to win, but Georgetown
did not deserve to lose I he game-
was that well-played.
I he 19H2 title game will certainly
go down in the NCAA annals as one
ol the best ever played It is the besl
collegiate championship that this
voung columnist has ever seen. It is
matched onlv by the N.C. State
1I A 1974 semi-final game.
rhe star of the show foi UN( was
certainly forward James Worthy.
1 he Gastonia native put on an
awesome display foi the entire na-
tion to see He certainly showed the
Associated Press that the made a
mistake bv leaving him off their All-
America team. Forwards Terry
Cummings ol DePaul and Kevin
Magee of CalIrvine were listed
ahead ol the 6-8 lar Heel.
Alter watching Monday night's
game, though, I am convinced that
there is no better forward in
America than lames Worthy.
Earth-shattering slam dunks mix
ed in with slick moves in the iane lefi
Worthy with 2S points and the
tourney's M P award.
Which brings us to a prediction
rhe Gastonia native will not return
to North Carolina tor his senioi
season He will declare foi profes
sional hardship
'The Heels certainly
deserved to win, but
Georgetown did not
deserve to lose. The game
was that well played
I he reasons arc H
formance Mondav
throughout the ea him in (Ik
pet feel bai gaimn tion NBA
coaches certainly drooled wa
him, and will be willing to pay him
the megabucks thai he will certainly
demand W hv come back and risk
an anti climatic senior seasonY oi
thy will go now while he's a red-hoi
commoditv
nothei prediction is thai 7 4
centei Ralph Sampson will be b
at Virginia next yeai He wants thai
national title too much to leave
now
Georgetown centei Pal Ewing lei
it be known Mondav that he is verv
wondering
againsl Sampson "Wl
v ask
Ilu two
ers Sa
sse while Ewing is definitely
more physu .
I he feeling hen ,
would gel the best ol it
were to meel 1 he Hoyas'
freshman has the "mean .
U Sampson so badly needs
W hat we saw Mondav night was a
sign ol things to come I wing was
simply devastating at times H
blessed with the physical attributes
thai should make him the most
dominant playei in the game for the
next 10 15 years, Ralph Sampson
notwithstanding





I Ml I AS! t AROl INIAN
APR11 1, 1982
Softball Favorites Beginning To Emerge
. . . � .1�. horA ir� monv tQmc that will have something tc
Sports- Shorts
By
Gregg Melton
little over tvo weeks hae passed since the
opening of the regular season for "Intramural
Softball" here at ECU, and man teams are
beginning to iron out the rough spots and pla
some pretty good softball. This is especially true
of those teams who played in the
�Miller Preseason Tournament" for main ol
those teams are now leading then respective dit-
sions
"Un Kappa Fifth" and "The Rats" are both
undefeated at 2-0 and have to be rated as the
leading contenders tor the women's independent
crown, while Alpha i Delta and Alpha Kappa
Alpha also sport ihe same records and aie leading
the sororit division the women's dorm leagues
are headed by the "Chick-Fil-AV of t lenient
n and the team from "Garrett
Over in the men's division, the "Bomber's
started their season out on a strong note by set-
turn an ECU 1M record with their 46-2 triumph
over the "Good Ole Boys Even so, they will be
hard pressed to win the championship because
last vear's champs, the "Sluts" along with the
� 1 n Humps" should prove to be tough competi-
tion A possible darkhorse could be "The
Plague So it should be a very exciting race.
The leaders in early season men's dorm action
include the "Avcock Yu-Loos the "Jones
Screwballers" and the "Jones Time-it-is-
Players" all with 2-0 records and appearing to
possess the neeesarv ingredients to win it all.
Finally, in the Fraternity Division, there seems
to be a wide-open race with the men from the
I Kl house again fielding a strong team. Teams
to watch with a good chance of defeating the
I Kl include "Kappa Sigs" and the "Pi Kaps
I his bungs us up to date on all the action
around the diamonds and as we all know com-
petition seems to bring out the best in everyone so
there are many teams that will have something to
say about the respective championships. The
moral of this story is simple, "Hang in there
Good Ole Boys'
(Note: The W. B. Dodgers won the women's
championship in the Miller Softball Tournament,
which was incorrectly reported last issue. Janice
Parlon was MVP for the Dodgers.)
Groom's Top hive
Men
1. Tri-Humps
2. Sluts
3. Tau Kappa Epsilon
4. Bombers
5. Dreadful Plague-Bombsquad
Women
1. Un Kappa Fifth
2. The Rats
3. Clement Chick-Fil-A's
4. Alpha Xi Delta
5. Garrett Girls
Bahama Mama '82
TONIGHT
Be There
Aloha!
-
s'j
& 48k
i - rosy

1982-83 arsit t heerleading
Squad
( ind Balson
Kim Blein
Marcus Brock
Jennifer Cooper
Keith Dubois
Nusan Dunn
Brian "Show Bi" Foye
Palti Harrill
ietor Hudson
Re nee Mer
Donald Sawer
Roslvn Singleton
'SI
Chi
Worthy
Diligent
Knowledgeable
Genuine
Winners
Attn. Psi Chi Members and Initiates
VOTE TUESDAY, APRIL 6
7:00 p.m. - THREE STEERS RESTAURANT
Magnify Psi Chi Awareness � Increase Student and Faculty Involvement
Continue Scholarships � Expand Psi Chi Library Availability
Augment Fund Raisers for Added Enjoyment - Expediate Rush Procedures
ED WINGFIELI) � President
WAYNE DAWSON � Vice President
SUE KRUSE � Secretary
ROBERT WOODARD � Treasurer
VERA GEISSLER � P.R.
for PSI CHI Officers
ADVERTISED ITEM PCH i
ese advertised items
iach Kroger Savon except a ted ir
I wed t o an item we w
conn, - � (em when a the
neck wt '�"� ' . the advert d item at
'��.����'
Open 8 a.m. to Midnight
Open Sunday 9am to 9 p m
MIDNIGHT LATE SHOW THIS FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHT
HENDRIX THEATER ADMISSION FREE
SHARP EL 1188
PRINT DISPLAY
Calculator
2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30
BUCCANEER MOVIES
hb SHI � GmiihIW' S.('���� Shoptimq C-nlef
STARTS
TOMORROW!
. rtght 1982
Kroger Savon
Quantity Rignts Reserved
None Sold to Dea rs
N
1
vv
IMPORTED
Ribier
Grapes &y
�?
KROGER
ASSORTED VARIETY
Sour Cream
Dips
� I Cups
COSMETICS A
FRAGRANCES
16�,
m






Dominique To Announce Decision
ATHENS, Ga. (UPl)
Dominique Wilkins
says he will reveal his
pro basketball inten-
tions in the next couple
of days and his friends
say they believe he has
played his last game for
the Georgia Bulldogs.
Wilkins, a second-
team All-America who
rejected a million-
dollar-plus offer from
the Detroit Pistons last
year, said Wednesday
he has reached a deci-
sion whether to declare
"hardship" status but
would delay the an-
nouncement until' a
news conference in "a
couple of days
"It seemed like he
was leaning more and
more towards- turning
pro said sophomore
forward James Banks,
one of Wilkins' closest
friends on the team. He
said Wilkins discussed
on Tuesday the pros
and cons of giving up
his senior season with
him and Lamar Heard,
Wilkins' roommate.
"He didn't really tell
us 'yes' or 'no but 1
think he was leaning in
that direction said
Banks.
"I've come up with a
decision Wilkins told
United Press Interna-
tional. "But I'm going
to wait a couple of days
before announcing it
Wilkins seemed to in-
dicate he had decided
to go pro. He said if he
did enter the draft, he
would expect to be in
the top five picks,
"maybe in the top
three He noted a lot
would depend on other
underclassmen who
decide to forsake the
rest of their college
careers, including
Virginia's Ralph Samp-
son and North
Carolina's James Wor-
thy.
"There is always the
chance that some of
those guys might go
he said.
The 6-foot-7 junior,
who averaged 21.3
points and 8.1 re-
bounds while leading
the Bulldogs to a 19-10
record, said he decided
last Saturday while on
spring break from
classes after talks with
Coach Hugh Durham
and his mother.
"I did go off by
myself for awhile he
said. "The thing 1 had
to do was to decide
whether I wanted to re-
main in school and
have fun for another
year or go pro. That's
what 1 had to decide at
this time
Wilkins, 22, was fac-
ed with the same deci-
sion last year but final-
ly decided to reject a
million-dollar offer
from the Pistons.
��1 didn't regret mak-
ing that choice at all
said Wilkins. "1 got
another year's ex-
perience. I had a good
year all around. 1 had
my heart set on staying
in school another
year
Durham, who was
out of town on a
recruiting trip, gave no
hints earlier as to
Wilkins' decision.
Classifieds
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST"Wed. March 17. Man's
brown tn fold wallet between
Aycock and Austin. II tound. can
keep money iust return wallet to
Ml Aycock or call 7H-2TO.
LOST IN MINGES March it, a
l��l class ring, blue stones, initials
"JAA" on inside. It found, please
contact Joe at M Slay (7S-M�S).
ATTENTION
Classified ads will be taken ONLY
during the following hours:
Monday � I 15 3 00
Tuesday � 700-3:00
Wednesday � I IS 3 00
Thursday � 2:00-3.00
Friday � IIS 2 00
You must place the ads m person
and pay for them m advance
Rates are l tor the first IS words
and � OS per word after the first fif
FOR SALE
TRAILER FOR SALE: Set up in
Greenville 2 BR. all electric, ac.
excellent condition 17WS call Tar
boro 023 �W4
VIVITAR ZOOM LENS 75 210 with
macro lor Nikon mount used only
two times SUS Call 757 HIP
SKIS FOR SALE K 2 US comp
110 skis with Soloman bindings
I11S. Call 7S7 3710 and leave
number.
FOUR BIC TURNTABLES tor
sale, �2Seach. Call 752 24S9.
DORM SIZE REFRIGERATOR
Good condition Price Negotiable.
CaM Odile now at 7 5 348
FOR RENT
I Roommate reedeo 'o share 3
bedroom house � S125 deluding
utilities Can 7S6 5303
CHRISTIAN FEMALE roommate
needed: to share double room in
an apartment. 50 plus t3
utilities. One block from Jenkins
building, call 7S2-200.
TWO BEDROOM Furnished
mobile home 3-4 miles off campus.
SIM monthly. Possibly no lease or
deposit. Call 751 7724.
TWO BEDROOM Trailer, mostly
furnished, �t40 per month plus
utilities, wal to wall carpet One
mile from campus. More info, call
7S23373.
FOUR BEDROOM House Fully
furnished and carpeted May IS -
Aug IS S22S plus utilities. Call
7S2 I72T.
CANNON STREET Apt to sublet
tor summer, spacious partially
furnished townhouse 2 bedrooms,
1 12 baths on ECU bus route Call
7SO7S�0� tor more into.
APT FOR RENT starting m May
Two bedroom fully carpeted, dose
to campus Air conditioning and
pool. Call 757 1104 after t p.m.
LARGE HOUSE I blocks from
ECU 47 bedrooms, 2 baths,
SSOOmo. 7S7-S26.
COMPLETELY FURNISHED, air
conditioned apartment for one
across from College 7SI-7SOS
S. HOOTER BOB. How long two
months? It' been nothing but
"squishy" times tor sure. I guess
the ole' cowboy trick worked, huh.
I can't resist the rodeo or bull
rides. Do you blame me? Than
for everything. I enjoyed Ma and
Pa what do you think about the
floor? I love you. -S.C. Sue
LITTLE BIT: I love you almost
the mostices. Hope this ad brings a
smile to your lace and ightens the
day Thin bout me. I love you.
Billy.
FOR SALE: One silver haired
prof. Reasonably good condition,
semi-mteiigent Answers to
"Dumb Donald" contact S and C
Austin 314.
I NEED a bicycle. H you have one
for sale Call 7SO 445 (after S pm or
before 10 am weekdays.)
Call Kempte
757 4733
Dunn anytime
NOTARY PUBLIC - Call Amy at to type thesis, dissertations,
757 3734 publications, manuscripts or term
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST wants P�P�" �' � !?
HELP. Ride needed to Chapel
Hill, April IS tor B 52's concert.
Call 7S3 000S.
RIDE NEEDED to Virginia
Beach or surrounding area any
weekend Cheryl 7SMW.
RIDERS NEEDED
DC Northern Va Area for �!��
Weekend (Apr i Call Keith
750317
Central Book
&News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open 7 days a week � 9:30-9:00
J
JOLLY'S
PAWN SHOP
HELP
WANTED
20
off
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
For nicely furnished apt at
Cypress Gardens. Within walking
distance of campus Call 750 3I�4
GOING TO Summer School and
need a place to live? How about a
nicely furnished apt instead ol the
dorms? Available May thru Aug
Walking distance to campus Call
7S0 3W4
APARTMENT FOR rent May
Aug Furnished, one block from
campus. Deposit required Cheryl
752 KSf.
FURNISHED H' �� tor rent tor
summer. 3 bedrooms. I block from
campus 5140month. call 7S8-4403
AVAILABLE FOR semmer school
and net fall it desired 3
bedroom 2 full bath. Furnished
Duplex walking distance from
campus $245 Call 7S7 IW7.
SHARE SPACIOUS Apt in Large
house females call 75 5450 (work)
after S leave message tor Dee
PERSONALS
Do you know someone with an in-
teresting or unique hobby or
craft? If so contact the Buccaneer.
7S7SOI.
BEER DRINKERS WANTED:
Think you can chug a beer? Prove
it. Enter the Beer Bong Contest on
April IS tor details call Alpha
Sigma Phi 752 1073
EUZABETH Rabbits, Rabbits,
Rabbits. I think of you all month
long Have a good one Call you
from Atlanta.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY. Glenn San
Marko From the guys on the 2nd
floor of Aycock. Look forward to
seeing you in Showboat.
PSI CHI Members and new in-
itiates vote Cathie Murensky
President April 6 Be there Be
known vote right PS Who is Ed
Wingfield'
VICKl Happy 24th Birthday, I
cant afford a gift so I'll take you
downtown and sho you what I
would have bought you Your
lavonte sister. Michelle
TO THE FLORIDA FIVE
Veronika, it's easy to tell one and
all I know lor sure you're olf the
wall And to Kim who had the
showing slip, but couldn't get Boio
to take a dip So with a tiery heart
she headed south, and ended up
shooting Kermit the Frog in the
mouth. Gern. Gerri, We all know
your way, your bound to sleep no
matter what time of day Vicki, we
tor sure know how you are, you'd
claim to out drink anyone at the
bar. Val you're time is near and
you shall see because it's time to
marry Al but only as Melony
Love ya lots. A cool, prompt oker
TRUMPET PLAYER
WANTED�top 40Beach group.
Weekend work. Vocal ability
preferred. Call 7S4 44vS
GOOD SUMMER JOB: Swim
coach needed. Salary negotiable, t
wk. 3 hrday. Only those looking
for serious employment need app-
ly. Contact: Swim Chairman, co
202 Beverly Drive, Concord, N.C-
20025.
NEED MONEY? Has Tuition in-
creases caught you short? If
you're a hard worker, like to
travel, earn $l200month. Send
name and phone number to Sum-
mer Work Box S04 Stanley. N.C.
2144
MUSICIANS NEEDED: Bass
Guitar, Lead Guitar, Kcyborads.
Saxophone, and trumpet Able to
play top fortybeach, Chicago and
Earth. Wind and Fire type music,
vocal ability would be nice but not
a necesity PA system already
purchased Nice place to practice
play on weekends If interested or
for more information, call Jeff at
752 5512. Call Mon. and Wed. I 30
pm until, and Tues. and Thurs.
11:30-0 00 p.m.
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICA
TIONS tor Positions at WZMB-
FM Assisant General
Manager Program Director.
Music Director; and Business
manager. For more information
on positions come by the Studios
on 2cd floor Joyner or call 757-445
SERVICES
I Any Paperback
i or Hardback in Stock
j With This Coupon.
i
Good through Fri April 9th
Large inventory of new and
used merchandise
We Have
Layaway
� Accepting any items of value for collatera
BICYCLES
GUNS
JEWELRY
STEREOS
MUSIC INSTRUMENTS
TOOLS
�All transactions confidential
WE BUY GOLD & SILVER
ACROSS THE RIVER � Corner of N. Green & Hwy 33
.Pactolus Hwy.) 752 5759 MonFri. 9 to 6 � Sat. 8 to 4
NO
APPOINTMENT
NECESSARY
G�SIY
sxpecmians
Carolina
East Mall
Greenville
756-8694
PRECISION HAIRCUTTERS Offer good thru April.
:
&
Master Card & Visa Accepted
CARICATURES BY WEYLER
Greenville's original personalned
art service Have cartoon done of
yourself or a loved" on a unique
gift idea HO tor � x 10, bl
white or color. Call 752-577
TYPING: TERM. Thesis.
Resumes, Dissertations, etc Pro
fessional quality at lowest rates
Clip coupon & bring it in on yourjiextvsit.
' SAV�$2.50 T SAVE $10.00
� n.i anv UCDU
PRECISION HAIRCUT
Re.�U.50
ON ANY PERM
I Ref $12.50 I
t unique sO-1
lack and ftJ(Z?
�V)
.�
CASH
FOR COLLEGE
MONEY AVAILABLE FOR NEXT FALL
There is still time & money available
for next fall & EDUCATIONAL
GUIDANCE SERVICES of N.C, a uni-
que computerized service designed to
locate sources of financial aid for col-
lege students can help you get that
money.
We know where the money is � we can
tell you how to get it for college next
fall.
For FREE & Complete
Information Write:
EDUCATIONAL GUIDANCE
SERVICES
OF NORTH CAROLINA
P.O. Box 1784 Kinston, N.C. 28501
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
1.
ITSWARI
BOOM! BOOM! BOOM!
To introduce you to our mouth watering style of pizza, we're mak
ing two incredible offers. With this coupon save $1 00 on a
medium or $2.00 on a large Godfather's Pizza
What's holdin' ya? The doors are open now!
Godfather's Pizza
$100
XOFF
Medium
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville Boulevard Phone 756-9600
Offer expires March 31, 1982
Limit o"e pma per coupon
For
GRANDMA
BOY FRIEND
SISTER

The Annual Jr. Panhallenic
Easter Egg Hunt
Monday, April 5th at 4:30
Ages 3 and older and 4-6 yrs. of age.
Easter Eggs and Candy
from the Easter Bunny
For Children of the Faculty, Staff, Students.
Please Bring Basket

��
;x-
ti
THE YEARBOOK etc.
youf
pictuid tak�n
CALL BUCCANEER OFFICE FOR APPOINTMENTS
757-6501
SITTINGS: MARCH 25-APRIL 16 � 9-5
Varden Studios. Inc.
'

.
��
m





Title
The East Carolinian, April 1, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 01, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.190
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57471
Preferred Citation
Cite this item
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of ECU Libraries. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy