The East Carolinian, March 30, 1982






�a0t (Earoltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.5SNo.52
Tuesday, March 30, 1982
Greenville.VC
12 Panes
SGA Appropriates Funds For
ECGC Informational Pamphlet
By DIANE NDERSON
Ml. I H
The Student Government
ssociation Mondav appropriated
$100 to the Fast Carolina Gay. Com-
munity. The funds will pa for ttie
l printing a pamphlet, which
ittempt to "increase an
ess of people ol dittereni
sexual orientation according to
Mai k Zumbach, president of the
ECG
Another appropriation was made
to the i ateer Education Committee
in the amount o $3,000. The
money, which was amended from
an original request for $5,000, will
covet the printing costs of an infor-
mative book regarding career op-
poi (unities.
The legislation approved a third
appropriation of $7,000 to help
fund the National Merit Scholarship
Award, which encourages students
with high academic quality to attend
the university.
Constitutions for the ECU Allied
Health Association, the Poetry
Forum, and the Baha'i organization
were also approved.
Media Board Appoints New Editors,
Managers For Coming School Year
� MIKh HI (.HI S
ViNljm S,� �, i i
business manager for The East
Carolinian, will replace interim
�Vter several recei
ECl Media Board
ji meetings,
has announced
Editoi in Chiel .
the beginning ol
session.
immy DuPree at
the first summer
the names ol tne
the academic yeai
I sa Colemar
of the Bui
d to replace
i ol the v.
Field ne Mi lei
f the mod.a heads
Q81
V iv P
. - .
Hit:
1 he Ebony Herald, which has not
been published since January, will
be headed b Donna Wiley. She
replaces Debra V iggins, who resign-
ed tier position as editor in
1 ebruary. Wiley, has reportedly, said
of the tabloid.
Gary Patterson will replace Chap
Gurley as the head of the ECU
Photo Lab at the beginning of the
fall semester 1982.
Former poetry editor o the
Rebel, Rick Gordon, will replace
Bill Rapp as editor of that publica-
tion.
And Warren Baker, currently the
production director for W MB. will
replace Sam Barwick as the station's
current lv
she plans to put out an pril edition general manager.
Students From ECU, UNC Arrested During
Protest Of U.S. Involvement In El Salvador
n has L arohi ill �
a .1 � d and ai ged
S while p
'taming ol El Sa
ps at I on Bragg ii I ay
Pati . I ('Neill, 26, was rel i
on his owi - nizance with three
stuek fron I niversity ol
North a at Chapel Hill. -
trial is scheduled lot next m n .
O'Neill, a member o the Green-
Peace Committee, joined the
I c students blocking four lanes
raffic near the post's informa-
tion booth as the were about to be
Mso arrested were le Charnes,
25, Stephen Kahn, 22, and Mark
Beaty, 21, according to Deputy U.S.
Marshall C lift Hart
Charnes, a third-year law student,
reportedly told an Army officer the
demonstrators would not leave until
the Salvadoran troops left the base.
The officer gave them 10 minutes to
leave. The protestors were arrested
soon after the warning was issued
but offered no resistance.
O'Neill, who called the arrest a
"symbolic act showing mv solidari-
ty with the people being oppressed
and murdered in El Salvador1 has
worked tor The Eai Carolinian
since September 1981.
It Sure Beats Rainwater
Photo Bv DAVE WILLIAMS
li.i husky pup braves the cool breees and gets a taste of the good life at saturdav sentralampus Pig-
on the mall.
Pit kin
Tobacco Tax Draws Criticism
An increase in the tax on tobacco and tobacco products is currently drawing
arguments from both sides.
By MIKE HUGHES
Mtnt Nr� frdilor
"Technically, there is no medical
proof of a connection between
smoking and health says Danielle
Westphal, director o' smoking
education for the American I ung
Association, "but when nine out of
10 people with cancer have been
smokers, that is enough proof
Arguing for an increase in the
federal excise tax on tobacco and
tobacco products, Westphal criticiz-
ed current government policy on
tobacco farmer taxation.
According to Westphal,
Americans spent in excess of $27
billion in smoking-related health
care last year. Between $5 billion
and $8 billion was paid directly for
treatment in 1981, while the remain-
ing costs resulted from lost produc-
tivity and wages caused by smoking-
related illnesses.
However, despite the Surgeon
General's neverending war on
smoking, tobacco analysts and of-
ficials sa they don't expect North
Carolina's economy to suffer. In
addition, they believe tobacco tax-
ing will stay about the same.
robacco currently ranks third in
highest-taxed commodities in the
U.S behind gasoline and alcoholic
beverages. In 1980, federal excise
taxes on tobacco amounted to S2.4
million. Still, the tax on tobacco
products has not been raised in 30
years.
Keith Weatherly, a spokesman
for Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C. said
that congressmen from states
without tobacco industries are more
prone to advocate tobacco tax in-
creases than representatives of states
like North Carolina, where the
tobacco crop is a prime source of
revenue.
"It's easy for them to criticize
Weatherly said. "They have their
farm interests to protect, so they
criticize the tobacco program. When
you turn against theii product.
however, they don't understand
WeatherK said that the majority
ol Americans who complain o so
because thev feel the government
should not subsidize something
which is considered a health haaid.
"In the first place he explained.
"there is no government subsidy,
and in the second, there has never
been a proven cor relation between
health and smoking
Weatherly cited a recent study
conducted bv the Tobacco Institute,
which backed up his statement,
claiming that no direct link between
smoking and cancer has been
established.
Another member of the Tobacco
Institute, Anne Browder (assistant
to the president), feels that tobacco
products are alreadv overtaxed. "If
the tax on automobiles was as high
as the tax on cigarettes, a $6,000 ear
would cost $10,000 she said.
Browder continued saying that
tobacco and the tobacco industry
contributes to the economies o each
ol the 50 states.
report completed by the
I niversity of Pennsylvania last vear
showed that the tobacco industrv
contributes two million jobs and $30
billion in annual earnings to the
I S economy, likewise, the pro-
duct yielded S22 billion to federal,
state and local taxe last vear.
Despite the recent legislative pro
posals to increase tobacco taxes,
farmers are not overly concerned,
according to Browder.
"Reagan refused to increase the
tax she said, "so I don't think
there will be any problem
Congressman Walter Jones.
D-N.C, echoed Browder's opinion
"In my opinion Jones said. "I
think the president will stand firm in
his decision and will not increase the
excise tax on tobacco
Students Hold Memorial Vigil
Bv PATRICK O'N El LI
111 Mnift
More than 50 Greenville residents
and 1 C students gathered on the
steps of the Pitt County Court
House last week for a Candle 1 ighl
Memorial Vigil in remembrance ol
the second anniversary ol El
Salvadoran Archbishop Oscai
Romero's assasination and in op-
position to continuing United States
military aid to El Salvador.
The Vigil, which was sponsored
bv the Greenville ECU. Commit
tee on El Salvador, was reminiscent
of the anti-Vietnam war protests of
the sixties and seventies.
Romero wa killed on March 24.
1980, the day after he had publicallv
called on the warring factions m 11
Salvador to stop the violence and
stop the killings Romero
specifically called on the El
Salvadoran military to stop killing
their own people, and his death was
subsequently attributed to the
military.
Members of the Green-
ville E.G.U. Committee on El
Salvador stated their belief that
U S. military aid is being used by
the ruling junta to murder their own
citizens.
Ihree signs that were used by
those at the vigil stated "El
Salvador � feed the People � Stop
the Killings "Oscar Romero �
Opposed Violence, 1 oved the Poor,
and died at the hands of the
violent" and "Stop Aid to Violence
in El Salvador
Several o the vigilants reported
that this was their first time
publicallv demonstrating for a
cause. "I'm putting what 1 feel into
action said ECU freshman Beth
Nader. "You can't just sit back and
watch what's going on and not get
involved
"1 don't believe in the slaughter
of innocent people said ECU
junior Mary Rider. "The majority
of the American people seem to be
upset with our government's posi-
tion on hi Salvador
Several religious leaders address-
ed the group with their reflections
on the life and death of Romero and
the situation in El Salvador. A
Catholic nun working in campus
ministry, Sister Kathleen Jackson
led the opening prayer for the
vigilers and recalled the life of
Romero as a peacemaker and a mar-
tyr.
ECU Presbyterian campus
minister Rev. Stewart LaNeave
spoke to the gathering about his op-
position to the U.S. position in El
Salvador and read off a long list of
facts about the history of the
violence and suffering in El
Salvador.
"It's extremely important that the
American public become aware of
our government's foreign policy in
relation to El Salvador Rev.
LaNeave said.
LaNeave added that the
American public "is the last to
become informed and to know
where our tax dollars are going and
how they are being spent He was
referring to financial support and
aid to the present regime in El
Salvador and to the U.S. training of
El Salvadoran military officers at
Fort Bragg, in Fayetteville, N.C.
The GreenvilleE.C.U. Commit-
tee on El Salvador stated that the
Vigil "was just the beginning" in a
series of actions and educational
projects they would be sponsoring
in the near future until the United
States' position in El Salvador
changed.
The participants in the Vigil were
pleased with their efforts, and the
committee's leaders were encourag-
ed by the high turnout. Randy
Alley, a spokesman for the commit-
tee, said that very little advance
publicity was done and that most
people found out by word of
mouth.
"The Vigil was one small way of
saying I'm sick of war and strife in
the world said Val Parker, an
ECU music student. Parker said he
felt the Vigil was a success and pro-
bably helped to make more people
aware of what's going on in El
Salvador.
"It's hard to express that feeling I
had when I as watching T.V. and
saw an El Salvadoran soldier kick a
civilian in the head Parker said.
"This is just my beginning of
being involved in world issues
Nader said. "A lot of people came
out to show their support Rider
added. "What I could do was lend
my prayers to the cause
On The inside-
Reody for action, the Pirates won three straight games over the Ohio
University Bobcats last weekend See Sports
Weather Watch
(UPI) - Partly cloudy today with
highs m the low 60s. Low tonight
in the 40s Warmer Wednesday
and partly cloudy with highs in
the 70s
Inside Index
Announcements
Opinion
Campus Forum
Entertainment
Learning About College
Sports
Classifieds
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 30. 1982
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcements column
please send the announcement (as
brief as possible) typed and
double spaced to The East Caroli
nian in care of the production
manager.
For better service, we are now
asking that you pick up several
copies of our new announcement
application for your upcoming
events
There is no charge tor an
nouncements, but space is often
limited. Therefore we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you want
and suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column tor publicity
The deadline tor a .nouncements
is 5 p m Friday for the Tuesday
papesr and 5 p.m Tuesday for the
Thursday paper
This space is available to all
campus organizations and depart
ments
CO-OP
60 Clerk Typists positions are
available for the summer in
Washington. D C at the Pentagon
m the Office of the Secretary of
Defense The Pentagon, in part,
uses a random selection process to
select clerk typists for the sum
mpr Students who have social
security numbers ending in "7"
have been selected tor considera
tion this summer Also available
are 36 internship positions for
students maioring in Political
Science. MPA, Computer Science.
Business, and Business Educa
t.on Interns will be selected ac
cording to their GPA's and work
experience Interested students
should apply today! Deadline tor
applications to be received is Apr.i
V
SAB
An students are welcome to sup
port ECU Athletics by attending a
get together of the Student
Athletic Board m Room 247
Merdernaii or Tuesday. March 30
at 5 p m
SOCWCORR
The Department of Social Work
and Correctional Services will of
fer courses during the second sum
mer session of I9t2, beginning
June 22 July 29 which will be of in
terest to professionals in the
human service field, social
workers, ministers, lay persons
and law enforcement and criminal
justice students preparing to enter
these fields.
SocW 4002. "Crisis Interven
tion a generic approach to
recognizing, understanding, and
intervening appropriately in crisis
situations. Tim 4:20-550 every
day m the Allied Health Building
Room 206
SocW 5003. "Processes of Group
intervention working effectively
with the group, utilizing it as the
change media Four theoretical
approaches will be examined with
emphasis on group constellation,
group dynamics and group Fro
cess Time 1 00 2 30 every day in
the Allied Health Building Room
206
For additional information
please call or wr.te to the Depart
ment ct Social Work and Correc
tional Services or call 757 6961
REFUNDS
All refunds of individual tickets
tor the Eiiy Ameimg Concert,
cancelled from February 23 and
March 2, must be completed by
April 2 There will be no refunds
after that time Refunds are
handled at the Central Ticket Of
tice, MSC Mondays Fridays, 10
am 4pm We regret the m
convenience of the cancellation
FRIDAY NIGHT
ACTION
Fun filled Friday nights will
continue at Minges Coliseum tor
Volleyball and Badminton Addicts
on March 26 and April 2 and 16 All
equipment will be supplied for you
and your friends This is and ex
ceilent opportunity to beat the
boredom of staying home or it
could be the way for that in
tramural Team to get m a Little
x tra Practice
A-HOY MATES!
Enroll in the basic sailing class
Two classroom sessions and three
weekend afternoons on 19 26 ft.
sailboats on the Pamlico River
Tuition is S60 and a required text.
Invitation to Sailing is available at
the student bookstore. Class
begins April 8, and registrations
should be received bv April 1 Con
tact the Division of Continuing
Education in Erwin Hall tor
details (phone 757 6143)
"MR. 10"
The Elbo and the Little Sisters of
Lambda Chi Alpha present the
first annual "Mr. 10" Contest to be
held Tuesday, April 16 at 8:30
Contestants wishing to enter,
l lease contact 757 1638 or 758 2799
There will be no entry fee The
charge at the door is S 50 before 10
and75 after. Door prizes will be
awarded
CIRCLE K
The Circle K club of ECU invites
all students to attend our Tuesday
night meetings in room 221
Mendenhall We are now initiating
a membership drive for students
who are interested in helping
others through our various service
projects See y'aH Tuesday night
at 6 30
ACM
The ECU Chapter of ACM
will meet this Thursday, April 1 at
3 30 m Austin room 132 This week,
Mr David Soweli, Research
Associate and software engineer
to the ULTRA Proiect at ECU. will
speak on the last segment of
designing and building your own
microcomputer Anyone in
terested is invited to attend.
KYF
The King's Youth Fellowship
will hold its next meet on April 1 at
8 p.m in Mendenhall. room 247.
Everyone is invited and
refreshments will be served at the
conclusion of the meeting
THE WALK
"The Walk" is only 2 weeks
away. Sign up to "walk" or soon
sor a friend. The nth Annual
"CROP WALK FOR HUMANI
TV" will be held on April 3 at � 30
a.m. The money raised will be us-
ed to help poor countries become
self sufficient. Church World Ser-
vice and The ECU Hunger Coeli
tion are working together on the
"walk" signup cards will be
available from ECU campus
ministers or from tables to be set
up on campus next week. More
more information call 752-4216 or
come to our meetings at 7:30 p.m.
on Thursdays at the Newman
House.
OUTDOOR
RECREATION
RENTALS
The outdoor recreation center
located in room 115 Memorial
Gym is open from 2 3 p.m. each
Monday Friday Reservations
andor rentals for equipment in-
cluding Tents, Backpacks,
Canoes, and a Tandem Bicycle
can be made during these hours.
Hand outs are available providing
information relative to Hiking and
Backpacking Trails, Canoeing
Waterways and Camping areas on
the Federal, State, and Local
levels. Reservations and rentals
are available to all ECU students,
faculty and staff
SURF CLUB
Meeting Wednesday night in the
Coffeehouse. Plans for the team
surf off and trip to the Outerbank;
during Easter will be made The
surf off is this Sunday so all
members be at the meeting if you
want to surf in the two contest that
have been made
PHI ETA SIGMA
Students who are to be initiated
into Phi Eta Sigma, national honor
society for freshmen, are remind
ed to be at the multi purpose room
of Mendenhall by 7 15 p.m. or
Thursday. April 1.
Supreme Court Delays
Racial Discrimination Talk
WASHINGTON (UP1) � The Supreme Court
indicated Monday it may not settle until next fall,
at the earliest, a controversy ovyer whether private
schools that practice racial discrimina ion should
enjoy tax exemptions.
The court today released its schedule of oral
arguments for the remainder of the current term.
Conspicuously absent from the list was a test case
on the issue involving Bob Jones University, of
Greenville, S.C, and the Goldsboro Christian
Schools.
The justices could schedule special arguments
in the case during May or June, when it normally
does not hear debate in pending cases, but such
action is rarely taken by high court.
In addition, the justices still have not announc-
ed whether they will go forward with the case,
which thev originally accepted for argument last
fall.
The Bob Jones controversy shapes up as one of
the top cases confronting the justices this year
because of its far-reaching implications. It pits
civil rights groups against conservative, fun-
damentalist institutions that have been strong
supporters of President Reagan.
The Reagan administration, reversing its posi-
tion for a second time, has urged the court to pro-
ceed with the case.
Reagan ignited a political firestorm in January
when he decided to reverse a 12-year-old policy �
adopted during the Nixon administration � of
denying tax exemptions to private institutions
that practice racial bias.
At that time, the administration urged the high
court to drop the case, which it originally agreed
to hear last October.
But in February government lawyers said the
administration had changed its position because
of a decision by the U.S. Circuit Court of Ap-
peals in Washington, which temporarily bars the
Internal Revenue Service from granting or restor-
ing tax exemptions to such private schools.
Defending the decision to give the schools tax
breaks, Reagan has argued government
bureaucrats usurped a decision that should be
made by Congress and he has called on
lawmakers to pass a law clearing up the dispute.
Bob Jones, however, maintains Congress can-
not constitutionally deny such tax exemptions, a
critical split between the administration and the
fundamentalist schools.
The NAACP had taken the lead in urging the
court not to drop the case, charging schools such
as Bob Jones and Goldsboro represent a "badge
of slavery" to blacks that should not be en-
couraged by special tax breaks.
BAHAMA MAMA 1982
The 1912 Kappa Sigma and
Strohs Bahama Mama Beach
Party and Raffle will be held April
1, Thursday night from 8 p.m. ur
till midnight, located across from
Umstead Dorm on Tenth Street
This is presented by Kappa Sigma,
Hallow Distributing Company, Ac
cu Copy, University Book Ex
change and Hodges Sporting
Goods. The Grand Prize drawing
will be held at midnight for an
ALL EXPENSE PAID TRIP TO
THE BAHAMAS FOR TWO. all for
just one dollar. Tickets are on sale
in front the Student Store, or from
any Kappa Sigma member. For
more information call 752 5543. Be
There Aloha.
BAHA'I
The Baha'i Association of ECU
is having an introductory meeting
tonight at 8 p.m. in the Mendenhall
Coffeehouse The topic will be The
History And General Tenets Of
The Baha'i Faith All are
welcome
JEWISH STUDENTS
There will be a Passover Seder1
For reservations please call Mark
Coher at 757 1155 or Dr B Resu'k
at 756 5640
BOOK SCHOLARSHIPS
The chapter of Phi Eta Sigma at
ECU announces that applications
may now be received for book
scholarships of $100 to be awarded
to the most outstanding rising
junior and rising senior Only
members of Phi Eta Sigma may
apply, and service to the local
chapter is a maior criterion infor
mation and application forms may
be received from Dr John D
Ebbs, Faculty Adviser, m Austin
214.
MARSHALL
APPLICATIONS
Marshall applications now being
accepted in the SGA Office, Room
228 Mendenhall (Monday Friday.
from 8 am thru 5 p.m
PHI BETA LAMBDA
The Omicron chapter of Phi
Beta Lambda will meet March 31
at 4 p.m m Rawl 130 Elections for
officers will be held and all
members are urged to attend
SUMMER SCHOOL
ROOM RESERVATION
Residence hail room deposits fo
Summer School 1982 will be ac
cepted in the Cashier's Oftict.
Room 105, Spilman Buildmo,
beginning April l Room
assignments will be made m the
respective residence hail offices
on April 5 and 6 Thereafter, they
will be made in the Office of Hous
mg Operations, Room 201.
Whichard Building The rent for a
term of summer school is $120 for
a semi private room and $180 for a
private room Additional r�nt m
the amount of $20 is required for
Jarvis Hall
Students who wish to reserve
rooms they presently occupy, pro
vided such rooms are to be in use
this summer, are to make reserva
tions on Monday. April 5 All other
students may reserve rooms on a
first come, first serve basis on
Tuesday, April 6
Residence halls to be used for
women are Green, Slay and Jar
vis Men will be housed in Garrett,
Slay and Jarvis Hails
Hey ECU Students,
BATTLE OF THE
BANDS is coming
April 17th on the mall 12-7
6 bands and lots of your favorite beverage.
(bring your SRA card)
Sponsored by the Student Residence Association
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13-14
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
SltS.M Pregnancy T�tt, fcirttt
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling for fur
ther information call Ul-asis
(Toll Fret Number
�00-221 2$M) between � A.M.
RALEIOH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
?1' West Morgan St
Ralaioh. N.C.
n�vv
mm
RESEARCH
PAPERS
10,278 on file � all subjects
Send $1.00 (refundable) for your up-to-date.
340 page, mall order catalog.
We also provide research - all fields.
Thesis and dissertation assistance available
RESEARCH ASSISTANCE
11322 Idaho Ave 206F
Los Angelas. Calif. 90025
(213) 477-8226 or 477-8227
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PPHA
The Preprofessional Health
Alliance will have a meeting this
Thursday. April l. This meeting
will be held at 6 p m at The Afro
American Cultural Center. All
members and any other interested
parties are urged to attend.
COMIC BOOK CLUB
Fantasy fans and music lovers
will have a chance to meet, mouth
off and buy, sell or trade their
treasured items on Sunday. April
18 when the ECU Comic Book Club
will sponsor it's annual collector's
convention An added attraction
this year is record collecting. The
convention will be held at the Moli
day inn on 714 S Memorial Drive
from 10 am to S p m Admission
is free to the public For more in
formation andor dealer's regula
tions, contact The Nostalgia News
land (919 Dickinson Aveor call
752 6389 between 8 10 p m
CADP
The Campus Alcohol and Drug
Program will hold its bi monthly
meeting on April 5 at 3 30 p.m. m
the second floor conference room
of Erwin Hall Students interested
in furthering responsible attitudes
toward the use of chemical
substances are encouraged to at
tend For more information call
757 6793 or 757 6649
SEMINAR
The Department of Chemistry of
ECU announces a seminar on
"Synthesis And Development Of
An Anti inflammatory Drug" by
Dr William j Welsteao, jr ,
Director of Chemical Research,
AH Robbms Pharmaceutical
Company of Richmond, Virginia
The seminar will be held on Fn
day. April 9 at 2 p.m in room 201.
Flanagan Building Refreshments
will be served m the conference
room following tne seminar.
FIELDHOCKEY
There will be a Field Hockey
meeting Wednesday. March 31 in
the lobby of Umstead Dorm at
5 30 Elections will be held Old
members must be there, new
members invited Any questions,
call Beth at 757 1721
WSI
Anyone interested m taking a
Water Safety Instructors Training
Course call 756 8607
CROPWALK
FOR HUMANITY
� Saturday. April 3 at 8 Mam
at Greensprings Park E 4th St Be
there for the fun or sponsor a
friend Walk sponsor cards and in
formation available this Thursday
evening at Mendenhall and Friday
during the day at trie Student Sup
ply Store Come on "Put A Little
Heart In Your Sole ECU Hunger
Coalition. 752 4216
IVCF
Anyone interested m going on
the Spring Retreat with Inter Var
sity Christian Fellowship come to
the meeting Wednesday night at
7 30 m Mendenhall Room 221
We'll rtave singing and fellowship
too Everyone is welcome1
ILO
The international Language
Organization will be having a
meeting on March 31 The meeting
will be at 2 p m m BC 301
members are encouraged to at
tend and all interested people are
welcome to come
PHI SIGMA PI
Tau Chapter of Phi Sigma Pi Na
tior.al Honor Fraternity w.n nave
a short meeting Wednesday at 6
p m , after the pledge tes' The
group photo for the yearbook ��
be taken at 8 15 pm Wednesday
m the Mendenhall multipurpose
room This means coats and ties
guys ladies pust do your best
SGA
Applications for (82 83) Honor
Council members ar Demg taken
in the SGA Office. 228 Mendenhall
Student Center Between 8 00a rr
and 5 00 p m , Monday thru Fri
day
lO
mai
rav
thrj
Sill
I
Phone 752-0326
The
Marathon
Restaurant
The Best in
Greek food, Pizzas, and Subs.
Try our delicious Souvlakia
Special only $2.65
FREE DELIVERY
AFTER 5:00 P.M.
Located Across From ECU
at 506 Evans St.
hr
fern
I
The East Carolinian
Srrvmg ihf cainpui oinmumiv
umr�
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
mg the summer
The East Carolinian is the of
ficial newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned,
operated, and published lor and
by the students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate: 120 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU,
Greenville, N.C.
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carolinian.
Old South Building, ECU Green
ville. NC 27634
Telephone 757-6366. 6347, 4309
Application to mail at second
class postage rates is pending at
Greenville, North Carolina.
f SAMMY'S
Country
Cooking
NOWOPEN
7 DAYS A WEEK!
STARTING THIS SATURDAY
SAT. & SUN.�
OPEN 12-8
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY
NOW SERVING BREAKFAST!
OPEN: 7:00 A.Mtil 8:00 P.M.
CALL FOR DAILY WEEK DAY SPECIALS
752-0476
i
I
i
Part II in a series to
assist graduating
seniors
Dressing
for the
Interview
m-4 very interviewer will agree that the
X�way you are dressed for the interview
is extremely important. Many potential
employers will inspect you from head to toe.
When you consider that many companies
will interview more than one-hundred ap
plicants for a position, it makes good sense
to insure that you're properly dressed.
A dark suit, preferably a navy, navy
pinstripe, grey, or grey pinstripe should be
worn for the first meeting.
A white shirt should be worn for each in-
terview (Some large companies require that
their employees wear nothing but white
shirts).
A conservative stripe or foulard tie is
preferred. Don't make the mistake of wear
ing a linen tie in the winter or a wool one
during spring or summer. A burgundy stripe
with some navy blue andor grey usually
looks very nice with either of the aforemen-
tioned suits.
Dark shoes, preferably a dark leather
tassel or lace-up is best. Light colored
loafers won't cut it (a fresh shine would be a
good idea too). Wear a belt that matches
your shoes.
We wont to offer you high quality choices
when It comes to making that important
decision on a suit. Our selection includes
suits oy Austin Reed, Hart Shaffner & Marx,
Hickey Freeman, Chaps, Polo University,
and Corbln. We want to make sure you
understand the difference in tailoring,
fabrics, and styling that our clothing
delivers.
o�fttiat&
MENS WEAR
A navy blazer is permissable. But it must
be worn properly with a conservative stripe
tie. Grey pants are generally the best to wear
with the blazer (khaki's are too casual for an
interview). Again, dark shoes are best.
Make sure that your clothes are clean and
pressed.
Some self-proclaimed professionals say
that you should work your way up to your
best looking suit. In other words, save the
best for last to make the lasting impression
when it comes down to the final cut. This
makes sense until you consider that you
want to make a good enough impression at
the first interview to be asked back for the
second. This is a decision you must make for
yourself.
Downtown Greenville
Carolina East Mall
Student Layaways Welcome
t

r





IHt 1 AS! C AkOl IMAN
1AK H V !VX:
Watch Out For The Quarter At The Bottom
I
ii
IOWA CITY, Iowa (C PS) - While
main campuses ate coping with the
ravages of the winter, others wade
through the floods of spring and
still others desperately try to con-
coct ways to survive their fiscal
crises, the University of Iowa is
lighting a different kind of pro-
blem: a small epidemic of students
who have to have quarters removed
from their digestive tracts.
Over the last six months, Iowa Ci-
t University Hospital has treated
15 to 20 students who had been
playing the drinking game
"Quarters according to Dr.
Robert Hageman.
The game, Hageman says, con-
sists of "a bunch of people sitting
around a table drinking beer, and
trying to flip quarters into the mugs.
When someone gets a quarter into a
beer, he can either drink it or choose
someone else who has to. The per-
son elected must chug the beer, and
catch the quarter in his teeth
"Caps a variation using bottle
caps instead of quarters, is also
Iran Islams Executing Baha'i Religious Leaders
Bv PAlKKk
O'NEll I
Editor's So te:
Because portions oj the
following story were
accidentally deleted m
1 hursday s edition,
it is being reprinted
Religious persecu-
tion, violence and
murdei ate again tak-
ing place m Iran, where
a religious body known
as Baha'is is now mark-
ed foi "Naboundi ot
elimination, by the
Islamic majority in
Iran.
V cording to the
Bal a ffice ot' Public
f fa i r s has ed in
'A ilmette, Illinois, v
oi Iran's Baha'i leaders
have been executed
without charges being
hied, dnd another 14
ave "disappeared
Baha'is have been sub-
jected to "a ceaseless
n ot persecution"
ce the 1 s revolu-
n in Iran.
V ol March 21. the
1- . � vei nmeni has
been issuing identifica-
� . ai ds il citizens
! exce pl
a' ds
squired tor the
I Hid and
atd ECl
luate student and
ei ot the Baha'i
�mufffiiiiinnwin
faith Jeremy farlo.
larlo. along with
abil lurney, Jim
Wilkinson and Michael
Hillis, all members of
the Baha'i Association
oi ECl . ate hoping to
"call attention to the
plight of the Baha'is in
Iran and to the worsen
ing situation there
Under Iran's new
laws, Baha'is will be
barred from holding
iobs, owning propertv.
having bank accounts,
running businesses,
receiving medical treat-
ment or traveling.
Baha'i children arc
denied the right to at-
tend schools, and all
Baha'i marriages have
been declared null and
void.
Man ied couples will
be considered to be in-
volved in prostitution,
w hich is a crime
punishable bv death in
Iran
Systematic killings,
often done bv lynch
mobs, are nor unusual.
Baha'is have reportedly
been killed b methods
involving the use ot ex
treme v iolence.
The use o identifica-
tion cards is "one more
step in a concerted plan
bv the present Iranian
eminent lo kill
Baha'is or attempt to
force them to recant
faith;
Tarlo
their
said.
The Baha'i faith
preaches an essential
oneness of all the
manifestations oi God
and all the great world
religions. " Therefore,
we honor Krishna,
Budda, Zoroaster.
Moses, Jesus. Moham-
med, the Bab and his
s u c c e s s o r
Baha'if llah Tarlo
said. "We believe that
they are links in one
chain of successive
revealers oi the word ot
(.iod he added.
Baha'is also believe
in ideal world govern-
ment and advocate full
equality o the sexes.
Baha'i women need not
wear veils and are eligi-
ble tor all positions ot
Baha'i leadership.
Removal ot the veil is
considered a serious sin
in Islam.
Fundamentalist Ira-
nians have found
numerous reasons to
criticize the beliefs of
Irans ?(Xt.(MX) Baha'is
the country's largest
religious minority. 1 he
Baha'is are viewed as a
"dangerous heresy
larlo said. "They ac-
cuse the Baha'is ol
creating disunity, oi
cooperating with the
West, and of corrup-
tion on earth
larlo notes that the
Baha'i faith calls for
belief in and support ot
"any lawfully con
stituted government in
whatever nation we are
located Baha'is are a
worldwide religion with
several million
adherents, who all re-
main loyal to their
governments.
Recently, it was an-
nounced in Iran that
Khomeini had classed
the Baha'is as
"Mahdoui Ad Damn"
those whose blood
must be shed. Baha'is
are being referred to as
heretics, unclean, mi-
a g en t s of
powers and
of the Itue
m oral,
foreign
enemies
faith.
that was passed by a
sub-committee of the
United Nations Human
Rights Commission.
Recently, a gathering
of 1,500 Baha'is from
the United States and
Canada took place in
1 os Angeles to pav
tribute to the murdered
Baha'i leaders. I he Ira-
nian government has
admitted to the execu-
tions, saying the Baha'i
leaders were spies for
foreign powers.
The Baha'i Associa-
tion of ECU has as is
purpose to bring the
tacts of the Baha'i faith
to interested people.
More recentK, it has
decided to call on
others to take action to
help bring about justice
for Iranian Baha'is.
larlo hopes people
"will be moved bv the
facts of the situation"
and will write letters to
their representatives
reguardmg the upcom
ing healings in the
House ot Represen-
tatives.
A House sub-
committee will be in-
vestigating "religious
P e r s e c u t i o n s
throughout the world
and local Baha'is are
hoping to get tire
message out about the
plight ot then sisters
and brothers in Iran.
making the rounds ot local college
bars, accordiing to Dr. Harley
Feldick, Iowa's director of Health
Services.
Feldick reports an increase in in-
juries relating to other drinking
games among Iowa students during
the last two school year. Some
students have also been hurt playing
a game in which a participant lights
the alcohol in a drink on fire, and
then tries to gulp it down without
getting burned.
"We started hearing rumors
about the games, and before long
we were getting students with in
juries from them Fredick recalls.
"Quarters" has caused most of
the problems, according to
Hegeman.
Many people simply pass he
quarters, but some notably
smaller, younger, and female
students - are physical! incapable
of passing them.
Neither Hegeman not feldick will
speculate why there's an increase m
the game playing, or in the miuries
trom it.
some of this infor-
mation was released in
an "exclusive report by
Rosemary Righter" in
The Sunday Times of
London, but aside
from this and a tew oc
tasional I .S. news
ieports, verv little inter-
national attention and
subsequent action has
been taken in support
of the Baha'is.
I lope has been found
in a recent resolution
c o n d e in n ing t h e
"systematic persecu-
tion" ot the Baha'is
Cbapte
Thurs April 1st
Thunder Thighs Contest
Ladies' Lockout
from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m.
Doors open fo general public at 10:00 p.m.
PRIZES- 1st- $50
2nd - $25 3rd - $10
for information call 355-261 5
or 752-9745
THE SHOE OUTLET
(Located beside Evans Seafood)
Featuring name brand shoes at bargain prices.
Up To 75 OFF regular prices
Bass Mevard-Mc(juire Brouse Abouts
201 W. Washington St. Within walking distance of campus.
�SUBI1(RM
ARTISTS!
ENTEROUR
WALL PAINTING
CONTEST
would like to lake this op-
portunity to thank everyone
who supported me in my cam-
paign for SGA President.
There will be a run-off April
7th and I would appreciate
your vote and support.
Eric Henderson SGA g
A. UNIFORMS
SHOP
types of uniforms at reasonable
ces. Lab coats, stethoscopes,
oes, and hose. Also used ECU
rses uniforms. Trade ins allowed.
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive.
Near Hollowell's Duq ana old hospital.
I I I I X I I I 1 1 I
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POST-HAPPY HOUR MUSIC
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LAUGHING MATTER
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4pm 7pm
TUES. - PIZZA SPECIAL $2.49
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FRI. - HAPPY HOUR 4-7
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(
t
X





3Ue lEaot (Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Jimmy Dupree. Emam
Charles Chandler, �����
Ric Browning, omctortfAdmnhm Tom Hall, mm&am
Fielding Miller, Mmmr William Yelverton,
Alison Bartel, Steve Bachner, hwaito
Steve Moore, a� Diane Anderson, sosaw
March 30, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
N.C. Prisons
Top Priority Taken Care Of
Who says there is no such thing as
justice?
When three felons with violent
backgrounds negotiated to be
transferred to a federal facility in
Virginia in exchange for the release
of their hostages, there was little
legal foundation to insure there
move would be permanent. Indeed,
they were returned to North
Carolina's Caledonia Prison within
32 hours of their departure from
Central Prison in Raleigh.
Correction Secretary James C.
Woodard has been criticized by civil
rights activists for violating the
spirit of the agreement � as one put
it "naked deceit
"We abided by the agreement
completely Woodard said at a
Friday news conference. "We said
we would send them to a federal
unit. We did that and nothing more.
There was no agreement for a time
frame for them to stay in a federal
unit.
"We were dealing with lives
What we did was appropriate
Three of the original eight
hostages remained for through the
siege. Five were released in ex-
change for supplies and another
because of a medical condition.
Three lives � three lives which
officials had no intention of en-
dangering. The safety of those
hostages was the top priority of the
negotiations.
As Woodard stated, "It includes
anything to save a life
The three felons were known to
be of violent backgrounds. Who
could have known what they might
do if not convinced they were suc-
ceeding? Who would have wanted
to guess and be wrong?
It all comes down to a basic ques-
tion of the penal system: who's go-
ing to run the prison � the guards
or the inmates? The answer should
be logical and clear. But is it?
Rev. Leon White, director of the
United Church of Christ Commis-
sion for Racial Justice, attended the
news conference and later stated
correction officials "showed a total
lack of sensitivity
Sensitivity to whom? Certainly
not the hostages who were released
without use of force. Certainly not
the rebel inmates.
Convicted felons holding inno-
cent citizens captive for their own
personal gain can have little to
quabble about on moral grounds.
After all, they were undoubtedly at
Central Prison for a reason.
Critics have argued the actions
taken by officials could seriously
hamper negotiations if another
hostage situation were to occur. It's
possible, but only time will tell.
One of the three inmates has
reportedly stated further violence is
likely. Should this occur, state of-
ficials will be pressed for legal
assurances of no further
"trickery
For now, the hostages are safe at
home and so are the criminals.
SGA Elections Smooth,
Presidential Runoff Set
Congratulations are in order for
the candidates who ran for office in
last Wednesday's SGA elections.
All candidates? Why not just the
winners?
The answer is simple in the 1982
election all candidates were winners.
All 12 candiates for the offices of
president, vice president, secretary
and treasurer should be proud to
admit they took part in what is be-
ing called the fairest election in
many years.
This year there was no Alter-
native Press, no switching of pic-
tures in campaign ads � none of 'he
shenanigans which have marred
past elections.
Further, Chuck Blake, elections
committee chairman, should be
commended for the smooth opera-
tion of the polls.
Last Thursday The East Caroli-
nian reported part time students
were ineligible to vote. We stand
corrected. As Blake pointed out,
there was a misunderstanding by
several pollsters at Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center and they turned away
"maybe six" part time students.
This was unfortunate, but accidents
do happen.
To Vice President Bob Mills,
Secretary Sarah Coburn and
Treasurer Becky Talley, good luck
� you have your work cut out for
you.
To presidential hopefuls Eric
Henderson and David Cook, have
fun at the runoff next Wednesday.
We'll be waiting anxiously for the
results.
DOONESBURY
by Garry Trudeau
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Coverage Is Water Under Bridge
By ART BUCHWALD
Los Aiifctn Timf sndicalr
President Reagan's attacks on television
coverage have made the news executives
take a hard look at what they are showing
on the nightly news.
Durham, at the ACN network, told me,
"You know, the President isn't all wrong.
What people see on the nightly news can
affect them one way or the other. We make
a lot of tough decisions when it comes to
what we show
"Give me an example
"Well, remember a couple of weeks ago
when Mr. Reagan stopped off in Fort
Wayne, and for 10 minutes helped the peo-
ple pass sandbags to each other to stop the
flood?"
"Do I ever. It was a great piece of film,
and showed the President really cared
about the people
"I'm glad you saw it that way. But when
the tape came in, we had a lot of questions
about it. The first one was, if we snowed it,
would the viewing audience think the en-
tire Midwest was under water?"
"You cleared that up by saying only
Fort Wayne was being threatened
The second question was. would the
American people think that all President
Reagan did all day was pass sandbags from
one person to another?"
"He was dressed in a black suit and
wore a shirt and tie. I got the impression he
just stopped off because it was a great pic-
ture opportunity for him, and his press
people couldn't pass it up
"That occurred to us, too. If this was
true, was it a news story or just a publicity
stunt to get the President on the evening
news?"
"It could have been both I said.
"Frankly, the fact that the President of the
United States took time out from defen-
ding his budget to pass sandbags to the
people of Fort Wayne made me feel very
good
"Some of us thought that, but there
were others in the newsroom who argued
that viewers should be frightened about
what we showed them in Fort Wayne, and
they'd say if it could happen to the
Hoosiers, it could happen to them. That
could prolong the recession
"I hadn't thought about that. People do
tend to stop buying cars when they see
them floating down the streets
"Yet if we didn't show the President
passing sandbags, the White House would
start screaming that we were keeping Mr.
Reagan off the air when he was doing
something for the people, and only show-
ing him when he was attacking the media
"Why couldn't you have done both?
First you could have shown the President
talking about South Succotash, and then
you could have used them film of him sav-
ing Fort Wayne from going under water. It
would have portrayed Mr. Reagan as first
in war, first in peace and first in the hearts
of his countrymen
Durham said, "That's what we finally
decided to do. But then we followed it with
a story about an unemployed steelworker
in Gary, Ind and the White House raised
the roof. They wanted to know what the
President passing sandbags out in Fort
Wavne had to do with unemployment in
Gary
"They had a point. Mr. Reagan was try-
ing to stop an act of God, and you were
trying to dramatize a manmade calamity
for which the Democrats are responsible
"Maybe we made a mistake in news
judgment. We should have devoted the
whole program to President Reagan pass-
ing along the sandbags
"That's all water under the bridge.
Durham I told him. "When you're
under a deadline it's hard to judge what
will play in Peoria. Maybe you'll have
another chance to make it up to the Presi-
dent
"How?"
"As soon as Ml. St. Helens blows again,
the White House might give the President a
broom and have him help the people sweep
up the lava dust in Montana
Decision Makers Are The Problem
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
The White House war machine is shif-
ting into overdrive. Consider the events of
recent weeks. The U.S. is: stepping up
military aid to the murderous rightist
regime in El Salvadore while it backs that
country's bogus elections, boycotted by
every Salvadoran to the left of Ghengis
Khan; budgeting $19 million to overthrow
the Sandinista government in Nicaragua;
admitting that the military hardware that
Reagan is financing by firebombing social
services will cost $114.5 billion more than
originally announced; training rightwing
death squads here and abroad and talking
with Argentina about sending more troops
to invade Nicaragua.
In the face of add this, White House
spokesman David Gergen could blithely
retort recently that, "This government
does not engage in operations to topple
other governments Veterans of the
U.Sbacked coups in Chile (1973), Brazil
(1967), Guatemala (1954), and Iran (1953)
can attest otherwise. So can the
Nicaraguans picking up the pieces of two
bridges blown up in their country on
March 14 of this year � only four days
after U.S. press reports of American plans
to "destroy vital Nicaraguan targets, such
as power plants and bridges
If any of this sounds familiar � if
history appears to be spinning in circles �
it could be because the planners of and
apologists for the war crimes mentioned
above are still making policy. Consider, if
you will, this rogues' gallery of U.S. of-
ficials now deciding vital questions of war
and peace:
General Daniel O. Graham, one of the
leading lobbyists for the Reagan ad-
ministration's claim that the revolutions in
Nicaragua and El Salvador are stage-
managed from Moscow, is the same man
in charge of U.S. intelligence prior to the
Vietnam Tet Offensive in 1968. Graham's
contention then � that the U.S. was kick-
ing hell out of the National Liberation
Front � was way off the mark. Can he be
trusted to see, or tell, the truth now?
Dean Hinton, the current U.S. am-
bassador to El Salvadore. Hinton headed
the Agency for International Development
(AID), now widely believed to have been a
Trojan horse for the coup in Chile, when
that coup took place. As ambassadore to
El Salvadore, Hinton has not distinguished
himself as a champion of unrigged elec-
tions or as a hard-nosed investigator get-
ting tot he bottom of who really killed
those American churchwomen last year.
General Vernon Walters (Ret.), now
Secretary of State Alexander Haig's key
advisor on Latin American affairs.
Walters was deputy director ofthe CIA
when the government of Guatemala was
overthrown. Guatemala is now run by a
rightwing dictatorship � just the kind of
regime the Reaganites feel comfortable
with. Walter was also one of the designers
of the "pacification" plan in Vietnam,
which resulted in the forcible dislocation
and death of thousands of peasants.
Thomas O. Enders, the Assistant
Secretary of State for Inter-American Af-
fairs, is none other than the same U.S.
diplomat who supervised the illegal secret
bombing of Cambodia for the Nixon ad-
ministration in 1973. When a journalist
picked up bombing commands from the
U.S. embassy in Phom Phen over his tran-
sistor radio, Enders' story that the em-
bassy knew nothing about any bombing
was blown apart. Presently, Enders is
charged with defending the indefensible
human rights record of Jose Napoleon
Duarte's government in El Salvadore and
priming the Congressional pump for more
aid for the junta. He seems to like the
work.
Al "Hang 'em High" Haig, former
commanding general of NATO, and the de
facto president of the U.S. during the last
days of the Nixon administration, when he
held things together in the crumbling
bunker on Pennsylvania Avenue. Now
Secretary of State, as if you could forget.
Famous for his hopelessly scrambled syn-
tax, Haig is becoming infamous for his
bungled attempts to prove a Soviet-Cuban
conspiracy in the Carribean by: citing a
"captured Nicaraguan guerrilla" in Ei
Salvadore who turned out to be a student;
shiwing photographs of alleged brutality
by the Sandinistas toward Miskito Indians
that turned out to be pics of the late dic-
tator Somoza's troops from several years
ago; and other misstatements too
numerous to mention. Would you buy a
used conspiracy from this man?
And, least we forget, Ronald Wilson
Reagan, the boyish smiling sh.il for inter-
national plutocracy, whose every utterance
moves us closer to the brink of a new world
war. A New York Times-CBS poll last
week showed that 60 percent of Americans
contacted are worried that Reagan's
bellicose policies will get the U.S.
"involved in El Salvadore the way it did
Vietnam Sixty-three percent said we
should "stay out" of that country.
Next week, in the second installment of
this three-part column on war and peace,
I'll spotlight some of the hard-working ac-
tivists from many part of the political spec-
trum who are trying to do just that: help us
stay out.
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THk FAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 30, 1982
Id
pg a
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orld
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igan'
did
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Mil Ol
eace,
ig ac-
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lelp us
Tight Squeeze
These two coeds,
� long with 21
others, squeezed
into a Chrysler at a
Sigma Nu party
Monday. (Photo
By Gary Patterson)
L
Fraternity Loses Charter
Following Rape Investigation
DURHAM (UPI) �
Officials at Duke
University have revok-
ed the charter of Beta
Phi Zeta fraternity
following an investiga-
tion into reports of sex-
ual misconduct during
a party last month.
A hearing panel of
school administrators
concluded there was no
truth to reports that a
woman had been raped
at the party, but the
panel said members of
the fraternity
"encouraged a position
that group sexual ac-
tivity was accep-
table
The president of
Duke's Interfraternity
Council denounced the
administration's action
and said the council
will appoint a task
force to determined
what happened at the
party.
The school's in-
vestigation began after
an anonymous letter
was sent to Suzanne J.
Wasiolek, Duke's stu-
dent life dean, alleging
a woman had been
raped at the party. The
investigation concluded
no rape or sexual
assault occurred.
However, the hear-
ing panel said "a
sizable segment of the
membership of Beta
Phi Zeta fraternity was
involved in the total ac-
tivities of the late even-
ing and early morning
which strongly sug-
gested that group sex-
ual activity was taking
place and was accep-
table even though no
group sexual activity
did take place
The letter, which in-
formed fraternity
President Darryl
Webster of the im-
mediate revocation of
the fraternity's
charter, was signed by
Wasiolek; Richard L.
Cox, residential life
dean; and William J.
Griffith, Duke's vice
president for student
affairs.
In the letter, the
three administrators
referred to other in-
cidents that
demonstrated "an at-
titude of disrepect
toward persons and
property" and im-
plicated fraternity
m e m ber s i n
"streaking" sorority
activities.
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Americans Against El Salvador Policy
By PATRICK
O'NEILL
Marrvtriirr
The results of a Seu
York TimesCBS news
poll released in the Sun-
day edition of the
Times indicate that the
American public, by a
margin of nearly two to
one, disapprove of the
way President Reagan
is handling the El
Salvadoran situation.
Sixty-three percent
of those polled in-
dicated that the United
States should "stay out
of El Salvador while
60 percent said they
feared the U.S. would
involve itself in El
Salvador as it did in
Vietnam,
The latest poll, which
was conducted by
telephone between
March 11 and March
15, reached 1,545 peo-
ple from around the
country. The results are
said to "differ by no
more than three percen-
tage points in either
direction from what
would have been ob-
tained by interviewing
all adult Americans
Blacks represented
the largest opposition
to U.S. involvement in
El Salvador. Seventy-
six percent of blacks
polled felt the U.S.
should stay out of the
Latin American coun-
try.
Seventy percent of
those who classified
themselves as
democrats indicated
that they oppose U.S.
involvement.
Of the total number
polled, 65 percent of
women and 61 percent
of men oppose U.S. in-
volvement in El
Salvador.
Broken down into
regions, interviewees
from the South showed
the least opposition.
Fifty-three percent of
the college students
polled said they oppose
U.S. involvement in El
Salvador, while 66 per-
cent of those with less
than a high school
education indicated
their opposition.
The poll went also
pointed out that the
general public in the
U.S. lacks understan-
ding of the current
situation in El
Salvador.
According to the
Times article, "Half
the respondents said
they believed that
Soviet or Cuban troops
were present in El
Salvador, helping the
insurgents No factual
report concerning
Soviet or Cuban direct
involvement has vet
been published.
Fifty-one percent of
the 18- to 29-year-olds
polled believe that the
U.S. will send combat
troops into El
Salvador, although the
Reagan administration
has repeatedly denied
any such plans.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
MARCH 30, 1982
Page 6
'Chariots' Is
Creative Tale
Of Competition
ByJOHNWEYLER
SUff Wrilr
At press time, Monday, March
29, the film Chariots of tire stands
nominated for best picture, direc-
tor, and supporting actor. By the
time you are reading this on Tues-
day, the Academy Awards will be
over, and we'll know who won.
Chariois of Fire almost undoubted-
ly will not, which is a shame, tor the
film, now playing at the Plaza
Cinema in Greenville, is an elegant,
exhilarating motion picture ex-
perience.
In 1924, an athlete refused to par-
ticipate in an event in the Olympic
games, because the event was held
on a Sunday. This was the simple
fact that producer David Puttnam
stumbled upon in an Olympic games
record book, an accidental
discovery that was to lead to the
making of one of the year's finest
films. Puttnam enlisted scriptwriter
Colin Welland and director Hugh
Hudson, and together they created a
mini-epic about competition, en-
durance and honor, a tale told with
style, accuracy and enthusiasm.
Eric Liddell was the Scottish mis-
sionary athlete who competed to
glorify God, but whose religious
convicitons wouldn't allow him to
run in the race held on the Sabbath.
His story is contrasted with that of
Harold Abrahams, a Jew who com-
peted to exorcise his private
demons, one of which was the tor-
ment of anti-Jewish prejudice.
This pair of personal stories is
spotlighted against a vast
background, composed partially of
the physical landscape of 1920's
Europe, an era re-created with
detailed accuracy, and equally the
mental terrain of the time, a ter-
ritory landmarked with icons of
ethics and ideals.
"The charm of the film is the
naivete of the people involved in it. I
couldn't believe how naive they
were scriptwriter Welland has
said. "1 mean, these fellows never
had any girlfriends until they were
twenty-six; they all came from
private schools, and they based their
lives on very straight, very upright,
very simple ethical codes. This is
what touches you, because, frankly,
it is out of our contemporary ex-
perience. The cynics rule the roost
these days, and when you see people
basing their whole lives on these
naive codes of honor and decency
See CHARIOTS Page 7
Ian Charleson is attended to in this dramatic scene from Chariots of hire, now playing in its third week at the Plaza Cinema.
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By STEVE MORSE
Buxion lob
BOSTON � Although the future looked grim, the J.
Geils Band never gave up. Four years ago it was a half-
million dollars in debt and just trying to survive. Today,
in a miraculous recovery, the group has completed a
monthlong run in which it had the No. 1 album and No.
1 single in the land.
After a career spanning 14 years and 132 albums, the
Boston-based band hs a right to rejoice. Its
"Freeze-Frame" album jumped to the top of the
Billboard magazine charts in January and remains at
No. 2.
Its single "Centerfold" � a wise-alecky tune about a
youth who learns his old high school girlfriend posed in
the nude � is on the lips of rock fans from here to New
Zealand.
Geils has been setting a relentless pace. The band
played seven dates on the recent Rolling Stones tour and
is now on the road with its own tour. And the members
are fully aware of their success. Singer Peter Wolf calls
it "the fruits of hard labor Pianist Seth Justman ex-

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Xtra Xtra They're Coming To JJ's Wednesday
Hot new band Xtra Xtra! will perform this Wednesday evening at JJ's Music Hall in Greenville, bringing
debauchery and raw talent to an area starved for alternatives. The foursome render an appealing blend of
Punk and New Wave trappings while varying arrangements of cover material enough to give it a fresh feel.
They will play selected songs by bands ranging from U2 to Ultravox to The Jags as well as exciting original
numbers. The band will take to the stage at 10 p.m.
Music
claims, "We're on a creative rollIt's like we're star-
ting over again
Wolf and Justman sat down recently in a room at
Boston's Colonde Hotel to discuss the group's stunning
rebirth. Justman was his usual intense self, while Wolf,
a prankster onstage, was unexpectedly serious except
for an occasional witticism that dissolved the room into
laughter.
Surprisingly, they seem unfazed by their success.
"Nothing much has really changed Justman said.
"There's a feeling of gratification that people are really
getting turned on to our music, but other than that
we're just thinking about the next record, about our
next show and about just geting the laundry done on
time so we can make the next plane
Wolf, coiled in a corner sofa, noted that the biggest
change has been on the road, where the band is being
treated with new respect.
"We just played Minnesota, and it seemed to be a
really important event he said. "We had played Min-
nesota for many years � sometimes in little clubs,
sometimes in auditoriums � but this time seemed really
special. It's like the motion pictures that open up and
seem to have the vibe before they even hit town. It's nice
to have the sense that maybe that's happening with us
But Wolf added that the J.Geils Band, with each
member older than 30, has been around too long to be
flustered by all the attention.
"When we started he said, commenting on the late
'60s when they were a Boston rhythm 'n' blues band.
"We didn't go, 'Well, let's make a lot of money and be
famous We got together because we were excited by
the musical tastes we all shared.
"So now that we're at a point where we have a No. 1
record and a No. 1 single, it's incredibly gratifying, but
for us it's the means to another end; it's not the end in
itself. Maybe some other groups think, 'well, that's the
end but for us it means we can maybe take another
step in our development artistically on the stage and in
the studio
Though many people have known Geils as a major
band for some time, others are only now catching on
"It was really frustrating and discouraging Wolf
said of previous reactions. "We'd hear. 'Hey you guy
in a rock band? What's the name of y'all?' 'J. Geils 'J.
what?'
"And we'd see bands come up that had been together
for a year and all of a sudden � BANG! � thev're at
the top of the charts. We weren't envious of them, but
we figured, would we ever be able to have quality ork
and maybe have some recognition at the same time?
And now, fortunately, that's come true
The new "Freeze-Frame" album is easily the band's
most adventurous work. High-energy pop songs mingle
with politically flavored rockers, disco-funk and new
wave influences.
Guitarist J. Geils, who races stock cars in his spare
time, and harmonica player Magic Dick ("the Hendnx
of the harp Justman said) also show off their jazz
chops. The rhythm section of drummer Stephen Jo
Bladd (who plays with the polish of a GeneCrupa .Wolf
said) and bassist Danny "Ambassador of Funk" Klein
(who has a New Jersey high school buddy who was the
inspriateion for "Centerfold") again anchor the pro-
duction with class.
Once stereotyped as a one-dimensional party band,
Geils now defies categorization.
See GEILS, Page 7
Nightmarish Tale
'EraserheacT Ridicules Logic
By JOHN WEYLER
Miff rilcr
If you thought David Lynch's film The Elephant Man
was bizarre, grotesque and disturbing, wait till you see
his first film, Eraserhead, which is the Midnight Late
Show this Friday and Saturday night at Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center's Hendrix Theatre.
Cinema
Eraserhead, a low-budget, black-and-white picture,
written, directed and produced in 1977 by David Lynch,
who has since been widely acclaimed one of America's
finest young filmmakers, is considered a cult classic.
Midnight movie patrons don't exactly love the film. It's
more like they are mesmerized by it, compelled by the
eerie intensity with which Eraserhead makes nightmares
come to life.
A nightmare is the best metaphor for Eraserhead.
Like most dreams, its plot and theme are incoherent;
like the worst, most troubling dreams, it is unbearable
and unfortunately unforgettable. Eraserhead seems to
have been conceived, filmed and edited entirely within
the few seconds it takes to have a dream � or perhaps
during the split-second of extreme nausea before
vomiting when one realizes it will be over some time, but
who knows when. Eraserhead is not for the weak of
heart, or stomach.
Providing a plot summary would be useless and im-
possible; however, a Rolling Stone writer managed to
capture the feeling of the film:
"If there's a New Wave movie, Eraserhead is it.
Henry, it's hero, is a blank-faced fool wandering
through a black-and-white landscape on the edge of a
nameless city. The film is a nightmare about city life and
the family in which the wife is a stranger and the baby a
mutant � a bleating, wailing beast that Henry eventual-
ly kills more out of curiosity than malice. At once
gruesome and beautiful, Eraserhead is edited in a slow,
jagged rhythm that's awkward, even spastic, like Henry
himself. The sounds, mostly industrial noise, never
cease; in fact, they increase when he is alone, the city
filling his head, literally, and turning him into a kind of
mechanical zombie. Like Beckett's Malone, he drift
confusedly from event to event, the perfect living,
breathing robot, all consciousness
Archer Winsten of the New York Post wrote,
"Eraserhead is a unique experience yet not a thing of
horror for its own sake. It says something profound
about the outer limits of human experience. No pleasant
experience, this, but one that stays with you.
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g.
Geils Is Hot Again
, IMN
MAR( II '0
Continued From Page 6
"In terms oi what we think people expect ot
us, wee shed all that stuff said Justman, who
produces and arranges the music. "We don't
think about what people expect of us at all. And
that's what we're finding is really exciting. Even
among ourselves we're more open
Geils' climb up the commercial ladder began
atter its "Monkey Island" album five years ago.
That album had been an artistic milestone � the
jnoup spent nine months in the studio making it
but a commercial disaster. The group's long-
standing debts then reached a half-million dollars
all from recording costs.
Ceils had never made money from recordings,
only from touring. Wolf said, noting the band
had "tread water" for most of the '70s
"It was going through the difficulties of
Monkey Island' when we were in New York
and phone calls came in saying our car's going
to be taken awa if you don't get this pavment in.
and so-and-so's check is bouncing � that made
us teel mote totally commited as a group he
said "Because what was the alternative? Become
a chiropodist or podiatrist 1 mean, this is what
we wanted to do
Another snafu, he said, was the lack of sup-
port from Atlantic Records, their label of 10
years.
"We always loved blues and rhythm 'n' blues,
and Atlantic was the label to go to for that
Wolf said. "We told Atlantic one day, 'We'd
love to be on yor label so much that we'd even
pay you to let us be on it And 1 think that's
what happened
Financial doldrums eased when the band swit-
ched to the Capitol-EMl label for the
"Sanctuary" album in 1978. The label started
promoting the band heavily, and still does.
Even though Geils was a veteran unit, the band
couldn't afford its first synthesizer until just
before the "Love Stinks" album two years later.
"People said, 'Wow, you're changing your
sound, " Wolf said. "Well, one of the reasons
we changed our sound was we were finally able to
afford to
But the band wasnt' out of the woods. A big
problem was that the members were managing
themselves, with Wolf doing most of the
legwork. He had to go to New York for endless
meetings and go to Europe to do advance work
for a tour.
Geils' march to renown was aided by playing
with the Rolling Stones last fall. Geils and
George Thorogood & the Destroyers were the on-
ly bands the Stones specifically asked to tour
with them.
'Chariots' Exquisitely Crafted
Continued From Page 6
and integrity, it moves you. When we see this, we
yearn for it, and we long for it nostalgically
Savs director Hudson, "My instinctive reac-
tion, when I read the script, was to the immense
appeal of the overall endeavor of the two
characters to achieve something for themselves
against the odds that each of them came up
againsl 1 he struggle reflected a basic problem
of youth, leaving the family, coming out of
school, and dealing with the realities of a world
defined by competition. The influences of the
family, the church, the state and the educational
system are so strong that it's extremeh difficult
�i an identity, which these voung men
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do, despite all the pressure
The cast list of Chariots of hire boasts both
talented unknowns and established actors. Ian
Charleston and Ben Cross make their screen
debuts as Liddell and Abrahams. Several of
England's most distinguished Thespians appear
in the film, including Sir John Cnelgud, Lendsav
Anderson, Nigel Davenport, Patrick Magee, and
Ian Holm, who was nominated for Best Suppor-
ting Actor for his role as Sam Mussabini.
Abrahams' mentor. Ironically, Holm will pro-
bably lose his Oscar to Gielgud for his perfor-
mance in Arthur. Holm, Hudson and the picture
itself will have to be content with nominations
rather than actual awards and the knowledge oi
having helped to create an excellent piece o film
art.
for the rest of this semester, tf you need to
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Coronpi
Prints
, 400 TWO �
Why Pcf M.09
Nclf Geiien
Wisk Detergent
Wey Pey ' J.S5
16 Ounce
Sunshine Crackers
Why Pey 89
lOIUIlPi
TOWELS ,
125 Ct. Roil - Decorator
Coronet Towels
389
1 Lb. - Nerierlee Qeertert
Shedd's Spread
Why Pey IV Each
489
Why Pey 91
Keit-L
Won 4$
ISOi. - Beef & Chicken Chicken ft OG
Terkey Gibleti Doe Food PooD
Ken-L Ration
Why Pey 2 73
12 Or - Aeierieee Slicce1 Sieflee
Borden Cheese
Why Pey M.77
99 1399
52 Oeeee JJr-1 Or. - Del Monte CetFreeeb
Del Monte JL Green
Catsup km Beans
Why Pey M.19
Why Pey 2 99
m&
49.
S Ox. - Teeoine,
Quick
Maid
�jj Nj W )
Pricec ejood at Greenville Food Town Store only
Jeno's
Pizza
Why Pey M 29
y RFVoutrwaKV
cnvNusnotusiraiA
y
� '





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 30, 1982
Sammy 's Restaurant Is
Just Plain Good Eating
l fAjv�Q6 Awt CouaeU Tne rl�p jAjfil
5Y Vamw Not&l i.
B KATHYWKY1.F.R
stuff V ril�r
Sandwiches, pizzas
and burgers got you
down? Have you got a
hankering for some
good old, down-home,
Hist-like-Mom-makes
kind of food? Well
then, get yourself down
to 512 East 14th Street
and "Sammy's Coun-
try Cooking where
you'll find plenty of
just plain good eating.
"Sammy's" is a
variation on cafeteria
style. You can choose a
regular ($2 98) or large
($.V5) plate dimmer
that conies complete
with one meat and two
or three vegetables,
choice of sweet potato.
cheee or regular
biscuits or dinner rolls
and iced tea. Coffee
and dessert arc also
available, as is an all-
vegetable plate for
$2.50. Vegetable refills
arc available with the
large plate; tea refills
(setve yourself) come
with all dinners. A
child's plate is also
available tor S2.40.
Cuisine
(something the
management might
want to reconsider)
prevented us from
sampling the fried
chicken which was
plump, golden-brown
and very crispy in ap-
pearance.
"Sammy's" has
managed to work a
miracle with their
vegetables. Unlike most
cafeteria vegetables,
theirs are actually tasty.
The biscuits, too, may
well rival any Grandma
ever served at Sunday
dinner.
"Sammy's" is pretty
much a no-frills kind of
restaurant. The few
country touches in the
decor are scarcely
noticeable beside the
plastic tablecloths and
harsh lighting. In other
words, if you're sear-
ching for a new spot to
take a special dale, or it
excellent ambience is
all-important to you.
you might not want to
someplace where it
won't cost you an arm
and a leg, and the kids
won't overdose on car-
bohydrates, try
"Sammy's They're
open seven days a week
until 8 p.m serving
breakfast at 6 a.m.
Monday through Fri-
day, but you'll have to
wait until noon on the
weekends. "Sammy's"
also has take-out if
you'd rather sample
their home cooking in
vour own home.
ClCArtrTT S0etJISH
COVLP GtvJlT SrtOMs)6
IT
jusr tmroviO
A)0fc) ICL
AiOCT SAo1 �vrrs SfAOicifc'
OPENING SOON
Fried or baked
chicken, barbequed
ribs and country-style
steak are among the
meat choices at
�Sammy's My com-
panion and l tried the
ribs and country-style
steak and highly recom-
mend them. The ribs
aren't the leanest you'll
ever run across, but
they're tender and quite
avorful. The lack of a
la
prices
go to "Sammy's
must add, however,
that, at least at the time
o our visit,
"Sammy's" was im-
pressively clean, with
the tables remarkably
free of crumbs and
spills, despite the
"clean up yourself"
policy.
If you just want to
eat some good home-
style food, or if you'd
like to take the family
� FINE
QfOS FOODS
FEA TURING A MENU OF
SPEC I A LTY SA ND W1CHES
A ND GREEN VIL L E 9S BES T FRIES.
LOCATED IN GEORGETOWN SHOPPES.
WA TCH FOR US SOON!
Attn. Psi Chi Members and Initiates
Magnify Psi Chi Awareness
Increase Student and Faculty involvement
Continue Scholarships
Expand Psi Chi Library Availability
Augment Fund Raisers For Added Enioyment
Expediate Rush Procedures
VOTE TUESDAY. APRIL 6 Three Steers Restaurant
WINGFIELD - Pres DAWSON - V. Pres
KRUSE � Sec, VWOODARD � Treas
GEISSLER-PR For PSI CHI Officers.
the No. 3
Marshall
Dillon
er, that's
the No. 3 Marshall
NO. 3
BEEF
TIPS
WITH PEPPERS
AND ONIONS
ONLY
Copyright 1982
Kroger Sav-on
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold to Dealers
Old standards never fade
away, they seem to get better
and better. And like Marshall
Dillon, the No. 3 Marshall at
Western Sizzlin is a long time
standard. Broiled sirloin tips
with bell peppers and onions,
served with your choice of
Txjtato, baked
or fried, and
Texas toast
Onoe youVe
tried the No.
3 Marshall,
you are sure
to be back'
again and
again to West-
ern Sizzlin.
gO Suzftn
J y msE.itnist.
410 W Gre�nvilt� �lvd
mm�� ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
fo3, sa,e ,n each K-oye, Sa-ocw as specie M o, a
ad II e do run out ol an item � same savmgs or a
the advertised price wthm 30 days
600 Greenville Blvd. -Greenville
Open 8 a.m. to Midnight
Open Sunday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.

QC
z
COUNTRY CLUB
� ASSORTED VARIETY
SHARP EL 1188
PRINT DISPLAY
Calculator
$0,497
Reg.
$39.77
We are currently taking applications for paid writing posi
tions We also hope to train some applicants for salaried
editors positions. Are YOU interested? Come by our off.ee
and fill out an application. What have you got to lose?
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Old South Building Second Floor
Y
LAYS
REGULAR OR BBQ
8-Oz.
Bag
IMPORTED
Ribier
Grapes
Jh
tv
?

Lb.
SERVE N SAVE
VARIETIES
rr"
Meats
18
KROGER
ASSORTED VARIETY
Sour Cream
Dips
m cups �
BAGGED
& Snacks
'o
Off
SUGG
ME TAIL
COSMETICS &
FRAGRANCES
Let's Discuss
Career Opportunities
Wednesday, March 31,1982
By: City Executive of NCNB
and three staff members
Location: Rawl Business Building
Room 205
Time: 10:00 A.M.
All students are encouraged to attend.
Banking opportunities will be discussed
in relation to the rapid expansion of the
banking industry.
Co-sponsored by:
MttSL Kappa Aiptja
Banking
9ratcniiti
Look tor announcements concerning tuture meetings.
All business ma jors are encouraged to join.
t
A





1 Ht t M v -kll 1MW
Hot Pirates
Take Three
From 'Cats
Sports
he plai
n unidentified I asiarolina player slides home a la Pele R-i in a S
Richmond. 1 In II plaer scored and the learn won, M-i. I-asiarolin-j
haseman Mikr Sorell ill iPholo h (,ar Patterson)
I o-()ut W in
Stifc tain
M I David Wells dots hark into tirst In t��il an attempted pickoft play against the Richmond Spiders in an
( arolma win fnda afternoon (Photo In (ir Patterson)
I l-l I asi
ECU Thinclads Third In Relay
tU I M( Y 1 t l)f K( HI K
-l .

2
I ra � i i � "In Ra
's will compi
a ' need a :4" " V
! ,i kes
ECvV Go
tv�w Posts
Best Total
Vs BR SU

Emory: 'Better Team Now'
.i i � . ;
� v e n i
run Mr
' pi �
4
in.
1 A I
�tf iold�
IUM RI III M)I IK
diiui
� � :� Irill � iv
� I na and the task ol
a new offense has now
IH
js run n 'v
"We're a better I V
linn at anv unit
yeai he thu d-yea
'( tin weight ; gram has del initely
made us stronger than e om
hmorv said I vn
N � r event
Mm yard relay, 'h
Sixteen tean
pete in the meet, n
ugustine' s, olga11
Princeton,ornell and Pern
J tu Pii ates w ill .iinn ei
MX) mi ' : and 1600 n
events Cioinj Id n an
w ill attempt to j t tin
i in
n the
ril 3
I
Si
ilina,
I
i the
,i
! in r -
. � i is been ditched
I tl I'm mation New ot
fen iinatoi I arry Be, kish
. .ill week putting ihe
new l'i i mat ions in I lead i oa h I d
I ihinj are goin
l han expei ted
"Overall, we're extra happy so
tar I moi v aid ' 1 he guy s ha e a
great attitude i he e been en
thusiastk aiul highly motivated
Lmory said t he Bucs' off-sea ?i
i'hi program has helped make
i � which wa
( I footb ill foi alwa s question s
new offense is installed When a
switch is madt rnis and lask I
ol early adjustment usually resuli (a
la North (a 11 - Vet era ��m
( i urn's first season) � l � I �
V e'e done some i Inns' due lo a necfc
ioid those problems, oiy Inn M
'The guys hay
a great attitude"
claimed " 1 he tu si ol thos I
wa the selection ol an offensive nun run I v
coordinatoi We feel that I arr Ihe all i mi uu � -
very suited to out situation position is vi vith Gr
"Secondly, we've elected a v- K I
svstem wuh lots ol common values Broh






THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 30, 1982
11
�vise.
I
day
hae
I in
seven
I
pla
, but
te
Is he is
ar but
v eloped
I some
nose
'f we can
le going,
lam
Heels Win Title
New Orleans (UPl)
� Michael Jordan hit a
17-footer from the left
side with 15 seconds
left and North Carolina
completed its quest to
win the championship
for coach Dean Smith
by defeating
G eorgetown 63-62
Monday night in the
NCAA final.
It was a gallant com-
eback for the Tar
Heels, who were
powered by an outstan-
ding performance from
James Worthy. The
Mi-American forward
finished with 28 points
and kept the Tar Heels
m it down the stretch.
The victory was an
exceptionally i m -
pressive one for the Tar
Heels, who trailed by
foul points early in the
second halt and ap-
peared in s e r i ou s
danger with 57 seconds
remaining when Eric
I loyd hit a pop shot
from the lane to make
it 62-61.
Bahama
Mama
Following a North
Carolina timeout, Jor-
dan, North Carolina's
talented freshman,
struck from the outside
to make it 63-62.
Georgetown still had a
chance to win it, but
Fred Brown made a
bad pass right to Wor-
thy with six seconds to
go.
Worthy was fouled
heading downcourt and
missed both free
throws. Finally, Eric
Floyd's desperation at-
tempt at the buzzer fell
short.
The victory ended
one of college basket-
ball's great frustra-
tions. Although one of
the most respected
coaches in the game,
Smith had made six
previous trips to the
final four without win-
ning the title.
North Carolina's on-
ly other championship
came in 1957 � four
years before Smith
took over the Tar
Heels.
The game was played
before a Louisiana
Superdome crowd of
61,612, which matched
Saturday's total for the
semifinals that set a
record for the best at-
7 Hoyas. North
Carolina had to con-
tend with the likes of
7-foot freshman Pat
Ewing, who finished
with 23 points on
10-for-15 shooting and
11 rebounds. Floyds,
tended college basket- the gifted All-America
ball game of all time.
The No. 1 Tar Heels
overcame a
Georgetown club that
had parlayed its depth
and defense into the
best season in the
school's history. The
Hoyas were bidding to
become the first school
from the East to win
the NCAA champin-
ship since LaSalle in
1954.
The Tar Heels were
not in their accustomed
position MOnday
night. Ordinalily they
are secure in the second
half, relying on their
foul shots and poised
defense to carry them
down the stretch.
But they had no such
luxury against the No.
atoned for his poor
game in the semifinals
by finishing with 18
points, 9-for-17, and
five assists.
The Hoyas pulledl
ahead 56-54 on a foul
shot by Spriggs with
7:36 remaining before
the Tar Heels ran off
five straight points
two foul shots by
Perkins, one by Wor-
thy and two more by
Jimmy Black. Brown
put the Hoyas within
striking distance at
59-58 on two foul
shots. But with North
Carolina resorting to its
delay game, Jordan hit
a left-handed layup to
put the Tar Heels up by
three.
The SGA Transit will be accepting ap-
plications for bus drivers for Summer
School and Fall Semester.
All applicants must have
driven a bus in high school or
been employed driving a vehi-
cle of similar size.
Juniors, Seniors and
Graduate Students preferred.
Apply by appointment only.
Call 757-6611, Ext. 218.
SouHi's No. 6
lock Nightclub
TUES, MARCH 30
TEZZER
WED MARCH 31
� SHABOO ALL STARS '82
REDUCED ADMISSION FOR
ALL ECU STUDENTS.
THE VILLAGER
i OWNED AND OPERATED BY
JIMMY EDWARDS
LOCATED 10th ST.
R NEXT TO VILLA ROMA
SPECAI HAIRCUTS REG. $5.001
NOW $4.00 WITH THIS AD
I Call 758 37M or come by
MonFri. �8:30-5:30
� � � �? ��
wwwwwwww
Be There 1
Aloha!
$1.00
Call
752-5543
Veranda Room
April Fools Contest
Who can be the most foolish for 3 mins.?
Live Remote with WOOW Radio
9:00p.m. to 11:00p.m.
April 1st
1st Prize
Weekend for 2 at
Wrightsville Beach
2nd Prize 3rd Prize
Dinner for 2 at Arbor Room Bottle of Wine
21 or older to enter contest. Located 264 Bypass at Ramada Inn
Z
WE SEW
LEATHER COATS

� -
��&&

"� W
Located beside
Tarheel Toyota
on 264 Bypass
Quaiv Repair
SAAD'S
SHOE REPAIR
113 Grande Ave
7 58 1226
yf MIME
rORL vr
m
J 9
ami a time s
when every meMagc
and every mumento
is chcrtahed
Inr tin- fines m
wedding siauonerv
. i.mc tu
Morgan Printers. Inc.
i!l 1 Went 9th Street
i ,rr�-inl!lc. ' 273 "
l 75S-S1S1 "
Ctmt Mtxka Unr?
THE ORIGINAL
291 TACO
All Day Wednesday
also
From 4 to 7 Happy Hour
2 pltChCrS (free nacho chips)
fGOHDON FULfy
PRO SHOP
Located at
Greenville
Country Club
off Memorial
Drive
7560504
FREE GIFT CERTIFICATE
WORTH $2.00 ON THE
PURCHASE OF ONE IZOD
OR HAYMAKER SHIRT,
BLOUSE, SLACKS, OR
SHIRT!
OFFER EXPIRES
APRIL 25 AT 5 P.M.
LIMIT ONE COUPON PER ITEM
SHIRTS BOUGHT IN QUANTITY
HAVE ADDITIONAL
DISCOUNTS!
FINAL SALE on all Snow Ski ap-
parel and merchandise. Sale ends
April 11th - all snow skis, boors,
and accessories 40-80 off
All Ski Apparel
50-75 off
20 pairs of used Elam skis
with Tydi bindings �
95 a pair
All Solsmen Bindings - 20-50 off
All Sets of Golf Clubs
without trade-in Pro Cost plus 10
SALES ON GOLF CLUtS
END APRIL 25th
ALL IZOD SWEATERS
IN STOCK 12 PRICE
GORDON FULP
PRO SHOP
Located 1 mile past
Hastings Ford on
10th St. extension
Tues. & Wed.
POPCORN
SHRIMP
2.95
A PLATE
Bausch&Lomb
Soft Lenses
ooMPuere
Includes initial eye examination,
lenses, care kit, instructions and
follow up visits for one month.
ECU student ID. required
00
OPTOMCTWC
�Y�CArVEC�NT�r
Of Qr�nvUI� pa
228 GREENVILLE BLVD.
TIPTON ANNEX
756-9404
Dr. Peter Hollis
NOW
LOOKING GOOD COSTS LESS
N.VN.N.S.VXS.XN.N.N.XXS.NVNVXXSVNNNXXNN.
The 1982
Kappa SigmaStroh's Bahama Mama
Beach Party and Raffle
presented by
Hallow Distributing Company
AccuCopy
University Book Exchange
Hodges Sporting Goods
April 1, Thursday Nite, 8 p.m. till midnight
featuring Alan Handleman
from WITN
Location � Across from
Umstead Dorm
An all expense paid trip to the
Bahamas For just $1.00
TICKETS ON SALE NOW!
For more information
call 752-5543
Be There,
'Aloha!

i
:


T





12
THt EAST CAROL 1MW
MARCH ?0. 19S:
Bucs Rally To Defeat Amherst;
Undefeated Going To State
The PiraieN of East
Carolina lost the first
four matches to
Amherst, Friday after-
noon, but rallied to
take the next five and
keep their season
record unblemished at
6-0.
The Pirates face the
powerful Wolf pack of
N.C. State today in
Raleigh.
Summary
Williams (Amherst)
defeated Keith Zengel
(East Carolina) 6-4.
6-4.
Heuchling (Amherst)
defeated Donald
Rutledge (East
Carolina) 6-2, 7-5.
Gray (Amherst)
defeated Barry Parker
(East Carolina) 6-3,
6-2.
Ted Lepper (East
Carolina) defeated
Shepherd (Amherst)
6-1, 6-1.
Kevin Covington
(East Carolina)
defeated Clerdimen
(Amherst) 6-4, 4-6. 6-4.
Paul Owen (East
Carolina) defeated
Gilbert (Amherst) 6-2,
4-6, 6-3.
Zengel-Parker (East
Carolina) defeated
Clerdiman-Wyman
(Amherst) 7-5, 6-2.
Lepper-Bryant (East
Carolina) defeated
Hechling-Herman
(Amherst) 7-5, 7-6.
Humphrey-Gray
(Amherst) defeated
Rutledge-Treble
(Amherst) 3-6, 6-3. 7-6.
Reedy Creek Wins Title
Reedy Creek of
Raleigh, N.C,
defeated East Carolina
early and then went on
to beat North Carolina
to win the first East
Carolina University
Women's Rugby Tour-
nament this past
weekend.
Winning the tourna-
ment title enables
Reedy Creek to go to
the East Rugby
Regionals on April 17.
After that early
defeat, East Carolina
played Smith College
of Massachusetts, but
once again came up on
the short end of the
score card.
Smith College met
Cornell University
from New York in the
consolation match and
ran off with a trophy.
The other North
Carolina team present
was the Charlotte
Harlots.
East Carolina's
coach Kim Griffith was
happy with the way the
team plaved,
ECU Sports Medicine Dept.
Hosting Athletic Trainers
The 12th annual East
Carolina University
Sports Medicine
Athletic Trainers and
Coaches Conference
will be held Friday and
Saturday April 16 in
the Carol G. Belk
Allied Health Building
at ECU in Greenville.
The sessions, which
begin with registration
from 7:45-8:15 a.m.
April 16. are for cer-
tified athletic trainers,
teaher-trainers,
coaches, student
trainers and team
physicians in schools
with or without a sports
medicine program.
The program, head-
ed by East Carolina
sports medicine direc-
tor Rod Compton,
assistant director Craig
Baker. Liz White and
associate trainer Tony
Hopfer, is designed to
proude necessary skills
and techniques for
deeloping a systematic
program of treatment
and rehabilitation of
athletic injuries.
Topics to be covered
in the sessions include
the anatomy of the
shoulder, mechanisms
and immediate treat-
ment of shoulder in-
juries, understanding
eye and kidney injuries,
legal liablity, nutrition
and athletics,
psychology and
motivation in athletics,
CPR recertification ,
skill labs and much
more.
Tuition for the con-
ference is $40 per per-
son which includes lec-
tures, labs, materials,
notebooks,
refreshments and a pig
pickin The fee does
not include meals or
oernight lodging.
Enrollment will be
limited, with applica-
tions accepted in the
order recened prior to
the registration
deadline of April 8.
Register by writing
Sports Medicine Con-
ference Division of
Continuing Education,
East Carolina Universi-
ty, Greenville, N.C.
27834.
Rod Compton
Classifieds
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST Wed March IJ Man s
Drown Iri told wallet between
Aycock and Austin If found, can
keep money iut return wallet to
341 AyCOCk or call 752 2�0�
LOST IN MINGES March 16, a
l�i class rmq, blue stones, initials
JAA on inside I found please
contact joe aT mi Slay 17S8 B4BS
ATTENTION
Classified ads �nil be taken ONLY
dunng the following hours
Monday - I 15 3 00
Tuesday - 2 00 3 00
Wednesday � I 15 3 00
Thursday � 2 00 3 00
Friday � I 15 2 00
You must place the ads m person
and pay tor them in advance
Rates are Jl lor the first 15 words
and I 05 per word after the first f'f
teen
FOR SALE
TRAILER FOR SALE set up m
Greenyille 2 BR all electric a c
e�cellent condition �2"r�5 call Tar
boro 823 �8�4
NEW U S DIVERS depth guage
lor shallow and deep diving for
JJO Call 252 7278 Ask for Julian
VIVITAR ZOOM LENS75 JlOwith
macro tor Nikon mount used only
two times H65 Can 757 3210
SKIS FOR SALE K 2 185 comp
810 skis with Soioman bindings
S125 Can 7$7 3210 and leave
number
FOUR BIC TURNTABLES tor
saie �25 each Can 752 259
MARANTZ EQUALIZER
Amplifier Model S 247 for car
stereo S138 new asking 180
7S8 5634
DORM SIZE REFRIGERATOR
Good condition Pnce Negotiable
Call Od'le now at 758 366
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
For nicely furnished apt at
Cypress Gardens Within walking
distance ot campus Call 758 38'4
GOING TO Summer School and
need a place to live' Mow about a
nceiy furnished apt instead of the
dorms' Available Mav thru Aug
Walking distance to campus Call
7S8 38�4
FURNISHED TWO bedroom apt
to Sublet May Aug Two miles
ttom Campus Call
7 St 4151
APARTMENT FOR
Aug Furnished
355 6792 or
rent May
block from
campus Deposit required Cheryl
752 I'Sv
FURNISHED HOUSE lor rent for
summer 3 bedrooms 1 block from
campus il60 month call 758 4483
AVAILABLE FOR summer school
and ne�t fail if desired 3
bedroom 2 full bath Furnished
Duple� walking distance from
campus 245 Call 75? 1917
SHARE SPACIOUS Apt m Large
house females can 756 5650 (work)
alter 5 leave message for Dee
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
three bedroom apartment. May
Dec Close to Campus. 185 and
share ot utilities 752 0497
CHRISTIAN FEMALE roommate
needed to share double room in
an apartment J60 plus 1 '3
utilities One block from Jenkins
building call '52 2606
ROOMMATElSi NEEDED One
or two to share 3 bedroom
doublewide for summer Available
immediately No deposit required
Nice yard lor more into Call Con
me at 758 7386
PERSONALS
Do you know someone with an in
teresting or unique hobby or
craft' If so contact the Buccaneer
757 6501
BEER DRINNKERS WANTED
Think you can chug a beer' Prove
it Enter the Beer Bong Contest on
April IS lor details can Alpha
Sigma Phi 752 1073
ARE YOU INTERESTED m being
an ECU studnt athletic supporter
tor basketball goit baseball soft
ban. track swimming tennis, soc
cer. volleyball football come to
the Student Athletic Board 1SAB1
meeting m Room 247 Mendenhali
Tuesday. March 30th at 5 00 pm
SULLYS Congratulations on your
Nova Candlelightmg I d rather be
a sully than a damn S B
TAMMY Have a great birthday
and even though you killed my
lOurney tape III still buy the bottle
of wme Love va GR
WOLF TICKETS For Sale
Available only to Chapel Mill No
Return tickets II you re not there
you re square
WANTED -telegent moon child
that is differen' and unique lor an
optomistic Pisces Accounting
maior prefered Only one need ap
ply
HELP
WANTED
TRUMPET PLAYER
WANTED�top 40 Beach group
Weekend work vocal ability
prelerred Can 756 649j
CANVASSERS WANTED E�
cellent pay. transportation provid
ed Call 756 5311 or 7S6 0278
GOOD SUMMER JOB Swim
coach needed Salary negotiable 6
wk 3 hr da. Only those looking
for serious employment need app
ly Contact Swim Chairman c 0
282 Beverly Drive Concord N C
28025
SERVICES
CARICATURES BY WEYLER
Greenville s original personalned
art service Have cartoon done of
yourself or a loved one a unique
gift idea �'0 tor 8 � 0. black and
white or color Call 7S2 5775
TYPING TERM Thesis
Resumes Dissertations etc Pro
fessionai quality at lowest rates
Call Kempie Dunn anytime
752 4733
NOTARY PUBLIC Call Amy at
757 3734
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST wants
to type thesis, dissertations.
publications manuscripts or term
papers at home Call 756 3660
TYPIST All papers Professional
quality at low rates 10 years e�
penence Call 757 1378
RIDERS
HELP R'de needed to Chapel
Hill, April 15 tor B 52s concert
Call 752 8985
RIDE NEEDED to Virginia
Beach or surrounding area any
weekend Cheryl 752 1959
I
ADVtRTISeO
ITEM POLICY
Each 01 these advertised items a 'equed to be readily available lor saie at or
I below the advertised pf.ee in each AAP Store e�cept as specifically noted
in ihis ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT , APRIL 3, AT A&P IN GREENVILLE, N.C
703 GREENVILLE BLVD.
GREENVILLE SQUARE SHOPPING CENTER
GREENVILLE, N.C.
5THANNUAL PHIKAPPA TAU
SPRING FLING '82
FRIDAY AFTERNOON
APRIL 2 FROM 3-6:00 P.M.
A BEACH WEEKEND FOR 2
WILL BE RAFFLED OFF AT THE PARTY
MUSIC PROVIDED
BY CAROLINA ARTISTS
THE NICKY HARRIS
BAND
BROUGHT TO THE ENTIRE CAMPUS BY OUR SPONSORS AT:
GREENVILLE BODY SHOP
DOMINO'S PIZZA
INTER-FRATERNITY COUNCIL
MARATHON RESTAURANT
KING'S SANDWICH
GENERAL HEATING & PLUMBING
PHARO'S FINE FOODS
BISSETTE'S OF GREENVILLE
PANTANA BOB'S
SHIRLEY'S CUT & STYLE
DAN WISEHART
RAFTER'S
CLARKE-BRANCH REALTY
UBE
JB'S ISLAND SEAFOOD
ATTIC
OVERTON'S SUPERMARKET
GROG'S OF GREENVILLE
MORGAN PRINTERS
CHRIS LICHOK
HAPPY STORE
PAPA KATZ
TACO CID
THE WASH HOUSE
EDGEWATER MOTORS
PIPE DREAMS
FOR HEADS ONLY
ELBO ROOM
FAMOUS PIZZA
SPORTSWORLD
AN A&P EXCLUSIVE OFFER:
GENUINE
IMPORTED
STONEWARE
From the Highland Floral Collection. Qorxiro
A GREAT VALUE AT A GREAT PRICE! X r2l occ
this weeks m &.d For 4 Cost Less
FEATURE ITEM ITm- Thans14
Bread & wi��rf choose from 3 beautiful
�- With Each
ETVm� 5 00 Purchase
PATTERNS!
, PER PLACE . FrMzcr To Ov.fi To T.bl. Conv.ni.oc.
SETTING PIECE . Oiih��r�r �nd Mtcow.v. S.I.
EHf. StnKglri Chip R�.i.t�nl
A&PCOUPON j
SAVE 50'
When You Purchase A
Reg C�veIed ,
5.99 Sugar Bowl
49
650
With This
Coupon You
Pay Only
5
Good Thru St Apr 3
.�v. �
5 Ground
Beef
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
In 5 lb.
roll pkg
lb.
EXTRA LEAN SPECIAL TRIM
COUNTRY FARM
PORK
SPARERIBS
Lb 39
IN QUARTERS
Blue Bonnet
Margarine
00
Savingsv'
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED FRESH FRYER
Leg Qtrs.
69c
Breast
Qtrs.
79'
2 1
mm pkgs
Save 54e
On 2 Pkgs
FROZEN
TROPICANAGOLD N PURE
Orange Juice
-109
64 oz.
ctn.
Totino's Pizza
� Canadian Bacon
� Pepperoni
� Hamburger
�Sauaage 12 OZ.
Save 42' pkg.
BEEF. CHICKEN. TURKEY
Morton Pot Pies
Save 49 On 3
8 oz.
pkgs.
980
G
NkvSOwVjKSX
NftreffS�
2 gallon!
ctn.
Save 80
SPRITE TAB
MELLO YELLO
COCA COLA
2 Liter J
Bottle
V
� �����rpV SUPER SAVER COUPON �"�
A SUPERB BLEND. RICH IN BRAZILIAN COFFEES
i
Eight 0'Clock
Bean Coffee
Save 60c
APP
LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON Dag M 651
GOOD THRU SAT APR 3 AT AP IN GREENVILLE, N.C
ITEMs"oTfEREdToR,SAlTnOTVA� BLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
rFRESH WITH QUALITY
U.S. 1 EASTERN GROWN BAKING
m Russet
Potatoes ill
CALIFORNIA GROWN�SUNKIST
Navel Oranges
4i00
Jumbo
56 Size
t





Title
The East Carolinian, March 30, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 30, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.189
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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