The East Carolinian, March 25, 1982






�he Saat darnltman
4
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 58 N
ojn
Thursday, March 25, 1982
Greenville. V(
X Pages
Presidential Runoff Probable;
Mills, Talley, Coburn Elected
Bv PAUL COLLINS
special to llw a�U jr.ilinim
Wednesday's SGA elections have
resulted in three clear winners and a
probable run-off in the presidential
race.
In the contest for president,
David Cook finished with 887 votes
to runner-up Eric Henderson's 867.
However, since Henderson's
percentage of the vote is within
three percent of Cook's, he may re-
quest a run-off.
Elections chairman Chuck Blake
said that Henderson must official1
request a run-off within 24 hours.
He added that a spokesman for
Henderson had already indicated
that the candidate would ask for a
run-off, which would be held April
In the other races. Bob Mills took
the vice presidency, and Becky
Tallev and Sarah Coburn were the
winners for treasurer and secretary,
respectively.
Turnout for the election totaled
2,810, which Blake estimated as 20
percent of the eligible voters.
In the presidential election, Cook
and Henderson finished well ahead
of the other three candidates. Jay
Nichols finished third with 450
votes, followed by Bobby Pierce
with 429 and Andy Lewis with 166.
Mills outdistanced Keith Newbern
by 595 votes, 1,316 to 721. while
Carter Fox trailed with 715 votes.
In the race for treasurer, Tallev
polled nearly twice as many votes as
her lone opponent, Betsy Steinert.
The totals were 1,817 to 917.
In the most one-sided contest,
Coburn outpolled Robert Messer
1,948 votes to 726. In his platform,
Messer promised, among other
things, to "disband" the East
Carolina Gay Community, which he
called an "immoral organization
He also suggested Gerald Ford as a
candidate for chancellor.
"I was pleased Blake said of
the turnout. "It seemed less than
what we counted, but 1 think
students were more involved this
year than others He attributed the
increased interest to extensive press
coverage bv The East Carolinian
and WZMB.
Blake said there were no major
problems in administering the elec-
tion. "Scott (dorm) ran out of
ballots for two minutes, but there
was no real problem
For the first time, all 20 polls re-
mained open until 6 p.m and
Blake said the extended hours
resulted in an average of 12 to 20 ex-
tra votes per poll. He reserved judg-
ment, however, on whether or not
the practice should be continued.
"We'll have to wait and see
The Students Supply Store poll
recorded the heaviest turnout, with
496 votes cast. The lowest turnout
was 44 at the Belk allied health
building; there was no poll at
Minges this election.
A new poll at the bottom of Col-
lege Hill attracted 86 voters.
hoto Bv DAVE WILLIAMS
Chancellor Finalist S
On Campus Tour
Bv MIKE HUGHES
Vivijni e� k dit�tr
fter months of deliberation, the ECU Chancellor
Selection Committee has narrowed its search to four re-
maining candidates.
According to Ashley Futrell, chairman of the EC U
Board of Trustees, those applicants still being reviewed
for recommendation b the committee arc: Dr. Jair.cs
Robinson of the University of West Florida: Dr. C. Q.
Brown, acting Dean of the ECU Department of
Technology; Dr. John Howell, acting Chancellor at
LCL; and Dr. J. I red Young, President of lion Col-
lege.
futrell said that the selection committee and the
Board of Trustees will make their final recommenda-
tions (two candidates) to UNC President William Friday
"around the first week in May
A UNC Board of Governors meeting is slated for
Mu 14. at which time the new chancellor is expected to
be named.
Based on how the UNC Board of Governors has acted
in the past, Futrell said that one of the two candidates
recommended by the trustees will probably become the
new chancellor.
On W ednesday. one of the remaining candidates. Dr.
Young, began a two-day visit to ECU, a tour which will
introduce him to the various programs and personnel at
the university.
Young, 47, graduated from Wake Forest College in
1956 and received his masters degree in education from
I NC-Chapel Hill the following vear. He later earned
his doctorate at Columbia University.
Young entered educational administration in 1959,
when he assumed the position of principal at Enfield
School in Halifax County. Among his other positions,
he has worked as superintendent of Fynchburg (Va.)
public schools and deputy superintendent of public in-
struction for the commonwealth of Virginia.
He was named president of Elon College, near Burl-
ington, N.C in 1973.
Following a meeting with ECU'S vice chancellors
The One That Got A way
A spring fisherman loses an uninterested catch hul finds the sun in Greenville's warm-aain. cold-again elimate.
Hunt Opposed To Cuts
Photo By DAVE vVILLIAMS
Young: "I like t think that I'm available. "
Wednesdav. Young met vith students and udent
leaders to answer questions and reveal several com-
ponents to what might be termed his educational and
administrative philosophy.
Though he feels strongly about keeping out of student
operational ptoblems, Young savs he trie to maintain
an open-door policy as an administrator. "1 like- to
think that I'm available 1 hope students feel comfor-
table enough to walk into the office lie said.
Young also emphasized his firm belief that students
should take part in as main constructive activities
as possible.
"Getting involved is one of the kevs to a student's do-
ing well he said. "We've all heard the old saving that
'Football players make better guides in the tall than in
the spring Well, 1 believe that's true
And what does the candidate feel is I Cl 's greatest
need at this time? "I see a need to continue the progress
that has characterized the university in the past. Clearly,
it will take financial sources a team effort to con-
tinue the progress.
"The student has the best perspective on what the
university needs he explained. "The institution is tor
the students. 1 think it's awfully important that students
have a right to be involved and involve themselves
"East Carolina has a magnificent heritage of supplv-
ing this area with teachers and other professionals he
added. "It's one of the few institutions that alone serves
a particular region, and economic development is ter-
riblv needed in eastern North Carolina
B DIANE ANDERSON
sulr Jdiior
Governor James Hunt yesterday
referred to President Reagan's
budget cut backs on student finan-
cial aid programs as "the most
counterproductive cuts that the man
has proposed
The comment was spurred bv a
resolution presented to the governor
bv the vice president of the ECU
student government, Marvin Bra.x-
ton. The resolution calls for Reagan
and Congress, to senousl consider
the negative effects of the cut backs
in funding for college students.
The governor went on to sav, 'I
strongly commend the Student
Government Association ot I C I
for taking this position, and I would
urge that this speak in stronger
termsto the administration in
Washington, urging them to chai
their mind and to rescind their
for cuts in student loans
"1 hope that everv single student
at ECU will be in touch with their
Congressional delegation and the
President ot the USA, urging thai
they oppose these cuts and urge the
President to rescind his call foi
them Hunt continued.
He added that both he and his
went through college with
aid ol student loans.
Hun; also reterred to the negative
effects that the cuts will have or his
et torts to bring more "high
technology industry" into North
( ; rolina.
"We base got a great universit
sstem turning out the capacity (ot
students) to do a lot more and this
will knock out a great deal of
them the governor explaii
Locks Said Impractical
B GREG HIDEOUT
Miff Vnlrr
1 ast Carolina's student govern-
ment elections 1 ave raised the issue
of using wheel locks instead of tow-
ing vehicles that are in violation of
parking regulations. According to
Director of Security Joseph Calder,
the use of such a method is imprac-
tical.
"The price of one wheel lock is
over S400. It would be costly to pur-
chase enough for the whole cam-
pus Calder said.
The campus security department
now has two wheel locks, one for a
car, and one for a motorcycle.
Calder said the time involved to put
the heavy iron device in place is
about 15 minutes. "I wouldn't re-
quire one of my officers to have to
crawl up under the car to put one in
place he said.
"We use this procedure as a last
resort commented Frandis
Ededings, Assistant Director ot
Security.
The system now in use requires
the towing of a vehicle when its
owner has three uncleared citations.
The average cost to tow a vehicle on
campus is SI5 during the dav and
$20 at night. "I wouldn't consider
using a wheel lock for less than
$25 Calder said.
There are 310 vehicles on the tow
list; of these, only 14 are registered.
This means that 296 vehicles are
parking on campus illegally. The
registered vehicles are owned by
Iran Said In Storm Of Persecution'
three dav students, tour dorm
students, three freshmen and one
statt member.
" W e send out notices to
registered vehicle owners who have
three unpaid tickets, informing
them that they are being placed on
the (tow) list Caider said.
According to Calder, damage
done to a vehicle while it is being
towed is verv rare. "We require that
the four Greenville companies who
tow for us carrv S250.000 liability
insurance he said. According to
the security director, the rims of a
car mav be damaged by a wheel
lock.
Calder's advice is to "get in and
pay them (tickets) because it will
cost you in the end
rOn The Inside-
By PATRICK O'NEIIJ
suff Vnlrr
Religious persecution, violence
and murder are again taking place in
Iran, where a religious group known
as Baha'is is now marked for
"Naboundi or elimination, by the
Islamic majority.
According to the Baha'i Office of
Public Affairs based in Wilmette,
111 97 of Iran's Baha'i leaders have
been executed without charges being
filed, and another 14 have
"disappeared Baha'is have been
subjected to "a ceaseless storm of
persecution since the 1979 revolu-
tion in Iran.
As of March 21, the Iranian
government has been issuing iden-
tification cards to all citizens of Iran
� except Baha'is. "These cards will
be required for the purchase of food
and fuel said ECU graduate stu-
dent and follower of the Baha'i
faith, Jeremy Tarlo. Tarlo, along
with Nabil Jurney, Jim Wilkinson,
and Michael Hillis, all members of
the Baha'i Association of ECU, are
hoping to "call attention to the
plight of the Baha'is in Iran and to
the worsening situation there
Under Iran's new laws, Baha'is
will be barred from holding jobs,
owning property, having bank ac-
counts, running businesses, receiv-
ing medical treatment or traveling.
Baha'i children are denied the right
to attend schools, and all Baha'i
marriages have been declared null
and void. Married couples will be
considered to be involved in pro-
stitution � a crime punishable by
death in Iran.
Systematic killings, often done by
lynch mobs, are not unusual.
Baha'is have reportedly been killed
by methods involving the use of ex-
treme violence.
The use of identification cards is
"one more step in a concerted plan
by the present Iranian government
to kill Baha'is or attempt to force
them to recant their faiths Tarlo
said.
The Baha'i faith preaches an
essential oneness of all great world
religions. They honor the Koran,
Mohammed, the teachings of the
Bab, and his successor Buha'uTlah
("Glory of God"). Both were
believed to be prophets who claimed
they were sent by Allah. Baha'is
also believe present world govern-
ments to be ideal and advocate full
equality of the sexes. Baha'i women
need not wear veils and are eligible
for all positions of Baha'i leader-
ship.
Fundamentalist Iranians have
found numerous reasons to criticize
the beliefs of Iran's 300,000 Baha'is
� the country's largest religious
Recently, a gathering of 1,500
a "dangerous heresy Tarlo said.
"They accuse the Baha'is of
creating disunity, of cooperating
with the west and of corruption on
earth
Tarlo notes that the Baha'i faith
calls for belief in and support of
"any lawfully-constituted govern-
ment in whatever nation we are
located (in) Baha'is are a
worldwide religion with several
million aouerents who all remain
loyal to their governments.
minority. The Baha'is are viewed as
Baha'is from the United States and
Canada took place in Los Angeles
to pay tribute to the murdered
Baha'i leaders. The Iranian govern-
ment has claimed responsibility for
the executions, saying the Baha'i
leaders were spies for foreign
powers.
The Baha'i Association of ECU
has as its purpose to bring the facts
of the Baha'i faith to interested peo-
ple, and more recently it has decided
to call on others to take action to
help bring about justice for Iranian
Baha'is.
Tarlo hopes people "will be mov-
ed by the facts of the situation" and
will write letters to their con-
gressmen reguarding the upcomng
hearings in the House of Represen-
tatives.
House sub-committee will be in-
vestigating "religious persecutions
throughout the world and local
Baha'is are hoping to get the
message out about the plight of their
sisters and brothers in Iran.
Arms Race Halt Called For
BvPATRICKO'NEIII
suff Wnifr
Despite a lack of support by the
Reagan administration, the
"Citizens Campaign for a Mutual
U.S.Soviet Halt to the Nuclear
Arms Race or "the Freeze is
gaining momentum throughout the
United States.
Congressional support of a
"sense of the Senate" freeze resolu-
tion introduced by Senators Edward
M. Kennedy (DMass.) and Mark
O. Hatfield (ROre.) has jumped
from 139 to 171 co-sponsors in two
weeks.
California, Michigan, New
Jersey, Delaware and Montana have
nuclear freeze referendums on their
ballots. Many other community
level freeze endorsements and
referendums, including 33 of 44
communities in New Hampshire and
161 of 192 towns in Vermont, have
passed with as much as 75 percent
votes of approval.
A version of the freeze was
discussed Thursday at the United
Church of Christ in Raleigh. Bob
Hurley attended the initial meeting
as a representative of the North
Carolina Peace Network, to discuss
the "Raleigh Peace Initiative" and
said the response to the meeting,
that attracted around 100 people,
exceeded the expectations of the
organizers.
Hurley called the gathering "a
local effort and said the group
hoped to gather 7,500 names on
petitions supporting the peace in-
itiative that will be presented to the
Raleigh City Council.
The ordinance to be submitted to
the city council said that "in order
to maintain and promote the peace
and general welfare of its in-
habitants the city manager
See AMERICANS, Page 3
Flutist Tim Wetsberg charms a Green
vilie audience See page 6 (Photo bv
Scott Larson)
Weather Watch
(UPI) Cloudy today with a 60 percent
chance ot showers High near 60 Lows
tonight in the 40s Fair Friday and Satur
day with highs m he the 50s and low
60s Increasing cloudiness Sunday with
highs m the 50s
Inside Index
Announcemei its
Opinion
Campus Forum
Style
Sports
Classifieds
t
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J
k
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 25. 1982
Announcements
FALL SEMESTER 1982
ROOM RESERVATION
SIGN-UP INFORMA-
TION
Students wno plan to return to
East Carolina University Fall
Semester 1982 and wrio wish to be
guaranteed residence hall housing
are required to reserve rooms dur
� ng the week ot March 22 26 Prior
to reserving a room, a student
must make an advarce room pay
men ot S60 These payments,
which mus' be accompanied by
housing application contracts will
oe accepted w the Cashier s Ot
dee. Room 105. SpMmar Building,
begirmrg March 18 Application
contracts may be obtained from
the residence hall offices as of
March 16
Room reservations are to be
made m the respective residence
halt offices according 'o the
following schedule (Exceptions:
Assignments for Fleminq Hall will
be made in office m Jarv s Hall
aid those tor umsteac! Hall will be
"Mile m Slay Hall I
Monday. Marc" 22 and Tuesday
March 23 Students who wish to
return to same rooms they
presently occupy must reserve
Such rooms
Weoresday March 24 through
Fr.clay March 25 All other retur
nirg students will be permitted to
reserve rooms on a first come,
t � st serve basis
The hours for room assignments
will be
8 30 am to 12 30 p.m
130pm to 4 00 p m
Returning students enrolled Spr
in.g Semester wll have priority for
residence hall nousirg for Fall
Semester 1982 only if they reserve
rooms during the week of March
22 26
LIVE LOVE
You deserve the best and God
can show you how you can get it
God is so biq and loves us so much
i Ro I John 4t Learn, more about
what Goo can oo tor you by learn
ing his word By coming to our
fellowship you car learn more
about Goo and how to apply bis
principles to your life. Call us a1
either 752 2078 or 758 5361
F S Remember God Loves
You!
WZMB
The Electric Rainbow Radio
Show" is a rock n roll machine
gun Every Saturday and Sunday
n,qht from 10 1 Keith Mitchell is
your host as he fires off heavy
metal rock and great album
specais Saturday's album
special will be by Judas Foest
Sad Winqs of Dest.ny Featured or
Sunday will be 'he brand new
Scorpiars album Blackout
Tune .r and enoy only or WZMB
the ECU s student radio network
CARICATURE
Come out to the Springiest this
Saturaday, March 27, and have a
caricature ot yourself done by car
toonist John Weyler Proceeds will
go to the Walk For Humanity For
only $1 you can have a good time
and do a good deed tor the world!
BICYCLE CLUB
ECRC was born m March 1982,
founded by former bicycle racers
and by East Carolina Students. A
seperate organization from ECRA
but run by the same people, the
East Carolina Road Club has ex
cellent potential as a bicycle
power. The names ECRA and
ECRC were chosen to direct after
tion to Eastern. North Carolina,
and specifically to East Carolina
University, as a bicycle oriented
community.
Anyone can join, whether they
are enrolled m the university or
not Membership dues are S10 per
year, which go to club opera'inq
expenses. Iiscensmg, and covers
the cost Ot printing the monthly
newsletter. Pleasure rider or
Olympiar io be, we have
something to offer every ser.ous
cyclist
For more information, contact
Kip Sloar at 756 0246 from 8 5 and
757 1680 after 6pm or Jeff Horton
at 758 8519 The first U S C F. race
is March 28 if Virqiria Beach,
Virg.r.a
ECU Business School
Slates Trade Symposium
RHOEPSILON
The Professional Real Estate
Fraternity w II meet March 30.
1982 at 5 p.m m Rawl 130 There
will be a quest speaker and anyone
interested is invited to attend
JEWISH STUDENTS
There will be a Passover Seder!
For reservations please call Mark
Cohen at 757 1155 or Or B Resuik
at 7 56 5640
PLANT SALE
There will be a plant sale or
Wednesday. March It, 1982 m the
Biology building, room Sill The
sale will rur from 8 30 to roon
Come give a plant a good home!
AMA
The Americar Marketing
Association will have an orgarna
tionai meeting Wednesday, March
31, at 5 00 m Raw Room 130. All
members are encouraged to at
tend Elections will be held for
AMA officers tor 1982 83 school
year, and banquet plans will be
finalized Please. attend
meeting
SKATE-A-THON
A skate a fhon will be held Sun
day. March 28 from 1 to 5 p.m at
Sports World. All proceeds go �o
Hospice program of Greenville
Sponsors and skaters are needed
Call 752 0082 tor more information
Sponsored by Gamma Sigma
Sigma Service Sorority
MARSHALL
APPLICATIONS
Marshall applications now being
accepted m the SGA Office, Room
228 Mendenhall (Monday Friday,
from 8 am thru 5 p.m
ECU'S School of
Business has scheduled
a symposium on trade
between the United
States and Japan for
Tuesday, March 30,
from 9:20 a.m. to 3:30
p.m. in Brew sier B-102.
"Doing Business
with Japan: Oppor-
tunities and Obtaeles
will feature six experts
on trade between the
nations, according to
Dr. I mesh C. Gulati o
the business school.
Gulati cited "the
main misconceptions
about our trade rela-
tions with Japan" as
the reason for the sym-
posium.
1 ension generated b
U.S. newspapers has
resulted in many
businessmen urging
restrictions on trade
with Japan, according
to Gulati.
'The Japanese
market is very
restricted, and foreign
.wporters find it hard to
penetrate that market.
Consequently. Japan
has amassed whopping
trade surpluses with the
rest of the world
Gulati claimed.
A "very huge" U.S.
trade deficit with Japan
could be decreased b
removing some trade
restrictions, particular-
ly on tobacco and other
farm products. Gulati
said.
Scheduled speakers
include Fred Farmer of
the U.S. Department ot
Commerce in Green-
ville, Toma H a r u
W ashio of New York's
Japan Trade Center,
and Walter Johnson of
the N.C. Department
O f C ommerce i n
Raleigh.
Also scheduled are
Daniel Borasch of
Winston-Salem,
Wachovia Bank and
Trust's vice president
o international bank-
ing; Yuzo Itoh, vice
president of the Fugi
Cone Corporation in
Clinton; and John
Sylvestor of the N.C.
Japan Center in
Raleigh.
PHI BETA LAMBDA
The Omicron chapter of Phi
Beta Lambda will meet March 31
at 4pm in Rawl 130 Elections for
officers will be held and an
members are urged to attend
The symposium is
open io the public. For
more information,
Gulati can be contacted
at the School of
Business or bv calling
757-6363.
THE SHOE OUTLET
(Located beside Evans Seafood)
Featuring name brand shoes at bargain prices.
Up To 75 OFF regular prices
Bass Steward-McGuire Brouse Abouts
201 W. Washington St. Within walking distance of campus.
introducing
the No. 1
Sirloin M
HcoNP01
Western Stalin introduces
the No. ISlzzlin, our most pop-
ular menu item. USDA Chak�
western beef sirloin steak that
s� � - pomes
complete
with bated
potato or
french
fries and
Texas
toast The
No. 1
Stalin Is
the star
attraction
at Western
fMnn-Arvi it's awaiting your
oommentsnowt
NO.l
SIZZLI.N"
SIRLOIN
ONLY
$3.39
Mw.lTiwn.
sp.m.mtit
Owl
potato or Frtftc
fries and T�xm tMtt
�?
T w OrMMwWt Lftt� i
tm s. it sir��t
m$ �)� W. OrwMViMt Mvtf.
SAMMY'S'
Country
Cooking
NOW OPEN
7 DAYS A WEEK!
STARTING THIS SATURDAY
SAT. & SUN.�
OPEN 12-8
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY
NOW SERVING BREAKFAST!
OPEN: 7:00 A.M. 'til 8:00 P.M.
CALL FOR DAILY WEEK DAY SPECIALS
752-0476
SPS
The Society of Physics Students
will rave a talk and discussion on
the production ot nuclear
weapons Dr Jim Joyce, protessor
ol the Physics dept . willi be
leading the talk This will begin
Thrusdav. March 2S at 4 30 p m m
Room EJ05 ot the Physics
building Interested persons are
encouraged to attend
ACM
The ECU chapter ol ACM will
meet this Thursday, March 25 at
3:30 in Austin room 132. Mr David
Sowell, Research Associate and
Software Engineer to the ULTRA
protect at ECU will speak on the
third part ot building your own
microcomputer Anyone in
terested is invited to attend.
KARATE
There will be an important
meeting of the Karate Club at 7 30,
Thursday. March 25 All members
of all classes should attend. Next
year's officers will be elected
SUMMER SCHOOL
ROOM RESERVATION
Residence hall room deposits for
Summer School 1982 will be ac
cepted m the Cashier's Office,
Room 105. Spilman Building,
beginning April l Room
assignments will be made in the
respective residence hall offices
on April 5 and 6 Thereafter, they
will be made in the Office of Hous
mg Operations, Room 201.
Whichard Building The rent for a
term ot summer school is $120 for
a semi private room and S180 for a
private room Additional rent m
the amount of $20 is required for
Jarvis Hall
Students who wish to reserve
rooms they presently occupy, pro
vided such rooms are to be in use
this summer, are to make reserva
tionson V"ndav, April 5 All other
students may reserve rooms on a
first come, firs' serve basis on
Tuesday April 6
Residence halls to be used tor
women are Green. Slay ano Jar
vis Men will be housed in Garret
Slay and Jarvis Halls
WOMEN'S RUGBY
TOURNAMENT
The ECU womens rugby team is
hosting North Carolina's cham
pionship rugby tournament March
27 and 28 The action starts at 10
am both days at the Allied Health
fields Big party Saturday night
Come see the pirates take on Cor
nell and the Charlotte Harlots,
among others
AKA FASHION SHOW
Alpha Kappa Alpha presents
"Fantasia a fasion show that
will include fashions m designer
leans, lingerie, sportswear, semi
formal, lormal and many more It
will be held in the Mendenhall
Auditorium on Thursday March
25, 1982 at 8 30 p m Tickets are
$1 00 and at the door $1 50 So come
on out lor � niqht of enioymenl
MR. MO'
The Lambda Chp Alpha Little
Sisters and the Elbow will hold a
Mr '10' contest April 6 beginning
at 9 p m ! More information to
come but make plans to attend
now!
MINORITIES
Acting Chncellor Howell will
meet with interested faculty, staff
and students for a discussion of the
status ot minorities on campus
The dialogue session, scheduled
tor March 30, is sponsored by the
Committee or the Status of
Minorities Discussion will include
implications of the consent decree
signed by the University of North
Carolina arc) 'he Department of
Education It also will explore
strategies to be used during in.
coming years to increase the
minority presence and pariiopa
tor in campus activities All
members ol the university com
munty are welcome '0 attend the
session which is set lor 3 pm ir
Room 221 Mendenhall S'udert
Center
SGA
Applications lor (82 83) Honor
Council members ar being taken
,n the SGA Office. 228 Mendenhall
Student Certer Be'weer 8 00 a m
and 5 00 pm Monday thru Fri
day
California concept
OF GREENVILLi
QUALITY
HAIR DESIGNS
AFFORD A BLE PRICES
752-2967
Announcing . . . A new bicycle distributor!
East Carolina Roadracing Association is pleased to
announce that we are open for business, carrying a com
plete line of highest quality bicycles and accessories
Panasonic 10 and 12 speed bicycles in stock, others
available. For your professional cycling needs, give us a
call!
E.C.n.n.
Professional
757-1680
(after 6 P.M.)
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 25, 1982
t
to
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TS
. a
Americans In Opposition To Nuclear Proliferation
Continued From Page 1
(would have) to petition the presi-
dent of the United States to propose
to the Soviet Union a nuclear
weapons freeze
Hurley said the committee would
introduce a public referendum on
the ballot, should the city council re-
ject the freeze proposal.
The ordinance also called for "a
mutual verifiable nuclear arms
freeze immediately halting the
development, testing, producton
and future deployment of all
nuclear war heads, missiles and
delivery systems
A recent Gallup Poll has in-
dicated that 72 percent of the
American people favor a Soviet-
United States pact to stop the
building of more nuclear weapons.
In a report to a Senate sub-
committee last week. Secretary of
State Alexander Haig said the freeze
proposal was "not only a bad
defense policy, but it is a bad arms
control policy as well Haig added
that the effect of a United States ac-
ceptence of the freeze "could be
devastating
President Reagan said the freeze
would put the United States "on
thin ice Reagan claimed the freeze
didn't go far enough and therefore
wasn't good enough.
On the other hand, Soviet leader
Leonid Brezhnev has endorsed a
proposal similar to the freeze, call-
ing for a bilateral moratorium on
ECU Crimes Reported
By GREG RIDEOUT
siifl W ritrr
Editor's Note:
Because the campus
security department is
concerned that alt
thefts on campus are
not reported, the names
of victims of these
crimes will no longer be
printed.
The following is the
police blotter for
March 17 through
March 23. These are
campus-related in-
cidents.
March 17. 9:42 p.m.
� The larceny of
money from Room 222
of Rawl Building was
reported. 10:20 p.m. �
Marc Hunt of
Albemarle was arrested
for the larceny of a
telephone receiver. 7
p.m. � Malcolm Tully
of Holly Ridge was ar-
rested for possession of
marijuana. 8 a.m. �
Kenneth Tilley of
Durham was arrested
tor possession of mari-
juana.
March 18. 1:16 a.m.
� Roseann Blum of
Greene Dorm ws ar-
rested for damage to
personal property.
11:55 a.m. � The
larceny of a bicycle was
reported west of Cotten
Dorm. 3 p.m. � The
larceny of four wheel
covers was reported by
the owner of a vehicle
parked in the Fifth and
Reade lot. 8:45 p.m. �
The breaking and
entering of a Belk dorm
room was reported.
March 19. 3:20 a.m.
� Robert Hodges of
Raleigh was arrested
for driving under the
influence of alcohol
south of Joyner
Library. 9 a.m. � The
head resident of Flet-
cher Dorm reported the
vandalism of chairs and
the larceny of a lamp
from the lobby of Flet-
cher. 11:20 p.m. �
Stancil Music Com-
pany reported the
larceny of a money bag
from Aycock game
room. 6:30 p.m. � of
618 Greene dorm was
served with a warrants
for arrest on charges of
larceny and credit card
fraud.
March 21. 2:24 a.m.
� Officer Brown
reported the larceny of
the smoke detector
located near room 382
Jones Dorm. 2:40 a.m.
� The vandalism of a
first floor window in
Jarvis was reported. 2
p.m. � Deborah
Knight, a resident of
Spring Hope, was ar-
rested for larceny and
forgery. 7 p.m. �
Shelby Watson of
Mayodon was arrested
for forgery. 2:45 p.m.
� The larceny of four
hubcaps was reported
by the owner of a vehi-
cle while it was parked
in the 14th and
Berkeley lots.
March 22. 1 p.m. �
The breaking and
entering of a Belk dorm
room was reported. 5
p.m. � The larceny of
a bicycle from Brewster
was reported.
March 23. 12:01 a.m.
� Kenneth Sugg of
Snow Hill and George
Langston of Sanford
were arrested for
larceny of a newspaper
stand from Clement.
nuclear weapons between the US
and USSR.
Some American observers feel
that Russia's support of a nuclear
weapons moratorium is a direct
result of the tremendous drain its
present military budget is having on
their economy. Others, including
the New York Times in an editorial
in its March 21 edition, say that the
freeze is a way for the USSR to
maintain its nuclear advantage in
Western Europe. The Times called
for the renewal of the SALT Talks.
Whatever the answer, the freeze is
clearly demonstrating the current
trend among American and Western
European citizens to pressure their
leaders to work for nuclear arms
reduction.
The freeze has been endorsed by
over one million Americans in less
than a year of petition drives. Cur-
rently, the freeze has 149 offices in
47 states and has 20,000 active
working volunteers.
Unlike the peace protestors of the
Vietnam years, the current peace
movement has strong support from
doctors, lawyers and scientists who
claim that no one can win a nuclear
war, and therefore, we shouldn't
think of it as an option.
In his story to News and World
Report, David B. Richardson said
the current peace movement in-
cludes "substantial numbers of the
middle-aged and the elderly, blue
collar workers and professionals, as
well as homemakers
Numerous religious leaders are
leading the call for nuclear arms
control and disarmament. In-
dividual statements by some
religious leaders suggesting various
radical solutions to the arms race
dilemma have included a call for tax
resistance from Catholic Bishop
Raymond Hunthausen of Seattle
and the support of a unilateral
reduction initiative by the U.S. from
the United Church of Christ.
In a statement released by the
United Methodist Bishops, the arms
race was called "the most crucial
issue facing the people of the world
today
Traditional peace churches such
as the Mennonites, The Society of
Friends (Quakers) and the Church
of the Brethren have renewed their
peace calls to their congregations,
and some have started to call tor
radical acts, such as civil disobe-
dience as a method of resistance.
North Carolina Evangelist Billy
Graham has also joined the list of
religious leaders calling for the
elimination of nuclear weapons.
The Presbyterians, Baptists and
Lutherans have also been making
similar overtures for arms reduc-
tion.
Winning torm
Alison Wainwright
(left) beams as she
becomes the winner
of the Fifth Annual
Heart Fund Bikini
Contest at the Flbo
Tuesday night. The
contest, co-
sponsored by Tau
Chapter of Phi
Sigma Pi National
Honor Fraternity,
netted more than
$300 for the Heart
Fund.
J
March $T)
of Dimes
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2 Blocks from ECU
1
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Qtye �a0t Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Jimmy DuPREE, ���� c�
Charles Chandler, m�, Edor
Ric Browning, d,�� oj �! Tom Hall. NtwsEdiw
Fielding Miller, bus, mmm William Yelverton, sponsEdnor
Alison Bartel, Produce &, Steve Bachner, tummmmt mm
Steve Moore, cmwm m��" Diane Anderson, ew
March 25, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Part-Timers
They Deserve Right To Vote
There's asinine, and then there's
asinine �
Students paying tuition and fees
then not being allowed to vote in
SGA elections should be included in
Webster's Collegiate Dictionary
under assinine. There is simply no
justification for it.
True; those students do not pay
as high a total of money per
semester as "full-time" students.
But proportionately they pay as
much or even more.
To deny these students the right
to vote is equivalent to literacy tests
and property requirements.
When it comes to Student Union
films, special campus events and
athletic events, these individuals are
considered equal to those paying for
a full course load.
Why the double standard?
Our guess is it makes too many
votes for pollsters to tally. Or
maybe "unfriendly" candidates
would have a chance to be elected.
Perhaps it's a subversive plot by
those eager to overthrow the
regime.
DOONESBURY
Whatever the "logic" behind this
rule, it is unfair. As one ECU
veteran put it: "All I get to do is
contribute to the money given away
every year � not get to decide who
gives it away
Many part-time students were
disappointed Wednesday to learn
they were ineligible to vote. With
13,000 students at East Carolina
and only about 10 percent of those
voting, it seems logical that the
"powers that be" would be in-
terested in including as many consti-
tuent groups as possible.
But sometimes logic escapes reali-
ty. It's easier to maintain status quo
than to improve conditions for
those left out by the system.
A legislative body with the
responsibility of distributing over
$100,000 should reflect the wishes
of everyone contributing to the
system. Even the executive branch
� which has the power to veto
legislation � should be accountable
to every student at ECU.
Wise up � the days of suppres-
sion and poll taxes are gone.
by Garry Trudeau
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i-Campus Forum
Cheerleaders Slighted
The Tuesday, March 16, 1982 issue of
The East Carolinian had a picture of the
Old Dominion cheerleaders in the index
section on the front page and again on
page 11 with the ECAC-South Tourney
scenes. 1 know that many people share
with me extreme disappointment in The
East Carolinian not representing the
ECU cheerleaders instead. Those in at-
tendance at the Scope when East
Carolina played Richmond had to feel
proud of the performance of the ECU
cheerleaders. They clearly outclassed the
field. It seems unreal that the
photographer for The East Carolinian
chose to include cheerleaders from
another school for our newspaper. Why
not honor the ECU cheerleaders who did
such an outstanding job of representing
the University in the E.C.U. East Caroli-
nian.
JO B. SAUNDERS
Honor Council
Applications are currently being taken
for positions on one of the most impor-
tant boards at East Carolina University.
This is the Honor Council, a board
which has jurisdiction in all cases involv-
ing violations of the ECU Honor Code
or Code of Conduct. This Council may
provide sanctions against individuals
found guilty of violations of these Codes
ranging from a verbal reprimand to two
year expulsion.
Too few people apply for positions on
the Honor Council each year, probably
due to the fact that the application
period for it is poorly publicized.
Therefore, 1 am penning this letter as a
personal invitation to anyone who con-
siders himself a good judge of character
and a reasonable person to please come
by room 218 in Mendenhall Student
Center and fill out an application.
The Honor Council must be filled
with the best people available if it is to
do the best possible job. The only re-
quirements for positions on the Board is
that you have a 2.0 GPA and no record
of violations of the Code of Conduct of
the University. If you consider yourself
qualified, don't fail to apply, the Honor
Council needs you.
MIKE SWAIM
Junior, History
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian wefcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Letters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
days.
IN ALL HATTERS
OF POLITICS, I
PEFBk TO A
HIGHER
AVTHORlTVf
i h 7
tobacco
1o bbp
Candidates Had Shallow Platforms
By KIM ALBIN
A few of you may be aware of the fact
that yesterday we had elections for our
future Student Government Officers.
While I offer congratulations and best
wishes to the winners of that election, I
find I must comment on the unfortunate
array of campaign platforms which were
used this year.
Granted, most of us have seen worse
platforms. A few years ago, the major
election issue was beer on campus; this
year only one candidate even suggested it.
Obviously, there has been a shift toward
maturation among our prospective campus
leaders.
But their platforms remain, at best,
limited in scope. The promises printed in
Tuesday's paper were mostly vague,
general, shallow, and all the same. Every
candidate at least mentioned that he would
"support the arts often throwing in a
kind word or two about minorities and the
SGA loan fund. Many of them advocated
the wheel locks instead of tow trucks, some
were for extended bus routes. Deja vu.
Was that Lester Nail's platform, or Brett
Melvin's?
The problem, then, seems to be that our
candidates are unaware of what the current
issues are at ECU. And since as far as 1
know, we have never been properly polled
by SGA leaders for our opinions on
anything, it seems we must offer our sug-
gestions voluntarily. Should this practice
become a ritual, it could prevent a great
deal of embarassment for next year's can-
didates as they will be better informed and
able to treat the real issues with depth.
The most common complaint among all
the students I have talked to is the lack of
adequate lighting in certain areas of cam-
pus. This could be dealt with quickly and
with a minimal amount of trouble � yet
the situation persists. How many SGA
presidents have overlooked the problem so
far? Take, for instance, the streets behind
the art building and in front of the Student
Supply Store. These are common routes
for students on their way home from night
classes.
We still do not have a cafeteria on cam-
pus.
One candidate did mention closing down
Jones Cafeteria "until edible meals are
served however, 1 find it hard to take
him seriously as a candidate since his veivss
were terribly narrow-minded and radical
for a student leader. What we need is a
place to eat, not an on-campus pub.
We also need a closer rapport with the
members of campus security. I realize that
many students find it hard to tell their pro-
blems to a policeman who is at least twelv e
inches taller than the average basketball
player, but the officers are, after all, there
to help us. (Why are they all so tail0)
The students of East Carolina want
parking facilities.
They want a loan fund, and a decent
radio station.
They would like to feel more comfor-
table in Mendenhall Student Center.
They do not want to pay to see the
weekend films, brought to them by the
Student Union.
Most of all, 1 believe that they would
like to be asked what they want before any
issue is voted on. This is because ECU
students do not want to give a blank check
to their SGA officers. 1 can see why � the
candidates were all using the same plat-
form.
Necessary Rent Control In Danger
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
I live in a rent controlled apartment, a
one-bedroom place that my friend Liz and
I share for $220 a month. As renters in one
of the tightest, most expensive housing
markets in the country, we could easily pay
$350 without rent control, maybe more. Or
maybe we couldn't pay, and we'd have to
move � two more displaced persons pric-
ed out of their home by the gentrification
and real estate speculation rampant in the
nation's cities and towns.
Like a lot of Americans, we have a
dream of owning our own home someday.
But with the price of buying a house soar-
ing out of sight � a three bedroom home
sales for $200,000 in our neck of the woods
� we may never realize that dream. Unlike
our parents, homeowners all, we may pay
rent the rest of our lives.
It was with anger and fear, then, that 1
read the recent news that the Reagan ad-
ministration is thinking of ending all
federal housing aid to municipalities with
local rent control laws. This startling pro-
posal is being pushed by the Presdient's
Comission on Housing. Nevermind that
this recommendation, if it is adopted, will
brutalize the local autonomy that the
Reagan White House claims to cherish. It
will do what all the Reagan programs are
designed to do: enshrine property rights
for "them that's got at the continued ex-
pense of them that's not
Of course, the Commission isn't coming
right out and saying that. No, as is their
wont, the Reagan axmen say they are do-
ing this for our own good. A recent state-
ment by the Commission contends:
"Rent control laws inhibit owners and
lenders from investment in rental housing
and consequently constitute a substantial
deterrent to production and maintenance
of rental housing. While the rights of states
to control internal affairs are essential to
the American political arrangement, these
rights do not entitle states to do irreparable
harm to federal investments within their
boundaries
As with other applications of
Reaganomics, the logic behind that state-
ment is easily refuted. Opponents of rent
control point to the devastated moonscape
of New York's South Bronx as evidence of
what rent control will do to a community,
but they ignore the fact that cities such as
St. Louis and Cleveland � with no rent
control � have rates of abandonment even
higher than the Bronx. Moreover, rent
control's foes forget that some places with
rent control � Brooklyn's Bensonhurst,
not far from the South Bronx, and Santa
Monica, a city of renters near Los Angeles
� are among the most stable of America's
urban communities.
During the housing price spirals of the
1970's, more than 100 municipalities
enacted some form of rent control law.
Most were of the so-called "moderate"
type that stopped short of freezing rents.
These laws provide for a controlled profit
for landlords � usually keyed to rises in
the owners' expenses. They also typically
exempt new housing and small landlords,
while they tie annual rent increases to pro-
perty maintenance and provide protection
from arbitrary eviction for tenants.
Met studies of rent control in the past
10 years show that such reforms give at
least short-term relief to renters who, as a
group, are poorer, older, and less mobile
than property owners, and are more likely
to be racial minorities. Landlords, as a
group, have hardly suffered. Most con-
tinue to invest in municipalities with
moderate rent controls, and most continue
to make money.
Some 200 American cities and towns
now have rent control laws. All of them
are threatened with obliteration by the
Commission on Housing's recommenda-
tion, since few, if any, communities could
function without federal housing aid. The
Commission has recommended that Con-
gress deny offending municipalities direct
investments such as housing subsidies,
public housing funds and grants for restor-
ing delapidated housing. The Commission
would also end indirect investments, such
as Veterans Administration morgages.
If this proposal passes into policy, it will
underscore tenants' status as second-class
citizens � a status that was written into the
U.S. Constitutin when it was decided that
only property-owning white males could
vote. It took a grassroots suffrage move-
ment to get tenants the vote in the 1860s.
Rent control laws came later, after much
agitation by tenants incensed by the failure
of the free market to provide affordable
quality housing.
Denounced by conservatives as
dangerously radical, rent control is a
modest reform, when you think about it. It
doesn't deny landlords a profit or
challenge the basic acceptance of private
control of the public's need for shelter.
Even this minor league protection has
drawn the fire of conservatives, however
� part of the administration's larger war
on Americans so unfashionable as to be
without designer clothing and mountain
ranches on which to run their horses.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
MARCH 25, 1982
Page 5
Tim Weisberg
Energy And Style Grace Performers
B KAREN WENDT
It was a larger than usual crowd
for a flute player.
But those who were there con-
sidered it well worth the time.
Tim Weisberg appeared at the At-
tic Tuesday night for a concert that
Greenville audiences rarely hear.
His performance was totally in-
strumental, featuring only Weisberg
and his band. Weisberg brings a rare
talent to the rock world and his
band also contains talent that is
worth) of high praise.
eisberg has not been able to
classify his music, and from listen-
ing to it Tuesday night it can be said
that it does not fit into a traditional
genre,rock or otherwise.
�'1 don't know what it is. It's a
classical flute player (myself) and
tour or five musicians, a drummer
rom the Dave Mason Band, a
keyboard player from Manhattan
1 ransfer, a bass player from various
rock and roll groups and the same
with percusion and guitar. So I
don't know what it is. 1 mean it's
pretty energetic and at the same
token some o the stuff is really
mellow and sensitive says
eisberg.
You almost hae to agree. The
music varied from heavy rock and
roll to a mellow sway. And with the
magic ol special effects even the
flute took on a variety o different
tones and styles. Especially in
Weisberg's hands.
But this concert did not rely on
special effects or other risky
methods. Weisberg was not the only
talent on stage. His band members,
coming from some of the bands
mentioned above, are also major
talent in themselves. Throughout
the performance different band
members presented solos to the au-
dience and were always thanked
with cheers.
But it was not as noisy a night as
many expect in the Attic. For in-
stance, one person commented that
during Weisberg's final solo (the se-
cond encore) they had "never heard
the Attic more quiet during a per-
formance A group has been rarely
more appreciative either.
The entire evening was im-
pressive. But the most impresive
aspect of all was the tremendous
energy that Weisberg and his
cohorts present both onstage and
off. Their energy showed in their
music and tremendous audience ap-
peal. The energy was there before
the show and after, which is even
more impressive when you consider
the group had arrived in Greenville
from Florida that morning at 5 a.m.
according to Weisberg.
And they are a friendly and fun-
nycrew. Before the concert, during
an interview with The East Caroli-
nian and WZMB a marine entered
and said he was a fan, explaining
where he had come from. Weisberg
responded withIf you came that
far, you've got to get a picture
and posed with the marine, as well
as several other bystanders and gave
all his address so that when the
photos were developed they could
be sent to receive his autograph.
During rehearsal a call went out
for a repeat and the reply was "1
can't my nails aren't dry
An example of Weisberg's per-
sonal charm came when he was
stopped in the parking lot by a lost
fan and asked "Is Tim Weisberg
still playing at the Attic tonight
Weisberg answered yes, recomended
the performance and went on his
way. (When the woman saw him on
stage after the show she came back
and apologized. Weisberg laughed
and told her not to worry about it
with a grin.)
But it was the musical talent that
so many came to hear and ap-
preciate. The entire performance
blended together into a rainbow of
song and laughter.
Many people are unfamiliar with
Weisberg's work, a factor that
Weisberg blames partially on the
radio industry especially at the
present time.
"I would say that the people that
come to our performances really cut
across a wide range of people. We
played down in Florida at
something called the Youth Fair on
Friday. The Saturday night show
was supposed to be Ozzie Osbourne
which is like completely different
musically.
"And we have 14 and 15 year olds
which is quite shocking as far as the
record company is concerned. They
think the people that come and
listen to my music wear suits and
ties and they're above 25 years old
and that type of stuff. So I don't
know that our music completely
reached the mainstream, basically
because of the constraint of radio.
The radio business right now as far
as the music they play is pretty
limited and it's very difficult to get
instrumental music oneven more
so than in the past. But hen I think
that you take a look at our au-
diences it really does cut across quite
a wide range
Photo By DAVE WILLIAMS
Weisberg And His Instrument
and electric performance with partial proceeds to the March oj Dunes.
Karate Club Trains 'Body And Mind
Bv NGELA ROACH
sun Wriirr
Body and mind are the two struc-
tures that the ECU Karate Club at-
tempts to train. The Karate Club is
comprised of talented individuals
who enjoy this development for
various reasons. Karate gives the
members a sense o self-confidence.
Skills are only to be used as a last
resort. Most karate practitioners
report that the art helps them to
maintain self-control. It's an aide in
relaxation, concentration, and ten-
sion. Karate isn't intended to pro-
duce bullies, it is a means of acquir-
ine discipline and physical fitness.
The ECU Karate Club operates
under the Go Ju Shorin system. This
is a Japanese style with other
methods mixed in. Go JU Shorin
was prelected by Bill McDonald
who is the advanced classes instruc-
tor for the club. This system is less
brutal than the one exemplified by
the late Bruce Lee.
Classes for beginning karate
students are every Monday and
Tuesday night at 7:30 in room 108
(downstairs) of the Merrick Theatre
Arts Building. Advance classes meet
Thursdays at 7:30. Classes meet one
hour per night and are divided into
homogeneous groups.
The first lessons in karate are
aimed at teaching the beginner to
overcome fear, panic, and hesita-
tion. Then the body is trained to go
through the phsyical rigors of the
art. Areta Moore, the club's presi-
dent, states, "we make our bodies
do some weird things. The body is
doing things it's not used to
Actual practice begins with warm-
ing up exercises. Variations of yoga
and gymnastics are used to stretch
every part of the body. Members are
not placed on a special diet but are
advised against eating before
classes. Moore describes herself as
"a regular junk food junkie" but
admits that if she would diet, her
skills would improve. "Karate
demands a great deal of determina-
tion and concentration but sticking
with it pays off Moore said.
The Karate Club was formed in
1963 with Bill McDonald as its head
instructor. Mr. McDonald is a sixth
degree black belt champion. His
own karate school is located at 903
Dickinson Avenue. Through the
years the club has established a
sound reputation. This group is well
known in the eastern region because
of the notable competition it has
won. The team has also made
headlines in the western part of the
state and in other areas in the South.
One point is certain, this group is
not slack. Ms. Moore declares it to
be "very formal Even though
practice is not strictly enforced, it is
greatly encouraged. Practice is not
considered a game but is viewed as a
process in obtaining rank. "It's not
a sports club but is a teaching club
Moore stated. Members see karate
as a martial art, not a sport. An art
is considered to be skilled ac-
complishments but a sport is con-
sidered a game. Most members
become indignant when karate is
referred to as a sport.
The Karate Club has a promising
future if tournaments won can be
used as evidence. It recently won a
tournament in Shelby, and last fall
the team won the Battle of Atlanta
Championship, i he Atlanta Pro
Am. the Carolina Karate Cham-
pionship in Goldsboro, and a tour-
nament in Elizabeth City have all
fallen into their hands. The team
hopes to gain the championship of
the Battle of Atlanta II on April 24.
The team has a traveling group
which participates in these meets,
with expenses financed by the club.
The ECU Karate Club travels as a
group, but each individual enters
under his own name not under the
club title.
In addition to participation in
karate meets, the club gives
demonstrations. A two week notice
should be rendered to allow for suf-
ficient preparation. Barefoot On the
Mall was host to one of the
demonstrations this past season.
For more information concerning
the demonstrations contact Areta
Moore at 758-9827.
The Karate Club has approx-
imately three hundred members but
personal friendships are not lacking
in this vast group. "We are a very
tight knit group Moore com-
mented. Each member has a goal �
to be the best. However, conversa-
tion is dominated by referring to the
group, the team, or the club not the
individual. Since equipment is fur-
nished by the university and the only
other requirements are to pay a one
�ime fee of ten dollars and to wear
loose clothing, the student who
wants to be involved need only
possess willingness. Whatever is
amiss in your knowledge or perfor-
mance of the art will be readily
taught by the club.
WZMB: The People Behind The Music
B JOSEPH OUN1CK
xutl Mriirr
When WZMB came on the air not
long ago. the voices of some of
ECl 's students began modulating
through the air waves, bringing
stereos alive with various styles ot
music. But. who are the people
behind the voices?
It you tune into the station at
noon or 6 pm on Tuesday or Thurs-
day vou will hear Warren Baker
who "aside from being a disc-
jockev, is the general manager for
the station. Hailing from Richmond
Virginia, he has been going to ECU
for two years and is hoping to be a
communications major when and if
that program materializes.
As Warren will attest, WZMB is
not the first station that he has
worked for: "1 used to work at WR-
QR. I was in a vocational training
program in high school where we
dealt with practical broadcasting,
and I worked with an educational
station that ironically got on the
year after 1 left. 1 had been there
WZMB disc jockey Elton Boneyis
to the variety of music on the EC
Ftwt �y OAV� WILLIAMS
just one of the many DJs who contribute
U student radio station.
two yers. It really blew my mind.
That's why 1 was counting on
WZMB to get on the air, and it is,
and I'm really excited about it
He plans to go into, "maybe
broadcast management. Maybe
even TV. I have a job over at Chan-
nel 9. I work there as associate pro-
ducer for the Saturday News. Real-
ly, about 90 percent of my time is
spent here at the station. Two per-
cent is spent at Channel 9, and
about 8 percent at home.
"1 have a problem in radio,
though. It's my nose. 1 have a bad
nasal resonance. I've been told this
by many teachers: 'Warren you will
never make it in television or radio
because you sound like you have a
cold! 1 was born with a cold. It's an
allergy that I have. But, 1 think 1
will survive.
"Really, it is fun. Once you get in
the studio, you've got alot of power.
You can do just about anything you
want. You can create all these im-
ages in these people's minds. 1 love
radio. I mean where else. It's an in-
tangible. All you hear is sound. You
don't see anything. You can be so
creative. Like, say you wanted to do
a spot on dropping a 600 pound
cherry into a 3000 foot bowl of
whipped cream and this cherry is be-
ing carried by a B-l Bomber that's
flying over. It goes plof! You have
the sound effects. You can picture
in your mind what it looks like. If
you did that on TV, it would cost
you a heck of alot of money. But
radio, it's so possible. You can do
stuff like this. That's why 1 like pro-
duction. Like I'm working on a
PSApublic service announcement)
right now for the Battle of the
Bands that is coming up. You hear
artillery fire and stuff. You'll hear it
when it comes out.
"The public service an-
nouncements that you hear on our
station, I'm in charge of getting
those on the air and producing the
spotsThere's not a big load o
production. 1 wish there were.
"I've been working for the sta-
tion for two years, basically just
working (2 years ago) to get people
up here to work. We had all these
albums. Thev needed to be
catalogued. Still, they're not
catalogued.
"We have to have a big budget
for records. Not unless you want to
hear Joan Jet, "1 Love Rock-n-
Roll" all the time on a scratched up
record. Some of our records are
wearing out fast.
"1 am very anti-top 40. I like
some of the musicAnybody can
iurn to '1TN and pick up top 40.
Anybody can turn to 'RQR and pick
up top 40. When they turn to ZMB
they sould expect something else.
That's the way I feel about it. We're
the alternative. We can play some of
this stuff (in the old WECU collec-
tion). There's a lot of people you
might not of heard of (in the old
WECU collection). But, I know
some jocks that will go in the pro-
duction room, pick out an album
they haven't even heard of � this is
real admirable, too � listen to it
and say, 'hey, that's a good cut
They'll put it on the air and give
some exposure to something
nobody's ever heard of. 1 think
that's great. That gives us more of
an alternative image, playing stuft
that's never been heard of before in-
stead of just the popular albums.
5 "What kind of songs are the
epitamv of the top 40? Daryl Hall
and John Oates. It's kind of a feel, a
twang-twang sound, almost a
predicatble sound, like you know
what the next note is going to be and
how it's going to be sung.
Regurgitated stuff from previous
years, that's basically top 40.
AOR (album oriented rock) is
mostly built on the reputation of the
artist. Air Supply would not be con-
sidered AOR for the specific fact
that they sound too top 40. They are
top 40. They have a bad image on
AOR stations, so they won't play.
Elton John, a few years back, when
he came out with Goodbye Yellow
Brick Road and Caribou, his best
albums, was considered top AOR,
But they won't touch his stuff
now "Stairway to Heaven" is a
classic AOR song, but it's not hard.
It's not very hard rock, not until
you get into the middle of it. Here
we go again with reputation. Led
Zepplin is one of these heavy metal
bands that AOR people will always
play. Most of it depends on reputa-
tion.
"Top 40 is bubble gum. It's sweet
all the way through. But, AOR,
you've got to learn to appreciate it.
"It's (Jazz) so good, especially if
you have a girlfriend. People call me
up on the telephone and say 'when
you going to cut out this jazz crap? 1
sav, "What do vou mean. Do you
have a girlfriend nearby? This is the
perfect music One staffer here
calls it bellv-rubbing music. Jazz is
perfect for that. You can't study to
rock-n-roll these days.
"We're educational. These peo-
ple (the WZMB staff) are learning
sort of like the campus is learning
with us. They are learning how
jocks learn by putting them on the
air and having them make mistakes.
We've all made some big mistakes.
" 'ZMB, right now, is kind of
following a tight rope. We're in the
middle of two bureaucracies (the
Media Board and the FCC). 1 hate
to say it, but we have got to brown
nose both of them, or we're going to
lose. The Media Board holds the
license, and the FCC can take it
awav.
"1 think we should have a bigger
output. Maybe even 9000 watts. The
wattage is now 282 wattsThe first
night we went on , supposedly, we
got a call that somebody heard us in
New Bern. But, I doubt that's
rightBut, I think we cover Green-
ville really well Warren Baker
concluded.
Thomas Cormier, a history major
and psychology minor, is the
classical music director for WZMB
and is usually on the air from 10 to 2
pm Saturdays and 2 to 6 pm Sun-
days with his programs.
Thomas has been working for the
See WZMB, Page 6
i
y





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 25, 1982
WZMB Plays For Students
Continued From Page S
radio station for some
time: "Since I decided
to work for the station
two years ago, when it
was not even a station
yet, I started taking
alot more speech
courses and radio pro-
duction courses,
the public. I need all
the cooperation that 1
can possibly get. I need
support, both moral
and financial sup-
portThere are a lot of
programs that I wish
we could get. But, the
problem is it takes
money, more money
than I would get for a
courses that will help budget
me a lot better in speak- Donna has other in-
ing
"A year or so before
the station went on the
air, there were folks
here, working, getting
the records catagoriz-
ed. This stations has
been busy before it
went on the air
The day the station
went on the air, "1 had
a 6:30 class, and we
went on about seven
after six, and it was one
of the most joyous oc-
cassions I've had. It
was actually the birth
of a child because of all
the pain and struggle
we went through. We
got it on the air. Now,
like all children, we are
finally getting growing
pains. But, yeah, I was
ecstatic when we went
on the air. It freaked
me out
Behind the mike.
"The first time, I was a
bit skittish. After a
while, I was feeling a
lot more relaxed, and
with my music. I've
gotten a lot more relax-
ed with the field of this
type of music
(classical). This type of
music you have to
blend and mix. The au-
dience is a little bit
more critical since they
know a lot more about
the music, like the
music majors.
"I have enjoyed
classical music since I
was a small child. My
parents instilled that in
me. I'm lucky in that I
have great resource
people, Mr. James
Reese and Ms. Jerry
Laudante, the School
of Music librarian.
They give me sugges-
tions, and I pick what I
like. They're very
helpful.
"So far when I mess
up, 1 get quite a few
people to call up and
tell me that I did. So, 1
suspect 1 do (have a
large audience)Of
course, I have had a
few people come up to
me and tell me they ap-
preciate the music. But,
it will take time. Both
of us will kind of have
to grow with each
other. 1 will grow into
this music and feel
what the audience feels,
and they'll get used to
me. Hopefully, we'll
make a good match.
"The main thing that
1 would like to state is
that I need help from
terests, other than
radio: "Here at ECU,
I'm into the Karate
Club, so I'm working
out there. I'm not
dangerous, yet. I hope
to be lethal someday.
I'm just beginning. I
was into karate at my
other school, but it was
another form.
"My future is sort of
hazy, right now. I'm a
junior. I wasn't plann-
ing on it (going into
broadcasting). But I
sort of go with
whateverIf I'm of-
fered a job (in broad-
casting), I might take
it. It's hard to say what
the future will bring.
I'm having fun right
now. I'm planning to
do something in
psychology in the
future. Work for pro-
bably a large corpora-
tion with communica-
tions. I've thought
about grad school. But,
if I go, I won't get a
graduate degree in
psychology
The new wave show
every Tuesday and
Thursday night, one of
the station's more
popular shows, is
directed and hosted by
Mark Parrish, a senior
who is majoring in
Geography. Mark's
poition with the station
is relatively his first job
in radio: "This is my
first real job with
radio. My show is get-
ting a tremendous au-
dience. We try to play
everything from
Rockabilly to Sky and
mostly new wave and
some punk, but not real
hard punk.
"I've always been in-
to new wave. Ever since
it got started, I was.
But, I still like rock and
other types of music. 1
like all types of music
About his job, he
said, "1 love it. I've
gotten to do my show
and sit in for other peo-
ple during rock hours. I
enjoy just working
here. It's an experience,
and I get a lot of good
experience from it, and
you get to meet a lot of
new people.
"I've always kept a
good following of all
the radio stations here,
and I've always wanted
there to be an alter-
native rock radio sta-
tion here. Even when
they were pushing for it
3 years ago, I was
behind it 100 percent.
I've wanted to see new
wave make a break
here. It's always just
been right under the
surface here. You know
JJ's downtown had a
following for a long
time, and I was hoping
by bringing the new
wave out here to the
station, if I could
achieve that position,
to bring a better follow-
ing of new wave here to
Greenville, instead of
everybody getting the
bad idea that all of it is
just punk, no meaning
to it at all
Speaking of his first
experience on the air,
Mark said, "I was ner-
vous at first. I thought
I was going to mess up
for sure, and I, the first
couple of shows, had a
few mistakes and even
some now. Tonight, 1
made a few, but that
just comes with the job.
"I really think highly
of the station. We're
trying to provide a dif-
ferent type of music
that's not available for
this area. I think we're
achieving thatI think
we're filling the gap.
Some of the other sta-
tions, ever since we
came on the air, have
tried to come along side
with us. They've
started playing music
they've never played
before. It's purely
because of us. We're
drawing an audience
that enjoys the music
we play and drawing
some of their audience
away from them
As for choosing
music, "I go highly by
requests. If somebody-
wants to hear
something, 1 tell them
to call me up and I'll
play it. If it gets to the
place that people want
to hear it every week,
then I'll put it on the
high play list. Ever
since the show (the new
wave show) came on
the air, two months
ago, I've gotten
tremendous response.
The very first night, the
place was swamped
with phone callsOn
Thursday nights, we
have more phone calls
than we can handle. We
ge' that many re-
quests
As for his personal
interests, Mark said,
"Every chance 1 get, I
go surfing. That's
about all I do, except
for work. I fly. I am a
licensed pilotMost of
my free time I spend
out, going surfing, just
going to the beach,
hanging out there1
surf year around. I've
surfed when there is
snow on the ground
and the beach is
covered with ice.
"I'll be graduating
next December. I'm
hoping to do car-
tography work or
aerophoto interpreta-
tion, just trying to do
something with mapp-
ing. It's very in-
teresting, and I enjoy
it.
"I wish people would
give new wave a listen
and not go by what
they've heard in the
previous past New-
wave has really crept
into today's rock
"If the student body
has any comments, I
would really like for
them to drop me a line
here at the station.
Either write me, call
me, or come over to the
station in person.
"Starting next week,
Tuesday night, I'll be
starting a program
that's called Wave
Breaker, which is a
countdown of the na-
tion's top 20 new wave
hits for that week. It
might surprise you
who's going to be on it.
Now, it's not top 40
About his job, Mark
Parrish said, "It's
work. It takes a lot out
of you, coming in two
hours and play by re-
quest and right out of
your head. I have no
play listI just come
in, start playing, people
call in, and say they
want to hear this, and 1
play it. 1 don't want to
run the Sex Pistols and
OMD together. That's
two different types of
music. You have to fit
music together, and it's
a job, doing it, and get-
ting it right. But, 1 en-
joy it
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I wish I could be there!
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It's a hot summer.
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BODY
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As the temperature rises,
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"BODY HEAT" WILLIAM HURT
KATHLEEN TURNER and RICHARD CRENNA
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I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
MARCH 25, 1981 Page7
ODU Nips
Pirates In
Squeaker
By WILLIAM YtLVERTON
Spurts I 1tt�r
Old-timers say baseball is a
"game of inches
And for the East Carolina, that
old adage proved to be the story of
Tuesday night's ECAC-South Con-
ference battle with the Monarchs of
Old Dominion at bone-chilling Har-
rington Field.
With the Pirates holding a
treacherous 1-0 lead entering the
Old Dominion half of the seventh,
the Monarch's used two walks, a hit
batsman and a bloop double down
the left-field line to stop last
Carolina's nine-game winning
streak, 4-1.
The loss put the Pirates' record at
11-4 overall and 3-1 in the ECAC-
South.
Old Dominion is now 8-3-1 this
season and 1-0 in the conference.
For Pirate coach Hal Baird the
game's outcome was easily ex-
plainable. "They just played better.
"The did what it took to win the
game. 1 thought we had the chance
to break it open early, but we didn't
challenge them. They've got a good
club, and I'm impressed with
them
While Monarch hurler Jim Am-
brose, 4-1. was impressive with his
route-going five-hit, no-walk per-
tormance, liast Carolina pitcher Bill
Wilder was a little shakey. The Tar-
boro senior struggled much of the
night, hitting three batters and giv-
ing up five walks � one coming
with the bases loaded in the
disastrous seventh.
"He got to the point where he was
trying to be too fine Baird noted.
"He was trying to cut the corners a
little too close and was just missing.
Then (in the seventh) when he
siarted losing it, by the time we got
someone warmed up, it was too
late
Old Dominion threat. ' to score
in the first inning when the first two
batters singled, but a fielder's choice
and two strikeouts enabled the
Pirates to escape.
But the Pirates had a much
stronger threat in their half of the
first, loading the bases with two
outs. But an infield fly ended the in-
ning.
The Monarchs again threated in
the third with two outs after a hit
batsman and a walk, but Wilder
struck out the next batter.
Fran 1 ugerald gave the Pirates
their only run of the night in the
fourth inning when he blasted an
Ambrose fast-ball over the center
Aiming In The Right Direction
Fast Carolina pitcher Bill Wilder was aiming in the right direction against ODU Tuesday night, but the Monarchs didn't
cooperate, as they nipped the Pirates, 4-1, by scoring four runs in the seventh.
field fence, a powerful shot at least
400 feet away from home plate.
The Pirates were not productive
the rest of the contest, though, as no
other run net reached as far as se-
cond the other five innings. Am-
brose settled down and left the rest
up to his teammates.
Old Dominion then pushed ahead
in their half of the seventh inning to
stop East Carolina's win streak.
Kenny Koperna led off by getting
hit by a pitch, but was thrown out
by Fitzgerald when Joe Milhs
bounced one in the grass in front ot
home plate.
Mills then stole second, and se-
cond baseman Mark Wasinger
walked. Paul Keyes, also walked,
loading the bases. W ilder then walk-
ed Bob Gilland, forcing in Millis,
thus tying the game.
Jeff Beard then doubled down the
left-field line, driving in the winning
runs.
As for how the lost affects the
Pirates' chances of winning the
ECAC-South regular season cham-
pionship, Baird says. "This will
make it tougher. 1 hey are stronger
than (James) Madison. Ambrose is
their best pitcher, and we'll pro-
bably see him again. 1 feel like we
are capable of pushing some (runs)
against him. 1 felt we hit the ball
better and played better defense.
Thev just had that one inning
PIR 1 77 H 1 SI H Ml SO 77 V:
East Carolina's top eight batters:
Fran Fitzgerald, .395 with a team-
leading four home runs; Robert
Wells, 371; John Hallow, .368;
Mike Sorrell. .351; Todd Evans,
.339; Jack Curlings, .333; David
Wells. .315 and Chuck Bishop,
.305. As a team. East Carolina is
hitting .312 while opponents are at a
.180 clip.
Pirate pitchers continue have im-
pressive seasons. Bob Patterson is
leading the squad with a .60 earned
run average. Charlie Smith is second
with a .64, and freshman Bobby
Davidson is next with a 1.64.
Another freshman. Chubby Butler,
follows with a 2.33 average while
ace reliever Kirk Parsons has a 2.33
mark. As a team. Fast Carolina has
a 1.87 overall earned run average
while opponents have a 5.86 mark.
The Pirates have outscorcd their
opponents, 92-37, and outhil them,
147-80.
East Carolina Takes Two From Arch-Rival
An unidentified Lady Pirate is tagged out at second by an N.C. Slate player. (Pholo by Dave Williams.)
By CYNTHIA PLEASANTS
M-tant sports I- diior
The Wolfpack may have been
fired up but not enough to beat the
Lady Pirates.
ECU's women's softball team,
now 13-3. hosted a doubleheader
this past Wednesday, defeating N.
C. State in two games.
Head coach Sue Manahan said
she expected the Lady Wolfpack to
be ready to play, especially after
beating them, 14-6, in the A&T
tournament this past weekend.
"That's why we knew we had to
play good defense in the
doubleheader
In the second game ECU had a
6-1 lead, but State fought back to
score two runs and had two on base
with only one out left.
State's Dawn Mclaurin popped a
fly ball to the right-center fence,
driving in two mnners.
ECU centerfielder Mitzi Davis,
however, hurled the ball to second
baseman, Ginger Rothermel, who
then threw to homeplate, where
Mclaurin was tagged out, ending
the ballgame.
In the opening game, the Lady
Pirates scored once in the first and
gained two more in the sixth.
Jeantette Roth, now 9-2, was the
winning pitcher in both games.
ECU senior Shirley Brown went
two-for-three, with a double and
two runs batted in. Ciina Miller and
Davis also went two-for-three.
State's Sue Williams went two-for-
three in the first game.
In the second game the Lady
Pirates scored two runs in the bot-
tom of the first after State had
scored once in the top of the inning.
The Pirates added one in the third,
another in the fourth, and two in the
fifth, before State rallied for four in
the seventh.
Coach Manahan said the team
performed well, and was especially
pleased with some key plays by third
base freshman Marie Grube,
Yvonne Williams, and Fran Hooks.
Cynthia Shepard, ECU's
strongest offensive player, was not
able to play because of a pulled
muscle.
Manahan praised sophomore
Melody Ham, who replaced
Shepard.
"She did a great job out there and
played consistently on defense
Manahan had to make quite a few
position changes due to injuries.
Manahan said senior Maureen Buck
played exceptionally well after swit-
ching to shortstop from her usual
third base position.
"She made a diving catch
Manahan said, "taking away a sure
base hit
Manahan added that she is op-
timistic about having a successful
season.
"I just hope we keep improving
she said.
The Lady Pirates will travel to
UNC-Wilmington next Tuesday for
a doubleheader. Gametime is 3:30
p.m.
Pirates Defeat Campbell
Even With Aches And Pains
The East Carolina men's tennis
team continued their impressive
season by defeating Campbell
University 7-2, for their fourth vic-
torv against no defeats even though
Norman Bryant and Barry Parker
plaved with injuries.
Campbell fell to 8-4.
Summary
Billy Williams (Camppelt)
defeated Keith Zengel (ECU) 7-6.
7-5.
Donald Rutledge (ECU) defeated
Eddie Luck (Campbell) 6-0, 6-3.
Barrv Parker (ECU) defeated
Frankie Delconte (Campbell) 3-6,
6-3, 6-1.
Kevin Covington (ECU) defeated
Peter Gemborys (Campbell) 7-6,
7-5.
Don Gordon (Campbel) defeated
Norman Brvant (ECU) 6-2, 6-4.
Doubles: Zengel-Parker (ECU)
defeated W illiams-Luck (Campbell)
6-7, 6-0, 63.
Lepper-Bryant (ECU) defeated
Delconte-Gordon (Campbell) 6-4,
6-3.
Rutledge-Trebel (ECU) defeated
Gvmborvs-Dvchoff (Campbell) 4-6,
6-2. 7-5.
Lady Pirates Fall
The East Carolina women's ten-
nis season dropped their first match
of the season Tuesday afternoon,
falling 5-4 to Trenton State College
in Greenville.
The Lady Pirates are now 3-1.
"(Katharine) Tolson had an ex-
cellent performance noted coach
Carolyn Brown following the
match.
"We have accomplished a lot ot
the goaMs we wanted to accomplish.
We definitely have momentum right
now. "
Summary
State)
(ECU)
Pam Fera (Trenton
defeated Debbie Christine
6-2, 5-7, 6-2.
Katharine Tolson (ECU) defeated
Donna Weeks (Trenton State) 6-0,
6-0.
Wendy Kofman (Trenton State)
defeated Janet Russell (ECU) 6-1,
2-6, 6-1.
Laura Redford (ECU) defeated
Monica McGrory (Trenton State)
4-6, 7-6,6-1.
Tracey Eubank (ECU) defeated
Lynn Heinman (Trenton State) 6-4,
6-1.
Hillary Burk (Trenton State)
defeated Hannah Adams (ECU)
4-6, 6-2, 7-5.
Doubles: Fera-McGrory (Trenton
State) defeated Tolson-Christine
(ECU) 6-1, 6-4.
Russell-Redford (ECU) defeated
Weeks-Kofman (Trenton State) 6-2,
6-2.
Heinman-Burk (Trenton) d.
Harrison-Adams (ECU) 6-2, 6-1.
East Carolina Competing
Atlantic Coast Relays
East Carolina coach Bill Carson
will take his Pirates to the Atlantic
Coast Relays at North Carolina
State this Saturday, March 27 as
several Pirates will attempt to
qualify for the 1C4A Champion-
ships.
"We're running against some
tough teams Carson pointed out.
"It'll be a challenging meet
East Carolina will be running
against squads from North
Carolina, Winston-Salem State,
Pembroke State, Wake Forest,
Duke, North Carolina State, Cor-
nell, Bowling Green, Kent State, the
Philadelphia Pioneers, Old Domi-
nion and St. Augustine's.
The Pirates will be competing in
the 110 meter high hurdles (Steve
Rash), the 400-meter relay (Michael
Goings, Terry Ford, Tim Sephus,
Keith Golden), the 880-yard relay
(the same runners except Golden
and Sephus will switch positions),
the spring medley relays and the
mile relay (Keith Clarke, Lawrence
Ervin, Carlton Fraier and Cephus).
Hurdler Rash needs a 14.74 clock-
ing to qualify for the IC4A Outdoor
Championship meet, and the
400-meter relay squad needs a
42.10.
The mile relay qualified last
weekend at the Domino's relay with
a time of 3:13.71, three seconds over
the qualifying time of 3:16.98.
The Pirates will be without some
key sprinters Clint Harris and Ray
Dickerscn. However, Shaun Laney
will run in the 400 meters and hopes
to run a 47.78 or better to qualify
for the 1C4A Championships.
Wanna Be A Babe?
ECU's Norman Bryant
Applications are now being ac-
cepted at Scales Field House for any
female student interested in becom-
ing a Buccaneer Babe.
Buccaneer Babes are strictly
volunteer East Carolina football
hostesses who give tours of the cam-
pus and serve refreshments to Pirate
football recruits and their families
who visit Greenvile on game days.
The women selected usually
represent each field of study at East
Carolina.
All 26 Buccaneer Babe postions
are now open, but the applications
29.
The Buccaneer Babes also work
on the off-season � �he spring and
fall � sending messagers to recruits
and other athletes about such things
as football camp and information
on the Purple-Gold spring football
game.
All applicants will be interviewed
by a panel who will judge them on
appearance, poise, personality, how
they handle people and their
knowledge of East Carolina.
Any East Carolina student is
welcome to apply.

t
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 25. 1982
'Tri-Humps' Win
ATTIC
Sports-N-Shorts
By
Gregg Melton
Miller Pre-Season Softball Tournament
Cloudy days, scattered rain showers and 38
games later, the 1982 Miller-ECU Intramural Pre-
Season Softball Tournament is history. Even with
the bad weather, there was some outstanding play
throughout the entire tournament.
In the men's division, 24 teams competed for
the right to plav in the finals. Two of the early
favorites, the "Bombers" and the "Desperados"
bowed out of action in the first two rounds, being
eliminated by the "Sluts" and "Tau Kappa Ep-
silon" teams, repsectively. Well, the "Sluts"
went on to make it to the finals of the winner's
bracket before bowing out to the "Tri-Humps
This established the" "Humps" as the clear
favorite to win the championship.
Meanwhile, the "Bombsquad" worked their
wav through the losers bracket to earn a shot at
the finals. Here the "Tri-Humps" proved to be
too much as they went on to beat the
"Bombsquad" bv a score of 12-3, making them
the 1982 Pre-Season champions. Bll Nolan of the
"Humps" was particularly outstanding and was
named the men's tournament Most Valuable
Player.
Though there were only five teams in the
women's bracket, the action was still furious. In
earlv action, the "MD's" beat the Family Prac-
tice "Rangers" and the W.B. "Dodgers" to earn
the finalist position of the winners bracket.
Meanwhile, the "Dodgers" rallied to capture the
other finalist position in the loser's bracket by
posting a win over the "Chuggers This set the
stage for the rematch between the "Dodgers" and
the" "MD's Again, the "MD's" proved that
they were indeed the champions as they scored a
9-5 triumph. Janis Parlon of the "MD's" was
voted the women's Most Valuable Player.
The East Carolina Intramural Department
would like to thank all of the participants for
their plav durine the weekend and also pay a
special tribute lo the MILLER BREWING COM-
PANY for their continued outstanding efforts in
making our programs a success.
Golf Tournament
Don't forget that the '82 edition of the ECU In-
tramural Golf Tournament is to be played on
Tuesday and Wednesday, March 30th and 31st.
Entries close on Monday, March 29. The tourna-
ment was moved up one day due to an unexpected
price increase of student green fees at the Ayden
Country Club. For more information, contact the
Intramural Office or call extention 6387.
bOu T H
ROCK
THURS MARCH 25
STATES
WSECRET AGENT
FORMER MEMBERS OF PEGASUS
FRI. & SAT.
MARCH 26-27
THE
WHEELS
WHAPPY HOUR
FRIDAY 4:00-7:00
25C ADMISSION
65r BEER
SUN
MARCH
28
GOOD
HUMOR
5TH ANNUAL PHI KAPPA TAU
SPRING FLING '82
Classifieds
MUSIC PROVIDED
BY CAROLINA ARTISTS
THE NICKY HARRIS
A BEACH WEEKEND FOR 2 BAND
WILL BE RAFFLED OFF AT THE PARTY
FRIDAY AFTERNOON
APRIL 2 FROM 3-6:00 P.M.
LOST AND
FOUND
COST: Wed March 17 Mans
brawn tri fold wallet between
Aycocu and Austin. It found, can
keep money iust return wallet to
Ml Aycock or call 752 ?�0.
LOST IN MINGES March 14. a
tttt class ring, blue stones, initials
"JAA" on inside It found, please
contacl Joe aT " Slay (758 8485
ATTENTION
Ciaittt ads will be taken only
durmf the following hours
Monday � 1.15 3 00
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t�r�day � 1:15 3 00
Vou must place the ads m person
and pay for them m advance
Rates are 51 for the first IS words
and SOS per word after the first tit
teen
FOR SALE
TRAILER FOR SALE set up Ml
Greenville 2 BR all electric a c
encei'enf condition i2��5 can Tar
boro 823 t�4
WANTED TO BUY Dark room
e�uipment 754 4214 After I pm
NEW US DIVERS depth quage
lor shallow and deep diving for
SS0 Call 751-7778 Ask tor Julian
ESTRADA ACOUSTIC GUITAR
with lined case and many e�tras
including music stand, guitar
books and spare strings S)8S
(graduating soon. SO will likely
negotiate! Ask tor David at
7$7 J107 or see me at no E 10th
$�.�two blocks from the Mill.
V1VITAR ZOOM LENS 75 210 with
macro for Nikon mount used only
two times 515 Call 757 3210
SKIS FOR SALE: K 2. 185 comp
8ft Skis with Soloman bindings
H7S. Call 757 3210 and leave
number
FOUR BIC TURNTABLES I
sale. S2S each Call 752 2659
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
For nicely furnished apt at
Cypress Gardens Within walking
distance of campus Call 758 38�4
GOING TO Summer School and
need a place to live' Mow about a
nicely lurnisned apt instead of the
dorms' Available May thru Aug
Walking distance lo campus Call
7 58 3894
FURNISHED TWO bedroom apt
to Sublet May Aug Two miles
from Campuf Call 355 6792 or
7S6 4ISi
ROOMS FOR RENT 580 double
5125 Single located on East Filth
Street Call Marth at ClarKe
Branch Realty 7S6 6336
ROOMMATE NEEDED tor three
bedroom Apt in Wilson Acres
Pool Sauna, tennis Can 752 4787
COMPLETELY FURNISHED
EFFICIENCY apJ"
ment �utilities included� across
from college Phone 7 58 2585
COMPLETELY FURNISHED
ONE bedroom apart
ment �utilities included�across
Irom colieqe 758 2588
PERSONALS
Do you know someone with an in
teresting or unique hobby or
cratf It so contacl the Buccaneer
757501
RETRIEVER PUPPIES
Chesapeake Labrador mmed
BeauMui Puppies Call 756 9930
SOPHOMORE IN Mid Twenties
wants responsible girl (18 or
older; to date and develop honest
relationship Please serious
answers only to TOTO The East
Carolinian
BEER DRINNKERS WANTED
Think you can chug a beer' Prove
it Enter the Beer Bong Contest on
April IS lor details call Alpha
Sigma Phi 752 1073
A P and JD�thanks tor being
there for me. Love you both R G
TO MY SWEETHEART Mappy
birthday Lee Honey'Let's go
spend some moneyWe II plan a
secret rendezvous' I can wait�can
vou? Love you. M G
GEISCH LOUISE' Now that
you re approaching legaly
doesnt qualify you a an
adult�you re not tall .nough'
Happy B day tomorrow Janice
JOHN BARRON JUNIOR I
thought you would like to know
that someone s though go where
you go That someone never can
forget the hours we spent since
first we met That life is richer,
sweeter for such a sweetheart as
you are And how my constant
prayer will be that God will keep
you save for me With love
ANGIE PEELE has come of age!
That s right, no more laiibait,
she's legal Mappy birthday
HELP
WANTED
NEED MONEY You wont get
rich, but the East Carolinian has
openings for writers at the present
time There is also a possibility of
trammq tor editor positions and
training on computer terminals
Apply at the East Carolinian of
fice. Old South Building.
PHOTOGRAPHER NEEDED
Apply with the Media Board
secretary. Old South Building.
757 6009
TRUMPET PLAYER
WANTED-top 40Beach group
Weekend work vocal ability
prelerred Call 75 4495
SERVICES
CARICATURES BY WEYLER
Greenville's original personalized
art service Have cartoon done of
yourself or a loved one a unique
gift idea S'O tor 8 10. black and
white or color Call 752 5775
TYPING TERM, Thesis.
Resumes. Dissertations, etc Pro
fessional quality at lowest rate.
Call Kempie Dunn anytime
752 6733
NOTARY PUBLIC Call Amy at
757 3734
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST wants
to type thesis, dissertations,
publications, manuscripts or term
papers at home Call 75 360
SUMMER MOUSE SITTING
Responsible individual will tend
animals, plants, etc In residence
or periodical checks Faculty
Recomendations Write 14 Jar
vis Hall, ECU. Greenville
LEARN TO FLY: Van Air Inc.
Located Greenville Airport
Reasonable Rates Call 75 308
BROUGHT TO THE ENTIRE CAMPUS BY OUR SPONSORS AT:
The East Carolinian
Serving I he campus communil
since lv2?
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
iear and every Wednesday dur
,ng me summer
The East Carolinian s me of
f ic ial newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned.
operated, and pupiished tor and
by the students of Eas' Carolina
Universit-
Subscription Rate 520 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located m the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU.
Greenville, N.C
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carolinian.
Old South Build'ng ECU Green
ville. NC 27834
Telephone 75734. 437. 4309
Application to mail at second
class postage rates is pending at
Greenville, North Carolina.
GREENVILLE BODY SHOP
DOMINO'S PIZZA
INTER-FRATERNITY COUNCIL
MARATHON RESTAURANT
KING'S SANDWICH
GENERAL HEATING & PLUMBING
PHARO'S FINE FOODS
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FOR HEADS ONLY
ELBO ROOM
FAMOUS PIZZA
For just one dollar you could fly down to
fl Nassau for the weekend, stay in the
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Hotel, gamble in! the world famous
Playboy Club, relax j on the crystal
shores alnd sip exotic j tropical drinks,
1 most exquisite restaurants,
have thej time of your life.
dine at the
and
ALL FOR JUST ON DOLLAR
Go I jforitij Buy a
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starting
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Featuring Alan
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For
more info call:
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Be there � Aloha!
SSf






Title
The East Carolinian, March 25, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 25, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.188
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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