The East Carolinian, March 16, 1982






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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 16, 1982
Announcements
J
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organiiation
would like to have an item printed
In the announcements column
please send the announcement (as
brief as possible) typed and
double-spaced to The East Caroli
man in care of the production
manager
For better service, we are rjow
asking that you pick up several
copies of our new announcement
application for your upcoming
events.
There is no charge for an
nouncements. bu' space is often
limited Therefore we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as vou want
and suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column for publicity.
The deadline for announcements
is 5 p m Friday for the Tuesday
papesr and 5pm Tuesday for the
Thursday paper
This space is available to all
campus organisations and depart
merits
SOCIAL WORK
ANDCORRECTIONS
The Department of Social Work
Correctional Services at Eas'
Carolina University will offer a
course of particular interest to
staff members and administrators
in human service organizations
such as mental retardation
centers, psychiatric hospitals,
mental health centers, home
health agencies, departments of
social services, correctional
facilities and programs and to
selected undergraduate and
graduate students. The course,
SOCW 5000 Organization and
Management ol Social Service
Agenices will be taught by Dr
Walter F Lamendola
For additional information
about admission to the course and
registration procedures please
contact the Department of Social
Work Correctional Services, 314
Allied Health Building The course
has tentatively been scheduled to
meet from 2 3 15 on Tuesday and
Thursday but this may be changed
upon sufficient demand
SURFCLUB
Meeting wed (March 17) at 7
p m in the Coffeehouse.
MendenhaU Contest this
weekend Bring all your ticket
money! This meeting is very im
portant so be there! Aloha
ISA
There will be an international
Students Association meeting at
the International House (306 E 9th
Street! behind McDonalds' on
Saturday, March 20 at 3 p m. All
interested students are invited
PHI KAPPATAU
LITTLE SISTERS
Tnere will be a Little Sister
Hush on Tuesday and Wednesday,
March 16 and 17, at 9 30 There
will be a mee'inq anpm each
night ah Little Sisters are ex
pectea to attend
SOULS
Souls will have its annual Miss
Souls Pageant on Sunday. March
28 at 7 p m All interested ladies
are asked to submit applications
by Friday, Feb 26 to any Soul's of
ficer For further information con
tact Barbara Battle at 758 9550
AMA
The American Marketing
Association will hold a meeting on
Wednesday, March 17 in
MendenhaU Room 221 at 4 p.m All
members are encouraged to
come! Please, be sure to bring one
dollar it you would like to order a
shirt
ALL SING
Alpha Xi Delta would like to re
mind all Fraternities and
Sororities that the 1982 All Sing
will be on Thursday. March 25 We
hope to see everyone there
PPHA 4
The Preprotessional Health
Al ,nce (PPHA) will have a
meeting this Thursday, March IB
This meeting will be held at 530
p m at The Afro American
Cultural Center AM members and
any other interested parties are
urged to attend
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
The Physical Education
Physical and Motor Fitness Test
will be administered in Minges
Colsieum at 1 p m on Tuesday.
April 27 (Reading Day). Satisfac
tory performance on this test is re
quired as a prerequisite lor of
ficial admittance to the Physical
Education maiors program
Satisfactory performance is also
required on this test before one is
allowed to student teach More
detailed information concerning
the test is available by calling
757 6497
PHI SIGMA PI
Tau Chapter of Ph. Sgma Pi Na
tionai Honor Fraternity wH meet
at6pm Wednesday in 132 Austin
CORSO
To all Correction and Social
Work maiors and intended ma
jors CORO is proud to sponsor
Wilson's Director of Social Ser
vices, Jerry White, as he speaks
on "Social Worker's Look s
Children's Homes " Please ioin
Thurs . March 18 at 7 p m
auditorium Refreshments will be
served'
HONORS SEMINAR
Honors Seminar i36 HSEMl
2070 Psychology Will be offered
fall semester 1982 at 9 30 10 45
TTh Dr Steve Tacker will in
struct the course in seminar tor
mat The 3s h course will parallel
the PSYC 1050 51 introductory
courses it is no' open to students
who have completed those
courses it is open to Honors
students only lor social science or
elective credit HSEM 2070 was m
advertently omitted from the
schedule in the newspaper
EL SALVADOR
Any students, faculty, or stall
mteres'eo in pa'T.opatmg m The
ECU Committee on F. i Salvador
are welcome to rome to our
meeting on Wednesday evening at
9pm at the Baptist Student
Center For more information.
call 752 1002
DAT
The Dental Aptitude Test Will be
ottered a' East Carolina Universi
1y on Saturday. April 17, 1982 Ad
plicat.on blanks are to be mailett
in time to be received by the Divi
Sion of Educational
Measurements. American Dental
Association 211 East Chicago
Ave , Chicago, Illinois 60011 by
Marcn 22, 1982 Applications may
be obtained from the ECU Testing
Center, Speight Building,
Room 105
GRE
The Graduate Record Examma
tion will be offered a' East
Carolina University on Saturday,
April 24, 1982 Application blanks
are to be completed and mailed to
Educational Testing Service, Box
966 R, Princeton, NJ 08540 Ap
plications must be postmarked no
later than March 19, 1982 Applied
tions may be obtained from the
ECU Testing Center, Room 105,
Speight Bu'idmg
Bahama
Mama '82
FALL SEMESTER 1982
ROOM RESERVATION
SIGN-UP INFORMA-
TION
Students who plan to return to
East Carolina University Fall
Semester 1982 and who wish to be
guaranteed residence hall housing
are required to reserve rooms dur-
ing the week of March J2-26. Prior
to reserving a room, a student
must make an advance room pay-
ment of W0 These payments,
which must be accompanied by
housing application contracts will
be accepted in the Cashier's Of
fice. Room 105, Spilman Building,
beginning March 18. Application
contracts may be obtained from
the residence hall offices as of
March 16.
Room reservations are to be
made in the respective residence
hall offices according to the
following schedule (Exceptions:
Assignments for Fleming Hall will
be made in office in Jarvis Hall
and those for Umstead Hall will be
made m Slay Hall.)
Monday, March 22 and Tuesday,
March 23: Students who wish to
return to same rooms they
presently occupy must reserve
such rooms
Wednesday, March 24 through
Friday, March 25: All other retur
n.ng students will be permitted to
reserve rooms on a first come,
first serve basis
The hours for room assignments
will be
8 30 am to 12:30 p m
1 30pm to 4 00 p m
Returning students enrolled Spr
ing Semester will have priority for
residence hall housing for Fall
Semester 1982 only if they reserve
'ooms during the week of March
? 26 Based on this, returning
. 'udents who do not reserve rooms
dumg the week of March 22 26 pro
bably will be unable to live on
campus Fan Semester
THE WALK
"The Walk" is only 2 weeks
away Sign up to "walk" or soon
sor a friend The 11th Annual
"CROP WALK FOR HUMANI
TY" will be held on April 3 at 8 30
a m The money raised will be us-
ed to help poor countries become
sell sufficient. Church World Ser
vice and The ECU Hunger Coali
tion are working together on the
"walk" sign up cards will be
available from ECU campus
ministers or from tables to be set
up on campus next week More
more information call 752 42)6 or
come to our meetings at 7 30 p m
on Thursdays at the Newman
House
Coming
Be There
Aloha!
WATERSKIERS
All serious recreational and
competetive waterskiers In-
terested in beginning a waterski
dub on campus please contact
Tracy Watson at 238 Aycock,
phone 758 8895 by March II.
MCAT
The Medical College Admission
Test will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday,
April 24, 1982 Application blanks
are to be completed and mailed to
the American College Testing Pro-
gram, P.O. Box 414, lowa City,
Iowa 52240, to arrive by March 19.
1982. Application blanks are
available at the Testing Center,
Speight Building, Room 105 East
Carolina university
ACTING
Stephen B Finnan, formerly of
ECU'S Drama and Speech Depart
ment will be teaching an adult
class in Beginning Acting starting
Saturday, March 20, at the
Methodist Student Center, 5th and
Holly Streets. The class will meet
for ten consecutive Saturdays
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and will in
voive a registration fee of tt. For
further information, call Mr Fin
nan at 757 3546
UNITED NATIONS
Going to New York City for the
2nd United Nations Special Ses
sion on Disarmament? A group of
ECU students, faculty and staff
will be and an are invited to
ptlgramidge with us. We have a
local campaign working on the UN
proiect that meets on Friday even
ngsat6 30p.m We meet at 610 S.
Elm Si For further information
call 758 4906
BAHAMA MAMA '82
The 19(2 Bahama Mama Party
sponsored by the Kappa Sigma
Fraternity will be held Thursday,
April 1, 198 starting at 8 p.m. at
he Kappa Sigma across from
Unstead dorm on 10th Street.
Grand Prize is an all expense paid
trip to Nassau, Bahamas. Tickets
are SI � piece on sale now For in
formation call 752 5543.
PITT COUNTY HEALTH
FAIR
The East Carolina University
School of Medicine is recruiting
nonmedical and medical
volunteers for the Pitt County
Health Fair. The Health Fair is be
ing sponsored in conjunction with
WRAL TV and will be held Thurs
day, April 22 through Saturday
April 24 at Carolina East Mall in
Greenville.
The hours for the Health fair will
be from 10:00 a.m. until 8:00 p.m.
If you are interested in working a
shift as a volunteer, please contact
Barbara Berman or Ann Dill at
the Office of Health Services
Research and Development, ECU
School of Medicine, 757 6510 or
757 6735.
BEST TAN
Alpha Omicron Pi Sorority will
be sponsoring a "Best Tan" Con
test at the Elbow Room the Tues
day after Spring Break, March 16.
So enjoy the sun and tun over Spr
ing Break 1982 and then come
down to the Elbo the 16th and show
us your tan!
SOCIAL WORK
The Department of Social Work
and Correctional Services at East
Carolina University will offer
courses during the first summer
session of 1982, beginning May 17
and running through June 22,
which will be of interest to profes
sionals in the human service field,
ministers, lay persons, and to
students preparing to enter these
fields.
SocW 4001: Death and Dying
deals with loss, bereavement, and
coping with terminal illness. It is
designed to assist in understan
dmg of the conditions and pro
blems involved m facing death,
dying and survivorship.
Awareness, values, and attitudes
are stressed as they relate to pro
fessional practice.
SocW 5001: Human Behavior
and the Social Environment is
designed to assist individuals in
the development of a social
systems concept of the bid
psycho social elements of man's
being Emphasis is given to
deeper self awareness of one's
own behavior, attitudes , beliefs
and values as they relate to profes
sionai practice.
The courses will meet a
minimum of seven and one half
hours each week The time will be
announced. Students may be
allowed to indicate scheduling
preferences.
For information about applica
tion andor registration you may
write or call:
Department of Social Work and
Correctional Services
School fo Allied Health and
Social Professions
312 Carol Belk BuHding
East Carolina University
Greenville, N.C 27834
(919 757 6961)
BINGOICECREAM
There will be a Bingoice Cream
Party for al ECU students, faculty
and staff and their dependents on
Tuesday. March 16 in the Muiti
Purpose Room of Mendennaii Stu
dent Center from 7.00 PM 8 30
PM. Play bingo, eat ice cream,
win prizes and have fun ail ab
soiutely free! !
PREPPY PROGRAM
REFUNDS
If you have not yet turned in
your tickets for the Official Prep
py Program with Lisa Birnbach
(originally scheduled for
February 9). you must do so by
Friday, March 19 You can get
your refund by bringing your
ticket by the Central Ticket Office
in MendenhaU Monday through
Friday from 10 a m to 4 p m
There will be NO refunds after
March 19 Agam, we apologize for
the cancellation
GROUNDZERO
Get involved � A campus pro
ject to discuss and look for ways to
avoid Nuclear War Numerous
campus groups will be involved m
this most crucial issue during
"Ground Zero Week" April 18 to
25. Plan a program, hold a study
group, or join some other groups
already working on proiects For
further information call 752 4216
ILO
The International Language
Organization will be having a
meeting on March 17 at 2 p m m
BC 301 Elections for next year s
officers will be held and an
members must attend All m
terested people are welcome to at
tend
BOWLING
"SPRING" into action with
receation a' Mendenhai Student
Center Specials scheduled
throughout the Spring Semester
offer something for everone For
conplete information visit the
recreational area at MendenhaU
or call 757 6611. Ext 260
Specials include
DISCOUNT DAYS lJ OFF reg
prices�3'00 PM 5 30 PM
Billards and Table Ten
nis Tuesdays
Bowlmq Fridays
RED PIN BOWLING 7 00
PM 10 00 PM. every Sunday
Chance to win one ll) FREE
GAME with everi game bowled
FACULTY STAFF DAY Every
Wednesday from 5 00 PM 8 00
PM ECU faculty and stall MSC
members may bowl 2 games and
get a 3rd game free
MOONLIGHT BOWLING Sun
days 5 00 PM 7 00 PM Bow! in
moonlight' and have a Chanci "
win a FREE GAME One winner
each hour at fne Bowling Center
RENT A
LANE- Saturdays 17 00 N 6 00
PM S3 00 per hour per lane
REVIVAL
The Fountain of Life Christian
Fellowship will be having its an
nual Spring Revival March 18 'V
and 20 m Jenkins Auditor,urr
Various speakers and chdrs w
be present each n.gnt Ser.
start each night at 7 00 p m and
everyone is invited to attend
BAHA'I
A general meeting of the
BAHA'I Association ol ECU w
be held tonight al J pm il
msc Coffeehouse
and anyone interested in � �
about the BAHA � � '�
welcome to attend For 'nor.
formationall '58 9530 '�' '47 I
ST. PATRICK'S DAY
The Recreation Students of ECU
are planning a St Patrick's Day
Celebration for residents and
fam.ly of Greenviile V'lla Nu'Sing
Home The event will take place
March 17 at 7 p m in the dining
room Pieftse come! There
food, prizes and fon1
The East C arolinian
Serving tkt emmpta � ommumii
MKI
Published every Tuesday ano
Thursday during the ad
year and every Wednesday au'
ing the summer
The East Carolinian is �
f.oal newspaper of Eas'
Carolina Univeri fy wneo
operated, ano published for and
by the students of East Carol,na
University
Subscription Rate $20 year w
The East Carolinian officer
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus ol ECU
Greenville, N C
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The Eas' Care
Old South Building.
ville, NC 27834
Telephone 7S7 6364. 6367 630V
Application to mail at second
class postage rates is pending at
Greenville. North Carolina
INTERVARSITY
Hope you all had a god Spring
Break Let s start the last half of
the semester out right Come to In
tervarsity Christian Fellowship
Wednesday night at 7 30 in Room
221 of MendenhaU Buddy Medlon
will speak this week on "Why
Christianity is Unique "
SGA
Applications for (82 83) Honor
Council menbers ar being taken
m the SGA Office, 228 MendenhaU
Student Center Between 8 00 a.m.
and 5 00 p m . Monday thru Fn
day
COOP
The Cooperative Education Of
fice, located m 313 Rawl Building,
currently has lOb openings for Fall
'83 Interested students should
stop by today to complete the
necessary forms and to sign up 'or
interviews
NIH A representative from
the National Institutes of Health.
Bethesda. MO will be on campus
March 22 and 23 to interview
�turt�n' Mho wotd Ufc. to work in
a clinical setting as Normal
Volunteers Students will be paid
daily stipends All interested
students must attend a general
meeting ai 730 p.m. on Monday,
March 22 before having inter
views
Navy A representative from
the Navy Civilian Personnel Office
will be on campus March 23 and 24
to interview students Jobs are
available throughout the US
They are primarily interested in
the following majors Business.
Computer Science, Psychology,
Sociology, Accounting Finance,
industrial Technology, and Prin
ting Management Related majors
are also encouraged to apply
Japanese Courtesy Aimed At Compensation
By PATRICK O'NEILL
SUff Writer
Imagine a part
malfunctioning on your
car resulting in a fatal
accident and killing one
of your family
members riding with
you. Would you expect
the president of Ford,
General Motors, or
some other corporation
to pay your family a
personal visit to
apologize and pay
homage on his knees?
Well, that's what
recently happened in
Japan when Yasumoto
Takagi, president of
Japan Air Lines,
"embarked on a so-
journ of obligation" to
the 24 families who lost
loved ones in a recent
air crash.
It is the expected
common,behavior of a
top corporate exec-
utive to personally
apologize to the vic-
tim's family and join in
the eulogy praying. As
of yet none of the 24
families have filed suits
to gain compensation
from the airline.
Negotiations will be
conducted n a family-
to-family basis and
compensation will be
given after various fac-
tors are considered,
such as the victims'
age, salary, and their
responsibilities to their
families. Liability com-
pensation for air
crashes, although now
legally limited to
$140,000, is always
negotiable, according
to a Japan Air Lines
spokesman.
"Generally they (the
Japanese) place a much
higher value on social
harmony then on the
rights of the in-
dividual said Carl J.
ATTIC
Souths
No. 6
Rock
Nightclub
TUESDAY; MARCH 16
FOUR TH A NNUA L SPRING ZING
WING DING FLING THING
THRUSH
?FREE ADMISSION FOR
ECU STUDENTS
LOTS AND LOTS OF PRIZES
DISCOUNT BEER DISCOUNT BEER
WED, MARCH 17
SKIP CASTRO
?REDUCED ADMISSION FOR
ECU STUDENTS
AOT
"NO
MORE
MR.NICE
guy:
"I'm not my old lovable
self when I'm around
cigarettes. I get real
cranky. So 1 want ali you !
smokers to quit once
and for all. And who
knows? You might even
put a smile on my face
American Cancer Society i
presents
BEST TAN
CONTEST
Prizes:
1st � $75.00
Tuesday, March 16
plus weekend for two at Atlantic Beach
wJet Ski Rentals 1 yr. free pass to the ELBO
2nd � $50.00
plus keg � plus 1 yr. free pass
to the ELBO
3rd � - $25.00 "Si'SET,rM
Admission � $1 00 plus PrlIes ,or �'� other contestants
Doors open at 1:30 Contestants can sign up at Student Book Store Lobby
Entries sign up at ELBO AM DaV Thursday. Friday, and Monday
SIS;
by:
�' Design
"ft
Overtoil's
Jock's Stack House
Jeffries Boer & Wine
SportsworM
oooy anoppe
Jomtoit's Stables
Flower Basket
Toads Stereo
Heart' Delight
Morgan Printers
Apple Records
Sammy's Country Cooking
Green, a Washington,
D.C. attorney and
senior research fellow
at the Harvard Law
School. Green
specializes in the
Japanese legal system.
"In Japan suing is a
last resort Green
said. The Japanese
"don't like to sharpen
the conflict un-
necessarily
Green also aded that
monetary damages are
only part of the com-
pensation. "People are
less mad and less likely
to squeeze every dollar
of compensation out of
the legal system (in
Japan)
In contrast, 12 suits
have already been filed
by families of the vic-
tims in the Jan. 13 Air
Florida crash in
Washington, D.C. kill-
ing 78 people.
Just over 160,000
civil suits were filed in
Japan in 1979, accor-
ding to an article in i he
New York Times,
"while the comparable
total in the United
States was several
million Japan also
only has approximately
10,000 lawyers com-
pared to nearly 500,000
in the United States.
This "lack of
litigiousness in Japan is
often cited as an
economic advantage
said the Times story.
"The Japanese, it is
said, do not spend
much time, money, or
energy suing each other
but, instead, concen-
trate on outproducing
other nations
Japan has a cohesive
culture and has tradi-
tionally shunned open
confrontation that
could often lead to law
suits.
"The Japanese
prefer traditional
methods of conflict
resolution said
Green. He noted
"conciliation, media-
tion and alike
Green added that in-
dividuals identify with
a group. "Groups are
much more important
(in Japan)
Negotiations for
compensation generally
will go more smoothlv
because of the Japanese
corporations' will-
ingness to bear legal as
well as moral respon-
sibilities for a misfor-
tune.
In the Japanese
airline case it was deter-
mined that the Japar
Air lines pilot, Seiji
Katagiri, was responsi-
ble for the accident
when he suffered an
emotional breakdown
during the landing.
Something
Personal To Say'
r
Whisper It In
Our Classitieds
r
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
SHOP AT
OVERTON'S
AND SAVE
PIRATE COUPON
5 DISCOUNT
on all orders $10.00
or more.
Expires 3-20-82.
Student Name.
ID Number
Amt. of Purchase.
"I
I
i
I
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J
211 Jarvis St.
2 Blocks from ECU
Overton s
Supermarket, Inc.
'Home of Greenville's Best Meats"
Coupons will expire Saturday night
of the week they are run.

This week expires 3-20-82
t
! h VN
Novei
numl
quart
anticil
He
plans
the r
dustril
!
usual!
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THh LAST CAROt INIAN MARCH 16. 1982
nan
dV
In
leds
Job Prospects Grim
Continued From Page 1
thwestern.
'Changes occurred from
November (when the Endicott
numbers were gathered) to the first
quarter of this year that were not
anticipated Lindquist explained.
He blamed the changes in hiring
plans on rocky economic times in
the retailing, metals and oil in-
dustries.
'The basic metals industries are
usual!) heavy recruiters, and they
are barely holding their own this
ear Lindquist observed. "The oil
industry, which has had enormous
growth the last few years, has had to
pull back this year in response to
falling gas prices. They are tradi-
tionally heavy recruiters, and it has
caught many by surprise
Virginia Benfield, manager of
college recruiting for Fexaco, Inc
confirmed that "last year, no one in
the industry expected the economy
to be this bad
She said she anticipated "our hir-
ing will fall short of our projec-
tions but she said Texaco, for
one, is "just leveling off at a more
predictable rate of hiring
The continuing problems of the
auto industry have also depressed
campus recruiting, especially in the
midwest.
"Some of our regulars are tied to
the automotive industry, and that
has been a problem said Pat
Markle of Western Kentucky
University. "Some of our regulars
just aren'1 hiring, and some of the
recruiters who set up dates to inter-
view have had to call and cancel
"I tell them to come back when
thev can see daylight again she ad-
ded.
Such reports contradict most of
the student job market predictions
made just last fall.
The Endicott Report predicted ac-
celerated campus recruiting in many
industries, with average starting
salaries rising nine percent. The Col-
lege Placement Council's survey of
551 recruiters also uncovered
widespread corporate expectations
o' increased college hiring. The an-
nual Michigan State survey o' 428
businesses, however, cautioned that
"pockets of prosperity" would
balance out hiring declines in some
industries.
It is turning out differently. Hir-
ing of even highly-prized engineer-
ing majors is meerly "holding
steady according to Johns
Hopkins placement head Sharon
Baughan. Baughan did caution that
"it's too early to make statistical
comparisons" to last year.
"A recent increase in the numbers
of chemical engineering students has
brought in new interest from steel
and related industries she added.
Generally, the placement officers
credit defense-related industries'
recruiting with keeping student in-
terview traffic close to last year's
levels.
"Twenty to 25 percent of the
overall defense spending increases
will directly benefit California
said Cal State-Sacramento's Mit-
chell, "and it shows
"Recruitment is up three-to-five
percent in technical areas, and I
would guess it's up over 50 percent
in defense-related industries he
said. "Instead of sending one
recruiter, the defense-related com-
panies are sending in three or four.
They're going into the classrooms
and dorms to seek students out
At Johns Hopkins, the defense-
related firms are also "doing a brisk
business Baughan said. But at
Yanderbilt, Sellers reported "they
seem to be keeping it close to the
chest
Across the country, Lindquisl
says "prime defense contractors are
showing outstanding strength, and
so are those who supply them
The military itself has stepped up
recruiting, especially of liberal arts
majors. However. Mitchell said that
student desires "for something a lit-
tle more glamorous than the armed
forces" has inspired a renewed in-
terest in other government agencies.
"Applications to the CIA are wav.
way up
CIA recruitment chief Charles
Jackson confirmed "we are very ac-
tively recruiting
When it comes to liberal arts ma-
jors, "we're trying to widen our net
a little But "someone with a
general background needs the best
G.P.A must be a top-of-the-line
student
Jackson attributes the rise in ap-
plications less to a fallout from
military recruiting and more to an
improved CIA image. "Our bad
press is behind us now
Student job competition seems to
be stiffer in all fields. Because of ris-
ing unemployment among older
workers, Lindquist said he thinks
"it's valid to say students will be
competing with a greater number of
older, experienced job seekers this
year. The advantage goes to the
kids, whose education in new
technologies makes them more cur-
rent in the marketplace
M.l.T. Placement Director
Robert Weatherall agreed, saying
mobility is the major competitive
edge students have.
"Often a person with a mortgage
and a family can't afford to move.
But all that a student generally
needs is a damage deposit and a
IHaul trailer
But I indquist warned stiffer com-
petition requires students to adopt
"a whole new perspective on the
recruitment process. The days are
gone when they can throw as much
bullshit on the wall as they can, and
wait to see what sticks
ECU Retirees Student Emergency Fund Established
Photo By MARIANNE BAINES
Retired faculty members celebrated ECU! 75th anniversary on Founder's Da, March 8, b presenting a $7,500
gift to establish a permanent student financial aid fund. Interest-free emergency loans will be administered b the
student financial aid office with "no strings attached according to Dr. Richard C. Todd (far right), who headed
the retired faculty committee. Also pictured are (left to right) Dr. Henry Wanderman, acting chancellor Dr. John
M. Howell, Dr. Mildred Southwick, Elizabeth Drake, Louise Williams, Lawrence Brewster and Lee Williams.
the No. 3
Marshall
Dillon
ex. thatfs
the No. 3 Marshall
Old standards never fade
away; they seem to get better
and better. And like Marshall
Dillon, the No. 3 Marshall at
Western Sizzlin is a long time
standard. Broiled sirloin tips
with bell peppers and onions,
served with your choice of
potato, baked
or fried, and
Texas toast
OnoeyouVe
tried the No.
3 Marshall,
you are sure
to be back
again and
again to West
ern Sizzlin.
NO. 3
BEEF
TIPS
WITH PEPPERS
AND ONIONS
ONLY
izzun
.10 W. Greenville Blvd.
J.A. UNIFORMS
SHOP
All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes,
shoes, and hose. Also � used ECU
nurses uniforms. Trade-ins allowed.
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off AAemor lal Drive.
Near Hollowell's Drug and old hospital.
s
The Best Pizza in Town � Honest
Drive-Up
Window for
To Go Orders
Every Day - Butt 11:00-2:0�2.79
Mon. & Tu�l. - Buffet 50-8:00 2.89
Wed. - "AM YoeCoeEef'Spoakeiti $4000 2.25
Tkura. - Lasogna 54000Twofor3.$0
THURSDAY, MARCH 18
BIKINI CONTEST
Doors open at 9:00
1st PRIZE � $100 plus merchandise
2nd PRIZE � $50 plus merchandise
3rd PRIZE �$25 plus merchandise
Interested participants call 355-2615
EM SHOE SHOP
II3W4THSTHEET PHONE 758 0204
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
2 DOORS FROM COX FLORIST
We repair Shoes, Boots, Hand
bags, Belts and some suitcases.
We now have Leather and
Leather Goods for sell.
Large selection ot leather tooled belts
Come by P'Ck out one ot our desiqns Let
us makp you one
With the price ot NEW SHOES, we can
save you money by havinq your old ones
repaired
.i �
Gl Camouflaged Fatigues and
T Shirts. Sleeping Bags.
Backpacks Camping Equip
ment, Steel Toed Shoes.
Dishes and over 700 Different
Items. Cowboy Boots S3 �5
ARMY-NAVY
STORE
I SOI S Evans
m
h
anjfe�
�ccn
ABORTIONS
I 24 week terminations
App'ts. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1-800-321-0575
� � �
It M . it Print!
� r � � � .
�� ' i
MORGAN PRINTERS
INC
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 16
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
1185 00 Pregnancy Test. Birth
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling For fur
ther information call 832 0533
(Toll Free Number
800 221 2S�8) between v AM
and 5 P M Weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
�17 West Morgan St
Raleigh, N C
PLAZA
DENS
GREENVILLE'S NEWEST BANQUET
AND PARTY FACILITY
(FORMERLY BALLENTINE'S BUFFET
PITT PLAZA. GPEENVILLE)
Winter & Spring
��FORMALS
MEETINGS
BANQUETS
COMPLETE M)OI NhK 1(1 , All B1 I
SPECIALIZING IN CM IslDIAll KIM,
Ik
tall BOB SAL TLR
355-2361 OR 756-0842
COHVtNIIHT LOCATION AmPLI f'AfclUNCi
J

u
JP cf r4G

c

s

yj
?
r
9
6 - liSjr
ATTENTION
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
REQUESTING
FUNDS FROM THE S.G.A.
The SGA recently approved an annual budget resolution. Student groups
requesting funds from the SGA are allowed to submit a budget for the
1982-83 school year for consideration by the Spring SGA Legislature. The
budgets must be submitted by 5:00 p.m. Monday, March 22, 1982, to the
SGA office.
When the budget is reviewed and approved, funds will be available at the
beginning of the fiscal year (July 1, 1982). Budgets not submitted by March
22 will not be considered by the Legislature until the Fall Semester.
No funds will be appropriated over the summer months except for summer
projects or cases with special circumstances as determined by summer
legislature.
IN ALL CASES BUDGETS MUST BE SUBMITTED ACCORDING TO
STATE LINE-ITEM CODES.
Copies of line-item codes and SGA appropriations guidelines are available on
request in the SGA office.
TUESDAY
THRUSH
4th Annual Spring
Zing Wing Ding Fling Thing
WEDNESDAY
SKIP CASTRO
THURSDAY
� � PKM � �
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
EAZE
SUNDAY
Soiree De La Fern me
� Eaze � Kidd Blast �
Driver



11
im
TUES. - LADIES' NITE
wGENTLEMAN JIM & PIZZA SPECIAL
WED. - SALAD BAR SPECIAL
THURS. - SPAGHETTI SPECIAL
FRI. - HAPPY HOUR 4-7
WINE SPEC. - SMOKEY & STEVE
SAT. - HAPPY HOUR 4-7
WINE SPEC. - BRUCE FRYE
SUN. - LASAGNA SPECIAL
MON. - COUNTRY COOKING
EAST CAROLINA S
PARTY CENTER
Welcome
Back
E.C.U.
Students
TUESDAY
BEST TAN CONTEST
WEDNESDAY
HUMP NITE
THURSDAY
COLLEGE NITE
BULLPEN NITK
1st beverage � 25 wtichet stub
from ECU baseball game � Thurs March
FRIDAY
END OF WK. PARTY
SATURDAY
BEST IN DANCE MUSIC
SUNDAY
LADIES' NITE
111111 i
I I I I I I I M I I I I I I X I I I 1 I 1
I
Open
Mon. Sat.
� :30a.m.
I 00a.m
It takes 12 inches
to make a hero . . .
Deli Sandwich - Salads -
Veajtorian Sandwiches
H�.�.�-ride Sount Heroes on tresM baked rolls
WEDNESDAY
HARRY & SCRAPPY
THURSDAY
KURT FORTMEYER
SATURDAY
TERRY SILVESTER
(farewell experience)
NOW OPEN SUNDAYS
Good food � Good Times
VIDEOGAMES
Attitude Adiustment Daily � a.m. 7 p.m
(EljapfrrX
' 'Eastern North Carolina's
No. I Beach Club"
TUESDAY
Zoo Nile � 25C ponies
WEDNESDAY
Ladies' Night
Free Draft for
all ladies'
THURSDAY
Happy Hour � Free
Free Admission till 10
25 Ponies till 11.
FRIDAY AFTERNOON
END OF THE WEEK
BUCKET PARTY
SUNDAY
NICKEL NITE
Call 752 �74S tor mare info.
r-ffp�Rfir-
109 E. 5th St. 752 1361
GOOD TIMES
MARCH 20th
SKIP & FRIENJDS
Darts Mon. at 8:00
Free Pinball 3-4
Happy Hour 4-7
Largest selection
of imports
Mow opendays a wee � 3 p.m. 1 a.m.
M� EAST Sth STREET
7M 0711
Cartoon Contest
Call f or details �752:8711
NOW OPEN FOR
HAPPY HOUR
DAILY AT 4:30
Not open to the general public.
r





QUje Saat (Earaltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Jimmy Dupree, smmmcm
Charles Chandler, �����,� �,�
Ric Browning, o,mwoj Advtnwnt Tom Hall, � �,
Fielding Miller, Bui��, Ma William Yelverton, SPor,s mm
Alison Bartel, ��� mmm Steve Bachner, ����,�,�,�, Edllor
Steve Moore, cmuh Mon�fr Diane Anderson, so ����
March 16. 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Lady Pirates
Slow Start Leads To Blazing Finish
Sometimes persistence does pay
off.
For example, consider East
Carolina's Lady Pirate basketball
squad.
After a disappointing 62-56 loss
to nationally ranked N.C. State in
their second outing of the season,
the Lady Pirates suffered back-to-
back losses to Villanova and New
Hampshire in the Montclair State
Dial Classic. Later, a four game
road trip netted only an 80-61 win
over Miami of Ohio in the Miami
(FL) Hurricane Classic.
Just 11 games into the 1981-82
campaign they were down to eight
players from the original roster of
11 with a dismal 4-7 record.
Many people had written off this
season as a rebuilding year for
fourth year head coach Cathy An-
druzzi. The loss of veterans Kathy
Riley, Laurie Sikes, Marcia Girven,
Lydia Rountree and Heidi Owen
had certainly taken its toll.
Skeptics figured the Lady Pirates
would do well to finish with an even
record; a winning record would be
exceptional.
But a berth in the first NCAA
women's tournament � ludicrous.
DOONESBURY
To accomplish this a team would
have to win at least 13 of their last
15 games, including upsets over
Virginia (64-62), then North
Carolina (71-66) and later N.C.
State (68-60). It would also have to
hold national powers Old Dominion
and South Carolina to within 10
points (72-63 and 86-81, respective-
ly). All this would have to be topped
with an even more convincing win
over North Carolina (92-72) in the
season finale.
That's all it took for the Lady
Pirates to be invited to Columbia,
S.C. for the opening round of the
tourney.
Those supporters whose loyalty
aided the youthful Lady Pirates
through through their 17-10 cam-
paign were not upset when they fell
to South Carolina 79-54 Sunday.
No, 1981-82 was not a banner
season in terms of statistical ex-
cellance. But it was a remarkable
year for the development of the
identity of women's basketball at
East Carolina.
It would have been easy tc con-
ceed this season to the old excuse of
rebuilding, but excuses don't draw
crowds � winners do.
lay Garry Trudeau
Divine Guidance Through Vietnam
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Of PANASHER.MHOHASJVST
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SHOUSOME
CLASS.

By DAVID ARMSTRONG
You may have been enlightened, as 1
was, by the recent news that the late Lyn-
don Johnson felt he was visited by the Ho-
ly Ghost before he died. President
Johnson, according to a new biography,
received these divine visitations at critical
junctures in his presidency, usually when
he was planning to scalate the war in Viet-
nam. Does this mean that God is a hawk?
Apparently so. Unbeknownst to the
Supreme Being � who, contrary to
previous reports, can't really be
everywhere, and know everything � L.BJ
taped his conversations with the Supreme
Commander by hitting a little button � a
little red button, I believe � under his
desk. He wanted to record those conversa-
tions for posterity. Well, we're posterity.
Don't we have the right to know what went
on? 1 believe we do.
Not to brag, but I've got tapes. I flipped
Bob Woodward for them and won. Here
are some excerpts. I believe you'll agree
they show U.S. foreign policy in a new
light � a pure, white, shinine light.
GOD: Lvndon?
LBJ: It's You!
GOD: Damn right.
LBJ: Dear God, what should I do? The
kids are rioting in the streets again, and the
Viet Cong are at the gates of Saigon, strik-
ing at the very vitals of our national securi-
ty. Should I bomb? Strafe? Hit 'em upside
the head?
GOD: Hit the kids upside the head, and
bomb and strafe the VC.
rCampus Forum
LBJ: Really? You think so?
GOD: SUre. Serve 'em right. Force: it's
the only thing they understand. Why, I
remember when I nuked Sodom and
Gomorrah
LBJ: You're always talking about the
good old days.
GOD: Hey, listen, in the old days, things
worked. I was Number One then.
LBJ: I want to be Number One now.
Just down here, of course.
GOD: Of course you do. And you're on
your way. You're president of all the peo-
ple.
LBJ: Not all the people. Some of 'em
don't like me. The coloreds, the sissies and
the draft-card burners, the VC
GOD: Then let them know who's boss.
They may not like you, but they'll respect
you. You'll send a few of them to me a lit-
tle early. From dust to dust, you know?
Escalate.
LBJ. Escalate? Who with � the
Marines? They're all smoking loco weed.
The Army? They're fragging their officers.
The Air Force?
GOD: The Air Force. Bomb Hanoi. Go
ahead, you know you want to. If anyone
asks, tell them I said it was OK.
LBJ: They'll never believe me, even
Lady Bird won't believe me, butbut,
maybe You're right.
GOD: Lyndon, I'm always right. How
do you think I got this job? Not to worry,
Lyndon. I'll fly every bombing run, lead
every calvary charge
LBJ: Wrong century. Boss.
GOD: Whatever. You get the picture.
I'll take Personal control. It'll be a
bloodletting to remember, that's for sure.
Did you ever hear that song "With God on
Our Side"? 1 rather like it. (Sings a few
bars). "And you don't count the dead
when God's on your side
LBJ: Catchy. A great idea, too. I will do
it. I will escalate. And if Hubert, the
sniveling little Yankee, objects
GOD: Great! I haven't had so much fun
since I made Alexander the Great in M
own image and smote the Egyptians I
can't wait! Well, I can, I can do anvthing.
but 1
LBJ: Thanks, God. I knew I could count
on you in my hour of darkest need
(Stretches out hand to press the fit.
There is no flesh. Pulls hand back.)
GOD: Hell's bells, boy think nothing of
it. In a few years, I'll be doing the same for
Ronnie Reagan. But for now, vou're the
only president they've got
LBJ: And you're the ony vjod Ve go
The tapes get a little tough to understand
here, what with all the thunderclaps and
stuff, but you get the idea. The ?6th presi-
dent did what he did on the best authority.
and although things didn't quite work out,
he gave it his best shot. And his best
bombs, and planes, and napalm and
chemical defoliants.
When Lyndon Johnson was evicted
form the White House in 1969, he found
he could still talk to God, but he had to
telephone and he was put on hold a lot. He
died in 1973. Can you imagine the conver-
sations they're having now?
'Greed, Bigotry, Narrow-Mindednessy Labels Rejected
Recently, I co-signed a letter to Cam-
pus Forum. It was attacked by an alum-
nus who associated us with neo-
conservatism and "greed, bigotry, and
narrow-mindedness" in our attitudes
towards certain special interest groups
(called minorities by some).
We accept the label neo-conservative
but reject the other accusations.
Ironically, I am a life-long, dues-paying
member of two of the so-called
minorfies I'm supposed to hate.
DENNIS KILCOYNE
Freshman, Political Science
JEFFRY JONES
Freshman, English
Drinking Age
I would like to inform the student
body of ECU and all of Nrth Carolina
that the governor's ofice may decide in
the near future to raise the legal drinking
age to 21. Why do this? There is a strong
conservative faction (specifically Chris-
tian Action Group) which is actively urg-
ing passage of the bill in Congress.
The reason for raising the drinking
age, in theory, is to curb traffic
fatalities. In fact, Governor Jim Hunt is
seeking election to the U.S. Senate and,
toward that end, he is trying to impress
North Carolina voters with a new, more
conservative image.
Raising the legal drinking age is ob-
viously unjust. Eighteen year olds, who
are considered adults in every other
aspect of life, are now about to be told
that, although they may drive, marry,
die for their country, etc they are too
young to drink. Adding insult to injury,
in all probability this issue will never
come to a public vote. Outside of any
moral, legal, and political implications,
passage of the bill would also entail
severe economic and other repercus-
sions, as follow:
1. The state will lose between five and
ten million dollars in sales and use tax.
2. New taxes will have to be im-
plemented in order to replace lost
revenue.
3. Close to 40,000 young people, most
of whom are college students, will lose
their jobs.
4. Obviously, the economies of small
college towns like Greenville and Chapel
Hill will suffer.
5. If Prohibition taught us anything, it
is that people who want to drink will
drink regardless of legalities. Instead of
paronizing bars, joyng people would lbe
forced to drive while drinking - this is
exactly what the law is supposed to pre-
vent.
Please register to vote when you go
home over spring break.
ROGER LAZZARINO
Senior, Business
El Salvadore
The courage in this paper given to
human needs and human sights issues
deserves much praise. Especially timely
are the articles (and letters to the editor)
on he issue of U.S. military aid to El
Salvador. This is a critical time, as Con-
gress is in Washington with the subject
of El Salvador's efforts to uphold
human rights on its immediate agenda.
Previously, Congress made continued
aid contingent on progress in this area.
Reagan attests to the ruling junta's pro-
gress, saying it "is making a concerted
and significant effort to comply with in-
ternationally recognized human rights
Church groups working in the area,
international human rights organiza-
tions, and most recently, three U.S.
Congressmen just returned from El
Salvdor, maintain otherwise. The con-
gressmen were quoted as saying that
Reagan's claim of improvement by the
junta was "simply and obviously false
The Reagan administration is using its
version of the facts to pursue a military
solution, while ignoring other avenues
towards peace such as negotiation. This
in-itself should raise our ire, as
Americans. The tremendous loss of life
(32,000 since the junta took power in
1979) should enrage us as human beings.
With these issues in mind, the Ecu Ad
Hoc Committee Opposed to El
Salvadoran Military Aid is holding a
silent vigil and prayer on campus.
We encourage your attendence Mon-
day at 12:40 in front of the Student
Store. Let your congressmen, senators,
and President know how you feel about
El Salvador. As noted above, critical
decisions on the matter are being made
even now.
RANDY ALLEY
Senior, Physics
Clear Opinions?
I don't know who Kim Albin is, nor
do I fully understand why she feels it is
important to inflict upon us her strident-
ly phrased opinions. Her article in the
February 25th East Carolinian, which
concerned the policies of James Watt,
was remarkable. A topic of great na-
tional importance, a topic on which
there are intelligent arguments on both
sides, is reduced in Ms. Albin's hands to
a vicious attack on millions of well-
meaning Americans. This is unfortunate
as it weakens her article and makes it
suspect.
Ms. Albin's probity in this article and
her command of the arguments involved
are distinctly underwhelming. At any
rate, if Ms. Albin continues to submit
her articles to The East Carolinian I
think she would be more effective if she
would forgo the almost hysterically
whining tone and simply state her opi-
nions as clearly as she is able.
DAVID R.HAWKINS
School of Music
EDTOR'S NOTE: Dr. Walter J.
Pories is the chairman of the department
of surgery at the ECU School of
Medicine. The cartoon below entitled
"A Short Poem" was submitted to
Campus Forum as his commentary on
WZMB.
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-
THE EAST CAROL IN1AN
Entertainment
MARCH 16. 1982
Page 5
John Belushi's
Untimely Death
Not Too Funny
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By MIKE HUGHES
Asislaal Sr�s tdtior
March 5, 1982: It was on that day
that news reports from coast to
coast heralded the death of a short-
lived legend. John Belushi, the
famous "crazy" of Animal House
and the hero of a generation, was
found dead at his $200-a-day
bungalow at the Chateau Marmont
hotel in Hollywood Hills.
But the tragedy of John Belushi's
death may extend further than the
fact that his fans will never again be
treated to his own unique brand of
lunacy.
The real tragedy lies in that
Belushi, like far too many other
entertainers, died as a result of a
drug overdose.
The grim news of the cause of
death was released on the night of
March 10, by Los Angeles coroner
Thomas Noguchi.
In a written statement, Noguchi
said that the actorsingercome-
dian died due to intravenous in-
jections of heroin and cocaine
known as "hardballing as it is in-
tended to give the user an extra kick.
Belushi, a Chicago native, was
buried at Martha's Vineyard,
Massachusetts on March 9. He is
survived by his widow, Judith
Jacklin.
The funeral service was attended
by Belushi's sidekick on stage and
screen, Dan Aykroyd, who led the
hazy procession on his motorcycle.
Bill Murray, a co-actor with Belushi
on Saturday Night Live until 1979,
also attended the ceremony.
Tears filled the eyes of the
relatively small group gathered at
Belushi's grave site, an ironic end
for a man who brought tears of
laughter to millions of Americans
for years.
Belushi's comic career got a ma-
jor lift while he was a member of the
Second City "improvisational"
troupe, based in Chicago. In 1972,
he was recommended for a part in
National Lampoon's Lemmings, an
Off-Broadway rock musical.
The production was swarmed
with favorable reviews, and rather
than the scheduled six-week stint,
the show remained in Greenwich
Village for 10 months.
Three years later, Lome
Michaels, the producer of what was
then called Saturday Night, invited
Belushi to join the unorthodox team
of actors in New York.
The rest is history.
National exposure and his own
uncountable talents brought Belushi
See DEATH, Page 6
Tokyo String Quartet Announced For y82- '83 Artists Series
The internationally acclaimed Tokyo String Quartet will he performing Serkin. This Thursday night at 8 p.m. in the Hendrix Theatre, guitarist
as part of next season's MSC Artists Series. Among those also slated Michael Lorimer will perform. Tickets are on sale at the Central Ticket
are Julius Baker, Joan Morris and William Bolcom, and pianist Peter Office, MSC.
First President's Piano Returns To University
By FRANCINE PERRY
Ml Nt� Bureau
Throughout Dr. Robert Wright's 25 years as Presi-
dent of East Carolina Teachers Training School and
East Carolina Teachers College, the mahogany Chicker-
ing parlor grand stood in the music room of his
residence on Fifth Street here.
A gift from Dr. Wright to his wife, the piano became
a focal point of the president's home and was featured
at many musical evenings in the Wright home.
The piano left Greenville in 1934 when Dr. Wright
died and his widow moved to Hampton, Va. Now, after
nearly 50 years, the Chickering grand has come back to
the East Carolina campus to stay, as a gift from the
Wright family in recognition of ECU's 75th anniver-
sary.
The piano's history � traced in written records and
from recollections of the Wright descendants � is a
fascinating one indeed.
At the time of the piano's original purchase in 1903,
Robert Wright was an instructor in economics and
history at the City College of Baltimore. He and the
former Charlotte Peal Murphy, both natives of Samp-
son County, N.C had been married but a few months.
Where another man might have settled for an inex-
pensive small spinet � easily affordable on a college in-
stuctor's salary � Wright wanted only the best for his
bride, an accomplished musician who had studied at
Peabody Conservatory.
He selected the Chickering. a rare model priced at the
then huge sum of $650 at the Kranz-Smith Piano Com-
panv in Baltimore.
While it delighted young Mrs. Wright to have such a
fine piano, its purchase meant some sacrifice. It was
first leased for six months, then bought, with monthly
installments of $15 until three years later, when it was
paid for in full.
Robert Wright gave up one of his chief pleasures,
smoking fine cigars, so that his wife might have her
piano, recalls the Wrights' daughter-in-law, Rugh
McLean Wright.
" 'Mr. Papa' was a music lover himself and took
great pride in Mother Wright's musical skill she said.
"He wanted her to have the finest possible instrument
In 1909 when Dr. Wright came to Greenville to
assume the presidency of the newly-founded East
Carolina Teachers Training School, he was just 39 years
old, but well trained and experienced in the field of
education.
Between teaching posts at Oak Ridge Military In-
stitute and Baltimore City College and in schools in
Bladen and Nash counties, N.C, and ivtanoorough
Countv, S.C Wright pursued advanced studies at
UNC-Chapel Hill, Johns Hopkins University and Col-
umbia University.
He was in his third year as principal of Eastern High
School in Baltimore when the East Carolina presidency
was offered to him. So the Wrights came to Greenville,
and their treasured piano came too.
"In those days, the roads into eastern North Carolina
were terrible Ruth Wright explained. "The piano had
to be transported from Baltimore to Greenville by
barge. It landed at the Port Terminal and was carefully
unloaded and carried by a mule team to the president's
home on Fifth Street
When the piano was placed in the right-hand first-
floor parlor, that room became known as the "music
room" and remained so throughout the Wrights'
residence.
See PIANO. Page 6
A Gay New World
Films Now Taking It Seriously
ecture Bv Former Prime Minister Callaghan Cancelled
The rescheduled March 29 lecture to be given by James Callaghan, former Prime Minister of Great Britain,
has been cancelled. At this time, no word has been given concerning any further rescheduling for a later
date This Wednesday at 8 p.m. in the Hendrix Theatre, nationally syndicated political columnist James J.
KUpatrick will speak. Tickets are on sale at the Central Ticket Office, MSC.
By LESLIE BENNETTS
The New orfc Times
NEW YORK � A handsome 30-year-old doctor,
Zach has been happily married for eight years to Claire,
a successful television programming executive. But late-
ly Zach has begun to stray. He is powerfully attracted to
a voung writer whom he meets as a patient but who � a
lunch date and a dinner later � becomes his lover.
When Zach's wife goes away for the weekend on a
business trip, Zach turns up at the writer's apartment
for a prolonged tryst. The resulting strains on his mar-
riage precipitate a crisis.
Thus begins Making Love, a new movie directed by-
Arthur Hiller (now playing at the Plitt Entertainment
Center in Greenville). In some ways the film deals with
familiar themes indeed: It is about "star-crossed lovers
and something that comes between them that they can-
not control says Hiller, who made the movie Love
Story a dozen years ago.
But Making Love is decidedly not just another film
about adultery and its consequences. For Zach's new
lover is another man, and what comes between Zach
and his wife is his realization that he is a homosexual.
Moreover, while the depiction of homosexual
characters on screen is not new, the lovers in Making
Love are markedly different from most of their
cinematic predecessors.
"The film is revolutionary in concept because
everyone in it is so sane and seemingly normal
observes Vito Russo, the author of The Celluloid
Closet, a comprehensive history of the portrayal of
homosexuality in the movies. "These guys are matinee
idols. Before this, you either got aging, bitter losers or
21-year-old leather numbers. Here you have a doctor
and a successful novelist
Furthermore, not only are they professionally suc-
cessful, but Zach (played by Michael Ontkean) and his
lover Bart (played by Harry Hamlin) are both good-
looking, athletic, virile, sensitive, intelligent and just
plain nice. Their sole idiosyncrasy is Zach's developing
sexual preference for Bart rather than his wife, played
by Kate Jackson.
Nor is Making Lo"e the only new movie to deal with
homosexual love. Personal Best, written and directed by
Robert Towne, stars Mariel Hemingway as an Olympic
athlete (the film will be opening soon at the Plitt). While
filmmaker and star insist that Personal Best is not a
movie about lesbianism, much of the plot revolves
around the love affair between the two women and its
impact on their competitive goals.
Several other forthcoming films feature homosexual
relationships as well. Based on the long-running Broad-
way play, Deathtrap is a thriller about a successful
playwright � the author of murder mysteries � who
conspires with his young homosexual lover to plot the
death of the playwright's wealthy wife. Starring Michael
Caine, Christopher Reeve and Dyan Cannon, Deathtrap
is directed by Sidney Lumet and will be released this
month.
In Partners, scheduled to open in the fall, Ryan
O'Neal stars as a heterosexual policeman paired with
John Hurt as a homosexual policeman; their assignment
is to pose as a gay couple, infiltrate the homosexual
community in West Hollywood and catch a murderer
who is victimizing homosexuals.
Victor, Victoria � which opens with a scene of
Robert Preston in bed with a younger man � stars
James Garner as a Chicago nightclub owner visiting
Paris. He falls in love with Julie Andrews, who is mas-
querading as a Polish count. His love affair with so-
meone he believes to be another man causes Garner
grave discomfort, but it gladdens the heart of his
longtime friend and bodyguard, a large, beefy, former
football ?tar played by Alex Karras.
Upon finding his employer in bed with the young
Polish nobleman, Karras ecstatically announces that he,
See FILMS, Page 7
�. 'ir Ti Hilni
I 1g.





� .
THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 16, 1982
Piano Returns
Continued From Page 5
In addition to her duties as
mother of four and hostess for her
husband, Pearl Wright continued
her involvement with music and en-
couraged her husband to strengthen
musical offerings on the fledgling
campus.
From the beginning, private in-
struction in piano was available to
the students. Later came a "public
school music" curriculum and
establishment of chamber music
ensembles.
Campus music programs included
frequent student and faculty con-
certs and occasional productions of
an operetta or masque. A series of
visiting concert artists performed at
East Carolina, in public ap-
pearences usually sponsored by one
of the campus literary societies.
"Mother Wright always made
sure to invite these performers to the
president's home to play or sing for
her guests said Ruth Wright.
"Sometimes the piano was used
alone or as accompaniment for a
singer, and other times, it was used
in small group performances. But
the piano was always featured
Visiting artists included musicians
of note from New York,
Philadelphia and Baltimore, among
them dramatic soprano Sarah Storm
Crommer, Peabody pianist George
F. Boyle and D. Hendrik Ezerman,
a pianist and director of the
Philadelphia Consevatory. During
the early depression came the
greatest of them all, internationally
noted operatic soprano Amelita
Galli-Curci.
President Wright himself would
no doubt be amazed at all the
changes that have taken place since
his piano's first journey to Green-
ville in a crate aboard a river barge.
This time it traveled in a truck over
smoothly paved highways.
It left East Carolina Techers Col-
lege a half-century ago, a small but
thriving school of a thousand
students which Robert Wright had
guided from its beginnings.
Death Untimely
Continued From Page 5
to the helm of success. Saturday
Night Live blossomed into one of
the most successful late-night shows
in TV history.
Aside from his roles as the
Samurai warrior, killer bee and
cheeseburger chef, Belushi tried his
hand at other ventures.
Dressed from head to toe in
black, Belushi made his singing
debut on stage as the raspy-voiced,
pot-bellied Jake Blues. With Dan
Aykroyd, whose bluesy harmonica
sounds gave the band a touch of
realism, Belushi was en route to his
first (and subsequently only)
musical endeavor.
The band's first album, titled
simply The Blues Brothers, went
platinum � quite an accomplish-
ment for what was first conceived as
a comic routine.
Belushi also made movies, which
comes as no surprise to the millions
who crowded theaters nationwide to
see them.
Animal House, Belushi's first
motion picture r vrhtch �tc played
Bluto Blutarsky, was a box-office
smash. The film portrayed Belushi
as an addict of craziness, a lunatic-
at-all-costs fraternity brother � a
role which sharply limited his later
acting aspirations.
Belushi's other film efforts in-
cluded 1941, Old Boyfriends and
The Blues Brothers. The same type-
casting was apparent in each movie,
Belushi seeming unable to break the
character mold he had established
for himself.
But in his last two movies, Belushi
broke the mold. Playing Ernie
Souchak, a Chicago columnist, in
Continental Divide, Belushi lost his
heart to scientist Blair Brown, a
woman living in semi-seclusion in
the Rockies.
The part was a bit out of
character for the "Wild Bill Cody"
of 1941, but Belushi's acting talent
far exceeded the expectations of
viewers, and the film was a success.
In his final movie, Neighbors,
Belushi was back with his comedy
partner, Aykroyd. But this time as
the straight man.
At Belushi's funeral on March 9,
several of his New York and
Hollywood contemporaries raved
about the multi-talented man they
had been "fortunate enough to
work with
It now scents ironic that in an in-
terview last year, Belushi is said to
have disclaimed that he was
"anything like" the characters he
portrayed in films. "I'm really a
pretty boring person he said.

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 16, 1982
TH�r� OffttUtX, A
0�0 TOfiO AJI6HTS
k Ask a1 Royeifo�?
Noted PoetTranslator
Poulin To Give Reading
Films Trv Brave New
Continued From Page 5
too, is homosexual and that he has
been wanting to tell Garner for 15
years.
The emergence of a cluster of
films dealing with homosexuality
constitutes something of a milestone
in the history of a topic that long
was strictly taboo. The films are
widely disparate in style and con-
tent, but given the stereotypical
ways in which Hollywood has tradi-
tionally portrayed homosexuals,
their variety alone distinguishes
these films.
Homosexual-rights activists have
long deplored the negative
characterization of homosexuality
in the movies, and many believe that
Hollywood has discriminated
against homosexuals to a greater ex-
tent than any other minority group.
"Blacks were stereotyped in
movies, but there was never any law
forbidding the portrayal of blacks
on the screen Russo notes. "But
from 1934 until 1961, the Produc-
tion Code forbade any mention of
homosexuality on screen or any por-
trayal of homosexual characters
Such strictures often compelled
major revisions in plot and
character, as in the case of Lillian
H oilman's play The Children's
Hour. When first filmed in 1936,
"the story of two teachers accused
of lesbianism by a vicious child
became, on the screen, an
adulterous heterosexual triangle in
which one teacher is accused of be-
ing in love with her best friend's
fiance wrote Russo in The
Celluloid Closet.
While the production code was
revised in 1961, the resulting pro-
duct was often malignant.
"When homosexuality was allow-
ed as a subject, the industry seized
upon it as a dirty secret that had
come out of the closet Russo says.
"They could now portray gays, but
they knew the public would not ac-
cept a positive judgment on such
characters. So from 1961 until the
present, with very few exceptions,
almost every portrayal was one that
placed homosexuals in either a
psychopathic or a stereotypic con-
text, reinforcing the concept that
homosexual men axe effeminate and
that lesbians are masculine women.
"The tendency has been either to
make homosexuals a joke, and
therefore funny and harmless, or to
make them so threatening they
become vicious, like the psychotic
lesbian killer in Windows who killed
her psychiatrist with a butcher
knife
In Russo's view, "What has come
out on screen has been less a state-
ment about homosexuality than a
statement about the fear of
homosexuality
Indeed, at the end of his book
Russo provides a chart showing the
fate of homosexual characters in
various movies. It is a grisly list,
with most entries ending in suicide
(by straight razor, by shot-gun, by a
falling tree, by leaping, by hanging,
by poison) or murder (by stake
through the heart, by being pushed
from a balcony, by bludgeoning, by
cannibalism, by stabbing, by gun-
shot, by castration). In Hollywood's
eyes, the price of homosexuality was
usually a horrible death.
As the 1970s progressed,
homosexuality began to surface
with increasing frequency on screen,
as in the theater and on television.
But while there were exceptions,
usually the message adhered to
traditional conventions.
Barry Sandier, the screenwriter
for Making Love, says that in
writing the movie he was conscious-
ly trying to create "a positive image
of gay men that we've really never
seen on the screen before � an im-
age of gays as normal, decent people
that other gays could recognize,
identify with and relate to. 1 also
wanted to allow the heterosexual au-
dience to emerge with a positive
perception of gay people
Sandier acknowledges that in pur-
suit of that end he may have over-
compensated somewhat in blessing
all his characters with good luck and
happy endings in addition to their
winning personal attributes.
"I feel that over-idealization was
necessary he says. "To a lot of
people in Middle America, the fact
that a gay person can be a doctor or
a lawyer will be a major revela-
tion
Doubtless the increasing social ac-
ceptance of homosexuality in recent
years has contributed to
Hollywood's growing willingness to
tackle the subject. But this is also an
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Tuesday, March 23,1982
Admission � $1.00 Doors open at 8:30
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CAUFORNIA CONCEPT
MARGAUX'S
SWENSON-S
era when the emergence of the
Moral Majority and right-wing fun-
damentalism has helped to focus an-
tipathy toward homosexuality
among other segments of the
population, and this season's
bumper crop of homosexual themes
seems sure to prompt controversy.
"I am very nervous admits Ar-
thur Hiller. "Certain groups will be
distressed because they consider
homosexuality a disease and won't
understand why we are showing
what they could call sick people hav-
ing warm, human relationships
One index of the persistence of
social taboos is that a number of
prominent male film actors refused
even to consider the lead role in
Making Love because they were
afraid of its impact on their careers.
"The conventional wisdom hao it
that people are not interested in
homosexual things and won't go to
see a movie about the subject says
Sherry Lansing, president of 20th
Century-Fox Productions. "When
we started to do Making Love, a lot
of other executives, producers and
directors said, 'Why are you making
a movie like this � nobody will see
it But I'm very optimistic about its
commercial prospects. I would
assume that if the film is reasonably
successful, it will do an enormous
amount to erase some of the
negative cliches
Noted poet, translator and
publisher Al Poulin will conduct a
translation workshop and give a
poetry reading on the East Carolina
campus Wednesday, March 17.
At noon Wednesday in Brewster
303-C, Poulin will conduct a
workshop on translating German
and French poetry into English. At-
tendance will be limited with special
permission required. Anyone in-
terested should contact the Depart-
ment of Foreign Languages.
Later that evening at 8:30 in
Biology 103, the author will give a
reading of his own poetry. Admis-
sion is free and open to the general
public.
Poulin is the author of the best-
selling anthology Contemporary
American Poetry and has also been
published in Esquire, The Atlantic
Monthly, Tar River Poetry and
many others.
He has received a Creative
Writing Fellowship from the Na-
tional Endowment for the Arts, a
translation award from Columbia
University's Translation Center and
fellowships from the Research
Foundation of the State University
of New York for writing and
translating poetry.
His works include In Advent
(1972), Cat an ha: Omens, Prayers
and Songs (1977) and The homeless
Garden (1978).
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r
j





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Lady Pirates
Ice Cold A t
S. Carolina
Sports
Page8
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
sporn i dilor
COLUMBIA, S.C. � East
Carolina basketball coach Cathy
Andruzzi could have easily made
some excuses Sunday afternoon.
Especially after a microscopic 12
percent shooting performance in the
first half of her team's first-round
NCAA tournament game against
the South Carolina Gamecocks.
Especially after the final buzzer
sounded and South Carolina won,
79-54, thanks primarily to 28 per-
cent shooting by ECU, thus advanc-
ing to the Midwest Regionals in
Ruston, La.
And especially after three
members of her squad quit at mid-
season, leaving only eight active
players.
But she chose to look at the
positive and honest side of a roller-
coaster season that saw her team
lose seven of its first 11 contests on-
ly to rebound and go 13-3 the rest of
the campaign.
"We were well-prepared for the
game she said, "and we worked
very, very hard. We just came
against a very good club. We played
a very good ball game. But our
shooting percentage hurt us. That's
the bottom line. And our girls were
mismatched like they have been all
year.
"Overall, our kids tried very-
hard. South Carolina is a powerful
team, but you can't shoot 30 percent
in a tournament game
South Carolina was at a disadvan-
tage, too, after an NCAA ruling
trimmed four walkons from their
roster last week, leaving the team
with only six players.
The heralded front line of
Brantley Southers, Sheilia Foster
anfl Evenlyn JOhnsfltT more than
made up for that difference by com-
bining for 70 points and 44 re-
bounds for South Carolina, now
23-7.
South Carolina jumped out to an
early 19-5 lead during the first 10
minutes and coasted to a 34-14
halftime lead as East Carolina hit
only four of 34 shots.
The Lady Pirates bounced back
to shoot 41 percent in the second 20
minutes, but South Carolina
upgraded their percentage from 52
to 64 even though they turned the
ball over 25 times.
Southers, a 6-1 first-year player,
scored a career-high 30 points and
19 rebounds, while Foster, a 6-1
senior, positioned inside for 23
points and 19 boards. Johnson
pumped in 16 points and added six
rebounds.
East Carolina's Mary Denkler
scored 14 points, and Sam Jones
scored 13 after a one-point first
half. Loletha Harrison added 11
points and six rebounds, and
freshman Darlene Chaney provided
spark off the bench by picking off
nine rebounds.
"Our kids did an outstanding job
in approaching the game Andruz-
zi said. "We got their kids in foul
trouble, but 1 felt we got to the point
where we weren't getting any fouls
(calls). The fouls weren't going our
way. We were playing hard defense,
driving to the hoop.
"The officials really choked at
the end
Even though the season ended on
a down note, Andruzzi refused to go
along with the old saying of one
game a season does make. "We had
a great season she said. "Just
unbelievable. We made a tremen-
dous comeback, and It was just one
of the best season's we've ever had
for such a young team. These girls
are a credit to East Carolina. They
have brought East Carolina recogni-
tion
As for the three players quitting
the team, Andruzzi deadpanned, "it
was a very positive effect. When
tTtey ten, we started ttrwin . -i
Even though her team's season
has ended, Andruzzi's is beginning
her second. "I'm always on the
recruiting trail she said. "We
hope to sign some players in the next
few weeks, but we're against some
quality competition
Green Selected
East Carolina junior forward
Charles Green has been named to
the All-Junior College Transfer
third-team by Basketball Weekly it
was announced Monday.
Green, who transferred to ECU
from Catonsville Community Col-
lege in Baltimore this year, was the
Pirates' second-leading scorer at
11.3 and rebounder with 4.3 per
contest.
The honor was the second in two
weeks Green has received from the
publication. The 6-7, 200-pounder
was chosen honorable mention All-
Atlantic Coast Region last week.
East Carolina
Third In Fla.
By CYNTHIA PLEASANTS
XssiMum Sports hdilof
The ECU's women's softball
team joined thousands of college
students in sunny Florida this past
weekend, but not to soak up the sun
rays.
The Lady Pirates played in the
Florida State Invitational and plac-
ed third behind the University of
Florida and Lake City Community
college, the only two teams that
defeated ECU in the tournament.
The Pirates lost their first game of
the season, 5-2, against the Univ. of
Florida this past Friday in
Tallahassee, Fla. Florida gained the
lead after scoring four runs off of
one hit in the third inning.
In the tournament, ECU won
against South Florida, 6-5; Auburn,
8-6; and Florida State, 9-2. Jeanette
Roth was the winning pitcher in all
three games.
ECU lost to Lake City, 10-6, and
met the Univ. of Florida once again,
losing 9-2.
Head coach Sue Manahan said
she was pleased with the team's per-
formance, especially since the other
teams had already gotten their
seasons underway before the tour-
nament.
"It opened the season for us
she said, "but we improved as the
tournament went on
ECU's Mitzi Davis and Yvonne
Williams were selected to the all-
tournament team for their outstan-
ding efforts.
Davis had a batting average of
.625, hitting three homeruns and a
triple in the tournament.
According to Coach Manahan,
Williams was named to the team for
her super defensive play.
"She has a lot of speed in out-
field she said.
Manahan added that she was able
to play a lot of players in the tourna-
ment and said she definitely saw hit-
ting potential.
Sherry Stout, an ECU volleyball
player who tried out for the team
this year, was five for seven in the
invite, and returnee Cynthia
Shepard slammed two homeruns.
Manahan said Fran Hooks will
probably be a key hitter for the
Pirates. Hooks, an ECU basketball
stand-out, had a batting average of
almost .500 last year.
Manahan said she is looking for-
ward to a good season.
"I think our future looks promis-
ing she pointed out, "and I'm
happy to be working with a nice
group of ladies
The Lady Bucs will play a
doubleheader at home against
UNC-Greensboro today. Gametime
is 3 p.m.
Win Fifth Straight
Pirates Romp
Past
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
Sports Idilor
For the Huskies of Connecticut,
there wasn't much Southern
hospitality in Eastern North
Carolina last week.
Not after the Pirates of East
Carolina pounded out 16 hits Sun-
day, rolling to a 12-3 victory � their
fifth straight � that improved their
record to 7-3 and climaxed a four-
game sweep of the season-opening
Huskies.
Two of the losses came to the
sixth-ranked Clemson Tigers in
closely-contested ball games that the
Pirates could have easily have won
than lost.
"I'm glad we won, but when you
have a long game like that it tends to
get a little sloppy remarked head
coach Hal Baird. "I think it was ob-
vious that they were getting pretty
low on their (pitching) staff. We
knew they didn't have much pit-
ching left. We can't be elated,
though. They were throwing one of
their boys (pitching) down the line
(staff)
Todd Evans collected three hits,
including a homer, and David Wells
and Kelly Robinette also added
three each as freshman Bob David-
son picked up his first win in two
starts. He worked seven innings,
allowing nine hits and only one
earned run. Kirk Parsons picked up
the save.
East Carolina pressured the
Huskies early by scoring four times
in the first inning. Mike Sorrell
doubled to left and Wells reached
first on an error. John Hallow singl-
ed to right, driving in Sorrell. Todd
Evans reached on a fielder's choice,
advancing Wells to third.
Todd Hendley then walked,
loading the bases and Fran Fit-
zgerald singled, scoring Hallow.
Robinette's sacrifice fly scored
Evans, and Chuck Bishop singled in
Hendley.
The Pirates tallied two more runs
in the second when Sorrell walked
and Wells singled. Evans drove in
Sorrell and Hendley reached first on
a fielder's choice, allowing Wells to
score for a 6-0 ECU lead.
The Pirates built their lead to 8-0
in the third when Robinette singled,
and Robert Wells was struck by a
pitch. Sorrell and David Wells each
Old Dominion
Quiets Critics
At Tournament
singled and drove in a run.
Evans homered in the fourth
frame when the ball hit the top of
the fence in right center and popped
over. East Carolina another run in
the sixth and two more in the
seventh while Connecticut scored in
the fourth and sixth.
Baird was pleased with young
Davidson's performance on the
mound. "I think after he got the big
lead, he tried to get that first pitch in
there every time, rather than work-
ing on the batters; he was trying to
get ahead of them, and they got to
looing for a good first pitch. But at
least we have been able to save our
arms for the long streak of games
we have coming up The Pirates
were rained out Monday, but don't
have another day off for another
week.
� � �
The third-year coach says he is
pleased with his team's defense so
far this early season, especially the
outfield "It has been excellent
he says. "We're far ahead of where
we were last year. We've tried two
or three different combinations in
the outfield. Coach (Gary) Overton
has done a very fine job with them.
We feel real good about depth for
the next few years
He's also satisfied with the play
of freshman outfielder Ricky
Nichols, who was involved in a
rather interesting incident last week.
There were two professional scouts
at the Connecticut game Sunday,
and one timed Nichols in 3.8
seconds when running to first. Kan-
sas City's Willie Wilson is the fastest
in the majors with a time of 3.7. The
first scout was rather amazed at the
time and though maybe his stop-
watch was broken. He showed the
watch to the other scout, who
replied, "Mine isn't It seemed the
other scout had also timed Nichols
in 3.8 seconds.
"Ricky has played well Baird
said. "He has outstanding athletic
ability, and he could be a very good
player. He has unlimited potential.
But he has really come along. You
have to be happy
Nichols has driven in eight runs
while scoring nine.
� � �

The Pirates host Fair field today
and Wednesday. Both games start at
3 p.m.
EDITOR'S NOTE: For special
photo coverage of the ECAC-South
Tournament, see page 11.
By CHARLES CHANDLER
NORFOLK, Va. � For Old
Dominion, the ECAC-South Tour-
nament offered more than just a
chance to reach the NCAA Cham-
pionship Tourney. For the Monar-
chs it presented a chance to silence
critics.
ODU did just that ten days ago,
sweeping three straight games at
The Scope to win the conference
championship and move on to the
NCAAs. The Monarchs were seeded
third and won the title with wins
over George Mason (70-62), second-
seeded Richmond (77-69) and top
seed James Madison (58-57).
"I've been through a lot of
games ODU head coach Paul
Webb said after his team's title vic-
tory, "but I can't remember any
more satistfying than this one.
There were a lot of questions about
where we were going at mid-season
when we were 7-8. This win is very,
very rewarding. We beat a fine team
and one thing is for sure � both
teams fiat came to play
That they did. The Dukes and
Monarchs put on a show the likes of
which may have never been seen
before in ECAC-South play. The
lead changed hands an even dozen
times before the issue was settled.
Madison, which lost but one
regular season league game and
received a first round bye befo
defeating William and Mary in the
semi-finals, jumped ahead 3-0 in the
early going but lost the lead and
trailed 28-24 at the half.
The Dukes battled back in the se-
cond half oehind all-star forward
Linton Townes and guard Charles
Fisher. JMU overcame ODU and
had a five-point advantage, 47-42,
with less than seven minutes remain-
ing in the contest.
The Monarchs applied a vicious
pressing defense in the game's final
minutes to rally back. It was from
the free throw line, though, that Old
Dominion ultimately won the game.
Guard Billy Mann made six of
eight from the charity stripe down
the stretch. The first two gave ODU
a 52-51 lead, an advantage the
Monarchs would never relinquish.
Mann's biggest pair of free
throws came with his team ahead by
just one, 56-55, with four seconds
remaining. He calmly sank both and
ODU was crowned champion.
Mann finished the title game as
his team's leading scorer, tallying 19
points. Center Mark West and
guard Charlie Smith added ten
apiece for the victors.
Townes led Madison with 16.
Fisher added 15 and center Dan
Ruland 14.
Ruland, Townes, and West were
joined on the all-tournament team
by ODU's Ronnie McAdoo and
Richmond's John Schweitz, who
scored 28 points in his team's semi-
final loss to ODU.
For Madison the title game was a
bitter loss, but not a devastating
one. Just 24 hours after the defeat
the 23-5 Dukes were granted an at-
large bid to the NCAA Tourna-
ment, joining ODU in the
prestigious field.
Dukes Surprise, Monarchs tall In
NCAAs
Once in the NCAA Tournament,
James Madison went to work to
make amends for the tournament
defeat. They did so in top fashion,
defeating Big Ten runnerup Ohio
State 55-48 in first round action.
In the second round JMU had the
dubious distinction of facing top-
ranked North Carolina. The
Dukes showed the entire nation that
they were deserving of the at-large
bid by taking the Tar Heels to the
wire before falling, 52-50. After the
game JMU coach Lou Campanelli
said he was very proud but emo-
tionally "crushed
ODU did not fair as well in the
national tourney. The Monarchs
took on 18th-ranked Wake Forest
and played the Deacons tight during
the first half.
When stars West and McAdoo
got in foul trouble, though, the
powerful Deacons pulled away,
eventually winning 74-57.
Pirates Exit Conference Tourney
Early
ECU's Pirates went into the
ECAC-South tourney looking to
salvage a damaged reputation. A 2-8
league record resulted in a last-place
finish and a first-round match with
second-seeded Richmond.
The Pirates put in a new offense
for the tourney, one that was intent
on holding the ball for a sure shot
against Richmond's zone defense.
The Spiders refused to switch
defenses, so the game was a relative-
ly slow one.
The ECU strategy worked well,
the Pirates leading much of the first
half. Richmond recovered, though,
and led 22-20 at the intermission.
ECU kept the game close in the
second haif and had several ex-
cellent opportunities to cut sharply
into Richmond's lead, but failed to
do so each time.
On the other hand, the Spiders
made crucial free throws down the
stretch and prevailed, 49-42.
Jeff Pehl and Tom Bethea paced
Richmond, scoring 13 and 12
points, respectively.
Forward Morris Hargrove led
ECU with 14 points, while Charles
Green chipped in 13.
Following the game ECU head
coach Dave Odom was disappointed
but remained optimistic about the
future despite his club's 10-17 final
record.
"I'm still proud of our universi-
ty Odom said. "And I believe
with the proper care, committment
and backing we can do well in
basketball. 1 was certainly proud of
our play tonight
����� �V OARY HTTIItOM
East Carolina first baseman Todd Evans stretches for a
throw in the season-opening win over Virginia H'esleyan
10-8. The Pirates have won five straight and face Fair field at
Harrington Field this afternoon.

t
;3U





THP PACT CAROLINIAN MARCHJjggg?

East Carolina Golfers
Finish 11th At Iron Duke
By THOMAS BRANE
Staff Writer
The ECU golf team
was busy during spring
break with three tour-
naments.
The first tournament
was the Fnpp Island In-
vitational in South
Carolina. The Pirates,
as a team, finished
eighth in the 20-team
field. Ball State took
the team honors with
Tennessee-
Chattanooga a close se-
cond.
Don Gafner and Don
Sweeting were the
leading individuals for
the Pirates with two-
day totals of 147.
"We played
mediocre said ECU
Coach Bob Helmick
about the Fripp Island
tournament.
The next tournament
for the Pirates was the
East Carolina Invita-
tional.
Entering the last day
of the ECU match, the
Pirates were in second
place in the team com-
petition. "Then the
powerhouses took
over according to
Helmick. Georgia
Southern took the team
honors, while ECU
finished in fourth place
in the 12-team field.
In the individual
competition, the
Pirates placed two par-
ticipants in the top ten.
Chris Czaja finished in
fourth place with a 224
while Don Sweeting
placed ninth with a 227.
Eric Moehling of N.C.
State took the in-
dividual honors with a
three-day total of 218.
Next on the agenda
for ECU was the Iron
Duke Invitational. The
Pirates finished 11th in
the 24-team field at
Durham. The Pirates'
best individual score
was turned in by Don
Gafner with a total of
226.
The top three teams
for the Duke match
were NSCU, Clemson,
followed by Duke.
Helmick analyzed his
teams' play by saying,
"We can't get it
together. Only two
players play well each
match and we can not
move up in team com-
petition unless we play
better together
The Pirates have a
chance to improve on
their consistency this
week in Furman. The
Furman Invitational
gets underway Wednes-
day and ends Friday.
"This is the strongest
field we play in all
year said Helmick.
The 27-team field con-
sists of all the Atlantic
Coast and the
Southeastern Con-
ference schools and the
major independent
universities.
"If we play the same
as we have been then
we are in trouble in this
tournament said
Helmick. "If we play
up to our capabilities
we can beat some good
teams
Lady Pirates Place 16th
East Carolina's Lady
Pirate swimmers cap-
ped their swimming
season this past
weekend with a 16th-
place finish in the
AIAW Nationals in
Moscow, Idaho.
The men completed
their season at 5-6 with
a surprising fifth-place
finish at the Eastern In-
tercollegiate Meet.
The women, 5-4,
scored 109.5 points as
Clarion State won the
overall championship.
In the 400 freestyle
relay. Nan George,
Nancy Rogers, Nancy-
James and Moria
McHugh placed sixth in
a time of 3:37.91. That
same group finished se-
cond in the 200 free
relay in a time of
1:38.96. In the
preliminaries of the 200
free, the group set an
East Carolina varsity
mark and broke the
AIAW National
record.
In the 50-yard
backstroke, Jayes plac-
ed 15th with a time of
29:08. George finished
sixth with a time of
24.59 in the 50-yard
freestyle, an East
Carolina record. In the
500-yard free, Sally
Collins placed 16th at
5:13.29.
The 800-yard
freestyle relay squad of
Sally Reinhard,
Rogers, Collins and
James finished seventh
in a time of 7:54.90,
another Pirate record.
George, Jayes,
James, McHugh, Col-
lins, Reinhard, Han-
nelore Korhelr and
Rogers are earned All-
America honors.
West Virginia won
the Eastern Inter-
collegiate Meet with a
total of 411 points.
For East Carolina
Doug Nieman finished
third with a time of
4:09.64 in the 400 im
and Gregor Wray set a
freshman record of
4:11.78 in the consola-
tion event.
In the 200-yard
freestyle consolation,
freshman Stanley
Williams placed fourth
in 1:43.01. Doug
McMillan placed third
in a time of 50.53, a
freshman record. Kevin
Richards also placed
sixth with a time of
51.54.
Jokim Svensson
placed ninth with a
time of 54.2 in the
100-yard backstroke.
In the trials, his time of
53.96 set another
freshman mark. Bjorn
Johansen placed 10th.
In the 800 freestyle
relay, Williams,
Svensson, Nieman and
McMillan placed sixth
in a time of 6:58.13.
Classifieds
LOST AND
FOUND
REWARD Lo�1 Mem. Feb 8th
Brown Cordoroy Ladies Pocket
Booh with Bamboo Handles Lost
in Food Town and Fosdich's Area
Please Call 754-4323 Home and
754 ion Business Ask for Danny
or Ginny.
LOST Timex watch ist or 2nd
tloor "stacks' Joyner Library
Call Trudy 752 2�8I
ATTENTION
Classified ads will be taken ONLY
during, the following hours
Monday � I '5 3 00
Tuesday � 2 00 300
Wednesday � I 15 300
Thursday - 2 00 3 00
Friday � I 15-200
You must place the ads m person
and pay tor them in advance
Rates are 1 for the first 15 words
and SOS per word after the first tif
teen
FOR SALE
FURNITURE Sofa. 2 maple
frame arm chairs, one end table.
Good Condition Price Negotiable
Call 754 5323
SKI'S K2 IBScomp 810 ski's with
Soloman Bindings �'25 Call
757 3210 and leave number.
TOYOTA 1981 Corolla hardtop
AC AMFM stereo, tape deck,
automatic. 10 months old, like new
S4400 neq After 5:00 7544425 or
754 5420
VIVITAR ZOOM Lens 75 210 with
Macro for Nikon Mount used only 2
t.mes !45 call 757 3210
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
one bedroom apartment 575 plus
one half utilities Call Scott at
752 4547
1 or 2 roommates needed to share 3
bedroom Doublewide beginning
April I or after. Nice yard and
area For more info call Connie
758 7384.
STUDENT TO share a fantastic
place Hot tub, spa, sauna and sun
tan booth. Private Bedroom 51 SO
plus shared utilities 752 5048
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
For nicely furnished apt at
Cypress Gardens. Within walking
distance of campus Call 758 J8V4
PERSONALS
Do vc know someone with an m
terestmg or unigue hobby or
craft If so contact the Buccaneer
757 4501
BEAZ Spring Break was MM
good Yea for motorcycle rides,
Mickey Mouse, Dennis, Florida
State, back rubs at 3 am,
strawberrydacquiris, Purdue, the
Go Go's, sunburn, O.P s, men
Irom Emory Riddle (hahal. Ken
tucky, (haha), Maryland, South
Dakota (boo). Tallahassee.
eK. (let's not forget the locals).
Let s keep the lock on S.B.S s
Signed (with love), tte girls m the
car behind you
MO, Mr. Energetci, Whopper.
Winston. Lenny, Biscuit. JW, Oc
tapus. Foot, Buns, Hot Pants.
Thorn. Venus, Herpes, Bruce Lee
Thanx for a great time in Norfolk
We'll see you on the Hill after Hap
py Hour so Herbie leave the chair
outside your window. Love, C.
and B
MARY, there is something under
my bed
BUNS, TOM: But can you hang?
We understand that 104
can't. .Meow Paybacks are hell
Pooh
NEW ORLEANS is 24 hr drives.
A.P . K S. and D Unisex.
Norwegian Priests. Red Pants,
Sue and Luther. Sexkit 105s. Room
Healings, your still stood
TO THOSE Who Were There
Whafi the difference between a
r.ard on and darkness It stays
dark All night
EZ T Cocktail party, absence of
malice. ICK s, champagne,
strangers watching peck of
"wood ' back to RRHS. all adds up
to a good spring break. Love No
17
Dear Busy But Searching
Gentleman Your notice was writ
ten tor me I, too. enioy travel and
ports, anything outdoors also
I'm a bit adventurous and certain
ly a romantic I appreciate
glorious sunsets and fresh Spring
Breezes on my skin Sincerity and
loyalty count for a lot Are we kin
dred spirits? If you think we might
be call me at 355 4229
(Greenville)
7514713 � r
NOTARY PUBLIC C�ll Amy �t
757 3734
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST wants
to type thesis, dissertations,
publications, manuscripts or term
papers at home Call 754 3440
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST Term.
lesearch, Dissertation, Thesis,
etc Fast and Efficient cow
Rates Call 757-1378 anytime
ATTENTION COMMUTERS
FROM WILSON. I need a ride dai
ly Irom Wilson to ECU and back
daily We could trade rides or
share expenses Please call
Sherry at 343 304 ASAP Would
like to start immediately
HELP
WANTED
NEED MONEY You wont get
rich, but the East Carolinian has
openings for writers at the present
time. There is also a possibility of
training tor editor positions and
training on computer terminals
Apply at the East Carolinian ol
lice. Old South Building
PHOTOGRAPHER NEEDED
Apply with the Media Board
secretary. Old South Building.
757 4009
BASS PLAYERS Exp bass need
ed tor country rock band Must be
serious Call Steve 754 3314 Drum
mers and Lead Guitarist also
needed
SERVICES
CARICATURES BY WEYLER
Greenville's original personalned
art service Have cartoon done of
yourself or a loved one a unique
gift idea. SiO tor 8 x 10, black and
white or color Call 752-5775
TYPING TERM, Thesis,
Resumes, Dissertations, etc. Pro
fessional quality at lowest rates
Call Kempie Dunn anytime
PLAN A
HOBIE SAILING
ADVENTURE
TRIP INTO
YOUR SUMMER
Week long stress-challenge,
adventures along the Outer
Banks of North Carolina,
Beginning May 23
$100.00 Complete,
Register Now
For information
write or call:
UNITEOMETHOOIST
OUTDOOR MINISTRIES
Camp Don Lee
ArapahM, N.C.US10
t1?-34t-HM
IF YOU ARE HAVING PROBLEMS WITH DRUGS OR ALCOHOL �
WE CAN HELP �"STUDENTS HELPING STUDENTS"
CAMPUS ALCOHOL & DRUG CENTER � 757-6793
IN RECENT MONTHS, THE ARRESTS OF COLLEGE STUDENTS
INVOLVED IN DRUG RELATED INCIDENTS HAS INCREASED
DRAMATICALLY. Because of our concern and in our quest for
RESPONSIBILITY, we would like it known to all the students the new
drug laws now in effect. These are the laws and hence will be enforced!
1. Possession of 50 lbs. and less than 100 lbs. of marijuana - minimum
prison sentence of 5 years.
2. PMessiorTof 100 lbs. and less than 2,000 lbs. of marijuana - minimum prison sentence of 7
years.
3. Possession of 2,000 lbs. and less than 10,000 lbs. of marijuana � minimum prison sentence of 14
years. .
4. Possession of 10,000 or more lbs. of marijuana - minimum prison sentence of 35 years along
with fines. .
5. Possession with, or intention to sell 28 grams or less of cocaine - presumptive sentence of 3-10
years along with fines.
6 Possession with or intention to sell 28 grams or more, but less than 200 grams of cocaine -
presumptive sentence of 7 years along with fines.
7 Possession of 1,000, but less than 5,000 dosage units of methaqualone (qualudes) - 7 year prison
sentence along with a $25,000 dollar fine.
8 possession of 5,000, but less than 10,000 dosage units of methaqualone (qualudes) - 14 year
prison sentence along with a $50,000 dollar fine.
9. Possession of 4 grams, but less than 14 grams of opium - -14 year prison sentence, along with a
$50,000 dollar fine.
I
ADVERTISED
ITEM POUCV
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available for sale at or
ibelow the advertised price in each A&P Store e�cept as specifically noted
m this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT MARCH 20, AT AAP IN GREENVILLE, N.C.
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Greenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville, N. C.
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veeks M Mm
Saucer MB�
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PATTERNS!
PLACE . Fraczar To Ov�r. To Tab Convenience
PIECE . oiahwMrwr and Ulcrowav S�(�
Eitra Strength Chip Resistant
heatun
Week
DINNER PLATE
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A&P COUPON )
SAVE 50
When You Purchase A Pair
01 Cereal-
si Soup Bowls
With This C4Q F�f Pk9
Coupon You Jj OtTwo
Pay Only w 54-1
Good Thru Sat Mar 20
SEE STORE DISPLAY FOR COMPLETE DETAILS.
EXTRA LEAN SPECIAL TRIM COUNTRY FARM
Assorted
Pork Chops
10 lbs. or
more�Limit
2 Pkgs. Please
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN
GRAIN FED BEEF
N.Y. Strip Steak
2"
lb.
JAMESTOWN
Bone
In
Sliced Bacon I
J39
JAMESTOWN
Pork
Sausage
Hot 1 io ggc 1b-
or Mild Pk9
Kraft
Mayonnaise
Save 54
32 oz.
jar
109:
638
fMk i
GOOD THRU SAT , MARCH 10. AT AP IN GREENVILLE. N.C.
SUPtft SAVEH COUPONS
8WMMUJTK51
I N WHITE � YELLOW � BLUE
� Charmin EE
i
You Pay Only 8afla1kA
Bath Tissue 4,
LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON
GOOD THRU SAT MARCH 10. AT AAP IN GREENVILLE. N.C.
roll
Pg.
79�
FJL
SUPC SAVEH COUPONS
Fm
PURE VEGETABLE DEXO
Save 50
Ann Page
Shortening
Iatnzrrw limit one with coupon
VauLileaW GOOD THRU SAT , MARCH 10. AT AAP IN GREENVILLE, N C
SCHLITZ
BEER
H2-Oz.
Can
Ctn.
3
SPRITE
Sugar Free Litre
SPRITE 2
PEPSI
MOUNTAIN DEV
DIET PEPSI 2
Plastic
Bottle
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
iBBV
FRESH WITH QUALITY
U.S. 1 EASTERN GROWN ALL PURPOSE
Potatoes
10
RED RIPE LUSCIOUS
Strawberries
29
JANE PARKER
Shortcakes
69 �x
1
FOR ST. PATRICKS DAY
Green
FLAT END
Corned Beef
brisket
iii
1
3s 1
00
?
t





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 16, 1982
FOOD TOWN
OPEN SUNDAY
USDA Choice Beef Chuck Bone-In
LFPINCSCVAGA
U80A
CHOICE
Lb.
USDA Cheiee Beef Cheek Benelece
Chuck
Roast
Food Town Oil
Why Fey M.45
4 Rail Petk - White Certeaelle
Toilet Tissue
Why fey M.St
USDA
XHC4C�
tfSOA Choice Ertrt Use
Stew
1.S Liter - B�r�M�� Choklie, Rhiee
Reie Ory Rei Dnf White
Taylor
California
Cellars
Prices good March IS thru Mareh 21,1982
Quart -tiw
Straw
Berries
8alcb - Freeh California
Broccoli
8 Oz. Pka. - Snoar White
Mushrooms
Peckeac of 11 � 12 Or. Cots
Schlitz
3qoo
1U. - Feed Team
Margarine Quarters
12 One
Duke's Mayonnaise
Why Fey �U5
U Omcc
Sunshine Crackers
Why Fey 47 Bah
399
14 Oz. - PhlMlfte
Pork & Beans I Rally Towels
tfk Fee 111 N Fey St
Half Oeiitt - White Keeie
Apple Juice
IS Oz. - tee Feed Beef 1 Cheeee
Chlekee 1 Terkey
Ken-l
Ration
Whe Po It lech
Kent
S Oz. - Ubby'e
Vienna
Sausage
wtf ti n
Prices good at Oreenville Food Town Store only
?
jfcr
MfiMBjRl �BMSs






-South Tourney Scenes
Photos By Dave Williams
Old Dominion's AAonarchs captured the cham-
pionship of the ECAC South Tournament with
a narrow win over regular season champ
James AAadison. Leading the way for ODU
was AAVP AAark West, a 6 10 center who, at
left, is elated with his championship trophy.
At right, Monarch coach Paul Webb joins his
troops just after the win over JMU.
The tournament was filled with excitement, much of which was created by the
cheerleaders from the seven league schools. Above, Old Dominion
cheerleaders whoop it up just after the AAonarchs took the lead for good in the
championship game.
ODU's AAark West
es up against a
� JMU Dukes, m
. HI tourney choices
and (40) and Lin-
.vnes (30). At right,
coach Lou Cam-
n gretfully accepts
runnorup award.
v, JAAU fans spell out
Campanelli and the
Dukes bounced back.
Despite playing
wel I, East
Carolina was
eliminated in the
opening round by
Richmond. The
Bucs slowed the
game down and
fell just short at
the end. Above,
Pirate Tony
Byles (24) looks
to pass to team
mate Bruce
Peartree (44). At
left, ECU'S
Charles Green
guards Rich
mond's John
Schewitz, an all-
tourney selec-
tion.
'






12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 16, 1982
Even In Retirement, Jenkins Is No. I Fan
No question Dr. Leo
W. Jenkins was the
foremost Pirate fan
while serving as
Chancellor of East
Carolina University. .
No question Dr. Leo
W. Jenkins never took
"no" for an answer
when it came to deci-
sions to move East
Carolina University
forward, athletically or
academically.
No question that
even into his third year
of "retirement Dr.
Leo W. Jenkins is still
East Carolina Universi-
ty's number one Pirate
fan.
Speaking Thursday
night before the Fayet-
teville Pirate Club
Chapter, Jenkins told
the purple and gold
faithful, "we are win-
ners and we shall con-
tinue to demand this.
"I urge each of you
to do everything in
your power to see that
we move forward, we
must sacrifice and build
a Pirate Club member-
ship never dreamed of
before.
"I assure you that
you can count on me to
do everything in my
power to help us move
through this period of
money crisis. I know
that I can count on you
to help shoulder the
hard task.
"As long as we feel
this way, we shall win
the battle. We shall-en-
joy the fruits of our
labor for the past 50
years. We shall meet
with a destiny that has
been at the end of our
rainbow for these many
years
The occasion of
Jenkins speaking to the
group is most signifi-
cant. It is only a begin-
ning for Jenkins on the
banquet circle.
Jenkins was asked by
interim Chancellor Dr.
John M. Howell to join
forces again with East
Carolina University in
attempts to rekindle the
ECU spirit and push
forward Pirate athletics
to its finest hour. The
request by Howell was
re-enforced by Board
of Trustee members
and legislators.
Jenkins is slated to
appear at numerous
fund raising events,
beginning immediately.
"In the past East
Carolina University has
ignored the dark
clouds noted
Jenkins. "And we have
achieved every goal
that has been set. Our
cause was just.
"We are at this mo-
ment within reach of a
truly big time program.
We can get for East
Carolina a national im-
age that we all want
and deserve.
"This vision or goal
is much broader than
football or other
sports. Quality
academics and quality
athletics go hand in
hand. It is rare indeed
to find a university that
is truly great and does
not excell in its athletic
programs.
"Athletics create
spirit and pride unmat-
ched by any other pro-
gram. Success in sports
programs helps recruit
our state's and nation's
best students. They
want to see what we
have and be part of it.
They like a winner.
"The faculty feels in-
spired and proud, and
new professors want to
join the University
team. We are constntly
receiving new and ex-
citing ideas from peo-
ple across the country
who want to become
part of East Carolina.
"And, my friends,
people will support a
winner. Legislators will
do it, businessmen will
do it, alumni will get a
fever to escort their
alma mater to new
heights. They will lead
the way for others
In an attempt to
move further ahead
with the East Carolina
University athletic pro-
gram, Jenkins made it
known that a major
challenge lies ahead.
"We face one of the
greatest challenges in
our history, a challenge
that matches any
obstacle we have taken
on in our march for a
national reputation.
We are at a great
threshold.
"Fortunately the
NCAA has recognized
our great progress, and
our commitment to a
first class athletic pro-
gram. We have been
watched over the years.
They like what they see.
We have been placed in
the top NCAA IA Divi-
sion
"Today my friends,
because of our past suc-
cesses, we have been
placed in the position
of facing our most im-
portant challenge in 50
years of football at
East Carolina. We
must face it. The task
of competing in the big
league will not be easy.
But, we asked for the
chance.
"We must double or
triple our revenues if
we expect to remain in
the top matter of doing
it now, or forget it and
accept less than the best
in intercollegiate com-
pany.
"My friends, the
answer is money. We
cannot compete with
the best unless we pay
the price. We must
have ample funds for
scholarships, for travel
to distant places, and
for guarantees which
bring the best teams to
Ficklen Stadium. We
have an urgent need to-
day for one million
dollars.
"We have chosen a
road to take, and it is
long, and right now it is
tough. 1 am here with
you tonight because 1
believe we have chosen
the right road. The job
can be done
Neikro Ready For Season
WEST PALM
BEACH, Fla. (UPI) �
Phil Niekro has always
been an optimist, even
in those gloomy years
when the Atlanta
Braves were running up
a string of last-place
finishes.
But this year, says
Niekro, is different
because this time he
feels in his mind as well
as his heart that the
Braves are going to
have a shot at the Na-
tional League West title
that has eluded them
since 1969.
"That's not just us
talking says the soon-
to-be 43-year-old
knuckleballer as he ap-
proaches his 19th ma-
jor league baseball
season. "A lot of other
people are high on us
this year, too
It's easy to see why
Niekro, despite all the
disappointments of the
past, is so hyped up
here in mid-March.
Take a look at those
spring training
statistics.
The Braves, tradi-
tionally slow starters,
won seven of their first
eight exhibition games
and while no one takes
the Grapefruit League
all that seriously it's
hard to ignore a 1.90
earned run average and
.291 hitting.
"The pitching is
what has me excited
said Niekro who hadn't
allowed a run in nine
innings. "We've said
for the past several
years we thought we
had the young pitching
talent needed to win
and I've got the feeling
that this is the year it'll
all come together
Niekro scuffs his toe
in the dirt when it's
pointed out that he's
the only Braves pitcher
with a proven track
record.
"Oh, that may be
true if you are talking
about a long period of
time he said. "But
we've got other people
who have had good
years
That's debatable.
The only crtTier pro-
bable Braves starter
who ever won as many
as a dozen major league
games the same season
was Tommy Boggs
(1980) who has never
won more than three in
any other year and that
time (last season), he
lost 13.
Niekro, who usually
takes half a season to
really get going, was
only 7-7 last year when
the prolonged baseball
strike limited him to
only 22 starts, about
half his usual
workload.
But the graying
righthander, who won
21 games when he was
40 years old, is still con-
sidered the closest thing
to a stopper the Braves
have.
"I'm looking for-
ward to a good year
said Niekro while
resting in the dugout
following a morning
workout. "I feel great,
really great, and I'm
farther ahead than I
usually am this early in
the spring
It has long been Phil
Niekro's lament that
atthmrgti tre has been
playing professional
baseball since 1959,
he's never been in a
World Series. His best
chance for that was in
'69 when he won 23
games while helping the
Braves win the Na-
tional League West for
the only time. But that
year's dream was
quickly shattered in the
National League
playoff when the New
York Mets swept the
series, 3-0.
"I guess that is one
of the reasons I con-
tinue to be so op-
timistic said Niekro.
"Maybe I want us to be
good enough to go all
the way because I have
waited so long. Each
year we come up short,
the harder it becomes
for me
Niekro's record is far
more remarkable when
you take in considera-
tion that, for the most
part, he has been pit-
ching for a down-in-
the-dumps ball club.
Remember, we're talk-
ing about a team that
has only been as high as
third once in the past
decade and rnit! a frrc-
year stretch (1975-79)
when it lost at least 92
games a season.
Niekro, who pro-
bably would have been
For
GRANDMA
BOY FRIEND
SISTER
UNCLE
THE YEARBOOKetc
get yotuT
pictutb takgn
Sign Up March 15-19 9:00-5:00 Buccaneer office
Call 757-6501
Sittings March 22-April 16 9:00-5:00 Buccaneer office
a 300-game winner long
ago if he had been pit-
ching for Cincinnati or
Pittsburgh, has won
240 games while
posting a 3.13 earned
run average ' and that
includes the no-hitter
he hurled in 1973.
"It's hard to set
goals at this point in my
career said Niekro
who figures to get his
usual 40-plus starts this
season. "I feel like I'm
throwing my
knuckleball as well as
ever. If anything, I'm
smarter with it now
than I was 10-15 years
ago.
Niekro feels the
return of his former
batterymate Joe Torre
as new manager of the
Braves is "a definite
plus" for his ODtimism.
"Joe has brought a
new spirit to this club
said Niefro. "That's
the way he always was.
Back when he was cat-
ching for us (1061-68),
Joe was never afraid to
come out from behind
the plate and set you
straight if things were
going wrong
Niekro says the key
to whatever success the
Braves will have this
season will be how well
they play the first
month or two.
"For too many
years, we've gotten off
to a bad start and been
too far behind once we
started playing winning
baseball said Niekro.
"With a young club
like this, we need to get
off on the right foot
PIRA TES
Yarden Studios. Inc.
LITTLE SISTER
RUSH
at the
PHI KAPPA TAU
HOUSE
The Brothers and Little Sisters of Phi Kappa Tau would like
to extend an open invitation to all interested ladies to attend
our Little Sister Rush. The parties begin at 9:30 both TUES.
and WED. We are looking forward to your visit.
THE MEN OF PHI KAPPA TAU
TUES WED 9:30-until
"COME SEE WHAT MAKES
US BEST
409 ELIZABETH ST.
I
t
.v-
i
�; .





Title
The East Carolinian, March 16, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 16, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.185
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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