The East Carolinian, February 25, 1982






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She iEaat Carolinian


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Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol
. 58 So.JK
Thursday, February 25, 1982
Green ille.N.C
10 Pages
City Rezoning Leaves Students
Searching For Towed Cars
B MIKE HUGHES
"Hey, where the hell is my car?"
Sound familiar? It might if you
are one of the scores of unfortunate
students whose cars have been tow-
ed from Jarvis Street this month
Early in September 1981, the
Greenville City Council adopted a
rezoning ordinance which has made
parking one's car � especially in the
campus area � a major task. Un-
fortunately, many students were
never clear as to which areas were to
be affected b the reoning. At that
time, parking on Jarvis Street
(between Fourth and Fifth streets)
wa- not at issue.
However, steady complaints by
residents o that section oi' Jarvis
Street prompted the council to ex-
tend the ordinance.
Several students complained that
the had received no notice that the
area had been reoned, but accor-
ding to Delores Faulkner of the city
engineer's office, the council oted
on the Jarvis Street reoning on Jan.
29, and new signs went up shortly
thereafter.
Under the new ordinance, park-
ing in controlled areas is limited to
two hour periods between 8 a.m.
and
,m
Residents of the controlled areas
who wish to park for more than two
hours are required to purchase a $5
decal.
The procedure for rezoning an
area involves four basic steps, ac-
cording to Faulkner. First, the
residents of that area must petition
the city to have the change take
place.
Next, the traffic commission of
the city engineer's office conducts a
study to determine whether all the
qualifications for rezoning are met.
These qualifications include that
70 percent of the parking spaces in
the area in question are filled in
some two-hour period. Also accor-
ding to the regulations, at least one-
third of the parked cars must be
owned by non-residents.
Following their study, the traffic
commission refers the results to the
city council and makes some sugges-
tion as to the viability of a zoning
change.
Finally, the city council votes on
whether or not to put the proposal
into effect. Once an area has been
rezoned, however, cars are towed
away at the owners' expense.
According to Capt. J. A. Briley
of the Greenville Police Depart-
ment, those who have their cars
towed are generally given ample
warning.
"We usually give a two-week
grace period if cars are parked there
illegally Briley said. "During that
time, we usually put warning tickets
on the cars. If the car isn't moved
after the grace period, then we re-
quest the tow
In addition, Briley said residents
can request that a certain car be
towed if it is blocking their
driveway.
The Greenville Police Department
maintains agreements with between
10 and 12 Greenville wrecker ser-
vices, according to Briley.
The average towing fee for local
wrecker services is $25, if the car is
towed during the day and $30 if
towed at night. A mini-survey of
four area services showed that most
also charge a $2 per day storage fee
if the car is not claimed in 72 hours.
One student recently reported see-
ing as many as five tow true1 s work-
ing on or near Jarvis Street at one
time.
News of the rezoning was publish-
ed in The Daily Reflector shortly
after the council approved plan, ac-
cording to police. However, no
See PARKING, Page 3
Renegade Heather
Summer came to ECU all too briefly Wednesday as temperatures climbed into the 80s.
Photo By DAVE WILLIAMS
Editor Quits Post
A t Ebony Herald
Bv TOM HAM
r�N Mitiir
Ebony Herald editor Debra Wiggins announced
Wednesday that she is resigning from the minority-
publication because "nobody wants it
"Nobodv's serious about it said Wiggins, who has
printed two issues since assuming the editorship. "Why
nd mone on something the students don't want?"
V press time. Wiggins had not yet submitted a letter
� resignation to the Media Board. She said she had
: to Associate Dean Rudolph Alexander, the direc-
tor of university unions, but had not contacted board
president Carter Fox.
iggins, who was named editor by the Media Board
last fall, said a lack of minority student input into the
monthly publication was the result of a "boycott" in-
itiated by the Herald former staff.
Betore Wiggins took over, the first issue of the paper
in three years was printed by associate editor Edward
Nesbitt, with Safari Mathenge and John Weyler as news
and feature editors. Lamont Bvrd, the editor the Media
Board had named the previous spring, took a
cooperative education assignment in Washington, D.C.
esbitt told the Media Board he did not want the editor-
ship.
Wiggins fired the stafi soon after she was named
editor �They didn't want to work for me she said.
According to Wiggins, none of the businesses who plac-
ed advertisements in the first issue would support the
paper when she took oer. Wiggins blamed the former
� -or the withdrawal of advertising support.
'Ail the head people on my staff other than myself
are white Wiggins said, a fact she said "shocked"
Alexander when she telephoned him Wednesday.
adine Taylor, the paper's business manager, is black,
but the co-editors, advertising manager, staff artist and
layout worker are white.
Wiggms said she appreciated the help of former Stu-
ECU Gets Blue Light
Phone System Underway

Photo By DAVE WILLIAMS
H iggins: ' 7 don 7 think you need a minority newspaper
here. "
dent Union minority arts chairman Joe Lewis, but add-
ed that Russell Parker, the Society of United Liberal
Students president, and his organization "could have
helped more Lewis is now president of the Student
Union.
Co-editor Kit Kimberly, who said she calls herself an
"unrecognized minority" because she is female, said
minority students were not interested in the "cultural
paper" she and Wiggins had published. According to
Kimberly, she, Wiggins and advertising manager Brent
Wilkins put together the entire January issue wjthout
any help.
Of the 4,000 papers printed in January, few were
picked up, Kimberly said. She said a stack of the papers
in the Student Supply Store lobby was thrown away.
Kimberly, who is Wiggins' roommate, said she also
intended to resign. "I feel that if Debra resigns, her
staff is gone she said.
"The two issues we've printed are the best two issues
(of The Ebony Herald) that have ever been seen on this
campus Wiggins said.
"I don't think you need a minority paper here she
added. "1 think you need minorities on (the staff of)
The East Carolinian
By GREG RIDKOl T
sl�ll Unltr
Installation of a Blue Light
Security system has begun on cam-
pus.
According to Joe Calder, Direc-
tor of Security, the poles and lights
have been placed in ten areas. Four
more are scheduled.
"The phones will be put on
sometime in the near future
Calder said.
The system, which should be in
use by the end of this semester, will
provide a direct line to the Campus
Security Department. According to
Detective Sgt. Gene McAbee, the
phones will be numbered to corres-
pond to a switchboard in the securi-
ty building. "This way the person
answering the call will know where
it's coming from in case the caller is
unable to speak McAbee said.
"The phones are to be used for
emergencies only Calder said. He
explained that this includes reports
of vandalism taking place, harassing
phone calls or assaults.
Calder emphasized that the Blue
I ight System is providing a service
to the student and that someone us-
ing the phone should do so correct-
ly-
"Illegal use of the phones will be
prosecuted to the full extent of the
law explained Assistant Security
Director Francis Eddings.
According to Calder and
McAbee, the system is already in use
at a large number of schools.
Among these are Cornell, The
University of Wisconsin at
Milwaukee, and North Carolina
State.
N.C. State has bad the system for
approximately two years.
"They have had very few pro-
blems since The Technician (the
university newspaper) stressed the
system's benefit to the students
McAbee said.
The ECU system, according to
Calder, will enable the department
to respond rapidly to emergency
calls. The blue lights will also act as
a deterent to the poteneial criminal,
Calder said.
According to Calder the cost of
the system will be funded from a
number of university budgets.
Below is the Campus Police Blotter
for Feb. 17 - Feb. 23. These are
campus-related incidents. Among
the car break-ins listed, there were
two incidents in which the vehicle
was not locked. Assistant Security
Director Francis Eddings would like
to stress to all students and faculty
to secure their vehicle before leaving
it.
Feb. 17. 3:45 p.m. � Camel T.
Funk of 304 Umstead reported the
larceny of an AMFM cassette
player from his vehicle while it was
See LARCENY, Page 3
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
-On The Inside,
Ne �
Simon's lV
Barefoot in �
the Park, the popular
play about tribulations in a
honeymoon flat, comes alive
once more on the stage of the
Greenville Little Theatre See
The East Carolinian review on
page 5
Weather Watch
Clear and windy today, with
highs in the low to mid-50s
Highs Friday in the 50s and lows
in the 30s Partly cloudy through
Sunday with a slow warming
trend.
'Ground Zero' Aims At Nuclear War
Inside Index
Announcements
Opinions
Campus Forum
Style
Learning About College
Classifieds
Sports
2
4
4
5
6
7
8
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Stiff VSrilrr
Ground Zero: "The center of the
detonation "the target area
"the bomb hits at Ground Zero
These were the various definitive
responses given to the question
"What is Ground Zero?"
The question was posed to Dick
Welch during his Wednesday morn-
ing presentation to a meeting of the
East Carolina campus ministers.
Welch was introducing the
ministers to another version of
Ground Zero, a nationwide cam-
paign that "seeks to broaden the
spectrum of the American electorate
involved in the debate about nuclear
war
"I'm presenting an idea, because
if we have a nuclear war, it over-
shadows the importance of
everything 1 know except spirituali-
ty Welch said. He adds that it's
up to the students, faculty and other
interested people to develop any
programs for Ground Zero Week,
which will be April 18 through 25.
"It's an issue (nuclear prolifera-
tion) the public needs to think
about said acting ECU
Chancellor Dr. John Howell. "That
falls in the general category of issues
that need to be discussed
Ground Zero has a large list of
national endorsments, including the
United Steelworkers of America,
the American Veterans Committee
and the National Council of Chur-
ches.
Ground Zero, a non-partisan,
non-advocvacy campaign, finds as
its goal initiating dialogue and
citizen participation in a week of ac-
tivities dealing with all aspects of
nuclear war.
The organization addresses three
"fundamental questions
One: "How might a nuclear war
start?" Possibilities could include
an accident, a
"Cuban-Missle-Crisis" type
scenario, or other situations of con-
frontation.
Two: "What would be the conse-
quences of a Nuclear War?" These
would include the numbers of
fatalities and injuries, vastness of
the destruction and other en-
vironmental and medical issues.
Three: "How can nuclear war be
prevented?" Various options for
discussion could include furthur
negotiation for disarmament,
maintenance of strong deterrents
and studies of "technological uncer-
tainties
Welch has decided to become full-
time volunteer for the Ground Zero
project, because in order "to func-
tion properly he believes that "a
democratic society requires the im-
put of an informed public
"People are now seeing the real
possibilities (of nuclear war) close at
hand said ECU biology professor
Dr. Vincent Bellis. Belhs met with
Welch to discuss Ground Zero. "I
think it's a great ideaHe's raising
questions that people have avoided
talking about
Bellis added that "most of us just
assume nuclear war is un-
thinkable or "the don't conceive
of it as a real possibility He said
that increased tension in the world
was bringing this issue greater atten-
tion.
Dr. Howell noted that the nuclear
weapons questions have been get-
ting a lot of national publicity late-
ly, and he gave students and faculty
the administration's "blessing" to
pursue any involvement with
Ground Zero that they wish.
The Ground Zero effort has been
well organized in Beaufort County
and about 10 North Carolina cities.
In Pitt County, Ground Zero is
being supported by both the Green-
ville city and county public school
systems, the public library system,
Pitt Commumy College and the
County Emergency Management
for Civil Preparedness. Many local
churches are also being asked for
their input.
See GROUND, Page 3
1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 25, 1982
Announcements
MIOT STUDENTS
'� rtflistration for Spring
SemMltr will be hew Tuesday.
March atp.m. in Brewster
Old.
SCIENCE MAJORS
0� Monday. March I. the
American Chemical Society Stu
�nt AHUiates will meet at 7 p.m.
'� laMAMN m. All members and
inieresied persons ere urged to at
CAOP
The Campus Alcohol and Drug
Program will how its bi monthly
moating on March l at 3:30p.m in
�ha second floor conference room
of Crwin Hall. Students interested
to furthering responsible attitudes
toward the use of chemical
�wbatances are encouraged to at
�o�W. For more information can
7S7 am or 7S7 eaat.
OAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma Beta Phi will have a
meeting on Thursday, Feb. 25 at
� 00 p.m. in Mendenhail 244.
Anyone wishing to join can do so at
this meeting. w� wii wok forward
W seeing you mere
CONCERT POSTPONED
The concert by soprano Elly
Ameling scheduled Tuesday even
ing at Hendrix Theater.
Mendenhail Student Center, has
been postponed until l p.m Tues
day. Mar. . because of illness to
Ameling. Mendenhail Student
Center announced.
PPHA
The Preprofessionai Health
Alliance (PPHA) win nave a
meeting this Thursday. February
75 10(1. This meeting will be held
at �:Mp.m at The Afro American
Cultural Canter. All members and
other interested parties are urged
W attend.
AMBASSADORS
There will be a general meeting
Monday. March 1. 19M The
meeting will be held at S: 00 in the
Multi-Purpose Room at
Mendenhail
PHI ETA SIGMA
Phi Eta Sigma Freshman Honor
Society will hold a general
meeting on Tuesday, March 2 at
5 00 p.m. in room 212 Mendenhail
Student Center. All members are
urged to attend.
PRC MEETING
There will be a PRC Society
Meeting Thursday, at 7:00 in Rawl
building room ISO. A speaker will
be present to talk on lob oppor
tunities in the state.
SEMINAR
There will be a seminar on Fn
day. Feb. 24. at 2:00 p.m in room
201 Flanagan building. The
speaker is Or Joseph Bonaven
tura, which is the director of
Marine Biomedicai Center, of
Ouke University Marine
Laboratory in Beaufort, N.C His
topic is "Hemocyanins: Nature's
Weqy of Tricking Copper Atoms to
Reversibly Bind Oxygen
AED
Alpha Epsilon Delta pre
medical nonor society will meet
Tuesday. March 2. 730 p.m. in
Flanagan 307 Or Simmons of the
Dept of Psychiatry will be the
guest speaker This meeting is
mandatory for all people planning
to attend the convention in New
Orleans. All interested people art
invited to attend.
COLLEGIATE
JOURNALISTS
A meeting to organize the
Society for Collegiate journalists
will be held March 2. Tuesday, at
7:30 p.m. in Austin 132 Anyone in
terested m ioining is urged to at
tend
WZMB
This Saturday and Sunday "The
Electric Rainbow Radio Show" is
on from 10 pm to 1 am. Host, Keith
Mitchell, will play Tom Petty's
2nd album, "Your Gonna Get it
Sunday you will hear Michael
Schenker Group's latest U.S.
release. "MSG"
SOULS ELECTIONS
All people interested in being an
officer for Souls r� asked to sub
mlt letters to the President,
Russell Parker, by February 26.
Souls meetings are held every
Thursday at 7 p.m. All students
are urged to attend the scheduled
meetings. Your participation will
be greatly appreciated.
OMEGA PSI PHI
Omega Psi Phi Fraternity
presents a purple and gold party
this Thursday night, Feb. 25 at
"The Wiz" located on Airport Rd
S2 General Admission. SI College
ID.
SCECPRESENTS
Jim Barden from the Dept. of
Public instruction. He will discuss
budget cuts and how they will ef
feet ovr educational system, what
will happen to PL 94 142 and our
handicapped, and more. Please
loin us Monday, March 1 at 4 p.m.
in Sp. 12V. Everyone's invited.
The East Carolinian
PuDi'S"ec e.erv Tyescav a"c
T' urscai curiio e acace'C
ear ac ever Aenescav cw
T"e Eas" Carolin.ai s �"e ef
t'Oai newspacer cf Eas'
Carci �'� University, cwnec.
:c�'3'er ac cuOi'Siec icr a'c
c -e s'uee's cf Eas' Caci"
Untversi'y
Subscription Rate JJ0 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Buildmq on the campus of ECU.
Greenville. N C.
POSTVASTER Sena aocress
a-?es -c The Eas' Carolinian.
Oc SclT Bu'iCg. ECU Green
I. p NC 27834
Telephone: 757300. �17. �30t
Application to mail a second
class postage rates is pending at
Greenville. North Carolina
EL SALVADOR VIGIL
Monday. March I there will be a
silent vigil to protest the sending
of military aid to the strife torn
central American nation of El
Salvador. The Vigil has been
organiied by th "ECU Ad Hoc
Committee Opposed to El
Salvadoran Military Aid The
theme of the vigil will be "Bread
not Bullet" All interested persons
are welcome to participate at
12:40 p.m. 2:00 p.m. at the ECU
Student Supply Store.
FRISBEECLUB
We are jamming. We are par
ticipeting in an Ultimate touran
ment this weekend at Duke.
Anyone interested in going, prac
tices are Tuesdays and Thursdays
3 p.m at the bottom of college hill.
Meetings are at a p m Mendenhail
Rm 247 Mondays. Pete Laubert
and Chris Ryan will perform a
HOT freestyle demo Feb. 27 at the
Lady Pirates game at Minges
Pete and Chris finished 2nd in the
Canadian Nationals and will be
competing in the Natural Light
Flying Disc Classic here at ECU
April 17 and 18. For more informa
tion contact Pete Laubert at
7580375 or Mike Hill at 758 6043 or
talk to any member
VITA
The ECU Accounting Society
will sponsor the Volunteer income
Tax Assistance program on
Tuesdays and Thursdays from
4 00 to 6:00 p.m. The booth will be
at Mendenhail Student Center next
to the information desk Persons
wishing help with their income
taxes must bring all necessary
forms and documents
USED
TIRES
$10.00
inquire at
Evans Seafood
Help When You Need It Most.
The Fleming Center has been here for women of
all ages since 1974, offering understanding and
help to anyone faced with an unplanned pregnancy
. . . day or night. Services include:
Free Pregnancy Testing
Weekda & Saturday Abortion Appts.
Evening Birth Control Hours
CALL 781-5550 DAY OR NIGHT
THE FLEMING CENTER
W e 're here when you need us.
Spring Service Specials
Oil & Filter Change
$12.08
Includes up to 5 quarts of oil and filter for your late
model Ford or Mercury. Others slightly higher.
Tune-Up Special
L
13.00
4 Cylinder��!�. . . A3?0. $2100
6 Cylinder?� . . .�. $2600
8 CylinderI6:00 $3100
Includes plugs and labor, all necessary adjustments.
Electronic engine analysis. Electron ignition only in
late model Fords and Mercurys. Others slightly
higher.
Hastings Ford
E. 10th Street
758-0014
National Auto Finders
OFFER GOOD FOR LIMITED TIME
SPECIALIZES IN:
RESUMES
and
THESES
DUPLICATION
Located Across From Campus
In The Georgetown Shops
� Copies Cost 60 to 30copy
� Phototypesetting
� Binding Service
� One Day Camera Work
� Geotype Supplies For Art Students
OPEN 9-7 m f 9-2 sat
758-2400
YOGA
Yoga, a non credit mmi course
being offered by Mendenhail, will
be taught on Mondays, March 15,
22. 29. April 5, and Tuesday. April
13 from 6 30 7 30 pm This course
offers the beginning student a
Hatha (physical) approach to in
ner serenity Controlled posture
and breathing exercises will be in
troduced as a way of relieving
anxiety and tension, stimulating
circulation, improving stamina.
and increasing muscle tone and
body suppleness Without becom
ing a contortionist, the student can
improve his health, vigor, and
piece of mind. (NOTE The first
class meeting wil be held m the
MSC Multi Purpose RoomClass
space is limited so regiser now a'
the MSC Central Ticket Office
MANAGEMENT
The Society For the Advance
ment of Management will meet on
Thursday, Feb 25 at 4 pm m
Rawl 104. There will be a guest
speaker from Wachovia Bank All
members are encouraged to at
tend. Also anyone interested m
joining please come to this
meeting
ACM
The ECU chapter of ACM will
meet this Thursday, Feb 25 at
3 30 in room 13? Austin This week,
Mr Glen Crows, the director of the
ECU Computing Center, will
speak on proiect management
Anyone interested is invited to at
tend
POTTERY
This workshop will provide
basic instruction clay by teaching
wheel throwing, as well as hand
building techniques Using a pot
ter's wheel, participants will learn
the fundamentals of wheel throw
mg with instruction including
types of clay, clay preparation,
centering, opening, forming a
cylinder, and lifting from the
wheel Also, glazing and firing
processes will be covered Par
ticipants can expect to have some
completed ceramic pieces by the
end of the workshop Glazes will
be provided lor the workshop A
materials fee of S2 will be rhargeo
Pottery, a non credit workshop of
lered by Mendenhail. will be
taught on Tuesdays. March 16, 73.
30, April A and 13 Irom 69 pm
Class space is limited so register
now at the MSC Crafts Center
WALK FOR HUMANITY
Come Tonight1! Planning
meeting for the 1982 crop "Walk
tor Humanity" This is our major
organizors meeting Please come
if you can help us in any way
Thursday, Feb 24th at 7 30 pm at
the Newman House 953 E 10th
Street
MUSIC MAN
Wanted jinqers. Dancers,
Musicians (or the broadway
Musical Music Man" tryoutsd
March 1.2.3 7 30 p m till done at
Martin Community Auditorium
near Holiday Inn, Wilhamston,
NC The play will be presented
May 14. 15 at 8 p m by Martin
Community players Call 792 6146
tor more information
TTKS
viifi ten eentlu(l
MtA4doy fy&zSj 7-00-9:30
GET A
tims out
Cm 3
G&
I
PI
� �
BE A
HERO
Pick up
your
Hero Bouquet
today.
Greenville
Flower Shop
1027 Evans Street
758-2774
MC Visa Welcome
HARBIN HIGHLANDER
CENTER, INC.
Coin-Operated Laundry
Self-Service Dry Cleaning
101b. load - $6.50
(8-10 garments)
Cleanest laundry in town
Color T.V. and Video Games
Across from Highway Patrol
Station on 10th St.
Hours: 8a.m10 p.m. 7daysaweek
IT'S WAR!
BOOM! BOOM! BOOM!
To introduce you to our mouth watering style of pizza, we re mak
ing two incredible offers With this coupon save $1 00 on a
medium or $2 00 on a large Godfather's Pizza
What's holdin' ya7 The doors are open now'
Godfather's Pizza
$100
XOFF
Medium
$
2
00
OFF
Large
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville Boulevard Phone 756-9600
Offer expires March 31, 1982
L ' oe pha Per coupon
$�
V5.
S �
H
4
-v
N
Jr
KROGER
REGULAR OR LIGHT
Black Label
Copyright 1982
Kroger Sav on
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold to Dealers
on
600 Greenville Blvd -Gree�viiie
Open 8 a.m. to Midnighl
Open Sunday 9am to 9 p nn
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re
quired to be readily available for sale in
each Kroger Savon except as specif ical
ly noted m this ad If we do run out of an
� e �"er y�u y�ur ch0,ce of a
comparable Hem when available reflec
ting the same sav.ngs or a ramcheck
wh.ch will entitle you to purchase the
wS'oayT a fhe adVeM,Sed Pr'ce
"JJTH ATTACHMENTS
Cuffing iron
11 ft"
,22" � SA
ci
J
I12-OZ.
Cans
SEEDLESS
WHITE
MELLO YELLO OR
Coca-Cola
MADE FRESH DAILY
CHEESE OR PEPPERONI
fr
For
Grapefruit
8 $499
Bag g
SAVE
50
Plus Deposit
I
s

WHITE HOUSE
Apple Juice
32-Oz.
Btl.
CLAUSSEN
All-Varieties
Pickles
$448
32-Oz.
Jar
SHAMPOO
Prell
16-Oz.
Btl.
1 A.
(ampfcia
Chicken
CAMPBELLS SOUP
Chicken Noodle
BAGGED
Chips & Snacks
iMH8ls10�
COSMITICS A
FRAORANI
tasc'
3312!
lOVz-Oz
Can
16






THEEAS'I CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 25, 1982
Kv�j
rilie
light
m
e
in
an
Larceny Incidents Highlight Campus Blotter
Continued From Page 1
parked south of Joyner
Library.
Feb. 18. 2 p.m. �
Alan Brent Wilkins of
322 Slay Dorm
reported the larceny of
a ring and watch from
his room. 10:35 p.m. �
Randy Adolphus Reel,
a non-student, was ar-
rested south of Jenkins
Art Building for
reckless driving.
Feb. 19. 1:15 a.m.�
James Hughes of
Greenville was arrested
on College Hill Drive
for driving under the
influence. 3 p.m. �
Martin R. Carlson of
215-B Belk reported
that someone had cut
one of the tires on his
car while it was parked
west of Belk. 5:10 p.m.
� Sgt. Lawler
discovered a vandalized
display sign belonging
to Aldridge nd
Southerland on the
lawn of Belk Dorm.
11:45 p.m. � Gary
Eugene Edwards of
Ayden was arrested in
front of Clement dorm
for larceny of a floures-
cent lamp.
Feb. 20. 8:48 a.m. �
Graham Wilkerson of
215-C Belk reported the
bathroom window of
his suite was broken
out. 5:50 p.m. � David
T. Scott of 363 Jones
reported the larceny of
his bicycle while parked
at Jones. 6 p.m. �
Marcus Brock reported
that he had been ac-
cidently locked in
Joyner Library after
closing. 10:50 p.m. �
David Compton of
Greenville reported the
larceny of personal
belongings from his
vehicle while parked
north of Minges Col-
iseum.
Feb. 21. 1:00 a.m.�
Cpl. Watson reported
that the candy machine
in the canteen of Scott
Dorm had been van-
dalized. 1:30 a.m. �
Robert Lee Thompson
of Rocky Mount was
arrested for DUI south
of the Biology bulding.
10:04 a.m. � Regina
Williams of 310 Garrett
reported the breaking
and entering of the
cigarette and snack
machines in the canteen
of Garrett. 6:00 p.m.
� Officer Hales
reported the larceny of
the receiver and cord
from the Aycock Dorm
house phone. 10:11
p.m. � Jasper Barnes,
Jr. of Greenville
reported the breaking
and entering and van-
dalism of his vehicle
while parked west of
Minges Coliseum.
Feb. 22. 10:20 a.m.
� Julian E. Thrash of
204-A Scott reported
the vandalism to his
vehicle while it was
parked north of Scott.
5 p.m. � Kenneth W.
Melvin of 340 Jones
reported the larceny of
his bicycle from the 3rd
and Reade St. lot. 5:30
p.m. � Jane F. Farmer
of 328 Tyler reported
the larceny of her
wallet from her vehicle
while it was parked
north of Minges Col-
iseum. 8:50 p.m. �
Annette L. Hobbs cf
412 Greene reported
the larceny of her purse
from her room.
Feb. 23. 3:15 p.m. �
David Sanderson of
Greenville reported the
larceny of a ring and
watch.
Ground Zero' Broadens Nuclear War Spectrum
Continued From Page 1
East Carolina
University participa-
tion can take many
forms, according to
Welch. He says Ground
Zero is what you make
it.
Possibilities include
campus-wide projects
such as lectures,
speakers, debates, open
discussions, Films and,
possibly symposia.
Welch suggests that
student clubs and
organizations pursue
their own creative pro-
jects. He also hopes
that professors will of-
fer guidance and
leadership to their
students, and that
teachers will "welcome
and field questions"
from their students.
Classroom speakers are
also available for a
Ground Zero presenta-
tion.
Welch has been very
pleased with the
response at East
Carolina. He has met
with many campus
leaders to discuss
Ground Zero. "Things
are beginning to
move he said.
Dr. Elmer Meyer,
Vice Chancellor for
Student Life, said that
there was interest in
Ground Zero from
those present during a
recent chancellor staff
meeting at which Welsh
spoke. "Students, as
potential future
leaders, and citizens Dr. Bellis concluded
need to be aware of the that "the ultimate ob-
issues and questions jective would be to
that Ground Zero create enough sensitivi-
raises said Meyer. ty that rational people
would seek to 'avoid'
nuclear warfare The
Ground Zero pamphlet
states: "Nuclear war is
not unthinkable Dick
Welch hopes people
will begin "to think
about it" and take
steps to avoid it. "The
apathy of the American
public on issues such as
this may be our social
undoing he said.
Parking May Become Even More Of A Problem
Continued From Page 1
mention of the change
was forwarded to The
East Carolinian.
"We tried to an-
ticipate some of this
early in the fall said
Vice-Chancellor for
Student Life Elmer
Meyer. "But people
forget Meyer was
referring to a story
about Greenville rezon-
.ing in the Sept. 10,
East Carolinian.
"Students can still
usually get a space at
Mendenhall Meyer
added. "It's a bit
crowded in the morn-
ing, but there's usually
room later on.
"If it (the parking
situation) gets too
bad Meyer con-
tinued, "we can make
arrangements with the
city to use a couple of
lots between Evans and
Cotanche However,
he added that such a
move would entail buy-
ing costly insurance
and would be used only
"if it gets too bad
3UB
WIN A GIANT
6 FOOT SUB
Just complete these questions:
NAME,
ADDRESS
FOOD STORES
PHONE:
How did you learn
about SUBWAY"?
MALE n
FEMALE ?
AGE
Wnat radio station do
you listen to most9
OFFICIAL
ENTRY FORM
What newspapers do
you read?
DRAWING FEB. 28
We've Got More Toste.
208 E. 5th St.
ibU
mm mm want, man huhhh
5&i mm mm mvm sg
KIim �mmmneamtt-m,
tu
rss&rzxzsr
me
cmi�i Q�� mi wii. � .��
i " �� ii -
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHT 5. 7 & 9 PM
HENDRIX THEATRE, MSC
ADMISSION BY ID AND ACTIVITY CARD OR MSC MEMBERSHIP
SPONSORED BY THE ECU STUDENT UNION FILMS COMMITTEE
1 st Annual Pre-Spring Break
Beauty Contest
March 4th at PAPA KATZ
(Wet T-Shirt)
"Good chance to get
extra money for Spring Break
prize
Sponsors
Overtoil's Grocery
Crow's Nest
Mr, Gatti's
Nautilus
KA Sorority
Western Sizzlin'
University Exxon
East Coast Waterbeds
(Call David Hill 758-2408)
Sponsored by 10E
Five judges to
selected at random
from audience
Quicksilver Records
108 E. 5th St.
For Heads Only
"Jean Shop"
For more information call:
Chuck Brown � 752-2941
Glenn Conway � 752-6502
ii





QUr Safit (Earnlintan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Jimmy DuPREE, ammma
Charles Chandler, imnmumim
Ric Browning, Director of mhhu� Tom Hall, News Editor
Fielding Miller, (ii!IWS!m.� William Yelverton. spom Editor
ALISON BARTEL, Production Manager STEVE BACHNER, Entertainment Editor
Steve Moore, cvcw Mm Diane Anderson, style Editor
February 25, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Elections
Tactics Often Questionable
Elections for the executive offices
of the Student Government
Association will soon be taking
place. It is hoped that this year's
contest will be free of the
sophomoric shenanigans which
have marred past elections, but re-
cent events indicate this is doubtful.
Three years ago East Carolina
was graced (hah, hah) with The
Alternative Press: the publication of
a group of students who had pro-
claimed themselves the watchdogs
of justice in campus politics. Their
argument was based around what
they considered an unusual amount
of coverage of certain candidates by
this newspaper.
The ploy was, unfortunately, suc-
cessful. It is unfortunate because as
Pavlov observed, reinforced
behavior � whether negative or
positive � tends to perpetuate
itself.
Last year the controversy was not
in the presidential race, but the
treasurer's. Charges and counter-
charges were exchanged by outgoing
president Charlie Sherrod and in-
cumbant treasurer Kirk Little sur-
rounding the "mysterious"
substitution of a picture in Little's
campaign ad.
Again the results of the race took
weeks to finalize.
Already this year one unannounc-
ed candidate has addressed the
legislature about a "matter of con-
cern" to the student body.
BULL
To potential candidates we say:
save the speeches for the campaign
trail. If it's extra publicity you
DOONESBURY
want, do something newsworthy.
Really newsworthy. Otherwise,
advertizing rates are the same for all
campus organizations. We'll be glad
to print (virtually) anything in space
purchased ahead of time.
Advocating an action already on
the drawing board is hardly
newsworthy. Such psuedo-events
have long been a tool of politicians,
but this is hardly the type of election
decided by stances on earth-
shattering matters.
Face it � the election of an SGA
president is basically a popularity
contest dependent on name recogni-
tion. Few students are actually
familiar with a particular can-
didate's opinions.
In past.years this newspaper has
weighed the alternatives and sup-
ported the person the editorial
board decided was most qualified.
A year ago the board decided not to
endorse a candidate.
Whether or not we will this year
remains to be seen. Allegiances or
friendships will play no part in our
decision.
Nor will deplorable or in-
timidating tactics of various fac-
tions be allowed to contaminate the
the thinking of those who determine
the SGA leaders for the 1982-83
school year.
It is our sincere wish that students
will take advantage of various op-
portunities � which will un-
doubtedly present themselves � to
listen to the candidates and decide
who offers the qualities most
representative of East Carolina
University.
by Garry Trudeau
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'Anti-Watt Types' Off Base
By KIM ALBIN
We have been patient and lenient
enough with those ridiculous anti-Watt
petitioners.
As it now stands, most of us belong to a
silent majority of reasonble, supportive
Americans when it comes to Interior
Secretary James Watt. Yet there are a few
loud-mouthed and uncontested liberals out
there who are making a calamitous scene
out of a situation they seem to know little
about.
Perhaps their problems stem from a
tendency to read Doonesbury cartoons as a
solitary source of information, and stead-
fastly cling to whatever mistaken impres-
sions can penetrate their thick skulls.
The result of this obvious confusion,
coupled with the aforementioned loud-
mouthed nature of these anti-Watt types,
is a grave misrepresentation: the assump-
tion that the rest of the population is also
anti-Watt.
That is why it is now time to inject some
facts into the situation. While this infor-
mation may not be news to the well-
informed, it could serve to sooth their anti-
Watt-weary ears.
First of all, those who protest against
James Watt try to make it sound as though
he were out to tear down the national park
system. This is a brutal lie: his intentions
are rather to renovate the parkland that the
government already owns, and finance this
renovation with the funds appropriated for
the purchase of more parkland.
It makes good sense not to buy more
land when the existing parks are in such a
state of disrepair, and anyone who has
visited one of the parks can attest to their
health and safety hazards. At Yosemite
alone, there are three cracked bridges, a
hotel which is a fire hazard, and an expos-
ed sewer line. So, the man that the
"environmentalists" are trying to throw
oui of office has volunteered to fix their
park for them. He says "I won't mind be-
ing remembered as the guy who fixed the
plumbing and they respond with a peti-
tion. Wonderful.
Secondly, last Sunday Mr. Watt an-
nounced plans to ask Congress to put such
activities as mining and drilling in federal
wilderness areas on hold until the end of
the century. This move is a big one for Mr.
Watt, and clearly demonstrates his objec-
tivity and fairness in dealing with such
issues. The "environmentalists however,
responded by saying that the plan might
turn out to be a "Trogan Horse
Finally, one fact that the environmen-
talists find difficult, if not impossible to
swallow is that James Watt has no finan-
cial stake in the outcome of the en-
vironmental issues that he decides. Not an
oilman, not a mining tycoon, not a
millionaire with a vested personal interest,
James Watt is simply trying to seive all of
the American people � not just pacify the
loudmouths.
Isn't that the gutsy kind ot eadeT ha
we want to have? Let's keep the John
Wayne types in office, and tell the cartoon-
reading petitioners to get lost.
Mission Groups Explore Haiti
By PATRICK O'NEILL
"What was it like down there?" is the
typical question from a curious friend.
"Pretty bad, huh?" is their usual follow-
up to my slow reply.
The answers just don't come that easy,
even now one month later. I spent nine
days in Haiti with a Christian Mission
Group. Twenty-eight of us went to see for
ourselves what this "Third World" was all
about.
Perhaps one person on the trip summed
up my dilemma best when she said: "How
can you tell someone that you literally saw
people dying in the streets?"
Sure, I can tell you, but can you really
grasp it? I saw babies, children, elderly �
even dogs dying in the streets.
Beggars � everywhere I went there were
beggars � sticking their hands in my face.
"Give me five cents" was the phrase I
came to despise. Why wouldn't they leave
me alone?
Children with bloated stomachs. They
played in streets full of raw sewage.
Emaciated people, many terminally ill as
a result of malnutrition or from infection
from impure drinking water.
These were human beings living and dy-
ing under conditions that we wouldn't sub-
ject our pets to.
Our world � so modern, so advanced
Campus Forum
Professor Expresses Discontent With WZMB
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WZM8
fcLTefcNPvrtvE: i
Don't Know WHV THEY'RE ConPLRWUVG. WE Play the sw)E
muSIC EVERY OTHER 5TBTIOM DOES PAOUND HERE.
EDITOR'S NOTE: The abovi car-
toon was submitted to "Campus
Forum" as the opinion of Dr. Walter J.
Pories, chairman of the department of
surgery of the School of Medicine. In an
accompanying letter, Dr. Pories states
"I am on the side of those who believe
that a university's radio station should
reflect the best, not the worst, that the
institution has to offer
Albin Rebuttal
This is in response to Kim Albin's
February 18 letter.
I'm not writing this in defense of
liberals or liberalism. I consider myself
economically to be moderately conser-
vative. But what I'm objecting to is a let-
ter that appears to have been written to
blow off steam, rather than express a
carefully thought out point.
Since you're probably eager to read
responses to your letter, Ms. Albin, I'll
just state my comments nd criticisms in a
numerical order and save us all some
time.
l)Realize that extreme conservatism is
just as radical as exteme liberalism and
just as far from a balanced center.
2)Clarify yourself. Enlighten us to
what these "undoubtably highly liberal
remarks" were, rather than assume we
know just what you're talking about.
3)When has this campus ever been
"consumed in a liberal frenzy" that
you're afraid could happen again? ECU
generally seems about as conservative as
any other public state college. That is to
say, it's normal, 1980's style.
4)You make it sound as if conser-
vatism was the natural order of things
and should in no way be tampered with
or even examined. Remember that this is
a college, a place of learning, and as
such it's the only place that some
students might be exposed to a point of
view other than the one they inherited.
5)To sum up, it's not your political
views that worry me, but rather the
visciousness with which you attack
liberal attitudes.
A philosophy professor I had sug-
gested we read Karl Marx, not so that
we'd turn into raving Marxists but so
that we'd learn something about a major
historical trend and current interna-
tional reality.
If you don't like what your leftist pro-
fessors are saying, then enter into
spirited debate with them. If it's a good
debate, common sense and compassion
will prevail, rather than a pre-packaged
political stance.
JAY KELLY
Prison Letters
I am in prison here in North Carolina
(I have been for 4 years) for "sales of co-
caine" and have one year left to do. I
was born and raised on the West Coast
and have no family. All my friends are
out west so I'd really appreciate some
friends here in North Carolina so I
might have a visitor once in awhile (I
haven't had one single visit since I've
been incarcerated here in North
Carolina.) So you can see I'd really dig
on meeting some "good times" people!
1 am 24 years old, 6'1" tall, weigh 185
lbs brown hair, green eyes, and enjoy
skiing (water and snow), party's, music,
tripping around in nature, and traveling
around the U.S.A. exploring different
people and places.
JAMES "JIM" K. SAPPER
P.O. Box 58
McCain, NC 28361
and yet this massive suffering right before
my eyes. How can this be? Why does it
continue? What can I do?
A filfnstrip, I saw about hunger, dealt
with this question of response. It
(response) must first begin with a personal
awakening. This happens when your at-
titude about hunger changes from one of
"concern" to one of "outrage
Outrage must then be channeled to
positive action and a striving for justice.
Justice is the key word. Seeking justice will
hurt because on your search for justice you
will encounter "truth
Truth will invariably lead you to the
awareness of the distorted priorities of our
world. Truth may also be coupled with
guilt. (Guilt has been the worst for me.)
And finally, with truth, comes frustration
and lots of anger, because now you will be
intolerant of the ignorance of others.
As I rode on a bus through the streets of
Port-Au-Prince, Haiti's capital, I glared
out the window, wanting to spit on every
person who was well dressed or driving a
car. 1 thought "they must be rich. How
could they be living so well amidst all this
suffering? Why didn't they care?"
I leaned back in my seat and I tried to
understand the cause of my hostility. Then
it occured to me "I was seeing a reflection
of myself � I was angry with my own
easy, non-threatened, wealthy existence
I was one of them!
My mental image of Haiti is still
jumbled-like defracted light. It hits me
from many directions. I am trying to unify
these visions � visions of the corruption
of our human decency as is the
unbelievable sufferings of our brothers
and sisters, and finally the realization that
I am no longer ignorant � never again will
I be the same. Those visions of Haiti will
always assault my comfort.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing a points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All fet-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Letters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
days.
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FEBRUARY 25, 1982
Page 5
School Of Art Brings A Piece
Of The Big Apple To ECU
John
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
deCesare lectured in the Jenkins Auditorium Monday.
By MIKE HUGHES
Anislial News Milor
Greenville, North Carolina: a long way
from New York City, in more ways than
one.
Why, the only hustle and bustle in Green-
ville is probably illegal, and somehow
McDonald's cuisine just doesn't compare to
the Top of the Sixes.
But the ECU School of Art is doing its
best to bridge that gap � however partially
� with a program initiated this semester.
Under the new program, the art school br-
ings a different specialist from the "Big Ap-
ple" to Greenville every other week to lec-
ture, instruct and critique the work of junior
and senior communications art majors.
Three guest instructors have already made
the trip South. Alan Cober, who has receiv-
ed more than 200 awards as an artist, came
in late January, and Wilson McLean, winner
of the prestigious Hamilton King Award in
1980, spoke on Feb. 8.
Monday night at 8 in the Jenkins Art
Building Auditorium, John deCesare, the
third expert in the series, treated about 200
students and faculty members to a lecture
and presentation on his interesting career in
the advertising industry.
deCesare, who studied at Brown Universi-
ty and the University of Buffalo, opened his
own design firm in 1978. He is also manag-
ing director of the Illustrators Workshop,
based in New York.
With 25 years in the art business, deCesare
has accumulated a distinguished slate of
awards, including gold medals from the New
York Art Director's Club and the Society of
Publication Designers.
In 1979, he was featured in Idea
magazine's special issue titled "Important
U.S. Graphic Designers of the Last 25
Years
But despite the recognitions in deCesare's
career, most people outside the advertising
and art fields have probably never heard of
him. Why, even deCesare referred to himself
as ust a kid from the Bronx
Furthermore, deCesare's work has seldom
been aimed at public consumption. Rather,
most of his campaigns have been created for
professional magazines and journals.
He spent nearly 11 years working for
Geigy, one of the nation's largest phar-
maceutical companies. In that time, he
worked his way up to executive art director.
Working for a pharmaceutical company,
deCesare was continually faced with such
problems as how to market a new laxative or
how to advertise for Geigy's
"breakthrough" enema (no pun intended).
Indeed, how does one go about advertising
an enema?
deCesare answered this age-old question
with ad campaigns bearing such slogans as
"Who's Afraid of Big Bad Enema?" and
"Make a FriendNot an Enema
Another assignment found deCesare sear-
ching for a way to advertise Geigy's new pro-
duct for those suffering from enuresis (bed
wetting). After a number of attempted ideas
failed to materialize, he came up with a new
slogan, "Dry nights Bring Happy Days
"Geigy was a fun place to work
deCesare recalled, "a place you looked for-
ward to going to work every day
In conjunction with his work on drug
advertising, at a job which brought 1,200
projects across his desk each year, deCesare
designed magazine covers and book covers
for Geigy.
In addition to delivering lectures, each of
the artists forwards an assignment to the
design classes prior to coming down. Upon
completion of the assignment, each class
holds a critique, with the guest leading the
discussion.
Four guest speakers remain on the art
school's slate for this semester. Each profes-
sional brings his own brand of expertise and
technique � from graphic design to illustra-
tion � in helping create an "excellent learn-
ing experience" for the students.
Robert Hindel, whose works have ap-
peared in Sports Illustrated, Ladies Home
Journal and Time, is the next speaker on the
list. He will be followed by Fred Otnes, win-
ner of more than 100 prestigious awards;
and Mark English, who has designed seven
stamps for the U.S. government.
The final guest instructor will be Dick
Gangel, who recently retired from a 20-year
career as art director for Sports Illustrated.
A waken' Offers A nswers To Problems
By ANGELA ROACH
Staff �nUf
Channel 9 Alive's new program,
Awaken, has sparked the interest of
many area viewers. This program is
designed to uproot apathy, delete ig-
norance and instill perseverance
among Greenville citizens, especial-
ly the black community. The pro-
gram began production in January
and is scheduled to continue until
March.
Awaken is a product of local
leaders who forsee problems in this
country's socioeconomic establish-
ment. These leaders were willing to
try an innovative approach to the
problems and courageous enough to
stick with it despite criticism. It is
not one particular organization's
project but a collective idea.
D.D. Garrett, president of the
Pitt County chapter of the NAACP,
commented, "If people are going to
survive, they must be awake.
Number one, they must know the
law and all it entails and number
two, they must play the game and
play according to the rules. No one
is being excused for being ig-
norant
Thus far, WNCT, Channel 9
Alive, has been very cooperative
with the Steering Committee of
Awaken. This committee is present-
ly responsible for production,
management, publicity, and ad-
ministration of the program. This
causes a heavy burden upon the
already active members. Actions are
taking place now to divide the Steer-
ing Committee into these four bran-
ches, but more people must be
recruited who are willing to take the
responsibility.
WNCT has aired numerous other
programs of this nature in the past
but various difficulties halted their
continuation. Previous hosts of
Awaken express the view that the
station seems to have found just
what it was waiting for, a program
of substance and quality. If A waken
can maintain this status it will ex-
ceded its scheduled period.
"WNCT has tried to put others
on but this one is to be far reaching.
The station reaches 42 counties. A
number of people from all over the
state will be featured commented
Charla Davis, psychology instructor
at ECU. She is a member of the
Steering Committee and hosted the
first show.
In the two shows that have aired,
Awaken has provided information
on such topics as medical needs and
advancements, and the unemploy-
ment dilemna. The program at-
tempts to make people aware that
problems indeed exist, in addition to
stimulating them to find answers.
"The goal of 'Awaken' is to
spur the viewers to action
-D.D. Garrett
Unfortunately, the show has been
criticized for not providing the
answers. Many viewers who face 'he
situations discussd on Awaken are
seeking the methods to escape rather
than the rationale behind the situa-
tion.
"Right now the focus is on
awareness, strategies will come in
the future states ECU's Com-
munity Health professor, Don
Ensley. "I do realize that strategies
is one of our most important tasks.
We have received more pro's than
con's but being the perfectionist
that I am, I see a lot of room for im-
provement Professor Ensley is
also a member of the Steering Com-
mittee.
"The goal of Awaken is to spur
the viewers to action. If people have
enough initiative to seek help and
take action on their own, then
facilities to equip them with the
capacity to overcome the obstacle
may very well arise. The construc-
tion of a center to assist people in
coping with their circumstances has
already been proposed by some of
the Steering Committee members.
"A great number of people are lack-
ing in survival skills says D.D.
Garrett. "We have stopped
fighting. The abundance of material
things has made young people feel
that the fight is all over. This is why
there is Awaken he commented.
Mr. Garrett also expressed his
belief that the apathy among blacks
stems from their dependence upon
whites to supply their needs, which
happened to be the case during the
days of slavery. None of the
members of the Steering Committee
believes that the fight is all over. No
one denies that apathy, ignorance,
and insufficiencies exist but "we are
going to overcome apathy because
of the situation we are in accor-
ding to Charla Davis.
Mr. Garrett, Professor Ensley,
and Professor Davis all emphasized
that the program is not for blacks
only. As a matter of fact, it wasn't
at all planned to be that way.
Awaken is for the entire communi-
ty. It is for everyone that desires to
stay abreast of what may make a
significant difference in the region.
Also, it is not just for the food
stamp recipient or the unemployed
but for all those who have a hand to
lend and the heart to Fight in the
cause of prosperity for all. Awaken
offers intellectual stimulation and
physical motivation to the needs of
this present society.
Measuring the audience response
is a major priority of the show. Let-
ters to the 42 counties are being sent
out with the hope of an overwhelm-
ing reply by the time of the next
show. Although dedicated to the
needs of the Greenville area,
4 waken definitely wants to expand
its scope.
The next show apears March 6 at
12:30. Professor Don Ensley will
host and will discuss educational
issues with a focus on the affect of
recent federal cuts.
Awaken is new. Yet it is not just
new faces and a new name that ap-
pears on the screen, but a new ap-
proach to issues that encompass the
80's. The staff is enthusiastic as well
as determined to make the program
a success. Although they readily ad-
mit there are a lot of improvements
to be made, each talks in an op-
timistic tone. If those already in-
volved can contact others like them,
the forces to eliminate the vices will
conquer the apathy, the ignorance,
and the inadequacies.
Awaken cannot do it alone but it
can be the starting point on the road
to survival. This requires an interest
by each viewer; interest in the com-
munity, the state, the nation, the
world, and in Awaken. The
originators of the program all hope
that it will indeed air for a long
time; the key is in the hands of the
viewers.
Simon's Barefoot In
The Park A Delight
By KATHY WEYLER
SUffttrilcf
The Methodist Student Center is
ringing with laughter and applause
this week, and the reason is the
Greenville Little Theatre's produc-
tion of Neil Simon's Barefoot In
The Park. Under the direction of
Stephan B. Finnan, and with the
help of an excellent cast and produc-
tion staff, this second presentation
of the Little Theatre is a comic
delight.
Barefoot In The Park, for those
few of you who've missed the Jane
Fonda and Robert Red ford version
on the late show, is essentially the
story of the trials and tribulations of
a very newly married couple, Corie
and Paul Bratter. The focus of the
play is on their different per-
sonalities and their difficulty in lear-
ning to live harmoniously in the
post-honeymoon "real world
Perhaps the best thing to be said
about the Little Theatre's Barefot in
the Park is that none of the cast of
five seems to be imitating their mo-
tion picture counterparts. Each per-
formance appears to be completely
original.
Though all performances were
well done, one actoi in particular
managed to steal the show. He is
Greg Watkins, who portrays Paul
Bratter. Mr. Watkins, an ECU
English major, made his stage debut
last fall in the Greenvile Little
Theatre production of The Glass
Menagerie, and seems to have a
natural talent for acting. He handles
the comic as well as he does the
dramatic, and is to be commended
for his excellent execution of a few
bits of difficult stuntwork. The
scenes between Mr. Watkins and his
on-stage wife Corie, portrayed by
Allison Thompson, are very natural
- it's not hard to believe they are a
newlywed couple.
Allison Thompson, a WOOW
disc jockey and veteran of several
ECU Playhouse productions, gives
us an enthusiastic Corie Bratter.
Her Corie is a bit like a little girl
playing house - a characteristic of
many new brides, true, but Ms.
Thompson may be overemphasizing
this quality instead of focusing on
Corie's spontaneity and zest for liv-
ing. Overall, though, her perfor-
mance works well, especially when
she is interacting with Mr. Watkins
or Hazel Stapleton, who plays Cor-
ie's mother.
Ms. Stapleton, an ECU
psychology professor, brings digni-
ty, comedy and professionalism to
her role as Ethel Banks. Her perfor-
mance as an increasingly intoxicated
Mrs. Banks in Act II is especially
hilarious.
Dwight Eastwood portrays the
fifty-eight year old Mr. Velasco, the
Bratter's upstairs neighbor and
eventual suitor of Mrs. Banks. Mr.
Eastwood gives us a charming Vic-
tor Velasco, complete with Euro-
pean accent and mischievously
twinkling eyes, but much of the
role's comic potential was left un-
touched. The only real criticism of
Mr. Eastwood's Velasco is simply
that he is not fifty-eight years old
and the touch of silver in his beard is
not sufficient to convince us that he
is. This wouldn't really matter ex-
cept for his scenes with the ap-
propriately aged Ms. Stapleton.
David Werdal's warmly funny
Telephone Man also deserves men-
tion. Though a minor character, the
Telephone Man certainly captures
the audience's sympathy as he huffs
up and down Five flights of stairs to
service the crisis-ridden Bratters.
Barefoot in the Park really has
only one fault and this has to do
with the sets. In general, great care
appeared to have been taken to
make the Bratter apartment as
realistic as possible on a low budget.
Barefoot In The Park
�y CHAf �OftlCV
A production of Neil Simon's comedy about the "trials and tribulations of a very newly married couple' Is Appear-
ing through February 2 at the Greenville Little Theatre. Above, Alison Thompson, a WOOW disc Jockey (Corie
Bratter), and Greg Watkins (Paul Bratter), an ECU English major, perform a scene from the piny.
However, a few parts-namely a kit- All in all, Greenville Little
chen cabinet and a wall-less Theatre's Barefoot in the Park is a
bathroom - seemed too poorly built marvelous production of good old
for believability. Nel1 s,mon comedy. The play runs
through February 28, with perfor-
mances at 8:15 p.m. Tickets are
$2.50 for students and $3.50 for
general admission.
?
� n m � m







THE HAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 25, 1982
lJtMAJG AtOUT Cggggg- 7 Hmp AAj
6V fiiip MwttiS
PAtn rM�"Ai�xr poo
1MB AT
M�WIaJHl�4 P00r) D HAU.
4
CYPRESS
GARDENS
APARTMENTS
2308 E. 10�h Si
Music School Lends Support
CANNON
COURT
APARTMENTS
Luci Drive
Two bedroom apartments easily accessible to cam-
pus. Low electric bills. Cable TV provided. Call us or
come by to see these apartments available for im-
mediate occupancy.
Professionally managed by
Remco East. Inc. 758-6061
E
P
(
M
M
1 v I Sews Bureau
Dean Charles F.
Schwartz of the School
of Music, East
Carolina University,
has announced the for-
mation of the Friends
of the School of Music.
'Our faculty and
students feel that the
Friends of the School
of Music will be an im-
portant and exciting
liaison between the
School of Music and
the music communi-
tySchwartz said in an
invitation to the com-
munity. "We hope that
you may find that it of-
fers you many oppor-
tunities for expanding
your own knowledge
and enjoyment of
music and for dispay-
mg your concern for
the continued growth
of music in this area
"The existence of the
Friends group makes a
statement about the
concerns we share and
lends support to those
who devote significant
time and often their
lives pursuing musical
excellence Schwartz
said.
Schwartz said those
who become members
will receive many
special benefits, in-
cluding a regular
newsletter dealing with
the world of -music,
escorted trips to special
concerts, and a chance
to get an unusual
"behind the scenes"
view of the music-
making process.
Organization of the
support group v� as
guided by a planning
committee. Planning
Committee members
were Kay Crawford,
Nelson Crisp, Mrs.
Phillip R. Dixon,
Virginia Durham,
Camille Gaylord, Mrs.
C. Felix Harvey, J.
Reid Hooper, Meade
Home, Catherine G.
Lang, Mrs. William
Laupus, John B.
Lewis, JrCarolyn
Powell, Michael
Ramsdell, Jane Rose,
and Mrs. Charles
White, Sr.
This committee also
served as the
nominating committee
for the first set of of-
ficers for the new
organization. The slate
of officers, to be
elected March 1 at the
first general meeting,
is: J. Reid Hooper,
President; Camille
Gaylord, Vice Presi-
rammi
dent for Membership;
Carolyn Powell, Vice
PResident for Newslet-
ter; Candace Dixon,
Vice President for Pro-
grams; Mary Fleming,
Vice Presidnet for
Publicity; Nelson
Crisp, Vice President
for Social Events; Jane
Rose, Recording
Secretary; Kay
ding Secretary.
Hooper is Vice Presi-
dent and Office Ex-
ecutive, Wachovia
Bank and Trust Co
Greenville. A graduate
of the University of
North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, Hooper
serves as a member of
the Boards of Directors
See NEW, Page 7
Aloha!
m
THE SHOE OUTLET
(Located beside Evans Seafood)
Featuring name brand shoes at bargain prices.
Up To 75 OFF regular prices
Bass Steward-McGuire Brouse Abouts
201 W. Washington St. Within walking distance of campus.
Crawford, Correspon-
nmmnE
111111
I I TI
Every Day
11:00-11:00
300 E. 10th St.
758-6121
The Best Pizza in Town � Honest
NOW
OFFERING
FREE DELIVERY to
dorms and campus area
sororities & fraternities
BHHHmnnmnnnnnmminiii
THIS
SAT. NIGHT
r FEB. 27
8.30-1000 Half pr.ce
admission with Happy Hour
prices on ail beverages
10:00-On: $3 at door 758-7912
"Home of Greenville's Best Meats1
PIRATE COUPON -5 DISCOUNT ON
Any Food Order Regardless of Size
Present this coupon and show
your ECU ID to cashier.
Coupon Expires 3-13-8?
j Name,
i ID no
' Amt. Purchased
PRICES EFFECTIVE FEBRUARY 25-27
DOOR BUSTER
SEALTEST SHERBERT OR
ICE CREAM i2Gal.Ctn.
DOOR BUSTER
$169
HEAVY WESTERN
SIRLOIN
STEAKS
CRISCO
SHORTENING
Limit one with $10.00 food order.
3-Lb. Can
$"59
DOOR BUSTER
GRADE"A"
JUMBO EGGS
Limit two with SIC.00 food order.
Dozen
78C
$199
Lb.
1
FRYER LEGS
FRYER BREASTS
FRYER THIGHS
Lb.
u. 99C
$1.09
69
Lb.
FRESH, WHOLE m mm
FRYERS lb47
STOKELY
FRUIT
COCKTAIL
303 Con
2H00
GWALTNEY
FRANKS
GWALTNEY
BOLOGNA
12-Oi. Pk9.
Lb.Pig
99
$139
MAO LA
WHOLE MILK
MRS. FILBERT'S
MARGARINE
Lb. Pkg.
2l
$100
MrsFilbetts
COKE or
PEPSI
98C
DELTA OR GENERIC
PAPER TOWELS 4g
Gt. Roll
12 Gal. Paper Carton
88 S
MAOLA 12
LOWFATMILK $p9
Gallon Jug
CRISP FLORIDA
2 Liter Bottle Ea.
Limit 4 (Total) with $10.00 or more food order.
CUP THIS COUPON
DIXIE CRYSTALS
SUGAR tb98
With this coupon and $10.00 food order excluding specials. Without coupon
ti.fj- Limit one per customer. Expires 2-27-02.
LETTUCE 38
Head
MINUTE MAID FROZEN
ORANGE
JUICE UOiCan
ONLY A DIME
LOOSE (U-BAG-EM)
i WHITE
POTATOES
Lb.
10
CLIP THIS COUPON-
98
COCA-COLA 98
16-Oz. Carton of 8
Plus Deposit � with this coupon and $10.00 food order excluding specials.
Without coupon $1.71 plus deposit. Limit one per customer. Expires 2 27-82.
f
I







THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 25, 1982
I
New Music
Expansion
Continued from Page 6
of the Easern N.C.
ocational Center,
Pitt-Greenville
Chamber of Com-
merce, Pitt County
United Fund, and the
Greenville Country
Club.
The special program
for the First General
Meeting, to be held
Monday, March I, at
7:30 p.m. in the A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall,
features guest speaker
Paul Hume renowned
music critic of THe
Washington Post. The
program also includes a
welcome by ECU's Ac-
ting Chancellor, John
M Howell; a perfor-
mance of Barthe's
"Passacaille" by the
ICC Student Wood-
wind Quintet; and the
election of officers.
Classifieds
LOST AND
FOUND
REWARD Lost Mon Feb Stn
Brown Cordoroy Ladies Potket
Book with Bamboo Handles Lost
in Food Town and Fosdick's Area
Please Call 75 4321 Home and
75 2011 Business. Ask tor Danny
or Ginny.
LOST: Tan umbrella in Old
Joyner Library It found please
call Tom at 75714 and leave
message
LOST Timex watch. 1st or 2nd
floor "stacks" Joyner Library.
Call Trudy 752 2��l
FOUND Cross Pen in the A'P
store. Please drop in to identify.
LOST A BOOK BAG? I found it in
Joyner Library Call 7S7-J03 and
claim it
LOST OR STOLEN: Oneill wetsuit
with booties S25 reward tor
return, not questions asked Call
757 1204
ATTENTION
Classified ads will be taken ONLY
during the following hours:
Monday � 1:15 300
Tuesday - 2 00 3 00
Wednesday � 1:15 3:00
Thursday � 2 00-3:00
Friday � IIS 200
You must place the ads in per0"
and pay for them in advance.
Rates are 51 for the first 15 words
and s.05 per words after the first
fifteen.
FOR SALE
AATERBEDS DON'T pay retail
tor your heated waterbed buy
direct from mgf and save. Buy a
complete 1st quality pine wood
heated waterbed with 15 yr. war-
ranty for as low as 518? (Queen)
sm (King) Layaway avail. Call
David tor appointment 75� 2408
JVC PORTABLE AM FM
Cassette Player RC 5 JW
Dolby, Normal Cr02.
Manual Auto Recording, Sep.
Bass and Treble Controls. 4
speakers. Automobile plug, Ex
cellent Cond Must Sell $225
752 9704
USED YAMAHA guitar owned 2
years in good condition. SI20
negotiable. Call 757 3107 ask for
lOhn, 113 East Tenth Street.
PEAVEY T 0 Electric guitar:
machine heads, humbucking,
pick ups. phase switch Played on-
ly two months S37S, 752 542
NIKON 24mm F2AI Lens Brand
New. Serious Inquiries only Call
Chap between 4 7 weekdays
752-3549
MICROSCOPE�Monolux 4038
Magnification to 1200X, four
oculars, four obiectives, built in
coarse and fine adiustments,
wooden carrying case, and slide
preparation tools 5175. 758 5525.
BAYLEY WETSUITS-L S.
pullover top and longiohn com
btnation. 40 each or 5100 together.
Call Dirk 757 997 or 758 435 or
come by Rawl 123.
FOR SALE: two tickets to Rod
Stewart Concert Reynolds
NCSU�March 2 Excellant seats:
Call 758 4710.
SURFBOARD FOR SALE: 6'4"
Challenger, single fin Good condi
lion, price negotiable Call Bobby
at 752 9442
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
one bedroom apartment. 575 plus
one-half utilities. Call Scott at
752 4547
TWO ROOMATES needed. Large
three bedroom house located ap
prox three miles west of campus
House is fully carpeted with
fireplace 584 monthly rent per
person, plus utilities Please call
355-2809 between hours of 9:30 pm
and II pm Deposits required
FEMALE ROOMATE wanted to
share Georgetown Apt. as of Spr
ing Break or after Call 758 271
ROOMMATE WANTED: Tar
River Estates 5120 plus 1 fi
utilities Call 757 3549 between 12 4
or after II or 757 332
ONE BEDROOM apartment 5200
per month pays for heat, hot and
cold water Electric bill maximum
is below $9 See Peggy in Jenkins
217 or call 757 1257.
ROOMMATE NEEDED Tar
River Estates near campus
1115.00 a month. I 2 utilities Call
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed.
US a month plus 12 utilities
WasherDrytr, nonsmoker plus
serious student, Vf . 7S�-7US
FURNISHED one bedroom apt.
for rent. May�August. Walking
distance from campus. Call
758-702.
PERSONALS
NEEDED: l or 2 girls to share ex-
penses with 2 other girls for I wk.
in Ft. Lauderdale March 714.
Ocean Front MoteL Call 7S7-I40
KAREN T.� CannonballRight
back to ya�GC
GIRL WANTED to accompany
mature, older man, attractive,
cultured, on ski trip to Aspen dur
ing Spring holiday. Age and ski
ability not important. All expenses
paid. All replies strictly confiden-
tial Write P.O. Box 1242, Green
vile.
Do you know someone with an in-
teresting or unique hobby or
craft? if so contact the Buccaneer.
757 4501.
DAWN�I'm at the end of my rope
and slowly giving up hope. It takes
two to tango, so let me know it you
want to dancet
Ray
There once was a king named Bob,
who one night turned into a snob.
When Quail fought Waddy and
Sugar fought Marty, He somehow
forgot about Thursday night's par-
ty. Even though the scuffle �tidn't
get large. Snapper felt compelled
to narc to Sarge It's your accusa
tion, you can always abort, it could
go too far, maybe even Supreme
Court. So sorry to disturb you, it
won't happen again, but what's
wrong with wrestling, it there's
weights, there's a gym
CAR WASH � This Saturday at
University Exxon on Fifth Street
Only 51 50 BE THERE
NEED MONEY: You won't get
rich, but the East Carolinian has
openings for writers at the present
time. There is also a possibility of
training for editor positions and
training on computer terminals.
Apply at the East Carolinian of
lictlSMWing.
PHOTOGRAPHER NEEDED:
Apply with the Media Board
secretary, Old South Building,
757 4009.
SERVICES
CARICATURES BY WEYLER
Greenville's original personalized
art service. Have cartoon done of
yourself or a loved one a unique
gift idea. S10 for I x 10, black and
white or color. Call 7S2-S77S
TYPING: TERM, Thesis,
Resumes, Dissertations, etc. Pro-
fessional quality at lowest rates
Call Kempie Dunn anytime
752733
NOTARY PUBLIC - Call Amy at
757-371
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST: Term,
Research, Dissertation, Thesis,
etc. Fast and Efficient. Low
Rates. Call 757 1378 anytime.
RIDERS
HELP
WANTED
RIDE NEEDED to Nashville TN.
Spring Break or any weekend
Willing to help with expenses. Call
7 57 0710
RIDE NEEDED to Winston-Salem
area. Can leave anytime after 10
am Friday. Call 752 349
ATTN. WILSON COMMUTERS:
Responsible person to share rides
daily to and from Wilson starting
immediately. Call Sherry,
243-3099. Need someone who com
mutes everyday Irom 8-5.
RIDE needed to Philadelphia area
spring break. Wiil share expenses
and driving call C.J. 758-175.
RIDER needed to Arkansas or
anywhere along Interstate 40
west Spring break CaM 758 0204
RIDE needed to Winston Salem
area. Can leave after 400 on Fri-
day Call 758 138.
7C0.011�
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORT SONS FROM 15-14
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
ttU.a PrefjeuMkcy Test, B-rtf,
Central, and fr8tl��
Pregnancy CevnseNaej. Ear tar
tfcer .nformatioe call UJ-MM
(Tell Free Number
�or Mi :M) between f AM
and 5 P M Weekdays
BAuElOH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
9i7 west Moren St.
Raten. N.C
Planning a spnng break fUng in
Florida? Then make plans to Hve it up
inside the Walt Disney World Magic
Kingdom! There, you'll find more than 40
exciting attractions . and, we're in
easy reach of the surf and sand of your
favorite Florida beaches!
This spring is an especially good time
to "break down' to Disney, during
Tencennial - the Walt Disney World 10th
birthday celebration . highlighted by
the sensational Tencennial Parade, and
all-new musical extravaganzas.
So, give yourself a break a spring
break to remember - inside the Magic
Kingdom of Walt Disney World!
$13 � ADMISSION AND UNLIMITED USE OF ALL
ATTRACTIONS (Except Shootin Gallery)
SPECIAL EXTENDED SPRING HOURS
March 7-12: 9 a.m9 p.m.
March 13 - April 1: 9 a.m10 p.m.
United Figure Salon's
Don't go to Florida & burn.
10 off Suntanning
10 suntan sessions for $18
15 for$27
Call for appointment.
Reg. now for March aerobics.
Call 756-2820 Red Oaks Plaza
The Media Board is now accepting applications
for Media Heads for all Student Publications
for 1982-83.
Please pick up applications in the Media
Board office in the Publications Bldg. � 2nd
Floor.
M�F8-1 or 2-5
Deadline for accepting
applications is March I.
UJaltglisneyUJorld
fe-
�i$ j
ijiwss ��� �
THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL
"Klaatu is no villainous monster; he is an ultra-civilized human being
who makes the earthmen, by contrast, look like a monstrous race of
Yahoos . .
� Time
SUNDAY ONLY 4 PM plus 'Outland' 6 pm
& 2001: A Space Odyssey' 8 pm
HENDRIX THEATRE, MSC ADMISSION BY ID AND ACTIVITY CARD OR
MSC MEMBERSHIP
SPONSORED BY THE ECU STUDENT UNION FILMS COMMITTEE
SEAN CONNERY in
"0UTLAND"
PETER BOYLE
FRANCES STERNHAGEN JAMES B. SIKKING KIKA MARKHAM
Produced by RICHARD A. ROTH Executive Producer STANLEY O'TOOLE
Music by JERRY GOLDSMITH Written and Directed by PETER HYAMS
PANAVISION
TECHNICOLOR�
001

mBmnm
A LADD COMfNY RELEASE
THROUGH WASNEfi BROS �N
A WAJMB COMMUNICATIONS COMPAOT J
R
WKI V KWMKS
MftMM
MKIT M UUiT
C��H0ll O '�� tk l� ����� AM M�M� ����
SUNDAY ONLY 6 PM plus 'Doy rh� Eorth Stood SHU' 4 pm & '2001' 8 pm
HENDRIX THEATRE, MSC ADMISSION BY ID AND ACTIVITY CARD
-� t





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Madison Will Get Bye
Conference
Seeds Pending
Sports
The race is on in the ECAC-South
to gain the best pairings possible for
next week's conference champion-
ship tournament.
Unfortunately for local fans and
students. East Carolina can do no
better than sixth and could easily
finish seventh, in last place.
James Madison clinched the
regular season championship and
the first-round tourney bye that
goes with it with a 56-55 win over
William and Mary last Saturday. A
last-second jumper by forward Lin-
ton Townes saved the Dukes from
defeat.
The win put JMU at 9-1 in the
conference and 21-4 overall. The
Dukes will be idle during next
Thursday's opening day of tourney
action and will play the winner of
the game between the fourth and
fifth seeds.
Old Dominion traveled to Rich-
mond this past Monday and could
have clinched the second seed, but
fell by a narrow margin and will
need a win over James Madison this
Saturday to gain the runnerup posi-
tion.
ODU is 5-3. Richmond upped its
record to 6-4 Wednesday with an
easy, 89-63 win over ECU.
William and Mary has already
clinched the fourth seed, standing at
4-5 with only tonight's game with
George Mason and Saturday's con-
test against ECU remaining.
Navy, unable to schedule as many
conference games as the other
ECAC schools due to the late
organization of the league, has
finished its season at 2-4 and should
finish fifth.
George Mason is at William and
ECAC
South
Report
Mary tonight (Thursday). If the
Patriots win that game they will
escape the cellar, leaving ECU to
finish last in the league. If GMU
loses and ECU defeats William and
Mary Saturday, the Pirates will take
the sixth seed.
Tickets are still available to next
week's tournament at the Minges
Coliseum ticket office. Prices per
book, which includes six games, are
$9 for students and $12 for adults.
The event will be held at the Norfolk
Scope and will run Thursday
through Saturday.
ECM-MH III s 4NDINGS
Irani( nrf HnordaffH
James Madison Old Dominion Richmond William and Mar s.a C.rorge Mason raslarnliai9-1 J 5 h 4 4 : 4 2-6 2-7:i-4 i in r f 11 10 10-13 i: i: 10-15
RrMMNntKOt KMr W)W Hill
Thur. rrb. 2S
i.c'ki-Mason Sal.1! rrbilhani .it;j nM
� EastX Jamesar.wina Mad h Sun .rrb.ilnam and ()lu Domi 2XM 1!
HewarJ a' .1 : tr. Mason
PoH By KIN MAKTIN
ECU'S Bruce Peartree, pictured here
against N.C. State, scored 27 points
against Richmond VVednesda
Spiders
Decimate
Pirates
RICHMOND � Richmond
finished its regular season at 6-4 in
the ECAC-South and 17-9 overall
with a 89-63 romp over East
Carolina Wednesday night.
The Spiders jumped to a 36-27
halftime lead and, for all practical
purposes, clinched the win with an
11-0 streak over the first five
minutes of the second half.
The 89-point total was the highest
amount scored against the Pirates
this season, surpassing by one the
number of points Navy put on the
board against ECU last Saturday.
The loss was the fourth in a row
for the Pirates. All of those games
were conference matchups. Though
ECU won a number of non-
conference games in between, the
Bucs actually now have a six-game
ECAC-South losing skein.
Richmond was paced by senior
guard John Schweitz, who poured
in 22 points. Point guard Tom
Bethea contributed 16, Jeff Pehl 13
and Bill Five 10 points.
Pirate freshman guard Bruce
Peartree scored 27 points, both a
career and game high. No other
ECU player scored in double
figures, though Morris Hargrove
and Bill McNair tallied eight points
apiece.
The Pirates will be looking to
escape the league cellar this Satur-
day when they travel to William and
Mary for their final regular season
game.
ECU is 2-7 in the conference and
10-15 overall. The Pirates are hop-
ing to beat out George Mason (2-6
and 12-12) for the sixth seed in next
week's league tournament.
USC Controversy Included Sexual Involvement
Allegations of recruiting viola-
tions, financial and academic
assistance to players, drug use and
sexual involvement have all been
thrown around at South Carolina
this basketball season. The result
has been a rocky year for the USC
women's basketball team.
The furur became public on New
Year's Eve when it was announced
that Pam Parsons had resigned her
post as head coach of the Lady
Gamecocks for health reasons.
When contacted by the press the
next day. Parsons denied ever hav-
ing resigned.
She was having second thoughts
and did not want to confirm her
resignation to the press. University
officials would not reconsider her
case.
When Parsons resigned the Lady
Gamecocks were 7-0 and ranked se-
cond in the country. After her
resignation the team lost 6 of 11
before rebounding for the current
eight-game winning streak it will br-
ing into Minges Coliseum for a
game with East Carolina this Satur-
day night.
The real reasons behind Parsons'
departure were not made public un-
til an aricle appeared in the
February 8 issue of Sports Il-
lustrated. That is when the bubble
really burst at USC and, probably
not coincidentally, when the club
began its current hot streak.
Following Parsons' departure five
of the team's 11 players left the
squad, some in support of the
former coach. Things got so bad
that Larry Kelly, Parsons' replace-
ment, put an add in the student
newspaper asking for walk-ons.
Before the current season 18
players had left t-he USC program
during Parsons' five-year tenure as
head coach.
One player who quit the Lady
Gamecocks told the Gamecock, the
Charles
Chandler
student newspaper, she did so
because "the team was a cult and
she (Parsons) is Jim Jones
Among the numerous allegations
that Sports Illustrated uncovered
was involvement with drugs. Several
players admitted that they
remembered occasions in the past
when Parsons appeared to be
"stoned" on marijuana during
away trips.
In addition, her recruiting techni-
ques were questioned. She was said
to have "bought" several players,
offering to pay for such things as
room rent.
What did Parsons in, though,
were the accusations of her having
sexual relations with one or more
players.
Brantley Southers, a freshman
forward, witnessed Parsons and a
USC player kissing and reported
this to her mother, who took the
situation to university officials.
"I saw them kissing on one occa-
sion Southers was quoted as say-
ing in SI. "They were long kisses. It
really spooked me. And I heard
them saying they loved each other. I
heard a lot of rumors about Par-
sons, and she told me the rumors
were all true
Southers mother, to say the least,
was upset. She said in the article:
"What would you say if Pam Par-
sons came into your home, all dress-
ed up, with pretty clothes and
makeup and a nice hairdo and said,
'In a year you won't even know
your 'aughter You'd think, 'my
little tomboy is going to become a
lad Instead
A former Gamecock player, Pat
Mason, also told the magazine she
aw first-hand some instances that
she questioned.
"On my first recruiting trip to
campus, Parsons felt my left arm
and said 'It's so strong I looked at
her and that 'What is with this
lady?In her office she patted my
on the rear endI got out of there
fast. I didn't sav anything to
anybody about it
Mason also claimed that Parsons
"was always complimenting us on
our bodies
This brings us to the case filed
against Parsons b one of her
former assistants, Karen Brown.
"Pam recruited with sex in mind
Brown charged in the story. Brown
said Parsons once told her "I only
want good-looking girls on my
team
Sports Illustrated was unable to
get any sufficient comments on the
charges from Parsons, though she
did answer a question dealing with
homosexuality.
"What does 'being gay' mean?
she said. "I've had close relation-
ships with women, but when does a
relationship mean gay?"
Parsons went on to say that she
had no desire to coach again, that
she "might write a book, get into
broadcasting or go into a chiroprac-
tic field
One thing is for sure, what has
transpired at South Carolina this
year is very unfortunate and troubl-
ing. The controversy surrounding
Parsons did little to help the sport of
women's collegiate basketball.
The Lady Gamecocks, after some
rough going, have bounced back
and apparantly overcome the situa-
tion under interim head coach Larry
Kelly. Let's hope the controversy
will not lend permanent damage to
the sport of women's basketball.
Saturday In Minges Coliseum
Lady Bucs Host 13th-Ranked Gamecocks
��� �v CHAP 0UKLCY
Lady Pirate Mary Denkler Defends
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Managing Kdilur
Interesting matchups are not un-
common. But the one that lies ahead
for the East Carolina women's
basketball team this Saturday is
most unique and most important.
The Lady Pirates got off to a slow
4-7 start but have won 12 of their
last 13 and stand 16-8 heading into
Saturday's 7:30 p.m. matchup with
13th-ranked South Carolina.
The Lady Gamecocks have also
had to recover from some early
woes. They were at the top of the
basketball world earlier this season,
standing 7-0 and ranked second na-
tionally when head coach Pam Par-
sons turned in her resignation. Five
team members soon left the squad,
which responded with a tough 5-6
streak.
Parsons left the program in stor-
my fashion, with accusations of
recruiting violations and sexual rela-
tionships with her players making
the headlines. The team struggled
under interim coach Larry Kelly �
for a while.
Kelly has turned things around of
late, though. The Lady Gamecocks
have won eight in a row heading in-
to tonight's (Thursday) game at
thi-d-ranked Old Dominion. ECU
coach Cathy Andruzzi says USC
may now be playing its best ball of
the year.
"He (Kelly) has obviously done a
great job Andruzzi said. "I've
certainly been impressed with him.
He came into a most difficult situa-
tion. Any of the problems they had
apparently helped them because
they are a very tight group now
So are the Lady Pirates, Andruzzi
says.
"Our kids are playing well.
They're working very well together,
and are working harder than any
team I've ever had. They have
become very closely knit
USC is in good shape for a bid to
the NCAA post-season champion-
ship tournament, but the Lady Bucs
have only an outside shot. A win
Saturday would certainly help
ECU's chances, as the club will have
only next Wednesday's game with
arch-rival North Carolina remaining
on its schedule.
"Certainly, if we won this game
our chances would be increased
Andruzzi said. "We're looking at it
as very important. But you look at
every game this late in the season as
very important
ECU will depend on junior
forward-center Mary Denkler and
guard Sam Jones.
USC is led by 6-1 center Sheila
Foster, who averages 20 points and
10.3 rebounds per game. During the
club's winning streak those averages
have been 26 ppg and 13 rpg.
Forward Evelyn Johnson,
Magic's sister, averages 13 points
and 4.7 rebounds, while freshman
leaper Brantley Southers contriubes
9.2 points and 4.6 rebounds each
contest.
Boxing Tournament Upcoming
The seventh annual TKE-Miller
Boxing Tournament returns again
to Greenville on the East Carolina
University campus March 16-18.
The AAU sanctioned tournament
brings exciting amateur boxing to
Eastern North Carolina.
The tournament, principally
sponsored this year by the Miller
Brewing Company and C. O.
Tankard in conjunction with the
Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity at
ECU, is open to anyone who has not
won any prize money for any kind
of boxing event. No experience
whatsoever is necessary � just a will
and determination to box for three
two-minute rounds. The three
nighis of boxing will take place in
Minges Coliseum on the ECU cam-
pus. AAU officials will referee the
fights.
Winners from each weight class
will receive Miller identified
trophies. A "Most Valuable Boxer"
trophy and watch will also be
presented.
Proceeds from the tournament
will got to the St. Jude's Children's
Hospital, the National Philanthropy
project of Tau Kappa Epsilon. The
event was originally a collaborative
effort of the TKE fraternities at
ECU and Appalachain State in
1976. Since 1977, however, the
event has been taken over entirely
' by the Lambda Psi Chapter of Tau
Kappa Epsilon here at ECU.
Highlighting this year's tourna-
ment events is the "Ring Girl Com-
petition" being held Tuesday night,
March 2, at the "Elbo Room The
three winners will each work one
night as the Ring Girl and will
receive money and gifts.
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THE EAST rABOl 1NIAN FEBRUARY 25, 19829
Lady Pirates Place Second
BY CYNTHIA
PLEASANTS
�l. Sports rdiiur
The Lady Pirate
track team ran at UNC-
Chapel Hill this past
Saturday, and placed
second in two events.
Freshman Lisa
Whitley placed second
in the 600-yard run
with a time of 135.6.
Sophomore Carolyn
Moore placed second in
the 400-yard dash and
had a time of 61.5. Liz
Graham, a freshman
walk-on, placed fifth
with a time of 66.0.
Davene Cherry, a
freshman from Green-
ville, took third place in
the 60-yard dash with a
time of 7.4. Moore
came in at 7.5 for fifth
place in the same event.
Whitley also ran in
the 880-yard run, and
placed fifth with a
228.1 clocking.
Junior Eve Brennan,
a top lady Pirate long
distance runner, placed
fifth in the one-mile
event with a time of
5:25.0.
"I was particularly
pleased with Cherry,
Whitley, and Moore's
pertormance at the in-
vitational said ECU
coach Pat McGuigan.
"Our team is working
hard and really looking
forward to the outdoor
season
Is Balance A Disadvantage?
ATLANTA (UPI)
It seems a bit unfair,
but the only reason the
Atlantic Coast Con-
ference probably won't
wind up with the top
two basketball teams in
the nation this season is
because one is going to
lose, likely to the other,
in the ACC tournament
next week.
No conference has
ever wound up 1-2 in
'he national rankings.
But if top-ranked
Virginia and 2nd-
ranked North Carolina
meet in the ACC finals
at Greensboro, N.C a
week from Sunday and
the margin is as close as
expected, maybe, just
maybe, the loser will
wind up no lower than
No. 2.
Virginia's only loss
this season was at
North Carolina. North
Carolina has lost twice.
One of those was at
Virginia and the other
at home to 20th-ranked
Wake Forest which the
Tar Heels proved was a
luke by crushing the
Deacons by 18 points in
their return match at
Wake Forest.
The ACC has long
been rated the toughest
college basketball con-
ference in the country.
In the league's 29-year
history, only four
teams have made it
through its conference
schedule unbeaten
and two of those
North Carolina in 1957
and N.C. State in 1974
won the NCAA cham-
pionship.
Virginia is favored to
win the ACC regular-
season race since the
Cavaliers hold a one-
game lead over North
Carolina and their final
two games this week
are at home against
Wake Forest and
Maryland, two teams
they beat on the road.
But North Carolina
is the favorite in the
ACC tournament
because of its location
and, since they'll be
placed in different
regions for the NCAA
playoffs, don't he sur-
prised if the ACC has
two teams in the Final
Four like last year when
Carolina beat Virginia
in the semifinals.
Weight Lifting Titles On Line
SUMMER JOB OPENINGS FOR CAMP COUNSELORS
at Camp Sea Gull (boys) and Camp Seafarer (girls). Serving as a
camp counselor is a challenging and rewarding opportunity to
work with young people, ages 7 16. Sea Gull and Seafarer are
health and character development camps located on the coast
of North Carolina and feature sailing, motor boating, and
seamanship, plus many usual camping activities including a
wide variety of major sports. Qualifications include a genuine
interest in young people, ability to instruct in one phase of the
camps' programs, and excellent references. For further infor-
mation and application, please write a brief resume of training
and experience in area(s) skilled to Don Cheek, Director,
Camps Sea Gull Seafarer, P.O. Box 10976, Raleigh, North
Carolina 27605.
The national collegiate weight lif-
ting championships will be held at
the East Carolina stregth complex
this Saturdday.
The best weight lifters in the na-
tion wil gather at the complex,
located at 220 E. 14th St with
hopes of winning a national title and
growing closer to their goals of
making the 1984 Olympic Games.
Competition will be held in three
areas of lifting � the snatch, clean
and jerk.
There will be three separate ses-
sions, with the lighterweights com-
peting in the morning and the
heavyweights in the afternoon.
The action gets underway at 10:30
a.m. and will last until early in the
evening. Admission is $1 foi ECU
students and $2 for the general
public. ECU varsity athletes will be
admitted free of charge.
introducing
the No. 1
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Tuesday Night -
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ECU Students are admitted for
JUST $2.00 including Skate Rental
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mon. through sat
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Western Sizzlin introduces
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FILMS COMMITTEE
1
T





10
THF EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 25.1982
Bucs Successful
BY CYNTHIA
PIKASANTS
The ECU men's
track team took first
place in three out of
four events this past
Saturday at a UNC-
Chapel Hill meet.
The meet included
such teams as North
Carolina, Wake Forest,
Duke, N. C. State, Ap-
palachian State, and
Western Carolina. All
of the schools fielded
complete teams except
ECU.
Sophomore Clint
Harris placed first in
the 60-yard dash with a
time of 6.3. ECU's
Michael Coins placed
second with a time of
6.3 and freshman Jeff
Golden placed third
with a time of 6.4.
Shaun Laney, a
Pirate All-America in-
door performer, had a
time of 1:12.9 in the
600-yard run to take
first place.
Sophomore Ray
Dickerson won the
880-yard event with a
fast clocking of 1:57.4.
Three ECU runners
placed in the 440-yard
dash. Junior Tim
Cephus, who has been
hampered with leg in-
juries for some time,
placed second with a
time of 50.7. Keith
Clarke placed third
with a time of 50.9 and
freshman Terry Ford
had a time of 51.2 to
place fifth.
The ECU relay team
did not run in the mile-
relay because Cephus
had injured his ankle,
and Clarke was having
problems with blisters.
Head coach Bill Car-
son said the meet was
definitely a success.
"This was really a
tremendous perfor-
mance for us" he said,
"It's the best perfor-
mance we've had all
season. "This just goes
to show that we're still
a pretty good club in
this area
Spirits 'Lifted'
The track team will
run this Saturday in the
Metro Invitational at
Virginia Tech. Accor-
ding to Carson, the
team will run the milc-
relay in addition to the
usual events.
The ECU Intramural Department spon-
sored a weight lifting meet on Tuesday,
February 16 at the ECU Strength Complex.
The participants were divided up into dif-
ferent weight classes and participated in three
various types of lifts. These lifts included the
"Bench Press "Squat and "Dead Lift
In the women's division, Devena Cherry
was named the outstanding lifter while in the
men's action Mike Davis took top honors.
Congratulations go out to these respective
winners. The ECU IM Dept. would like to
thank all of the participants for making this
such a success. We would also like to give a
big vote of thanks to all the student workers
who assisted in the meet with special recogni-
tion going to the M M Boys, (Mike 9 John
Merritt) for lending their expertise.
Here are the results and the respective win-
ners:
Men's Division
Flyweight Division � Allen Best,
Lightweight Division � Dean Wolford, Mid-
dle Heavyweight Division � Mike Davis,
Heavyweight Division � Jeff Speight.
Women's Division
Flyweight Division � Wanda Moore, Mid-
dleweight Division � Devenna Cherry.
Several outstanding lifts were recorded dur-
ing the night as Mike Davis benched a total of
385 lbs. Other contestants with outstanding
lifts included Wanda Moore with a 220 lb.
"squat" and Jeff Speight with a 335 lb.
"bench press
Remember to get your entry forms in early
for upcoming activities including Softball,
Volleyball, and Home Run Derby. These IM
activities are presently opening and will get
underway within the next few weeks. Softball
and Volleyball will both be "instant schedul-
ed" so if you have any questions call or come
by the Intramural Office at 204 Memorial
Gym.

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ECU Golfers Ready
B THOMAS BRAME
The ECU golfers tee
up for their first match
this Friday in
Tallahasse, Fla. The
home team for the
tournament will be
Florida State.
The 24-team field
features someof the
best teams on the est
coast. Some of the
strong schools include
Alabama, Louisiana
State, UNC-Chapel
Hill and Clemson.
As tar as a team
finish for the match,
1 CU Coach Bob
Helmick predicts, "We
should finish among
the top 10. We need to
get off to a good start
which will help our
confidence
The Pirate qualifiers
for the state match will
be Don Sweeting, Mike
Move, Don Gafner,
Jerry Lee and Chris
Czaia.
"Gafner and
Sweeting are capable of
showing well said
Helmick. "They are
playing their best golf
now
The favorite to win
the individual honors is
Jodie Mudd of Georgia
Southern. Mudd is
rated the number one
amateur inthe world.
Helmick said. "1 expect
Jodie to win every tour-
nament he is in this
year.
"Mudd will be
challenged by reigning
U.S. amateur champ
Nathaniel Crosby of
Miami, Florida
The match will last
until Sunday. The
Pirates go back on the
road to the Fripp Island
Invitational in South
Carolina March 5-7.
Smith's Mo. 6 1 Rock Nightclub
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IF YOU ARE HAVING PROBLEMS WITH DRUGS OR ALCOHOL �
WE CAN HELP �"STUDENTS HELPING STUDENTS"
CAMPUS ALCOHOLS, DRUG CENTER � 757-6793
IN RECENT MONTHS, THE ARRESTS OF COLLEGE STUDENTS
INVOLVED IN DRUG RELATED INCIDENTS HAS INCREASED
DRAMATICALLY. Because of our concern and in our quest for
RESPONSIBILITY, we would like it known to all the students the new
drug laws now in effect. These are the laws and hence will be enforced!
1. Possession of 50 lbs. and less than 100 lbs. of marijuana � minimum
prison sentence of 5 years.
2. Possession of 100 lbs. and less than 2,000 lbs. of marijuana � minimum prison sentence of 7
years.
3. Possession of 2,000 lbs. and less than 10,000 lbs. of marijuana � minimum prison sentence of 14
years.
4. Possession of 10,000 or more lbs. of marijuana � minimum prison sentence of 35 years along
with fines.
5. Possession with, or intention to sell 28 grams or less of cocaine � presumptive sentence of 3-10
years along with fines.
6. Possession with or intention to sell 28 grams or more, but less than 200 grams of cocaine �
presumptive sentence of 7 years along with fines.
7. Possession of 1,000, but less than 5,000 dosage units of methaqualone (qualudes) � 7 year prison
sentence along with a $25,000 dollar fine.
8. Possession of 5,000, but less than 10,000 dosage units of methaqualone (qualudes) � 14 year
prison sentence along with a $50,000 dollar fine.
9. Possession of 4 grams, but less than 14 grams of opium � 14 year prison sentence, along with a
$50,000 dollar fine.

vs
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00
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0 .
America's roast beef
'Yes sir!
2 Arby's Roast Beef Sandwiches for $2.00
Limit 1 Coupon Per Customer Per Visit.
Not Good inConjunction With Any Other Offer �Good at Arby's, E. Greenville Blvd.
Pitt Plaza Shopping Center Expires March 7th, 1982
Please present coupon before ordering.
r Free Potato Cake With Beef 'N Cheddar
Limit 1 Coupon Per Customer Per Visit.
I Not Good in Conjunction With Any Other Offer � Good at Arby's, E. Greenville Blvd.
r Pitt Plaza Shopping Center Expires March 7th, 1982
Please present coupon before ordering.
grLIwIlTjTcjua arosITrom kmar-
"Pilot pens! You have
to hold onto them
with two hands
Rodney Dongerfield
fr
College
Graduates
BECOME A LAWYER'S ASSISTANT
� Program approved by American Bar Association
� Day or Evening classes available
� Employment assistance
A Representative from The National Center tor Paralegal
Training's Lawyer's Assistant Program will be on campus
on Tuesday Mar 76 from 1 00 p.m. - 4:30 p m at the
Placement Office to meet interested students For more
information contact the Placement Office or The National
Center for Paralegal Training. 3376 Peachtree Road NE.
Suite 430 Atlanta Georgia 30326. (404) 266-1060
Please send me information about a career as a lawyer s
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if s almost criminal how peooie go 'or my p.iot Fmeimer Why? i�s
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Peopie get their hands on it and forget it s my pen
l got no pen And no respect'
People go nuts over my Pilot Raw
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For only 89c fhey
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PILOT
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Name
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1 College � v, ryarj
� 1982
�SPRING 0AY SUMMER DAY PALL DAY
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Atlanta. Ga. 30326
404 266-1060
w
Carolina Opry House
Presents in Concert
ONE NIGHT ONLY
Delbert McClinton
Thursday, Feb. 25 th
Special Admission Price
$7,00 at Door Day of Show
Doors Open �8:00 p.m.
Special Guests�Bill Lyerly Band
For Further Information Call
758-3943
t
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CRIMEBUSTERStextbook
LESSON 4v M0LD1M6 YOUR
smart,) ciGAiBire like real
TDU6H GUY:
c 1951 UHIVERALCITV STUDIOS. INC





'iJiis a?ittiii u?
DETEC TO-VISION
by Rigby Reardon
dame to see you, Rigby Announced the bellhop, handing
a card.
It read, 'Trixie LaTour, Dancer Extraordinaire
The kid jerked his thumb over his shoulder and said, "It's that one,
Rigby � the blonde with the puzzled look on her kisser
Puzzled was hardly the word for it. Perplexed, yes, confounded, maybe. In a
quandary, doubtless. Confused, possibly .who knows? (What do I look like: a
walking thesaurus?!) I sauntered across the hotel lobby to where she was standing. "What
gives, sister?" I snapped, "You're about as jumpy as a cat in a room fulla rockin' chairs
She glanced at me through her dime-store lashes and blubbered, "I'm sooo confused! I just sat
through three showings of 'Dead Men Don't Wear Pajamas' at the Bijou and I still don't
know who dunnit! I know I ain't the smartest dame in the world, but sheeesh! I didn't
understand any of it! I feel so so stewpid
"Awww, lay off the googoo talk, ya dumb broad I sneered. I
had heard it all before.
"When is Hollywood gonna wise up?" I mumbled. How long are
they going to go on confusing and embarassing John Q. Public?
That night I stopped by the laboratory of Professor Al Fresco, the
world's smartest man. He has more degrees than a thermometer,
a Ph.D in General Knowledge, and a B.L.T. in the toaster oven.
He's so smart, he's rich.
"I've got just the ticket, Rigby The Professor assured me. "It's a
little invention of mine I've been working on ever since I saw
'Dead Men Don't Wear Dentures' back in '32you know, me
and the little Mrs. never DID figure that one out! That's when I
came up with the idea of this dandy gadget
"Cute, Professor I yawned. "What is it?"
"I call it DETECTO-VISION It attaches to any motion picture camera lens. Then, through the
miracle of modern technology and by means of a scientific process far too complicated for the
average man on the street to understand, it transforms even the most muddled, confused
unintelligible screenplay into a concise, comprehensive mystery movie that even a hat check
girl can understand
I flicked my cigarette ash onto his bald head.
"Fresco I smiled. "There's a whole world out there just waiting for you
When is Hollywood
gonna wise up?"
PRINTED IN U ' �"�





Title
The East Carolinian, February 25, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 25, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.182
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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