The East Carolinian, February 18, 1982






Ulhe
Carolinian
�5
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 58 No.
Ihursdav, February 18. 1982
(�reinville, VC
H Pages
On The Inside
Law Society Hosts Edmisten
By DIANE ANDFRSON
M�t( Wntrc
Mtei three yeais � and a halt -
houi cla because of airplane trou-
ble v Attorney General Rufus
Edmisten discussed several kev
issues and ottered helpful informa-
tion and encouragement to I C I
lents aspiring to law careers.
I dmisten spoke Wednesday night
i. February meeting of the ECU
1 aw Society
"Since 1 have been a lawyer, I've
a boring dav Edmisten
said " 1 he greatest ingredient to law
school is a simple sort of banal in-
gredient called intestinal fortitude
"1 have seen some people with
degrees in chemistry do nist as well
as those who majoi in political
science he added. "1 will sav this
about law school. You should learn
to write make English sentences
learn to get to the heart ol the
issue
Among the issues discussed was
Edmisten's stand on the state en
forcement ot di ug law s.
"I'm a fanatic lie said In
November 1975, Edmisten stai
what has been called an on goinj
"wai against drug pushers wh
included the use f specialized State
Bureau ot Investigation units
Several representatives from the SB1
were at the meeting.
Anothei issue the attorney
teral expressed strong feelings
about was the protection and treat
ment ol v ictims ol crime.
"Why do we simply forget the in-
nocent victims ol crime Edmisten
� ed ' I hey have no rights. e
will rush out and do everything we
can foi thosC wio have committed
mes
Some ol his suggestions tor mi
proving the situation were govern
ment funding t: medical tr
ment. time lost 'Kim work,
various other deli
victims
"Right now th
( arolina ha
restitution progran ited
States Edmisten "It
matter ot mom . but 1 thinl
priority should b
priority
Regard
ing age in the 21
I dmisten said. "I thinl
thai would solve the
because 1 think you would
"I don't kniw hi w you could ei
uie wh
trunk drivinj the
langei enl people
sei ve a t ere p i
I � � elected to I
. 1974 an I ted
976 a 1981 Bel
�rked with
am J 1 rvin I; (D N.( in
-
See EDM1STI V Page J
Weather Watch
Inside Index
Monday Break-Ins Damage Three Cars
K t.RH, RIDFOl T
Wafl W nltr
v mately $20 worth ot
lipment was stolen Mon-
n one-third of a three-car
it the parking lot on Fifth
Read streets According to
. . the incidents oc-
i sometime after 1 p.m.
, eny was reported at 4:2s
by I 1,1 x' vens, owner of one
e veil . . I Ipon returning to
earlier in the day, Stevens
doot on her 1981 Honda
t ad been ben: back and an
a I several cassette tapes
i In addition to the larceny.
ige to he N eens car was
� S V If
kellv
Ste ens not it iedpl
Jackson ot campus security, w
was on patrol in the area.
by lackson revealed, that two otl
sars had also been broken ini
Damage to the other ars, ow
Christine Iavloi and l.ori
Fordey, was assessed at 530 a
$500 respectiv elv .
" 1 he odd aspect to this i ase
that they (the break-ins) occun
during the dav and the method
volved according to Detect
McAbee. "A large prying devic
was apparently used, he said
McAbee added that the Fifth a
Reade streets lot is
susceptible to b t ak-ins.
the east bv the w oods
icr
o.
by
tul
Mt. bee suggests that students
ove all valuables from their cars
when parked and recommends that
eo equipment be installed in a
tied place.
Although fingerprints and foi
' phot � iken, there ate
no suspe ts al this tune.
I he remaindei ol the blottei was
rhe follow
" pus in . i � reported between
iliKi I
uia
net
rly
� b s -I M) p.m. Ricl a
inonway ot Kick's Guitai Shop
reported the larceny ot stereo equip-
ment fi �ultural (
ret � 12:45 a m p).
nderson reported that a vehicle
registered t Steven Rash ot room
206 1) Belk
and a tape pla
Nancy He:
reported the �
belonging i v
S 11 k i: i
Feb 11. 11 a
McDowell '
calculatoi from 202 K
Officer (i
larceny
emergency
at the northea
Building.
Feb. 12. 1:15
I awrence, a. i
rested norl
ent exp
cy Hrrje ot 707 (.)�.
i � �
I
;ntl fli
Feb md 14 No campu
re repo'
� 1:30 r Hmothv
cle had be
outh ol loyner !
W i
ar bat-
the vehicle
le power pi mi ;
par k i
� eley streets .
High School Students Unhappy
With 'Incompetent' Teachers
ti VUkr kU (.ilk Ssuive. more than 51 percent claim-their s hools' teachers and were incompetent adequately preparing Foi college. Another : 5 percei that their instruc-� ver � iding that prepara-( remaining 5 percent no strong feelings either u eyed, percent in-
.hey plan to attend col-�matelv 60 percent of . bound claimed they pursue graduate degrees. 1 �� 'han three
'lose answering said that
.need financial aid during liege careers, either loans, me combination ot the 5, with the decreases in tudent-aid opportunities aireadv
M H) wimplemented bv the Reagan ad-
ministra ind furtl ,
posed tor 1983. n
unsure as to what then fu
in store, especially c
immediate post-high school pei
Furthermore, although m rc than
half of the students claimed
their teachers were incompete
tew indicated that they woul
any attempt to improve or
the existing educational system
Fewer than MX)
students, ot 6.5 percent � .
ot majoring in education .fil-
ing careers in educational fields
I he majority showed interest in
more "tangibly profitable" occupa
tions, such as business administra
tion, 20 percent: medicine. 17 pei
cent; and engineering, I" percent.
These figures reflect the recent
trend by students to shy away from
liberal arts programs.
M rists Of 1hampion
"Black" Bartollins, intramural arm-wrestling champ at astarolina tor two vears. takes
Flbo I uesday night.
Photo Bv DAVE WILLIAMS
on a challenger at the
Pentagon Increases Military Research Funds
MADISON, Wise. (CPS) - It - Imach, who also heads the
Ge rge Stelma i ersity's Motor Behavior
ei at the I aboratory .
He envisions a dav when his work
tudy how tin. ild aid sufferers of Parkinson's
vhat I do. .ase. or improve sports perfor-
nM i3f
But Stelmach's grant came from
an unlikely source; the U.S. Air
Force, which presumably wants to
1634
1545
Above are the lop Pentagon grant-getters for iqjjo, according to the Depart-
ment of Defense. Figures are in millions of dollars. The next five:
Rochester, deorgia Tech. Dayton. Penn State and Southernal.
learn more about pilots' reaction
time than pole vault records.
Stelmach's uncertainty over tak
ing the money is going on more tie
quently at major research campuses
these davs as the Pentagon, taking
advantage of receding memories ot
college anti-militarism, muscles its
way back into academia in a big
way.
Military research on campus, in
tact, is virtually the only segment ot
the higher education budget to grow
in recent years.
The Pentagon's campus spending
has rocketed from $495 million in
fiscal vear 1980 to an estimated
S709.7 million tor 1982 , according
to the National Science foundation,
which monitors federal research
finances.
The same sum would pay the
salary ot 215,(KM) fully-tenured pro-
fessors making $33,000 a year, oi
swell the U.Ss total teaching corps
by more than 40 percent.
Even though they can't use the
money for new professors, colleges
are undoubtedly the mam
beneficiaries of the Reagan ad-
ministration's $20 billion research
budget. Over the previous three
years, campuses have enjoyed a
TO-perceflt increase in military
research grants.
The bulk of the increased spen
ding has gone to the hard sciences.
Funds for engineering, physics,
chemistry, math and compute!
science projects are way up, while
funds for political science, sociology
and othei liberal aits fields are
dow n.
Ihete is also a S24 million in-
:rease in military funding tor
psyhological research.
Because there are so tew other
sources ot funds these davs, many
presidents ot research universities
regularly travelling t o
U ashington, D.( to ask what they
can d foi the Pentagon and then to
defend increased military funding
before congressional critics.
1 or its pail, the Pentagon has
opened a special agency � the Of-
fice foi Research to inform pro-
lessors .md administrators of its
needs and to encourage grant pro-
posals to meet them.
I here are some kinds of military
research that are beneficial
seasons Wisconsin's Stelmach, who
ultimately decided to take the Pen-
tagon's money. He savs his research
would go undone despite its impor-
tance "to daily life" if the Air Force
hadn't funded it.
On the Othei hand, �"there are
sonic that I would object to
Academic objections to and wor-
iic's about military research have in-
creased as dramatically as the
military spending.
"I he worst thing about military
funding argues Dr. Seymoui
Melman, a Columbia University
professor who has authored several
books critical of Pentagon spen-
ding, "is that it sets the tone for the
university. It sets the tone for foun-
dation money, and each time leaves
a woeful absence ot work ii
areas
" tun ou're
t co kmd ol money (on campus)
he predicts. One kind is "classil
which means closed doors and ai
ed guards piece ol the univei
becomes an aimed camp
"And tor unclassified
you have to remembei that
military always has areas of special
interest t I he money) becomes a big
magnet, and tor every ten applic;
(tot it), you'll have anothei ten
thinking. "What does he 1)M
(Department ot Defense) want
Melman contends that "when
they do this, they're no: thinking of
other needs. It tends ; deflect
research and intellectual develop
ment
1 o; example, "there is no
research on conversion from a war
economy Melman points o
Similar dissent is being heard at
campuses where mihtarv research
grown over the last few ve
Demonstrations and protests m
various torms have happened at
Harvard. Michigan. MIT. Arizona
State, Iowa state and Washington,
among others.
An organization called the
Wisconsin Peace Conversion Pro-
ject sponsored a November national
meeting to form a network of
ips opposed to the mihtarv spen-
ding. dni helped bring the i
back to nationwide attention las-
vear when it picketed the most
See Mil II R . Page 3
Student Suffers Fatal
Heart Attack At Game
An last Carolina student who
went to Minges Coliseum to watch
the Pirate basketball team play
James Madison Wednesday night
suffered a heart attack just betoie
the opening tip-ofl and died shortlv
thereaftei
Randy I ail Griffin, a sophomore
from Tarboro. suffered a heart at
tack in the coliseum lobby at ap
proximatel) 7:30 p m. and went into
cai diac arrest at ?9.
He was transported to Pitt Coun-
ty Memorial Hospital via am-
bulance and given CPR on the way
bv medical technicians He was pro-
nounced dead at the hospital at
8:25.
Griffin, who had a history of
heart problems, turned 20 years of
age just over two weeks ago, on
February 2 He was a resident of
Scott Dorm.





i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 18, 1982
t
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
It you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
m the announcements column
please send the announcement (as
brief as possible) typed and
double spaced to The East Carol,
man in care ot the production
manager
For better service, we are now
asking that you pick up several
copies ot Our new announcement
application tor your upcoming
event$
There is no charge tor art
nouncements but space is often
limited Tneretore we cannot
guarantee mat your announce
menT will run as long as you want
ana suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column for puCI'C't,
The deaahne for announcements
is 5 p m Friday for the Tuesday
paper and 5pm Tuesday tor the
Thursday paper
This space is available to a
campus organizations and depart
ments
SGA POSITION
Persons interested in applying
toi the SGA Attorney General
pos't.on may do so in Room 228 of
Mendenhali Student Center bet
ween the hours ot 8 a m and 5
p m Monday through Friday
CHURCH OF
NAZARENE
The Church ot Nazarene la
rra.nline Protestant denom.na
tiOh has oec'Oeo to plant a church
n Greenville under the areec'ion
of Rev Ainston Huff Any Chr.s
hart nt"restea n finding a place ot
se-v .e ano a chance to ma'ure in
,Cir spiritual growth is urged to
help No mat'er niji your talents
arc Ou are important -Vtte' he c
Id a church, you mji move
OP Out ,0jr work will rems ana
grow Call Pastor Huff at 757 J606
WRITERS
To a'i writers who have applied
'or lobs wi'h The East Carolinian
or who would like to apply There
a De a meeting tor ail writers on
Tuescay February 23 at 5 p m for
an .nterestea part.es it you can
not come to the meeting at th.s
time can Karen during the
oass.t.ed hours and snme othere
arrangements w.M be r je it we
ao not hear from you we will
assume you are no longer in
terested Assignments will be
given at this meef.ng Be there!
WOMEN'S SOCCER
CLUB
Congratulations ladies for four
games on Sunjay' Our
ne�t paract.ces will be Thursday
Feo 21 at 4 00 on the soccer fieio
beside Minges New members are
encouraged to attend
CO-OP EDUCATION
The Cooperative Education Of
tice. located m 313 Rawl Building
currently has iOb openings for
Summer and Fall 1982 with the
foiling agencies Social Security
Administration Baltimore MD
Morth Carolina internship Ottice
Raleigh. NC Camp Day NC in
stitute ot Government Raleigh
NC
For more information contact
the Coop office in 313 Rawi
Building
TEAM HANDBALL
CLUB
ECU Team Handball Club in
v.tes an interested persons both
male and female to iOin us Hand
ban .s a new and e�oting sport
tha' is eas� to learn and tun to
play The Handball Club is cur
rentty scheduled to make two trips
to the New York city area tor tour
naments For more information
and practice times can Tom Cody
i7S8 4933!
VITA
The ECU Accounting Socety
will sponsor the Volunteer Incomt
Tax Assistance program on
Tuesdays and Thursdays from
4 00 to 6 00 p m Tne booth willb e
at Mendenhali Student Center next
to the information desk Persons
wishing help wth the.r income
taxes must bring an necessary
forms ano documents
PRINT GROUP NEWS
Rudy Pozzatt dist.ngu :hea
Professor of F.ne Arts ot Indiana
UnverSity Will conduct morn.ng
and afternoon pnntmak.nq
workshops on February 23 and 24
Morning workshops will start at 9
am and run until noon The atter
noon workshop w.tl be held from
1 30 until 5 P m A slide presenta
t.on and lecture will be given by
Mr Pozzatt! the evening of
February 23 in jenk.ns
Auoitorium atgpm
FAITH & VICTORY
i ve got a serious question tor all
of you reading this announcement
Do you have any real assurance
that you'll go to Heaven if you died
torn � -w if not, then you should
rea consider finding out how to
get that gift Jesus has already
paid the price for you � ius'
receive him as lord of your life
Faith 8. Victory Fellowship meets
every Friday night at 7 p m in the
Jenkins Art Building m the
Auditorium
SLAP
Students in General College with
an interest in Speech Language '
Auditory Pathology are 'c meet on
Tuesday February 23 at 7 00 p m
;n Brewster D 101 At that time all
students wit receive advisement
for pre regstration tor summer
ana fan terms
ATTENTION
AKA PPHA NAMS w sponsor
a hypertension screening Satur
day, Feb 20 at Cornerstone Mis
S'Onary Baptist Church from 10 00
am to 4 00 p m The public is in
v ec
CONTINUING
EDUCATION
Personal Development Pro
grams begin Feb 25 � Yoga, in
vesting in the 80s, Speed Reading.
Prescription 8, Non prescription
Drugs Feb 27 - The Small Com
puter Revolution. March 1 -
Assertiveness as a Way of Life
March 22 Child Behavior
Management Also. Feb 23 �
Roberts Rules of Order. Camera I.
Calligraphy. Beginning Ballet,
Jazz Exerc.se. intermediate
Bridge. Banio Guitar Feb 24 -
Aigebra Review Clogging I.
Aerobic Movement Exercise Can
7SJ 6143 or visit Division of Conti
nuing Education
SEMINAR
There will be a seminar on Fn
day. Feb 26. at 2 00 p m in room
201 Flanagan building The
speaker is Dr Joseph Bonaven
tura. which is the director of
Marine Biomedical Center, ot
Duke university Marine
Laboratory in Beaufort. N C His
topic is "Hemocvanins Nature's
Waqy of Tricking Copper Atoms to
Reversibly Bind Oxygen
LIFE ANDCAREER
College is set up to give a stu
dent a guarantee for a career, yet
college does not teli the student
how to succeed tin their career or
life Real success includes inner
peace and confidence. 11SH 26 3.4)
ana the only way to have the best
peace and happiness in your heart
is through a knowledge of God
( n Peter 1 2,3) Understanding the
B'ble 'S hte way to Obtain this in
ner peace and knowledge so you
can live lOyfully (ECC 9 7 10;
That is what we strive to learn ana
teach Come lO.n us m our quest to
grow to our best (EPH 4 IS)
Thursday at 8 00 p m in room
242 MSC
DRAWING COURSE
The School ot Art would like to
make all University students
aware that Art 1020 (Drawing) it
available both first and second
sessions of summer school This
drawing course is geared to non
art ma tors and can be used as part
of the Humanities and Fine Arts
requirement The course is being
taught First Session everyday
trom 11 20 12 SO. and Second Ses
Sion it is being taught everyday
trom 8 9 30 p m
HOUSING DISPLAY
The school of Home Economics,
is having a Residential Housing
Display trom Feb 14 21 at
Mendenhali Student Center
Students from the Housing
Department will be displaying
works of all aspects of residential
houseing There will be a recep
tion on Saturday, feb 20 from 1 00
to400pm The public is invited to
attend
BLACK HISTORY
In honor of Black History
Month. Reverend Arlee Griffm
will be speaking on the Black
Church. Thursday Feb 18. at 7
p m m the Multi Purpose Room
Mendenhali Also the ECU Gospel
Ensemble will be featured Admis
sion S SO Tickets are available
from NAACP members or at the
door
KYF
The Kings Youth Fellowship
will hold its next meeting on
Februar y IB at 8 p m in
Mendenhali iRoom 247) Visitors
are welcome and refreshments
will be served at the conclusion ot
the meeting
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
Personal Development Pro
grams begm'
Feb 16 Conversational French
Conversational German II. Out
door and Indoor Plants Feb 19
Beginn.nq Ballroom. in
termediate Ballroom Dance Feb
22 How to make a Good Marriage
Better Sottbaiiasebali Official.nq
Call 757 6143 or visit Divsion ot
Continuing Education
VOLUNTEERS
NEEDED
The Pitt County Juvenile Ser
vices Restitution Program is
urgently m need ot volunteers to
serve as on site supervisors tor
luveniles as they perform various
community service tasks
You may volunteer any number
Of hurs per week or per month
Monday through Saturday, and
you can be reimbursed tor an,
program related travel
For further information please
call Cookie Rodgers at 758 4223 or
come by the Juvenile Court
Counselors office on the fourth
tlOOr ot the Pitt County COur
thouse
WALK FOR
HUMANITY
ECU Greenville Walk For
Humanity is having an important
meeting tor anyone wanting to
help with this years "Walk " We
need lots of help We want to have
total campus exposure plus sup
port lor our biggest Walk ever
Please come on Feb 25 at 7 30
p m to the Newman House (953 E
10th St I or call 752 4216
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAMS
Will begm March 30 Bas.c
NAUI or PADI SCUBA Certifica
tion April 8 - Bas c Sailing Can
or visit Division ot Continuing
Education telephone number.
757 6143
AD HOC
U S Military Aid rsle�n�
El Salvador s corrupt govern
ment We tram their troops at Fort
Bragg n you're opposed to these
practices we .nvite you to iOin the
ECU AD HOC Commttee opposed
to El Sawadoran Military A.d We
will be organizing an ECU Carr
pus Protest For more, ntc �
can 758 4906
LATTER DAY SAINT
atter Day Sam Student
association is sponsoring a tree
dim aria refreshments ever Tues
day even.ng at ' 00 in 'he cot
house at Mendenhali Ai"
et ome to come ana jotn us �
week '
n
The Kast Carolinian
rr.e iht- iiintpus i intmttitniy
unu I9f
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the acaaemic
rar ana every Weanesday dur
.ng the Summer
The East Carol.n.an is the ot
ticiai newspaper of East
Carolina University owned,
operated, and published lor and
tf the students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate SJ0 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located m the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU.
Greenville. N C
POSTMASiER Sena address
changes to The East Carolinian,
Old South Building, ECU Green
ville NC 27834
Telephone 757 6366, 6367, 6309
Application to mail at second
class postage rates is pending at
Greenville, North Carolina
CORSO
There will be a CORSO meeting
Thursday, Feb 18 at 5 30 p m at
Mendenhali Check Information
Desk for room number All people
interested in Corrections and
Social Work are invited to attend
ATTENTION
The East Carolina university
Chapter of the National Student
Speech. Language ano Hearing
Association is sponsoring the
Twelth Annual Speech. Language
and Hearing Symposium on
February 25 and 26, 1982 Guest
Speakers include Kathleen
Holmes and Dr Howard Shane
Topics include. The Use of a Nor
mal Language Model lor Deat
Children' and Assessment and m
tervention tor the Non Speaking'
For further information contact
Margo Mulligan at 757 6961
GENERAL COLLEGE
PREREGISTRATION
CHANGES
General College stuOc-nls should
conta. ' the.r advsers pr.or '
Februa 72 to l�r
prereq stration
LAW VS LOVE
Christianity not, � h I . �
set ot laws apoi ed to ao .
neaver EpheSians 2 8 9
It is a qrowmq procev ���'
leacn to Ad
a change to the bf t attil
values in I )� Romans 12 I 7 &
Coiossans 3 I '� '
fellowship
th.s ana Othei ' n the B'bli
Thursday a' e p "
Mendenhali Feb 18
SGA
To An Organizat.or
, � . rtent
� tor lunos tor the
school ,ear are nc.
�� �
MEMBERSHIPDRIVE
i
15 Students from
SCEC �' pi �
SW�S

ACM
The ECU chapter ot ACM will
meet this Thursday Feb 18 at
3 30 n room 13? Austin This week
Mr Charles Fowler, the data base
adm nistrator at the ECU com
put.ng center, will speak on data
base administration Anyone in
terested is invited to attend
ANIMALON WZMB
The "An,mar himself Jay
Nichols wilt be hosting "The Hap
py Pre Came Show From 2 4
Friaaqy the warm up will oeg.n
Lucky callers who call in when a
certain group is piayea (to be ah
nounceo) will receive a T shirt
r.ght off the Animals back! Tune
� n and turn if up
INTERVIEWERS
WANTED
The institute for Coastal ano
Mar.nt Resources is currently
Seeking six tc eight prospect ve
student interv.ewers tor a
research proiect on the recrea
t.onal fisheries .n the upper sounds
of eastern North Carolina Pro
spective interviewers must be
students at East Carol.na ana oe
able to furnish own transportation
The work will start m m.d to late
Apr and will continue through the
Summer months and .nto the tall
Training will take place in March
interested students are asked to
contact Cindy Stack for an inter
view at 757 6779
ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA
Would you like to be in a Fashion
Show Wen the Theta Alpha
Chapter of the Alpha Kappa Alpha
Soronty !nc presents Fantasia
featuring the fantasy of spring
1982 fash.ons There will be
fash.ons from sportswear,
swimwear. scene oes.gner .eans
formal wear, semi formal,
lingerie and many more There
wilt be a series ot meetings in th
month of February tor an n
terested young ladies and
gentlemen The schedule for
February is
Feb 18 Menoenhan Room 22)
7 30 10 30
Feb 22 Cultural Center
7 30 U 00
Feb 25 Mendenhali Room 221
7 30 10 30
BOOK AND
BAKE SALE
Pi Alpha Theta will be having a
book anc bake sale in front ot the
Student Supply Store Monday
Feb 22 Cook es, brownies ano
cake will be sold, also paperback
and hardcover books
ECU FRISbEECLUB
We're lammmg We have an
ultimate tournament next
weekend at Duke Practices are on
Tuesdays and Thursdays at 3 p m.
at the bottom ot College Hill For
mal tryouts this Saturday 2 p m
same location
Peter Laubert and Chns Ryan
will perform a Freestyle demo
Feb 27 at the Lady Pirate game at
Mmges They finished second in
the Canadian Nationals, so expect
some Hot freestyle Watch World
Champ.ons compete n The
Natural Light Flying Disc Classic
here at ECU April 17 and 18
WZMB
Have you heard? There is a
Show on WZMB with nothing but
high energy rock plus album
specials That's right 'The Elec
trie Rainbow Radio Show with
Kieth Mitchell is tor real I When
you ask' why every Saturday and
Sunday night from 10 1, of course
And what abaout this weeks
albums' Wen Saturday Keith's go
ing to play UFO's "Force it"
album and then Sunday it's Red
Riders latest No iazz and no com
meroals, no fooling
BETA LITTLE SISTERS
Beta Theta P. little sister rush is
tonight at 9 00 until All in
terested girls are invited to come
603 E Ninth St Behmg the
Library
Popcorn
Shrimp
All you can eat
Bob Hearing �
Manager
Phone 758-0327
Cross Green Street Bridge
Toke left ot 1st Light
Located one block down on left
Special Good Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday
This Week
SPORTSWORLD
THE SHOE OUTLET
(Located beside Evans Seafood)
Featuring name brand shoes at bargain prices.
Up To 75 OFF regular prices
Bass Steward-Mid u ire Brouse Abouts
201 W. Washington St. Within walking distance of campus.
�Y.n. v- �� .
J,
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610 W Greenville Blvd O W.
Tuesday Night
ECU NIGHT
JUST $1.00 with ID includes Skate Rental
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JUST $2.00 including Skate Renta
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SPECIALIZES IN:
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� Copies Cost 60 to 30copy
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208 E





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 18, 1982
SAINT
P DRiE
6000
:?
'
lv-3
Is
t.
Military Research Funds Increased
Continued From Page 1
notable symbol of
military research on
campus: the Army
Math Research Center
at Wisconsin.
But since 1970, when
the bombing of the
center killed a physics
grad student and
became a turning point
in the college anti-war
movement, the center
has kept a low profile.
It has dropped
"Army" from its name
and moved to a more
secluded part of cam-
pus. The actions are
typical of the Pen-
tagon's sharpened
sophistication in
softening its image, and
in the process-muffling
protest against its
newly-enlarged campus
presense.
But Pentagon of-
ficials in position to
discuss the DOD's
image-changing
strategy refused to
return College Press
Service's repeated
phone calls.
They have, however,
forged new. nominally
separate relationships
with their research
centers at Michigan,
Washington and John
Hopkins, which gets
the largest single col-
legiate chunk of DOD
research money.
In all three cases,
faculty members work-
ing at the centers �
which are organiza-
tionally independent
divisions of their cam-
puses � do only
unclassified,
publishable research,
while government
researchers handle the
classified work. By of-
ficial formulas, 85 per-
cent of all the work is
strictly military.
Aside from changing
names and altering
organizational charts,
the Pentagon has also
lowered its profile by
sponsoring multi-
disciplinary studies
done by different col-
lege departments.
Each department
gets a DOD grant, but
is never told the
ultimate nature of the
research, or how it fits
together with other
departments' research.
Such caution and
secrecy only angers
critics more. "It's like
having a permanant
military installation on
the campus com-
plains Adel Hough,
director of the Wiscon-
sin Peace Conversion
Project. The campus
becomes "an important
place for military an-
nihilation.
"I'm the parent of
two students, and it's
horrible to realize that
our daughters are at-
tending somewhere that
this is going on
Hough emphasizes
her objections extend
to other campuses as
well. "This has to be a
national effort. If you
kick them off one cam-
pus, they'll just move
to another
Edmisten Speaks To Students
Continued From Page 1
Edmisten was first
elected to his position
in 1974 and was re-
elected in 1976 and
1980. Before serving as
attorney general, he
worked with Sen. Sam
J. Ervin Jr. (D-N C.) in
several capacities, in-
cluding deputy
chief counsel to Ervin's
Watergate Committee.
Regarding his ex-
perience with
Watergate, Edmisten
said, 'There was a
magic moment there
when things changed.
the stock market dip-
ped a little bit but we
went on.
On his own career in
law, Edmisten said, "I
got elected to do my
thing, and by the way,
there is not a thing
wrong with the political
process
"ECU would not be
here, the great universi-
ty that it is, without the
great workings of
politics he added.
"There is nothing
wrong with politics.
The thing that would be
wrong with politics is
people not taking part
in it
After recalling a few
of the changes and im-
provements in which he
had been involved since
taking the office of
state attorney general,
Edmisten explained, "I
have only been an at-
torney for a little over
10 years, so how else
would I have an oppor-
tunity to engage in
something that impor-
tant?"
Classifieds
ATTENTION
Classified Mis will b� t�k�i ONLY
during th� Following hours:
Monday � I:is 3.00
Tuesday � 2 oo 3 00
Wednesday � 1:15-3:00
Thursday � 2:00-3:00
Friday � I IS 3:00
You must place the ads in person
and pay lor them in advance.
Rates are $1 lor the lirst is words
and � 05 per words after the lirst
fifteen.
FOR SALE
WATERBEDS: DON'T pay retail
for your heated waterbed buy
direct from mgf. and save. Buy a
complete 1st quality pine wood
heated waterbed with IS yr. war-
ranty for as low as tit (Oueen)
Sit (King) Layaway avail. Call
David lor appointment. 750-300
BANGED UP '71 Chevy Wagon
want to sell fast. S3SO or best oiler.
Dean 7S 2173
7 TRIUMPH TR-7. 4cyl. 4 speed.
Air. AM FM Cassette, stereo,
sunroof, Mag wheels, Beautiful
sports car. 53000 757-1711
JVC PORTABLE AMFM
Cassette Player. RC 5 JW
Dolby, Normal Cr02.
ManualAuto Recording, Sep.
Bass and Treble Controls, 4
speakers. Automobile plug. Ex-
cellent Cond. Must Sell 5135 -
750704
USED YAMAHA guitar owned 7
years - in good condition. 5130
negotiable. Call 757-3107 ask for
john. 1104 East Tenth Street.
540. STEAL a Pioneer Supertuner.
540. In-dash cassette, AMFM
Model KP 0000 (About two years
old. needs good demagmftcation
and clean job) Still cranks. Call
SCQtt: 750 2Q�
PEAVEY t to Electric guitar:
machine heads, humbucking,
pick-ups, phase switch. Played on
ly two month: 5375, 752 543
NIKON 24mm. F2AI Lens. Brand
New. Serious Inquiries only. Call
Chap between 4 7 weekdays.
752-354.
TOYOTA: AUTOMATIC, disk
brakes, lold down seats. 55 or
best offer Must soil. 750 420
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
one-bedroom apartment 575 plus
one-half utilities. Call Scott at
7 53 -4547
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 3 bedroom apt. at
Eastbrook. 50 plus 13 utilities
Coll 750-350
WANTED: HOUSEMATES 3
rooms available in 4 bedroom
house six blocks from campus.
Rent 50 and utilities. Call 752-507
TWO ROOMATES needed. Large
three bedroom house located ap
prox. three miles west of campus.
House is fully carpeted with
fireplace 504 monthly rent per
person, plus utilities. Please call
355-200 between hours of t 30 pm
and II pm. Deposits required.
FEMALE ROOMATE need Ml SO
per month. 13 utilities, one block
Irom school 7St 547
WANTED: MALE roommate
Wilson Acres Apts. Very nice 3
bedroom apt Pool and Sauna. 13
rent and utilites. Call 7S2 llll After
pm.
FEMALE ROOMATE wanted to
share Georgetown Apt. as of Spr
ing Break or after. Call 750-247)
NICELY FURNISHED 2 bedroom
Cypress Gardens Apt. available.
May thru Aug. Great for females
that are going to summer school.
Walking distance to campus. Call
751-304
RIDE NEEDED to Winston Salem
area Can leave anytime after 10
am Friday. Call 752-14.
HELP
WANTED
COUNSELORS FOR western
North CArolma coed summer
camp. Room, meals, laundry,
salary and travel allowance Ex
perience not necesary, but must
enjoy living and working with
children. Only clean-cut non
smokino college students need ap
ply. For applicationbrochure
write: Camp Pinewood, 1001
Cleveland Rd Miami Beach. Fla.
33141.
NEED MONEY: you won't get
rich, but the East Carolinian has
openings tor writers at the present
time. There is also a possibility of
training for editor positions and
training on computer terminals.
Apply at the East Caoiinian office.
Old South Building.
SERVICES
CARICATURES BY WEYLER
Greenville's original personalned
art service. Have cartoon done of
yourself or a loveJ one - a unique
gift idea. 510 for I x 10, black and
white or color Call 753 S775
TYPING TERM, Thesis,
Resumes, Dissertations, etc. Pro
fessional quality at lowest rates.
Call Kempie Dunn anytime -
752733
NOTARY PUBLIC Calf Amy at
7 57 3734
SIX PRINTED T shirts 512. Free
Shipping. Satisfaction guarenteed.
New quality production over runs
at below mill cost. Different
designs. Specify Size desired.
Papillon, P O Box 133, Rocky
Mount, N.C 27001
RIDE NEEDED to Nashville TN.
Spring Break or any weekend.
Willing to help with expenses. Call
757 0710
RIDE NEEDED: to Virginia
Beach or surrounding tm any
weekend. Will help with gas
Cheryl 732-15
PERSONALS
ECU SUNBATHERS: We Still
have space on your Springbreak
Trip to Ft. Lauderdale 513 7
nights. I days - tennis parties
and much more. For mere infer
�nation (100) 341 300 TOLL
FREE Space is Limited.
NEEDED: I or 3 girls to share ex
penses with 2 other girls lor I wk.
in Ft Lauderdale. March 7 M.
Ocean Front Motel Call 757-140
Pi Kapp's I heard thai OC and
Stiggs have asked ST Hicks to help
with National Lampoon's Annual
Gaslt report. Dan Ray comments:
"Simmy could write his own after
that bash, we called Founder's
day. " Hope everybody had f3 as
much fun as -Sgt. Yukon Debits
SECOND ANNUAL B2 Party But
don't be square. You know where.
See ya there Saturday, Feb. 20,
1:30. From Ann, Connie, Donna.
Eileen. All 'S.AMt" welcome.
WET T SHIRT CONTEST- S150 1st
Prite. all interested ladies call
753 S03 and register with Glenn
Conway or register at Papa Kati.
KAREN T. Cannonball Right
back to ya -OC
TO THE girls ol Coften Hall who
wrote that I looked so line, drop by
and see me sometime. -Bill, the
Sig-Ep or Bags.
CIRCLE K would like to thank all
organizations who helped with the
blood drive.
CONGRATULATIONS, Beta
�?! Welcome to Q7.I
BETAZETAS: The time has final
ly come. We're proud of you Con
gratulations. Your Sisiers.
CAR WASH: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m
Saturday. University Exxon on
Fifth Street. Only 31.50
VOLUNTEER
Support
March of Dimes
Give to
Save Babies
ATTIC
Souths No. 6
Rock Nightclub
THURSDAY
Brice St.
FRI. & SAT.
ISO
SUNDAY
Robin Thompson
Help When You Need It Most.
The Fleming Center has been here for women of
all ages since 1974, offering understanding and
help to anyone faced with an unplanned pregnancy
day or night. Services include:
Free Pregnano Testing
Neekda & Saturday Abortion ppt.
Evening Birth Control Hours
CAI L 781-5550 DAY OR NIGHT
THE FLEMING CENTER
H e 're here when von need us.
Aloha!
Friday
Flo-WOW-er
Special
Add a little
sunshine
to your
weekend.
Greenville
Flower Shop
1027 S. Evans
758-2774
MC & Visa Welcome
PRE-INVENTORY SALE
HARBIN HIGHLANDER CENTER, INC.
Coin-Operated
Laundry
and Dry Cleaners
C leanest laundry in town!
Color T.V. and Video Games
Across from Highway Patrol
Station on 10th St.
Hours: 8 a.m10 p.m.
7 days a week
A fantastic sale at unbelievable prices at Student Supply Store. Beginning Monday
February 22nd, the items below, plus others too numerous to mention will go on sale'
This sale will end Friday, February 26. Be sure to stop by for great savings
WIN A GIANT
6 FOOT SUB
Just complete these questions:
NAME
ADDRESS
PHONE
How did you learn MALE ?
about SUBWAV? FEMALE I
AGE
What radio station do
you listen to most9
What newspapers do
you read?
OFFICIAL
ENTRY FORM
DRAWING FEB. 28
We've Got More Taste.
208 E. 5th St.
Textile
Paints
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
Wright Building
East Carolina University
t
i





Stye East (Karolintan
the Ernst Carolina campus community since 1925
Jimmy Dupree, �,�,� ck
Ric Browning, a�, �, ,�r�� Tom Hall. �. ��
Charles Chandler, �, �,�.
Steve Bachner. b
William Yelverton. &��-
Fielding Miller.
Alison Bartel, ,
Steve Moore, cv��
February 18. 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Pirate Pride
Support Fizzles As Fans Shy A way
Apathy has struck again.
Of course, this has comes to be
the status quo at East Carolina
University. It certainly was the case
Wednesday night in Minges Col-
iseum.
The ECU men's basketball team
was hosting ECAC-South leader
James Madison. The Dukes were
7-1 in the conference and 18-4
overall coming into the game. The
club went to the NCAA tournament
last season and seems headed that
way again this year.
The Pirates were 2-3 in the ECAC
prior to the game and needed badly
to win. As it turned out, ECU
played poorly and suffered a con-
vincing defeat.
The team had actually suffered a
defeat before the game ever started,
though. A mere 1,800 fans showed
up to watch the matchup. That's
right, just 1,800 people.
ECU students and fans let the
team down � BIG TIME. The stu-
dent section did not even come close
to being full. The Pirate Club pro-
vided an even bigger letdown. It
sure is getting old looking in those
nice yellow � empty � seats. It has
got to be depressing for players to
be in one of the biggest games of the
season only to look into the stands
and see a pint-sized crowd.
Why the poor showing? Who
knows? It was just last season that
DOONESBURY
everyone was fussing because the
Pirates were not in a conference and
didn't have any quality teams on
their schedule. Both those re-
quirements were met Wednesday.
Oh yeah! The UNC-Wake Forest
game came on TV at 8:00. ECU was
playing at 7:30. "To hell with East
Carolina; I'm going to watch the
ACC game tonight. The Pirates will
just have to wait until next time
� � Wonder how many people
said this?
No matter what the reason, the
attendance at Wednesday's game
was pathetic. Both the students and
the fans in the Greenville communi-
ty should be ashamed.
This brings us to the apathy bit.
It is defined in the dictionary as
"insensibility, unfeelingness, indif-
ference Need we go further?
No doubt, tons of students and
fans complained this morning about
last night's ECU loss. Very likely,
few of these people were present at
the game.
That is the worst part about the
entire situation � that it is those
people who do NOT show up in
Minges who complain the most
about why the Pirates are not a big
success.
To those people, we say: "Ask
not what your Pirates can do for
you before you ask 'what you can do
for your Pirates
by Garry Trudeau
MS flOMBtKm
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msormHorm
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THAT
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WKHPStjUOarte SOI
had mmxpeat, nan temp,
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f-Campus Forum
Diverse Music Praised
Jimi Hendrix was sailing through
"Purple Haze" as I finished reading the
headliner in Tuesday's East Carolinian.
Immeditely following Hendrix, Joan Ar-
matrading's powerful voice belted out
from my radio. I'd like to ask, what con-
stitutes soul? Is Hendrix VFoxy Lady"
inferior to Rick Jame's "Superfreak"?
In response to the question of
WZMB's format, I feel that if you want
to hear the so-called "Soul and top-40"
music that I think Mr. Parker has in
mind, you have several stations to
choose from. With a fewer exceptions �
Country and Easy Listening � one can
find any station that plays "soul and
top-40 Don't you see Mr. Parker,
WZMB is an alternative to anything else
you can find on the dial. WZMB is dif-
ferent and tasteful.
In reference to Mr. Parker question-
ing the use of "minority student fees"
towards a radio station that does not
cater to the "minority students" I'd like
to say a few things. First of all � I am a
legal minority student.
I am a native American indian � my
people were abused just as much as
yours were. I waste my "minority stu-
dent fees" everytime I skip a class. I
waste my "minority student fees"
everytime I forget to pick up an East
Carolinian. I waste my "minority stu-
dent fees" everytime I decide not to at-
tend a basketball game.
Do you begin to understand my
viewpioint Brother? In my own opinion,
Bob Marley is one of the greatest reggae
artists that has ever existed and Jimi
Hendrix is by far, the greatest guitar
player to have ever graced a concert
state. WZMB does not discriminate and
gives black artists as well as white artists
equal air time.
All I'm pointing out Mr. Parker is
that you can appease your musical
desires by turning anywhere on the dial.
We who avidly enjoy reggae, classical
rock n'roll, jazz and new wave can't do
that. We are finally being given a chance
"to exercise our freedom" to listen to
the kind of music we appreciate. Please
be fair � give young WZMB a chance.
LISA DISTEFANO
Freshman, Gen. Col.
Prison Letters
My name is Erick Jackson, I am
presently incarcerated at Attica State
Correction Facility. I am writing this
message, in the hope that I might have
the priviledge of corresponding with
you. I also hope I'm able to greet you
with a formal act of courtesy plus a
warm gesture of peace.
I am attempting to reach out and
touch some individual who is caring and
considerate. I've lost all contact with
family and friends. I'm very lonely and
need to be able to converse with so-
meone on the outside.
If by chance you are needing a friend
to talk to then please let me be your new
friend and by means please write.
ERICK JACKSON
81-A-0883, Box 149
Attica, New York 14011
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Letters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
days.
m m. schools arb
MSSS!
m oar mi T&om cwn m
T&ACH! Ttft 0RMJ�fe k BUNCH
FRILLS! TeXTWOrS AR� IAUSH

&
ISN
WSClPUNfclS
WJ1GS AND WNDNM
&�&!
CLOSING MRS
SCHOOL
W


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Americans 'Not Born Liberals9
By KIM ALBIN
Contrary to the popular belief of many
non-students, little of our time in college is
actually spent in the classroom. While this
may be a revelation to those who feel that
they are perennially sitting upright at one
of those sadistic wonders that we call
desks, I feel that many will agree that the
time they spend downtown and watching
television by far exceeds the time they
spend in more scholarly pursuits.
Nevertheless, I see no reason to allow
our classrooms to continue in the sad
shape which they are now in. It pains me to
walk into one of those places and see the
same advertisements tacked on the board
that were there when I was a freshman. I
cringe when I see the tattered remnants of
what were once visual aids-maps, I mean.
It sickens me to find gum stuck to the
underside of a desk in a college classroom.
But by far the most dangerous condition
that affects our classrooms is the rather
obvious infestation of liberally minded
pedagogues-those men and women whom
we have, on occasion, gone so far as to
trust with the burden of our education.
For the most part, those critters seem to
do a good job. They get the papers graded
on time, sometimes put the test off for a
day and often manage to entertain as well
as enlighten. Seldom do I catch one
overstepping its bounds-in fact, I have but
one complaint in that department: once or
twice I have heard professors make none-
too-subtle political remarks, and these
remarks were, undoubtably, highly liberal.
Granted, this type of activity is not as
publicized as the life-or-death issue of
prayer in the classroom, but I still feel that
attention should be drawn to it immediate-
ly, lest our campus be once again consum-
ed in a liberal frenzy.
Evidence of that lamentable state is
already with us: in Tuesday's East Caroli-
nian there appeared an article by Jay
Stone, who suggests that "charity"
become compulsive in order to save the
world form a violent revolution by the
"have-nots
Perhaps Mr. Stone has been witness tc
some of the same lectures that I have, lee
tures which, although not even remoteK
concerned with the subject at hand, were
given as a bonus by one or another of our
illustrious faculty members. The real trou-
ble with such a bonus is that it is given to a
room full of impressionable college
students, many of whom sit blank-faced
and take in their professors liberal biases-
take them to heart.
I can stomach an occasional attack on
Reagan, provided that I merely consider
the source of such an attack. I cannot,
however, sit idly and watch the minds of
my fellow students be needlessly altered to
the left by an egocentric college professo-
in the name of responsible education
As long as the Jay Stone types are ex-
pounding liberal lies, I will confidently
speak out against political bias being ex-
pounded in the classroom. Som�w�
brainwashing someone�anyone knowi
that American children are not born
liberals.
When Happy Hour Fever Sets In
By MIKE HIGHSMITH
There is a long standing tradition in this
town that has been enjoyed by a majority
of students here at ECU for many years.
This tradition is known as "happy hour"
and its participants are all those afternoon
buzz catchers. Happy hour is that time of
day when young people from all over
Greenville congregate downtown at their
favorite bar and socialize with their friends
while drinking beer at reduced prices. It
provides a forum for idle conversation,
rumors, gossip, and an exchange of infor-
mation on where the parties are that
weekend.
There is a happy hour somewhere every
weekday, but the best happy hours occur
on Fridays. Many people, such as myself,
look forward to Friday happy hours
almost as a weekly ritual and it would
upset their schedule if they missed one.
Happy hour is probably the main cause of
many daytime drunks, and Friday is the
best day for it because you can go there
and forget all the misery you were put
through that week.
I have been a happy hour regular here in
Greenville for six years, and even though
the faces and the bars may change, the at-
mosphere of happy hour seems to remain
the same. There have been a few happy
hours where I got there at 4:30 and,
without realizing it, stayed until closing
time. That is neither good for the body nor
the wallet. Around 7:00 my stomach would
remind me that I haven't put anything
solid in it since lunch, but then after the in-
Campus
Spectrum
itial hunger pangs pass it is clear sailing un-
til closing time. I try not to make that prac-
tice a habit.
Since I have worked at a store
downtown for nearly two years, I am just
across the street from happy hour when I
get off work at 5:00 on Fridays. Many of
my friends are already there when I arrive,
so 1 usually have a little catching up to do
when I get there. Since I have frequented
Pantana Bobs' happy hour most over the
years, I will use PB's for most of my ex-
amples.
I usually come into happy hour while it
is still light outside, so it takes my eyes a
moment to get used to the dim light inside.
This gives the people sitting near the door a
chance to scope the newcomers out to see if
they recognize them. I affectionately call
these people the "doorwatchers Once in-
side, it is customary to head to the bar for
a beer. This is easier said than done if you
happen to arrive late (around 6:00) and
find that it is shoulder to shoulder standing
room only. Pantana Bob's is famous for
packing them in like sardines during happy
hour. Since it is such a long, narrow bar, I
usually find myself drifting with the tide
from the front to the back of the bar, and
then back again. When it gets too crowd-
ed, I like to join in a game of foosball,
since that is the only place to comfortably
stand without being punched, shoved,
spilled on, stepped on, and burned with
cigarettes. The only trouble is that you
have to keep on winning in order to be able
to stand there.
Lately, I've been using PB's mostly for
the later part of happy hour and starting it
out at the New Deli. It has a good at-
mosphere, excellent music in the
background (but not so loud that you can't
talk over it), pinball, pool, and darts for
the game players, plenty of booths and
tables to sit at, and a great staff; most of
which I used to work with at Newby's. I
love to sit at one of their window tables
ana watch the drunks stumble by. The
New Deli also has some of the cheapest
happy hour beer prices in town.
Other bars are jumping on the happy
hour bandwagon. JJ's Music Hall just
started having happy hour ever since they
opened up their new addition. If every JJ's
happy hour turns out like their first, then it
is probable that I will make my appearance
there every week; especially if they con-
tinue to have live bands for happy hour.
The Rathskellar has a pretty good happy
hour. Their happy hour is more relaxed,
not quite as rowdy as some of the others. It
is a good place to take a date to. Grog's
has reasonable mixed drink prices during
their happy hour, but to get in you either
have to be a member or come with a
member as a guest.
By far, my favorite happy hour is the
one they have once a month at the Attic.
For a mere quarter you can go and watch a
pretty good band play two sets. That is a
deal that is hard to beat. Since the band
that plays the Attic happy hour usually
also plays that Friday and Saturday night,
they are generally good crowd pleasers and
can get Greenville rocking on Friday after-
noon.
Out of the eleven places we have
downtown to go and drink a beer, ten of
them have some form of happy hour to en-
tice you to go there on Friday, so there is
no lack of a place to go for that afternoon
buzz. Every one of them has a different at-
mosphere, so chances are that you can find
a place or two that suit your taste. If you
are a happy hour regular, then you can
understand and relate to what I've said up
to this point. If you have never been to a
happy hour in Greenville, then I hope that
I have stimulated your curiosity enough to
try one out sometime. Who knows, you
might end up becoming a regular too.
i
X
X
P1
1
X
X
X
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� - .

?





)
IHt bAST CAROL INJAN
t I HK1 KN 1" '�
Paui
atx MC
3W HOC
mtr-nHHwKrwococDOCzDnc
-HrfwxxatcrtMrr3ixrzx
King Of Hearts
Easr Carolina's Enthusiastic Pirate
Shows Why You've Gotta Have Heart
Bv JOSEPH Ol INK K
siafl -
yone who has been to an
1 Cl football or basketball game
have seen Randy Scheei He
e ECl Pirate
-Mthough he owns a business,
Heart's Delight, works 40 hours
at anothei business, and at times,
ikes lasses ai the ECl School
� t)i es time to attend
es as the mascot. He
also devotes time and effort to
x ian Heart ssociation
munity.
ig . Scheer
at 1I needed a Pit ate
and to talk to former Pirate
Clu em Gus Andrews
"1 walked up to Gus
?aid, '1 think you need a
ate He said to me. 'We just
id a meeting about this this
aid, I'm your Pirate.
1 wish it were that
H mid you like to
and bring us an
� costume you
g to do and what would
far as being the
li audi-
ack with drawings
. form and also ol
. ise at the games.
� rcy - Ltl
. � ai - ln-
Sc h ol, which has
. spent
: lg me a
e worl the
: � I
. coilume lone bv a
I partment.
loinj I'm trving
This
van! believe
;s around the
. �� ty is the
the on-
; town exists, other
toba -
b - time. It's a fun
e the Pirate. You
� be a motivator.
� � � heit ass and
g, eliing and scr aming.
cheerleaders, the
a i
V (
Pirate does not have to make the
crowd make noisel! I have to
do is create some sort of excite
merit by virtue of feeling out
what is needed at the time and
work for it. During a basketball
game, foi sav. 1 see that there is a
lot of displeasure with the ref and
1 personally feel a lot of
displeasure with the ret 1 start
picking on him and be the
mouthpiece tor the crowd and .
give him hell. Oi if 1 see a player
that obivously the crowd is
displeased with on the other
learn, 1 will statt grading, just
grinding the pooi guv. and 1 will
do everything I can to get him
(ticked) with me and the crowd so
maybe make him miss a shot 1 he
neat thing about it. is it usually
works
As Scheer can attest, being a
mascot can be dangerous
"V hen I was at the I V game, I
got jumped three times b tans
from I NC. Bv the third time. I
was getting (angry). Thev grabb-
ed m clothes and ripped my flag
all up. 1 was getting a little ag-
grevated Six guvs lumped the
fence onto the field and said.
"1 et's get him 1 turned around
ind saw this wall of big (gus)
was coming at me 1 was seared.
I'm not used to thai sort of thing.
I'm son � oi a pacifist. 1
drew mv sw it and said.
1 irst one here get it. and I'll stick
you One guy didn't believe it.
and I put my sword up against his
shirt and tore it. I said 'Next time
it's your skin. I swear I'll di it.
bud. .lust back oft ' From the
1 N( .1 go: six calls
threatening my life. 1 he mascot
becomes tl fot al point ol � hat
people associate with ECU.
When they try to do something to
eel back, thev
lo 1
t through that
person.
Speaking of the Valentine's
l)av party that he organized last
weekend, he said, it was "terrific.
We had ovei 5000 people in the
parking lot. We don't know how
they're going to accept it (the at-
tempt to have the world's largest
Valentine's Day party) because
we had over 5000 people, but on-
ly 1762 brought us heartIt was
an outrageous success I here is
a tape (of the party) being sent
off to Good Morning America.
We did not make CBS national
news, but Good Morning
America is under consideration.
We want to get it in the national
news. Get a little attention for
this town and possible the pro-
grams at the university
Scheer is proud of his notable
heart collection. "It is totally
unreal to the world. At this point,
after last weekend, we took in
1700 pieces. Before that, the col-
lection was over 1500 strong. I he
entire collection 1 have just given
to the American Heart Associa-
tion which they're going to use as
a travelling exhibition to go
around the United States, and it's
going to be called "A Show of
Heart From Greenville which is
going to be a real feathei in the
cap oi this community.
"I've been working on a heart
collection tor ovei eight years.
1 he heart is one oi the few sym-
bols in the world that has a
universal appeal. It goes back
through so many cultures and
civilizations. In fact, it was one
of the earliest known used sym-
bols. It's a symbol that has
always been linked with the
.enter oi man's spun, the human
spun and it's endeavoi to be in-
telligent and have emotional ap-
peal. It's the only symbol in the
world that means love between
two people or two groups
�i iterally, the shop (Heart's
Delight) is the centet tor hearts in
the I niled States, which is weird,
but true. That collection in there
is known all over the United
States I hat's amazing
The Collection is quite unique.
It contains a heart-shaped, ab-
dominal surgical tool, a heart
cathode, heart-shaped seas shells.
a heart-shaped leather and
aluminum candy box from the
late 1800s. a bamboo box in the
shape of a heart, heart
sunglasses, high heel heart shoes,
a Bruce Springsteen heart and an
AC-DC heart, to mention a few.
In foui years, Scheer will relin-
quish ownership o I he Collet
tion. "It is going to St. I ouis.
People from North Carlina are
going to be proud o it. It will be
impressive. I'm hoping to get
over 10,(KM) hearts. If I can get up
to 20.(MX) that would be ideal
because that means there would
be a heart here for every other
person in town. Thai would be
absolutley outrageous.
"The people form the head-
quarters ot the American Heart
Association sent a rep up here
and are flipped out about the
heart collection he continued.
" Thev look at the potential ot the
heart collection ot bringing in
people and focusing attention on
young people, young people
knee high, on heat! problems and
possible raising money tor them
i
I
Randy Scheer (photo by Daxe Williams)
The Sunday Valentine gathering outside of Hearts Delight. (Photo In Dae Williams)
DOC
30C
DOC
:xK3�c3acxc3oc :x HiC
DiVZ
:3K�r
200 Years Later, A Church Still Thrives
an find
yOU
Bx ANGELA ROACH
staff Wrilrr
h iet) began in a
smai � Vfarlinborough 200
tears ago
Somehow that statement docs not
seem ,er profound, but when that
small town is present da) Green-
tnd that Methodist society is
Memorial L niled
;hurch, then the impor
us the church, whu h
is celebrating its
iry.
arm t at � ttion of
ally began with j homecoming
er ice on Jan 10
Full) garbed as a Methodist cii
cuit rider on horseback, Mrs
William Tnp opened the ceremony
Metho
turn e
op van
b reading a � � amation. A six
member brass ensemble played
"Thehurch'i I mdation" as the
C hat hoir mar ; n proces
siun with six at olyU ling the
wui. 1 here �� � ' Q ' ' � ' �
drawing oj farvis Memorial, the
cross ot Jesus with the Methodist
flame and two symbols oj the Holy
Trinity. Members o) the church's
oldest families carried their Bibles
Some of those Bibles are as old as
the church.
A reception was held. The five-
tter, pink anil white caked baked by
Mrs Ernest Holt, had to be literally
towed in Also, the new archives
and history museum were opened
'or public visitation Bishop
William R.anon, president of the
WOrld Methodist conference, was
the guest speaker for the occasion,
later in the year, Ralph Rncs, a
professor oj English at ECU, will
present a historical drama of Jarvis
Memorial. He is a member of the
National Methodist History and Ar-
chives organization.
lames Bailey, senior pastor oj
Jarvis Memorial, commented on the
church's relationship with ECU
when the school had only women.
'There isn't a Sunday that one of
the fraternities doesn 7 represent the
campus. But I long for the days that
they lined them up and escorted
(hem over here, " he said.
� � �
Jarvis Memorial has matured
beyond limits during its 200 years.
Services first began in various
member's homes. The preachers of
that era noted a great spiritual
lethargy among the citizens. Green-
ville was the center o noting and
public drunkedness. Taverns were
strewened on each side of the street.
von
The tirst church building, named
St. Paul's, was built in 1833 in what
is now the Cherry Hill Cemetery. A
new church was built in 1880 on
Green Street. "The old St. Pauls
was taken down by the Salem
members piece by piece, loaded on a
barge tied up at the footof Pitt
Street, floated to a point opposite
Simpson, carted from the river to its
new site and reconstructedstates
The History of Jarvis Memorial
C hurch, the book telling the story of
the oldest church in the United
States with 15(X) or more members.
There are now 1900 members.
The church, in its present loca-
tion, was finished in 1907 in
member of former North Carolina
governor Thomas Jarvis, one of the
church's most distinguished
members.
A bus, tape and radio ministry are
among the main activities the
church sponsors. 1 he chief project
has been the sponsoring of two
refugee families. There are also 20
Bible courses offered during the
vear.
Jarvis Memorial Church is still
growing but Pastor Bailey thinks
there is an area the church needs to
readily inhabit, that being to touch
the lives of people on the bottom of
the soeioeconomic scale. Jarvis has
had many undertakings, but this
may very well be its greatest.
A front iew of Jarvis Memorial (Dave Williams





X
IHFfcASTCAROl ISIAN
FEBRUARY 18. 1982
Learning Aeout Coug Th� Hmp WH
I HAVE TO tOKiTf A a)
essAi, gur i caO't
peCl�7�-OfOA30BJ�cr
wu coucp AjieiTe woot
6l tfovHP MM�3
TllllllmmilllllinWiflj
WANTED NOWM!
GUITARIST ANDOR KEYBOARD PLAYER
FOR 'NEW WAVE' BAND ENDEAVOR
PHONE: 752-4935 OR 758-9746
?tl�irimiiiiiriU�i'liiii��inmrrr;
� .rwrwit�
A CU-I Teams Participate In Virginia
Twenty-three East
Carolina University
students qualified to at-
tend the Association of
College Unions�Inter-
national Regional
Tournament that was
held in Blacksburg,
Virginia (ACU-I) on
February 11,12, and
13ih. Teams represen-
ting universities from
five states competed in
Women's and Men's
Bowling, Table Tennis,
Table Soccer,
Backgammon, Chess,
Billards and College
Bowl.
The Women's Bowl-
ing team consisted of
Donna Herring, Betsy
Nelson, Virginia
Singletary, Carrie
Webb and Sharon
West. Virginia
Singletary was the first
place finisher in the
Women's No-Tap
Competition. Betsy
Nelson qualified 4th
place in the All-Events
competition. The
Men's Bowling teams
included John Mar-
shall, Tim Merck,
David Schmitz and
Todd Weymus. Tim
Merck brought home a
second place plaque in
the Men's High-Series
competition.
Jerry Lee and Clay
Marklin represented
ECU in the Billards
tournament. Jerry
finished in third place
after a close game
against the number two
qualifier. Table Soccer
contestants were Todd
Gurganus and Terry
Liles who played hard
for East Carolina. Ran-
dy Bridgeman com-
peted in the Men's
Singles Table Tennis
tournament and again
with Tommy Douglas
in the Doubler Table
Tennis event. Craig
Sahli, East Carolina's
Backgammon contes-
tant played very good
and qualified in third
place. Don Sweeting
and Stuart Long com-
peted in Chess which
lasted many long,
grueling hours.
Dr.Lawerence Hough,
Associate Professor of
Political Science coach-
ed the ECU College
Bowl Team through
many tough matches.
The team was made up
of Adam Smith, Joe
Argent, Tom Chenier,
David Cochrell, and
Jeff Jones.
ICamp
SUMMER JOB OPENINGS FOR CAMP COUNSELORS
at Camp Sea Gull (boys) and Camp Seafarer (girls) Serving as a
camp counselor is a challenging and rewarding opportunity to
work with young people, ages 7 16. Sea Gull and Seafarer are
health and character development camps located on the coast
of North Carolina and feature sailing, motor boating, and
seamanship, plus many usual camping activities including a
wide variety of major sports. Qualifications include a genuine
interest in young people, ability to instruct in one phase of the
camps' programs, and excellent references For furtner infor
motion and application, please write a brief resume of training
and experience in area(s) skilled to Don Cheek, Director,
Camps Sea Gull Seafarer, P.O. Box 10976, Raleigh, North
Carolina 27605.
the traffic light
pitt plaza
Everything in Stock Reduced
30 to 75
ESPRIT new Spring Sweaters
SPRIT Sweater Dresses
New Will Wear Spring Arrivals
The best fashions in town are
now the best values in town
I
the traffic light
pitt plaza
� .
Carolina Opry House
Presents in Concert
ONE NIGHT ONLY
Delbert McClinton
Thursday, Feb. 25 th
Special Admission Price
$7.00 at Door Day of Show
Doors Open � 8:00 p.m.
Special Guests - Bill Lyerly Band
For Further Information Call
758-3943
Stretching Exercise Classes
M-W-F 10:00 & 11:00 T-Th. 5:00 & 6:00
Aerobics and Dancercize Classes
M-T 3:30-4:30
Features Included: Male & Female Instructors
�Nautilus Machines
(12 of the most sophisticated exercise mochines made).
Special Student Rates
Group rates for 5 or more students.
07e5U per student.
I ATNA UTL US FITNESS IS OUR SPEC IA L TY
WA knockyour'socks
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LIFE MAGAZINE
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AMERICAN
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AN AMERICAN WEREWOLF IN LONDON
TARRING DAVID NAUGHTON, JENNY AC,UTTER,
GRIFFIN DUNNE &JOHN WOODVINE
ORIGINAL ML SIC BY ELMER BERNSTEIN
EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS PETER C.UBER & JON PETERS
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WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY JOHN LANDIS
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THIS THURSDAY NIGHT AT 7 PM FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHTS AT 5, 7, AND 9 PM
HENDRIX THEATRE, MSC ADMISSION BY ID AND ACTIVITY CARD
SPONSORED BY THE ECU STUDENT UNION FILMS COMMITTEE
t





1 HI t AS1 CAROl 1MAN
Sports
II UK I ARV, IK, 19X2 K?7
Dukes Breeze By
Ice-Cold Pirates
B CIIAKI I s( IIIK
spiTU t itilr
I asl arolina learned fii si ha
about the hazzards ol playing the
Dukes Wednesday nighi.
I he Dukes ol lames Madi on,
thai i I he I South leaders
ran then record to 8 I in the con
ference and 19-4 overall with a con
vincing 6 I 4 win ovei t he
homestanding P
1(1 was outdont in vii
phase of th
then most difficult
JMU's v hanging del enses .
e idem ed b the team's 29 pei,
shooting from t he flooi
' ()b tously. we nee: . om
munication against a team thai
changes defense so often II
si it h I a e )dom aid folli w ing
the game "I'm lalkinj the
i. not necessarily from : he
bench
Madison suffered cold
shooting in the first hall. but sh I i
red hot 80 percent in ; I
period to finish at 52" i
the gan
ECU, now 2-4 in the
and 10 12 overall lumped out
6 2 lead but fell behind for v
Mad ored nine
point - to m 111-6
ECU'S Tonj Bles (left), given the o.k. n doctors to pla vith an injured hand, drives on Pirates scored juste
JMl 's Charles Fisher. oveI tne final 15 minutes ol the hall
Photo Bv CHAP GUSIEY
and trailed 2s 14 ,tt intermission.
lames Madison forward I mton
rownes, the conference's third
leading scorer, opened the second
hall with three jump shots to move
the Dukes to a comfortable H -14
mtage
I he IMI lead rea hed a high ol
2b points, at 52-26, when guard
David DuPont made two tree
throws with 7:21 remaining.
I os ncs was the game'? high
scorer, finishing with 18 points.
immates Dan Ruland and Du-
ll added ten each
Not one Pirate scored in double
figures Mike I , and C harles
Green both scored eight points to
: the Bucs. Freshman guard
Bruce Peartree and sophomore tor
ward Morns Hargrove contributed
sev en apiece.
"I doubl you could travel the 50
states and see a better coached team
than lames Madison Odom said
following his team's second loss m
six 1 CAC south games. " I'hey
�. prepared in e ei v area ol pla.
It tough to siav in the game with
them unless you shoot a blistering
per , and we sure didn't do
that "
l : obv ii
tppointt : � line's out-
con as somelhing else that
troubled him more Rand' Earl
This Saturday And Sunday
Lady Bucs Host Tourney
Bv JIMM DuPRKK

said ECl ICOmERSE
Andruzzi.UbUIIYGIiaS
Mil oi
at bastLADY PIRATE
Minges .CLASSIC
upcoming Converge ady Pirate
: lamentJones with 16 " md 6.6 re-
1 weekend.bounds Jone dished out 1 ;4
ken-assist this sea . 1 ad a careei
pen the tourney Saturday athigh se �. 1 iesda against
� I adv Pirates squaiDuke.
�. at 8Botl iches m Saturday's
ime will benightcap will be looking at
� p m. Sunday, with themilestones in their careers, as
m.MSI 's Carol L.angeland brings 9l
larks the firstwins to the game and Andruzzi
time there has been an invitationalneeds just three tor her 100th at
tournameni � n at 1 Last1 (I
d Andruzzi. "1 know
Kcited about it, and weGuards Marsha McCollum and
jet excited andPam Rose provide the offense foi
the games. The field isVlrmma State, who posted an 18-15
ll
n .in
. ol Michigan State
� � unior I il Preston
� points and 9.2 re-
- ame averages. Fel
iun; � i Ii Cai ter contributes
points and 11 rebounds a game
the Spartans 10-9 record.
. a 1 � Pirates will counter
enter Mary Denkler,
a erages 20.1 points and 8.5 re-
bounds a game, and senior Sam
�;d a yeai agach I eo Rev
returned every player from that
squad, but they have struggled thus
fai to a 10-9 mark.
Center Diane Depp leads Wesl
Kentucky with 16.4 points and 8
bounds a game, while forward 1 illie
Mason contributes 16.2 points and
7.2 rebounds. The 1 adv Troopers
are noted for their balanced attack,
as forward Oina Brown also adds
10.7 points per outing
"We've g in " ii t!
I en. ()hio alley and
(Central Intercollegiate -V
ssociation) said ndi
gonna be torn
" v e feel likeonvei se
thusiasticall � ;
basketball in thi past,
just anothei si$
support.
"We'll ha
the national promotions l
tor women's ev ents and V' Bel
(Mid-Atlantic Regiona
here this weel end represi
verse
I he teams will I
eption bufl I this t . i
Mendenhall S lent � Hi
Hodges Sporting i
soi this even w hile othei ai
chants have d sup
other related activ ities.
A cocktail pa � fo caches and
media is sponsored by Ramada Inn,
while Peps Bottlers and Krispy
Kreme share responsibility foi a
hospitality room at the games
I he I adv Pirates come into the
tournament with a 14 v . in-
cluding wins m 10 ol then last 11
contests.
" f he final game- on out -
will be most important foi us said
ndruzzi. "We have to take even
opponani seriously Winnii
tournament would be a bii
tor our program
to
Two Principles
l oletha Harrison (24) an n Jones (21) will have to supply
leadership if I( is to win (he Lady Pirate Classic
Emory Announces 29 Football Signees
1:arolina Yead football coach
ann�unced todaythe
otball recruits, tri-
�college transi'ers
lid the list ma orma
mplete,pending deci;ions
i be made. pair olhigh
ates are pursu-
ampieased withour
r iting searEmory said"I
! i.last
nk thi ��� is better. I
. e that this is the finest
ithietes signed in a single
irolina
the 29 signees are six ali-
� high school players (including
;ca) and two tumor
Americas.
1 mor went west tor most of the
!( . bringing to Greenville
nme transfers from California, in-
ling seven from San Francisco
City Collej
The most highly-touted of the
Bayitv crop may be All-America
defensive back Sam Norris, who
enrolled at Purdue in January but
changed his mind and came to LCI I.
N rns is said to have had offers to
play in the Canadian Football
I eague.
Another big signee from San
Francisco is 6-7, 270 offensive
lineman Barry Smith. - J All-
America, Smith chose ECU over
Oklahoma and Michigan.
Emory, also landed a pair of blue
chip JC linebackers in Chris Santa
Cruz (6 5, 225) and Dwayne Andei
son (6 2, 235). Santa C ruz, who
received honorable mention A-A
status, chose the Pirates over
Florida State, Florida and Wichita
State
Anderson was named all-
conference at Southwest 1 os
Angelas JC and was considered the
top linebacker prospect in C alifor-
ma.
Among the high school players
ECU inked were three North
Carolina all-state performers. The
most highly-touted of those is pro-
bably running back D wight
Richardson ot Fayettville Santord
HS
Richardson chose the Bucs over
national champion Clemson. He
was considered one of the top two
running backs in the state and was
named first-team all-state. He rush-
ed for 1,110 yards and 13
touchdowns in leading his team to
the state finals.
The Bucs also inked Greenville
Rose wide receiver Chris
Mel awhorn. Another first team a
stater. McLawhorn was famous at
Rose for his circus-like catches. He
had 38 receptions for an average
18 vards per catch this past season
Ihe othei N.C. all stater is tunn-
ing back loin Baker from High
Point Andrews.
ECU inked one all-state prepstei
from three othei states: Penn
sylvania, Georgia and Virginia
Offensive lineman Robert Alex
ander from Cardinal Brendon (Pa )
High heads the list. He checks in at
6-4, 260 and made several All
America lists. Alexander, who had
96 tackles this past season, was also
listed as one of the nation's top 100
prospects bv ihw ('hip magazine
He chose ECU ovei Notre Dame.
I ousiana State and West Virginia.
With Chuck Bushbeck's eligibility
used up, ECl had a void to till at
placekicker. I'hev mav have tilled it
by signing Virginia's all-state
kicker, Jeff Heath oi first Colonial
High School in Virginia Beach.
Heath once kicked a 58-yard field
goal, a slate prep record.
Ihe last of the all-state players is
Randall Watts from Washington
County High in Sandersville, Ga
Watts is 6-7, 240 and was listed as
one ol Blue'hip's top 100.
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Robert Pitt manDlf 12251 City ol
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di ian W atei 5DB5 10170si City ol
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Cinffin, an ECU sophomore, suf
tered a heart attack just as the game
was starting and died shortly after
arriving at Pitt Memorial Hospital
Odom discovered this shortly after
the game ended.
"When I walked off the floor 1
thought there was no way in the
world 1 could feel any worse the
ECU coach said. "Then 1 heard
about the heart attack and death oi
a student. That made basketball
seem like so little. 1 don't know the
student who died, but I do feel very
close to him because he was over
here supporting us. 1 feel sure we
can go on to finish the year well like
he would have liked for us to
The Pirates finish out the regular
season with four crucial conference
matchups. The first of those con
this Saturday when the Bucs travel
noithward to face Navy.
The Midshippmen are 1-4 in the
K AC -South. Gametime is 1 p.m.
The contest will be broadcast by a
pair of local radio stations, WIT'S
FM (93.3) and WOOW-AM (H40)
The Pirates then return to Green-
ville for their last home game of the
season Monday night against
George Mason. Seniors Tony Byles,
Mark Md aurin and Michael Gib
son will be playing their last games
in Minges Coliseum, (iametime is
7:30.
Foster Paces
Lady Pirates
Past Devils
Posting a career-high 19 points
off the bench, freshman guard I
raine Foster propelled the I dd
Pirates oi East Carolina to a 79-57
rout of Duke University Tuesday in
Minges Coliseum.
Despite shooting a lean 40 percent
from the floor, the Lady Pirate
posted one of their largest margins
of victory this season by humiliating
the Blue Devils 51-35 in the reboun-
ding column.
Junior center Mary Denkler fired
in 18 points and pulled down 10 re-
bounds, while freshman front-liner
Darlene Chaney netted 13 points
and gathered 10 rebounds in just 16
minutes o action. Senior Sam Jones
and freshman I oletha Harrison not-
ched 10 points a piece, with Jones
crashing the boards for 12 rebounds
and handing out eight assists.
"I hey were playing Sam tight
said ECl coach Cathy Andruzi
"But she'd find the open man and
get the ball to her. She did a tremen-
dous job. Rather than forcing it, she
looked tor others "
Jones, who now has 134 assists
during the 1981-82 campaign,
claimed a career-high seven steals in
the contest to bring her seasonal
total to 60.
"Everybody expects so much oi
us right now said Andruzzi,
whose squad hosts the Converse
I ady Pirate Classic this weekend in
Minges Coliseum. "We've just
played three tough games, and the
kids did well in each of them.
"Even though we only had 16 tur-
novers, we felt like we should have
had less. There were a lot of positive
aspects of this game, though.
"When you've had three tough
games, it's easy to let down and plav
not to lose � 1 don't think we did
that
Stacy Hurd led the Blue Deviis
with 19 points, while Jennifer
Chestnut contributed 12 points and
nine rebounds.
The loss drops the Blue Devils to
11-12 on the season, while the I adv
Pirates improved to 14-8 including a
6 1 mark against Atlantic Coast
Conference opponents.
No Upsets
All went as expected in the
ECAC-South last night, as the
favorites prevailed in all three
league games
League-leader James
Madison went to 8-1 with a
61-43 win over ECU, putting
the fifth-place Pirates at 2-4
Old Dominion held on to se-
cond place, going to 5-2 with a
66-45 win over William and
Mary. The Indians fell to 4-4.
Richmond is tied for third
with the Indians at 4-4 after a
68-59 win over George Mason.
The Patriots are in last place at
1-6.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 18,
IM Sports-N-Shorts
Cage Action
Picking Up
Basketball has reached the mid-point of the
season and teams are fighting for positions in
order to reach the play-offs. Only two weeks
remain in the regualr season and every game
now can mean the difference in participating
or watching in tournament action. Here are
some results from this past week's games.
In men's action, the Jones Enforcers Level
II continue to be hot as outscoring the Scott
Scrubs by a 66-39 count as Tony Martin toss-
ed in 35 points. Other scores had the Joint
Eight over the Titans by a 69-45 count, Kappa
Alpha "A" over Sigma Tau Gamma "A" by
70-23, and the Bad Mama Jammers over the
Nightcruisers by a 55-37 margin.
Outstanding individual performances in-
cluded Jay Brigel who scored 17 pts. in the
Bad Mama Jammers victory. David Buttes
threw in 19 points and Tom Lepoer toatlled 22
points in the Joint Eight and Ivappa Alpha
"A" wins, respectively.
Over in the men's FacultyStaff Division
the Golden Oldies of the Health ' Phisical
Education Department continued toward next
Sunday's showdown with the Steelers of the
Maintenance Dept. by easily posting a 56-26
victory over the Weary Warriors. Meanwhile
the Steelers were disposing of the Computer
Center by a 51-41 margin. Both teams remain
undefeated and next week's game will do
much in determining who is going to be the
league champion.
The White Rim Robbers remained
undefeated and atop the ladies dorm league by
outscoring the Garrett Gutbusters by a score
of 40-13 as Shannon Staples led the way with
14 points. It looks like White is going to be
hard to beat within their division. Perhaps the
girls from Gotten offer the best chance to
knock them off.
Meanwhile the Dribblers stepped out front
and made it known that they are for now the
class of women's independent division by
beating the previously undefeated Diehearts.
Finally, the Sigmas held onto first place in
the sorority division by posting a record of 4-0
while the Alpha Xi Delta girls were close
behind in second place.
This week's "ATTA BOY" goes to he
Greenville Coca-Cola Bottling Company, who
donated the new scoreboards in Memorial
Gymnasium.
Buc Jayvees Win
Third Game In Row
By CYNTHIA PLEASANTS
vsl .sports r.difttr
East Carolina's junior varsity
team overcame a slow start and
breezed by Mount Olive Junior Col-
lege Wednesday night, 80-59.
Mount Olive came into the game
with a 15-8 record and jumped off
to an 11-2 lead in the first 4:56 of
the game. ECU guards Mike Fox
and Herb Gilchrist then took over,
scoring ten straight points in a row
between them.
Sophomore forward Bill McNair
also got into the action with an
alleyoop dunk, but the Pirates still
trailed 15-14 with 11:31 left in the
first half.
Mount Olive guard Tony Ander-
son, who finished with a total of 18
points, kept his team ahead with
help from teammate Greg Gran-
tham, until McNair made a lay-up
with just 13 seconds left in the half
to put the Pirates up 35-33. ECU
never relinquished that advantage.
The Pirates dominated the second
half and went on io an easy win.
McNair led the way for the Bucs,
scoring 26 points and pulling down
16 rebounds. Gilchrist added 17
points and four steals.
Two other starters also scored in
double figures. Center Jeff Best ad-
ded 14 points and nine rebounds,
while Fox contributed another 13
points.
The win, the third straight for the
jayvee Pirates, ups their record to
3-2.
The JV's will play their last game
of the season against Chowan
Junior College next Monday night
at 5:30 in Minges Coliseum.
ABORTIONS
1 34 week terminations
App't's. Made 7 Days
CALLTOLL FREE
1 800 321 0575
ARMY-NAVY
STORE
SEA OATS MOTEL
702 South Ocean Blvd.
Myrtle Beach. S.C. 29577
STUDENTS! Plan your Spring Break
now! For reservations and information
call
(803) 448-8494
Now Booking For Easter Vacation
Current undctrjroduotr pre
medical ltudent mov "o com
pete tot several hundred Air
Force icholorthipt Their
tcnolarsnip ore to be awarded
to students accepted into
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at the beginning o their
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lob lees ond equipment plus o
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� estsgote trus financial alter
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Contoct
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Kit Kl HIM.
Suite GL 1 H0O No.oho Dr
Raleigh N C 276e0
Phone Collect 919 75SJ134
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FKOM 1M
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AT FUaTHKR fXPEMSE
StU.M tVifmcy T�t, n-
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lMr iMtormatHMi can U.4SH
(Tall Fraa Nvn.tr
�M-nilSrU) aatwaaa t am
RALtlQMWOMIM'S
HIALTN
OROANIZATIOM
i7WMt�ar�aaM.
��tsati M.C.
P
P
A
K
A
T
I
The 1960's
Brought Back
25 Can Beer
15C Draft
at Papa Katz
Fridays from
4to7.
No cover.
�-s
USED
TIRES
$10.00
inquire at
Evans Seafood
FOR SALE
4 BEDROOM HOUSE
614 Maple St.
2 full baths � 2 half balhs
H(X)sq. ft. family room
Will finance 15 lone term.
SeeJimim Brewer or call Hooker &
Buchanan � 752-6186 or 752-4433
P
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See The
ECAC-South
Tournament
To be played
March 4-6
at Norfolk Scope
Special Student Rate:
$9 per ticket book
(6 games)
BASKETBALL
Available in
Minges Ticket Office
Copyright 1982
Kroger Sav on
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold to Dealers
N
600 Greenville Blvd Greenville
Open 8 a.m. to Midnight
Open Sunday 9 a.m. to 9 p m
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re-
quired to be readily available for sale m
each Kroger Savon, except as specif ical
ly noted in this ad. If we do run out of an
item we will offer you your choice of a
comparable item when available reflec
ting the same savings or a raincheck
which will entitle you to purchase the
advertised item at the advertised price
within 30 days
HUM

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I





Title
The East Carolinian, February 18, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 18, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.181
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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