The East Carolinian, February 16, 1982






She
Carolinian
i
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 58 No. 41
Tuesday. February 16, 1982
Greenville, V(
10 Panes
On The Inside
Reagan Proposes More A id Cuts
classic
111 film
King of
Hearts is playing
Wednesdav at Mendenhall's
Hendrix Theater. Starring Alan
res and Genevieve Buiold, the
967 -novie combines comedy,
e and satire See The East
Miman review on page 5
Inside Index
Announcements
lions4
Campus Forum4
�'tainment5
ts8
- eds9
B MIKE HUGHES
niitl�1 Nr�� rdinr
"Deep cuts hae already been
made in appropriations for student
financial aid according to Ed
Hanley, lobbyist for the U.S. Stu-
dent Association. "Further cuts are
going to keep thousands of students
from returning this fall, and others
will neer get to attend college at
all
Though the recent budget cuts by
the Reagan administration have not
yet actually taken full impact on col-
lege students, campus life has
changed in several areas this year.
A "migration" of students from
private schools to public institutions
has already started. Many students
who had travelled out of state for
school are staving in their home
states this year; fewer services are
being offered on campuses nation-
wide; new ideas for tuition rates
have sprung up at various institu-
tions, and minority students con-
tinue to withdraw from schools in
record numbers.
The usual trend dictates that
students eventually become ac-
customed to changes in the college
routine such as these.
However. President Reagan's
financial aid cuts are not vet a thing
of the past. He has recent I v propos-
ed even deeper cuts for 1983. The
proposed cuts would affect all
federal student aid programs, accor-
ding to government spokespersons.
Pell Grants, for example, would
be cut from a maximum of SI,670
per year to $1,400. Also, students
from families earning more than
SI4,(XX) annually would not qualify
for the grant in 198?. After this
year's cuts, the ceiling was placed at
$27,000 for combined family in-
come.
Supplemental Educational Op-
portunity Grants, which provide aid
for approximately 61 5.(MX) students,
would be eliminated by Reagan's
1983 proposal.
An estimated 250,000 students
would lose their college jobs if
Reagan's 27 percent work-study
program cut is passed.
I he State Student Incentive
Grants, which give aid to about
300,000 students this year, would be
totally eliminated.
I he Reagan administration will
also ask Congress to discontinue all
funding for the National Direct Stu-
dent 1 oan program, under which
approximately 250,000 students
receive low-interest loans yearly.
finally, the administration wants
to make drastic cuts m the number
oi students eligible tor Guaranteed
Student 1 oans, by raising the in-
terest rates and the loan origination
tees. Under this plan, graduate
students and professional school
students would be eliminated from
qualifying foi the program
Earlier this month, represen
tatives of the largest and most in-
fluential college groups in the coun-
try met in Washington, D.C warn-
ing the President and his ad-
ministration that as many as two
million students will be hurl In the
cuts
John Phillips ol the National
Association ol Independentol
leges and Universities predicted thai
the proposed cuts would cause more
than 300,000 independent college
students to drop out of school.
Others expressed then concern
that the cuts might cause ma
financial problems foi the 839,000
public college students who now
receive aid.
Under the Reagan proposal, each
state would suffer approximately a
50-percent loss ol its financial aid
funding. Thus, bv 1983, 61,300
North Carolina college students
would lose federal aid, including all
forms of federal grants.
In an effort to express their
dissatisfaction with the current cuts
and those proposed, at least 14 ma-
JOI college lobbying groups are
planning a national campaign, in-
cluding a nationwide D.iv ol Protest
scheduled lor March 1
I obbyists hope that students and
others concerned will travel to
Washington on March 1 to pur-
le lawmakers to vote against the
Reagan cuts.
According to Roberi aron,
spokesman tor the largest a
lion ol I .S colleges and univer-
sities, the merican ouncil
Education, the campaign is intended
to demonstrate that "thi is I
the country as a whole
"We'll be pointing out that all ol
e rtumbi rs are people Aaron
I ��v hen we push people iul I
college, we're eating our own seed-
n I mean, e anl to mal e
economy more productive, so we
cul the graduate students, who do
the studies thai make it more pro
ductive. rhey want �ngei
military? Well, who the hell do thev
think is going to design all tl
weapons systems for them it thev
closedown university research?"
Rehabilitation
CA DP Helping Students
Bv PVrRKkO'NKIll
staff Writer
I was on Qualuudes and scotch
about three months said
Doug, and ECU social work major.
"I called here . . . and they came
and got me
Doug spent five days in the infir-
. savs he got control of his life
and is now doing volunteer work tot
�he Campus Alcohoi and Drug Pro-
gram (C ADY'i � the organization
ihav helped him
c A DP. in rooms 301 and 303 of
the Lrwm Building, is run and
operated by 2 student volunteers
who do peer group education, sup-
and counseling. Its basic
philosophy is "promoting responsi-
ble decisions for the consumption of
rmicals according to Jerry I ot-
the group's faculter adviser.
"Our first goal is education; our
t is toward assistance
Research shows that a large ma-
ity � approximated 87 percent
� of the student- at I asl C arolma
consume alcohol, according to
l.ianita Bolton, a nursing major and
t'ADP member. She said a signifi-
cant number of alcohoi consumers
will inevitablv have a drinking pro-
blem.
A Drinking Problem?
According to CADP's informa
tion brochure. Your Decision, "a
drinking problem exists it we need
alcohol in order to function, or if we
need alcohol in such a way that it
impairs our functioning
I he majority of alcohol users do
not have such a problem, Bolton
said, "which means that they drink
responsibly
However, if a student senses a
problem or wants information.
C-DP volunteers can help with ser
vices including books, films,
references, research and general in-
formation on alcohol and drugs.
Workshops for ECU students and
faculty members are also held on
many aspects of the consumption of
chemicals.
The organization also will send
speakers to any campus group that
wants to learn more about drinking
or drug problems as well as the work
of CADP.
CADP members stress that they
are an organization of students �
you must be a student to be a
volunteer member � who do sup
port work for other students. Lot
terhos said CADP is strictly a stu
dent service directed by students.
Interested students are invited to
join the group. Internships for
volunteers are available for students
desiring to become trained peer
counselors.
1 otterhos is also director of the
Mcohol Training Program offered
through the School of Allied Health
and Social Professions This profes-
sional program is designed to tram
students to work in the field of
alcohol abuse and alcoholism.
c ADP notes that LCL has a
freshman dropout rate of 33 per-
cent. Ot these '4s percent cue
drinking and drugging as the major
reason" tor leaving school, accor-
ding to c DP member Bob Horst,
a social work maior. "Too much
partying added Lauren Crist, also
a member and in social work.
Typically, main individuals with
drinking or drug-related problems
cause additional anxiety for the peo-
ple around them, be thev loved ones
or other college students living in
the dorms.
(ADP works with Last
Carolina's residence hall advirs to
help them deal with problen that
mav arise from a student's abuse of
alcohol or drugs. "We help them in
identifying a problem in a dorm
situation Horst said.
Resident advisers are trained to
deal with a crisis and to know their
options, assording to Horst. These
options mav be referral to CADP, a
report to Associate Dean of Orien-
tation and Judiciary James Mallory.
or even calling the campus police if
a situation is out ol control.
(ADP tries to dispel the myths
associated with drinking and
drunkenness such as "drinking
black coffee or taking cold
showers Horst said. "Only time
will sober up a drunk
The group also conducts
breathalizer demonstrations in
cooperation with the N.C. Highway
Patrol. The student volunteers
themselves are the subjects; various
tests are conducted on participants
who have consumed certain quan-
tities ot beer on a full or empty
stomach.
'Responsible Drinking'
Nuclear War
Is Pitt County Ready?
The Shadows Know "�" �� �� ��"
whether it's earl morning or lute afternoon as these students pass the
Brewster Building.
Ha PAIKICKO'M ILL
staff M mi, p
Here the title: uclear Civil
Protection, In Place andrisi.s
Relocation to Pit; ounty ivil
Preparedness Emergency Opera
lions Plan tor U ar.
According to Bettv Whitfield, the
secretary of the Pitt County
Emergency Management, "you're
talking about a pretty thick book
So thick, m Fact, thai Whitfield
claims it would take her a tew hours
to dig up the answers to any ques
tions a concerned citizen may have
on the subject ol nuclear war.
One problem arise- as a result
Whitfield's complex dilemma: V hat
would happen it a nuclear attack
took place today? Would we have
time to wait for her "to look it up"
in "the thick book Where would
we go?
Questions of this nature seem
vital, but would Whitfield and her
superior Bobby Joy net. both part-
time workers for All Natural And
Man-Made Disaster Emergency
Situations Management, possibly be
able to do the iob in the event ol an
attack?
Whitfield see- no problems
"Everything is readv to go it we
have a nuclear attack she said.
"Pitt County does have a nu
program on file and updated, and
ready to go
She referred calls tor furthei in-
formation to a Centralommunica-
tions Center or The National Alert
Warning System (NAWS).
According to W el don
McLawhorn, an employee with the
Pitt County Sheriff's Department.
they have "a direct phone hook-up
with Washington, D.C for com-
munications in the event oi a na-
tional defense emergency.
McLawhorn also had a limned
amount of information and was on
ly answering the phone as part ol his
job u1 the Communications Ofl
In the event of a nuclear attack,
Mel aw horn woul e citizens
to head tor the fallout shelters
knew �it only two shelters for all
Greenville's 35,000 residents. "1!
I'm nor mistaken I think it's just the
post offices right now he said
Mel awhorn also advised people to
listen to radio stations.
third call was placed to a toll-
free number in Raleiuh. hvii an of-
ficial spokesman was unavailable
tor comment.
According to the General Statut
ol North Carolina, under the funi
tion- tit State 1 mergency Man
ment, Section 166A-5(3)D,
"Development and presentation ol
traunng programs and public ini
mation programs insure the I
nishing ol adequately trained .
sonnel and an informed publit
time ol need Need indue,
nuclear emergency.
"The citizens are not informed
about the plan said a person �
dying civil defense who chooses to
remain anonymous, "and 1 believe
that tins information would cr.
additional panic and make the
working ol the plan impossible
He equated civil defense
preparedness to a 'ire raging in a
school and the panic that would en-
sue it a tire drill had never been
practiced.
"Basically the option would be to
leave said Arthur Colclough, the
ECl safety officer with the Occupa-
tional Safety and Health Ad-
ministration (OSHA) "We don't
have anv plans whatsoever. I can tell
you that. That's a fact
Whitfield recommended calling
tour people working on ECl 's cam-
pus, m cooperation with her office,
an a Disaster Control Plan.
One ol the committee members is
ee WOULD, Page 3
Test results are often surprising
and are designed to teach
"responsible drinking" levels,
CADP members said. Alcohol-
related automobile accidents are the
single largest cause of death in the
college-age bracket.
Mallory's office requires students
with a recurring abuse problem to
participate in the (ADP bimonthly
"rap session Any student directed
to the program may be subjected to
disciplinary action for failing to par-
ticipate.
Horst stated that CADP hopes
the "rap session" will be an
"awareness development process"
for the students involved. "We're
here non-judgementally Bolton
added.
The sessions last from two to two
and one-half hours, and include
films and discussions led by CADP
members. The group believes many
obvious signs may indicate a
possibly progressive abuse problem.
If the problem is identified early, a
student may decide to start a
"pattern change" to bring the abuse
under control. CADP members said
thev hope the sessions will help
students recognize potential pro-
blems and seek solutions.
"What goes on here stays in this
building Horst said, stressing the
confidentiality of the program. "No
information leaves this building. We
have no connection with the (ECU)
administration in this area he ad-
ded.
See REHAB, Page 3
Attorney General
To Speak At ECU
Save The Lighthouse' Funds Deliberated
By DIANE ANDERSON
Staff V filer
There is a possibility that the SGA
will not be sending any funds to the
Save the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse
Committee for the preservation of
that historic landmark, although
they approved a bill last week ap-
propriating $500 to the program.
It was attempted at the meeting
Monday to bring the bill up again
for reconsideration, but the motion
was defeated. Vice President Mar-
vin Braxton, who last week stated
that he would suggest to President
Lester Nail that the bill be vetoed,
was denied the opportunity to speak
on behalf of the reconsideration
because of objections by a few
members of the legislature.
Nail has until this Thursday to
veto the bill.
In other business, an appropria-
tion for $206 was approved for the
Graduate Business Association,
covering such expenses as a filing
cabinet, postage, and a subscription
to the Wall Street Journal.
The ECU Chapter of Speech,
I anguage and Auditory Pathology
was given $200 to help with advertis-
ing costs for their coming sym-
posium.
Mr. Dick Welch spoke on behalf
of the Ground Zero program to
enlighten and encourage the SGA to
take an interest in the threat of
nuclear war.
N.C. Attorney General Rut us Ed-
misten will lecture on the Last
Carolina campus Wednesday night
The lecture is sponsored bv the
ECU Law Society and will be held in
Brewster C-103 at 7 p.m. Dr. John
Howell. interim chancellor of the
university, is scheduled to deliver
the introduction to Edmiston's lec-
ture.
Edmiston was Deputy Chief
Counsel to Sen. Sam 1 rvin's
Watergate Committee, and was
elected state attorney general in
1974. He has been re-elected twice.
The lecture is open to the general
public, according to Diane Jones,
the president of the law society.
Jones said the society is open to
anyone interested in the law as well
as students planning to enter law
school.
Edmisten
K





I
r
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 16, 1982
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
It you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
In the announcements column
please send the announcement (as
brief as possible) typed and
double-spaced to The East Caroii
man in care of the production
manager
For better service, we are now
asking that you pick up several
copies of our new announcement
application tor your upcoming
events.
There is no charge tor an-
nouncements, but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
merit will run as long as you want
and suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column for publicity
The deadline for announcements
is 5 p.m Friday for the Tuesday
paper and 5 p.m Tuesday for the
Thursday paper
This space is available to all
campus organizations and depart
meots.
INTERVARSITY
Sorry about the mix up last
week lor the Intervarsity Chris
tian Fellowship Meeting. We will
meet Wednesday at 7 30 pm in
Mendenhali. room 210 Bob Clyde
will speak on "Love and Sexual'
ty"
INTERVIEWERS
WANTED
The institute tor Coastal and
Marine Resources is currently
seeking six to eight prospective
student interviewers for a
research protect on the recrea
tional fisheries in the upper sounds
of eastern North Carolina Pro
spective interviewers must be
students at East Carolina and be
able to furnish own transportation
The work will start m mid to late
April and will continue through the
summer months and into the fall.
Training will take place in March
Interested students are asked to
contact Cindy Stack for an inter
view at 7S7 6779
MEMBERSHIP DRIVE
The Student Council lor Excep
tional Children (SCEC) is having
their membership drive the week
of Feb. 15 Students from all ma
iors are invited to join Please stop
by the SCEC office m Speight,
now. and see what we're all about
or come by the membership booth
during the week of Feb 15 and talk
to a representative for some first
hand experiences. Don't pass us
up
SNEA
The Student National Education
Association will meet Wednesday,
Fob. 17. in Sp-129 at 4 p.m Or
Thomas Chambiiss. Director of
Student Teaching, will be our
speaker
GAMMA BETA PHI
BAKE SALE
GBP will have a bake sale
Wednesday. Feb 17 at the Student
Store, it will begin at lam. and go
until. All members remember to
bring bake goods
LAW VS LOVE
Christianity is NOT a restrictive
set of laws applied to work your
way ro heaven. (Ephesians 2 1,9)
It is a growing process where you
learn to walk in love with God. It is
a change to the best attitudes and
values in life (Romans 12 1.2 &
Colossians 3:1 17) Come to our
fellowship and learn more about
this and other truths in the Bible
Thursday at 8 p.m . rm 242.
Mendenhali. Feb It
BAKE SALE
The ECU Biology Club is soon
soring a bake sale on Feb 17
(Wednesday), m the lobby of the
Biology building The sale starts
at 9 a.m. Please come by1 Your
support is appreciated.
AD HOC
U.S. Military Aid is being sent to
El Salvador's corrupt govern
ment We tram their troops at Fort
Bragg if you're opposed to these
practices we invite �ou to join the
ECU AD HOC Comm. ee opposed
to El Salvadoran Military Aid. We
will be organizing an ECU Cam
pus Protest For more information
call 7S 4906
WALK FOR
HUMANITY
ECU-Greenville Walk For
Humanity is having an important
meeting tor anyone wanting to
help with this years "Walk " We
need lots of help We want to have
total campus exposure plus sup
port tor our biqgesf "Walk" ever
Please come on Feb 25 at 7:30
p m to the Newman House (9S3 E
10th Stor call 752 47)6
CONTINUING
EDUCATION
Personal Development Pro
grams begin: Feb 25 � Yoga. In-
vesting in the 80' Speed Reading.
Prescription & Non-prescription
Drugs; Feb. 27 � The Small Com-
puter Revolution; March 1 �
Assertiveness as a Way of Life;
March 22 � Child Behavior
Management. Also, Feb. 23 �
Roberts Rules of Order. Camera I,
Calligraphy. Beginning Ballet.
Jazz Exercise, Intermediate
Bridge, Banjo. Guitar. Feb. 24 �
Algebra Review, Clogging I.
Aerobic MovementExercise. Call
757 6143 or visit Division of Conn
nuing Education.
EPT
Epsilon Pi Teu. the honorary
technology fraternity, will hold a
business meeting on Tuesday.
Feb. 16 at 5 p.m. in room FI04. We
will vote on prospective members
and plan the annual spring ban
quet
WORSHIP
A student Episcopal service of
Holy Communion will be
celebrated on Tuesday. Feb. 16. in
the chapel of St Pauls Episcopal
Church. 406 4th Street (one block
from Garrett Dorm). The service
will be at 530 p.m with the
Episcopal Chaplain, the Rev. Bill
Hadden. celebrating
LATTER DAY SAINT
The Latter Day Saint Student
association is sponsoring a free
film and refreshments every Tues
day evening at 7:00 in the cof
feehouse at Mendenhali. All
welcome to come and join us each
week!
TEAM HANDBALL
CLUB
ECU Team Handball Club in
vites all interested persons, both
male and female, to join us. Hand
ball is a new and exciting sport
that is easy to learn and fun to
play The Handball Club is cur
rently scheduled to make two trips
to the New York city art tor tour
naments. For more information
�nd practice times call Tom Cody
i756 4933)
PHILOSOPHY
The Philosophy Club will meet
on Tuesday Feb. U at 7 p.m. in
Brewster D-313. Dr. James Smith
of the Philosophy Department will
speak on "Thoughts on
Metaphor All interested persons
are welcome.
DRAWING COURSE
The School of Art would like to
make all University students
aware that Art 1020 (Drawing) is
available both first and second
sessions of summer school. This
drawing course is geared to non
art ma iors and can be used as part
of the Humanities and Fine Arts
requirement. The course is being
taught First Session everyday
from 1120 1250. and Second Ses
sion it is being taught everyday
from � 9:30 p.m.
HOUSING DISPLAY
The school of Home Economics,
is having a Residential Housing
Display from Feb. 14 21 at
Mendenhali Student Center
Students i-om the Housing
Department will be displaying
works of all aspects of residential
houseing There will be a recep
tion on Saturday, feb 20 from 1 00
to 4:00 pm The public is invited to
attend
VOLUNTEERS
NEEDED
The Pitt County Juvenile Ser
vices Restitution Program is
urgently in need of volunteers to
serve as on site supervisors for
juveniles as they perform various
community service tasks
You ma volunteer any number
of hurs per week or per month.
Monday through Saturday, and
you can be reimbursed for any
program related travel
For further information, please
call Cookie Rodgers at 7SS 4223 or
come by the Juvenile Court
Counselors office on the fourth
floor of the Pitt County Cour
thouse.
KYF
The King's Youth Fellowship
will hold its next meeting on
February II at 8 p.m in
Mendenhali (Room 247) Visitors
�rt welcome and refreshments
will be served at the conclusion of
the meeting.
ECU LAW SOCIETY
Will meet Wednesday, Feb 17 at
7 p.m in Room C 103, Brewster
Guest lecturer will be North
Carolina Attorney General. Rufus
Edmisten. For further informa
lion, please contact Diane Jones,
756 6556
CORSO
There will be a CORSO meeting
Thursday, Feb 18 at 5 30 p m at
Mendenhali Check Information
Desk for room number All people
interested in Corrections and
Social Work are invited to attend
ATTENTION
The East Carolina University
Chapter of the National Student
Speech. Language and Hearing
Association is sponsoring the
Twelth Annual Speech, Language
and Hearing Symposium on
February 25 and 26. 1982 Guest
Speakers include Kathleen
Holmes and Or Howard Shane
Topics include. 'The Use of a Nor
mal Language Model tor Deal
Children' and Assessment and In
tervention tor the Non Speaking'
For further information contact
Margo Mulligan at 757 6961
NAACP
Will have its regular meeting
Wednesday. Feb 17 at 6 pm m
Room 248. Mendenhali All
members please attend
BLACK HISTORY
In honor ol Black History
Month, Reverend Arlee Griffin
will be speaking on the Black
Church, Thursday. Feb 18. at 7
p.m m the Multi Purpose Room,
Mendenhali Also the ECU Gospel
Ensemble will be featured Admis
sion i 50. Tickets are available
from NAACP members or at the
AED
A ED pre med society will
meet on Tuesday. Feb. 16 at 7 30
p m in Flanagan 307 Or John C
Moskop, Dept of Pediatrics. ECU
School of Medicine and Frank
Birinyi. an ECU 3rd year med stu
dent will be the guest spakers
They will discuss Ethics and the
Physician Drug Company Rela
tionship All interested persons
are invited to attend
CO-OP EDUCATION
The Cooperative Education Of
fice, located in 313 Rawl Building,
currently has iob openings tor
Summer and Fall 1982 with the
foiling agencies Social Security
Administration Baltimore MD
Morth Carolina Internship Office
Raleigh. NC. Camp Day. NC In
stitute of Government Raleigh
NC
For more information, contact
the Coop office m 313 Rawl
Building
GEOLOGY CLUB
The ECU Geology Club will hold
a meeting Wednesday. Feb 17 at
6 30 p m. in Graham 301 Dr Jean
Lowry will be the guest speaker
presenting a slide show entitled �
"Geology m Our National Parks"
An informal discussion of upcom
mg Geology Club happenings will
follow Everyone is invited to at
tend! P S T shirt orders will be
taken at this time A new design is
forthcoming
SGA
To Al! Organizations The Stu
dent Government Association
recently instituted an annual
budget Requests for tunds for the
1982 83 school year are now being
accepted at the Student Govern
ment offices m Mendenhali The
dead line for consideration of re
quests during the present
semester .s March 22. 1982
SGA POSITION
Persons interested in applying
for the SGA Attorney General
position may do so m Room 228 of
Mendenhali Student Center bet
ween the hours of 8 a m and 5
p m , Monday through Friday
HEALTHCARE
FOR OLDER CITIZENS
The public is invited to a discus
sion of today's problems and
trends in health care for older
citizens. Tuesday. Feb 16 at �
pm at the First Presbyterian
Church of Greenville on the corner
of Elm and 14th streets The
meeting is jointly sponsored by the
League of Women Voters ana the
Pitt County Council On Aging The
keynote speaker will be Ernest B
Messer. Assistant Secretary of the
Division of Aging and Former
Chairman of the North Carolina
House of Representatives Com
miftee on Aging, who will discvss
national and state trends in health
care tor the elderly A panel will
then present what they see locally
as problems and the needs of our
older citizens tor health care
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAMS
Will begin March 30 � Basic
NAUI or PADI SCUBA Certitica
tion April 8 � Basic Sailing Call
or visit Division of Continuing
Education � telephone number.
757 6143
AMA
The American Marketing
Association will meet on Feb 17 at
5 p m in Room 721 m Mendenhali
The guest speaker will be Terne
Treylor. director of marketing
and vales promotion at Carolina
East Man All members are en
coureged to attend We invite
anyone interested in ioining. and
participating in our marketing
organization to attend this
meeting
FAITH & VICTORY
l ve got a serious question for all
of you reading this announcement
Do you have any real assurance
tnat you'll go to Heaven if you died
tomorrow II not, then you should
really consider findinq out how to
get that gift Jesus has already
paid the price tor you � lust
receive him as lord of your life
Faith & Victory Fellowship meets
every Friday night at 7 p m m the
Jenkins Art Building m the
Auditorium
PHI SIGMA PI
The spring smoker will be held
tonight in the Mendenhali Multi
Purpose Room at 7 p.m Ail
brothers should attend this very
important meeting The follow up
meeting will be held Wednesday at
5 p.m. in 132 Austin, with the
regular business meeting follow
mg Be there Aloha
CHURCH OF
NAZARENE
The Church of Naiarene (a
mainline Protestant denom.na
tion) has decided to plant a church
m Greenville under the direection
Of Rev Winston Huff Any Chris
tian interested m finding a place of
service and a chance to mature in
your spiritual growth is urged to
help No matter what your talents
are. you are important Alter help
ing build a church, you may move
on. but your work will remain ana
grow Call Pastor Huff at 757 3606
anytime
PHI BETA LAMBDA
The Omicron chapter of Phi
Beta Lambda will meet Feb 17 at
4 00 p m in Rawl 130 Alt
members are urged to attend
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
Personal Development Pro
grams begin!
Feb 16 Conversational French,
Conversational German n Out
door and inrjoor Plants Feb IV
Beginning Ballroom, In
termediate Ballroom Dance Feb
22 How to make a Good Marriage
Better. Softballaseball Officiating
Call 757 6143 or visit Division of
Continuing Education
SIGMA TAU DELTA
Would i'ke to inform all current
and new members of its first
meeting of the spring semester on
Tuesday February. 16 at t 30
p m in the Mendenhali Student
Center s Coffeehouse A orie'
ousmess meeting wil' be followed
by guest speaker W'Hiem
HaMberg, who has published snort
stories -n nuthrrm ffrfr�
riiHifhihum and other noted lOur
nals Hallberg will read humorous
and appealing passages ftrom
some of his published works
Anyone interested it welcome to
attend
GENERAL COLLEGE
PREREGISTRATION
CHANGES
General College students should
contact their advisers pr.or to
February 22 t0 arrange lor
preregistratio"
� (
I
I

fi
I
The haI Carolinian
mii r -
Published every Tuesoar and
Thursday during 'he academ.c
Yea' ana every Aiednesoar our
ing the summer
The East Carolinian 4 'he o
fioal new.pape' ot Fas'
Carolina University owned
operated ana publ'Shed lor ano
by the students of Eas' Carol "a
University
Subscription Rate 17C yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU
Greenville. N C
POSTMASTER Sena address
changes to The East Carol nan
Old Soutn Building :CU Green
ville, NC 77834
Telephone TV IM8.8MT.eJW
Application to mail at second
Ctatt postage rates is pending at
Greenville North Carolina
febraflftrbwaa
:�
S
Trash Party ' A ngers Blacks
CINCINNATI, Ohio
(CPS) � While many
colleges were
celebrating the Rev.
Martin Luther King
Jrs birthday with
memorials and special
events to honor the
slain civil rights leader,
a fraternity at the
University of Cincin-
nati threw a "Second
Annual Martin Luther
King Trash Party" �
an event that has cam-
pus blacks in an
uproar.
"We look at it as
much more than a
fraternity prank says
Chris Mack, president
of the United Black
Association (UBA) on
campus. "It was ex-
tremely racist and
degrading for black
people in general.
We're asking for per-
manent suspension of
the fraternity
Sigma Alpha Ep-
silon, the fraternity
which hosted the party,
has been suspended in-
definitely from the
university pending a
full review of the event
by the Inter-Fraternity
Council.
Members of SAE,
reportedly the largest
and most sociality ac-
tive fraternity on the
40,000-student campus,
are refusing to com-
ment about the party.
The fraternity pro-
moted the January 17
event through flyers
that were secretly
distributed to selected
students, fraternities,
sororities, and
members of the student
government.
"To gain entrance to
this wonderful event
you must bring one or
more of the follow-
ing the flyer told
students, going on to
list such things as "a
bucket of Kentucky
Fried Chicken "a
radio bigger than your
head "a cancelled
welfare check or "a
bottle of Afro-Sheen
Since the promotion
was secret, the universi-
ty is still investigating
the extent that other
fraternities and
sororities were involved
in the party. Ad-
ministrators suspect a
similar party was held
last year without com-
ing to the attention of
the general student
population, as this
year's party did.
"I was appalled by
the whole thing says
a member of the stu-
dent government who
declined an invitation
to the party. "I'm
white, but I'm also
Jewish, and 1 know
that what happened
could just as easily be
done to me
According to reports
by students who attend-
ed the party. "It wsone
big evening of
humiliating and mock-
ing blacks Many of
the people attending
the party had black
paint on their faces and
were "mimicking out-
dated, stereotyped im-
ages of blacks
sources say. Members
of a local sorority
reportedly attended the
event dressed as
members of the Ku
Klux Klan.
"We regret that the
whole thing took
place comments Ken
Service, spokesman for
the university. "Those
kinds of actions do not
meet the standards we
expect as a university.
The fraternity has been
officially suspended as
a result of their actions.
We felt that because of
the nature of the of-
fenses something had
to be done right away
Black students are
still infuriated over the
event, and are worried
that racist behavior on
the campus is on the in-
crease.
"We've been having
quite a few problems
lately remarks UBA
President Mack. For
instance, he says, films
such as "Birth Of A
Nation" have become
popular on campus.
Mack also says that
blacks are not receiving
enough cooperation
from the administra-
tion or the student
government. "Both
groups are basically
covering each other's
behinds Mack
assserts.
"I don't know what
he expects Service
responds. "The event is
not typical of our
school. Our homecom-
ing king and queen this
year were both black.
We are one of the three
top universities in the
country as far as retain-
ing minority graduate
students. We're doing
all we can to let people
know that we deplore
what happened. I'm
confident that the
fraternity's suspension
is going to stick, and at
a sufficient level to
make it clear that we
will not tolerate that
kind of activity
Although the UC
Student Senate con-
demned the "racist ac-
tivities" and "acts of
ignorance" regarding
the party, top members
of the student govern-
ment are remaining
silent on the issue.
"I just do not feel
that it is our place to
make a statement
says Guy Glaser, vice
president of the student
government. "What
did happen was wrong
and shouldn't have oc-
curred. But the more
you get involved in
these types of things,
the more trouble you
cause. We represent a
lot of people on this
campus. A lot of peo-
ple
Black students
suspect the fraternity's
"power and influence
on campus" may result
in lenient punishment
against the group, an
action which they say
would throw the cam-
pus into turmoil.
"At this point, the
situation is very tense
Mack says. "The 3000
black students on this
campus are very united.
Should permanent
suspension not be taken
(against Sigma Alpha
Epsilon), there will be
some awful big pro-
tests. We are prepared
to do whatever is
necessary
; SHMTSWOmffi
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TO PLAY THE GAME:
Answer each of the riddles that will appear here each
week in February. Write your answer in the blanks betow
each riddle. The letters with numbers betow them corres-
pond to the numbered spaces in the master key. As you
fill in the letters of the master key, you will be spelling the
name and location of a secret city in Europe. Send us
the solution, and you and a friend could win a trip there, free.
TO ENTER SWEEPSTAKES
t. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY
2. Grand Prize consists of two regular round-trip economy airfares
to the secret city, 30-day Eurail passes. American Mouth Hostel
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3. Cut out master key for use as official entry blank or use 3' x 5"
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4. The first 1,000 correct respondents will receive a poster as an
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5. All entries must be received by 31582 Enter as often as you
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6. A random drawing of all correct entries wit! be held 32282 by
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WHAT AM I?
My arsenal is patience,
My sword is chalk;
My discipline is conscience,
My medium is talk;
My reservoir is history,
My greatest love is truth;
My highest art is alchemy,
Where lead to gold is youth.
1 IT
(Answer to Wfeek 2 RidVfle. CLFf)
� �� BB
O General Foods Corporation 1982
TODS'INTeRN ATONAL COFFeCS
MAKe QOOD CDMDANY.
?





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 16, 1982
it i
'O
IN
University Gets Praise, Accreditation Problems
AUSTIN, Texas (CPS) � It was
recognition most academics dream
about. But at the same time a na-
tional survey of business school
deans and business leaders named
the University of Texas'
undergraduate business school the
fifth best in the nation, Texa ad-
ministrators received a grim
message:
Fix up the school, or lose ac-
creditation.
Enrollment in Texas' College of
Business Administration, it seems,
had grown so fast and s much that
there weren't enough instructors to
teach the 10,325 students in the col-
lege.
The American Assembly of Col-
legiate Schools of Business
(AACSB), which regularly reviews
and accredits campus business ad-
ministration programs around the
nation, told Texas it had two years
to improve its teacher-to-studesnt
ratio, or lose its accreditation.
The accrediting group requires
one faculty member for every 400
undergraduate student hours taken.
But Texas � which, unable to
find more qualified faculty
merflbers, ultimately decided to
limit enrollment starting next fall �
is far from the only business college
suffering from its own popularity.
During the last year Arizona,
Penn State, Michigan, Ohio State,
Tennessee, Michigan State, and ihe
State University of New York-
Albany, among other large schools,
have complained of overcrowded
business enrollments and
dangerously-high teacher-student
ratios. Smaller schools like Bowline
Green and West Chester State have
similar problems.
"Almost every school's resources
are taxed, and many are barely
managing observes Charles
Hickman, the AACSB's associate
director. "You would have to look
hard to find a dean who is not hav-
ing enrollment pressures
Ronald Slone, the AACSB's
director of accreditation, adds that
only one college is currently on pro-
bation and "not many" are in im-
mediate danger of losing accredita-
tion.
But of the schools regularly com-
ing up for review, "many are ha ing
difficulty bescause of enrollment.
But we will give them a reasonable
amount of time (to compensate)
The overcrowding is well-
documented. Undergraduate
business course enrollment increas-
ed by 120 percent from 1966 to
1978, according to a recent U.S.
Census Bureau report.
Enrollment has risen another 12
percent since 1978, from 1.5 million
Would Greenville Be Ready?
Continued From Page 1
ECU Police Department director
Joe Calder, who claims he never met
with the committee, but had receiv-
ed a letter about it "a year or two
ago and that's the last I ever heard
of it He added that "there ain't a
hell of a lot of planning you can do
for it (a nuclear war). I'm being
facetious, but that's what it boils
down to Anyway, I wouldn't
worry about it he concluded.
President Reagan and the Depart-
ment of Defense are worried about
it, as is demonstrated by the
89-percent increase being given to
the Federal Emergency Manage-
ment Agency (FEMA) for the 1983
fiscal-year budget. Funding that
totals $252.3 million has been ap-
propriated for research, study, and
planning for various aspects of civil
defense as well as for identifying
and marking fallout bomb shelters.
The agency claims its civil defense
operations would protect the public
in the event of a "military attack
tive medicine. They believe that ex-
posure to radiation is incurable, but
can be prevented � if you prevent a
nuclear war. So they work actively
with public education projects and
political lobbying to avert nuclear
war. Mattern states that many Rus-
sian and American scientists have
been working together on the sub-
ject of nuclear war and have come
to the same conclusions as those of
the Physicians for Social Respon-
sibility.
"I'll be honest with you. I don't
spend a lot of time paying attention
to civil preparedness Mattern
said, "because I think that in the
event of a nuclear war any efforts at
civil prepardedness that we might
make are laughable Other citizens
of civil defense say that in the event
of a nuclear war the living will envy
the dead because of the horror that
wil follow.
to evacuate to Pitt County.
Research indicates that a
lOO-megaton nuclear bomb explod-
ed in Goldsboro would cause third
degree burns on people up to 54
miles away.
Under these circumstances, Sister
Mattern said that "budget increases
to civil preparedness are an illu-
sion She added that she would
have to refuse to participate in any
civil defense drills in the event that
President Reagan resumes them.
"They will never get me into an air
raid shelter
Sister Mattern said she feels that
civil defense preparation for nuclear
war is a way of saying "We see this
(nuclear war) as a real possibility
"It goes along with other
strategies for a limited nuclear war
that have been more evident" Mat-
tern added, and said she thinks that
a lot of indications coming from
U.S. officials are making the accep-
tability of nuclear war more ob-
vious.
"I think a lot of it might back
fire Mattern said. "Some of the
news media have collaborated with
civil defense people trying to
show the public that there is no civil
defense
"The average person feels this
tremendous psychic numbness in
looking at what nuclear war might
mean she said. "What parent
wants to think that their child is go-
ing to be the victim of something
like the children at Hiroshima and
Nagasaki?"
students to almost 1.7 million in
1980, a National Center for Educa-
tional Statistics survey found.
"Business school enrollments
traditionally rise when the econoni)
is in bad shape Hickman explains.
"Beople perceive a business degree
as a better union card
Hickman also cites the growth t
continuing education programs thai
have swollen the ranks of business
schools, and of a migration if
women students into business
courses.
A June 1980 Census Bureau
raport found "a slow but sure shiti
of women" away from "traditional
women's fields" like education
toward business.
"Students summarizes loin
Snyder of the National Center lor
Educational Statistics, "are looking
for a more marketable field of
study
Moreover, Snyder adds, "we ex-
pect an increase in business students
over the next few years
The trouble is that colleges can't
recruit enough teachers to ae-
comodate those students even if
they could afford to. Noi enough
students are going on for their doc-
torates and opting for leaching
careers.
"From our perspective, the most
important task is to attract more
students into Ph.d. programs
observes Dr. Kenneth Smith, dean
of Arizona's business school.
Smiih says "the difference bet
ween academic and business salaries
is not as great as most people seem
to think. For instance, at the better
schools it is not unusual for a bright
Ph.d. to be recruited (by colleges) at
a salary that ranges between $28,(KH)
lo $3u,(XK) for a nine-month posi-
tion. But students don't know about
it. In order to increase supplv t
Ph.d.s, we need to step up oui
recruitment efforts
A new AACSB report says new
business college teachers averaged
siartmg salaries of $22.K(X) last year,
ihough new accounting and finance
teachers are getting $25,100 and
$24,300, respectivesly.
While escalating recruiting, ihe
business schools have few choices
tor immediate!) ending the crisis.
"Ilus Smith warns, "is a bad
movement because only maybe one-
half the students who wish to can
get into Hie business program
rhere ate also those who, when
tailing short ot accreditation stan
dat ds. would rather change I lie stan
J a i d s.
J
disagree with FEMA's
Scientists are uncertain what the
long range effects of radiation will
Many organizations and individuals have on our planet, said Mattern.
She added, "Civilization as we
know it would pretty much come to
an end in any countrv that had
the bomb fall
Goldsboro, 40 miles from Green-
ville, is designated as a Level I area
in the event of a nuclear attack.
Level I means the area is probably
designated for a first-round nuclear
hit from a Soviet weapon.
In the event of such an attack, the
citizens of Goldsboro are supposed
Social Respon-
trying to make
civil defense is
strongly
position.
"Physicians for
sibility have been
(the) point" that
useless in a nuclear attack, stated
Sister Evelyn Mattern, a spokesper-
son with the N. C. Council of Chur-
ches.
Physicians for Social Respon-
sibility is a group of doctors work-
ing from the standDoint of preven-
Rehab Program Working
I
Help Wanted
If you are interested
in Advertising Layout &
Design Contact
The East Carolinian Advertising Dept.
at
757-6366 or 757-3210 & leave a message
Interested in
Helping
Exceptional Children
Join the Student
Council for Exceptional
Children
February 15-19
in the
Speight Building
IlfTTIIIIIIillltltlllllllllllll'lIl1
Every Day
11:00-11:00
Continued From Page 1
At times students are referred for
further treatment to the ECU
Counseling Center, Alcoholics
Anonymous, the Greenville Alcohol
Rehabilitation Center, Real House
Crisis Intervention Center or the
Student Health Center.
Although only one year old, the
ECU Campus Alcohol and Drug
Program has already become a
model program, according to its
volunteer workers. Lotterhos often
speaks to outside groups about the
program's successes.
Summing up the work of CADP,
Lotterhos called it an "educational
exercise" to get people to think
about alcohof and drug abuse. "The
whole concept here is one of com-
munication. The program is in-
dependent and not punitive
"This is the place to come for in-
formation, advice, assistance, sup-
port, or if you just want to stop
by Crist added.
The trwin Building is near
Mendenhall Student Center on the
side facing Greene dormitory.
CADP's telephone number is
757-6793.
300 E. 10th St.
758121
FAST SERVICE
Gome
Machines
Big Screen
TV
Drive-Up
Window for
To Go Orders
NQWOFFER1NG
FREE DELIVERY to Dorms
and Campus area sororities
and fraternities.
Located 1 mile past
Hastings Ford on
10th St. extension
POPCORN
SHRIMP
2,95
A PLATE
Tues.
Night
TUESDAY
TEZZER
WED &THURS.
BRICE ST.
FRI.&SAT.
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1 SUNDAY j�
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THOMPSON
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ATTICL
SOUTH S "6 1 ROCK NIGHTCLUB


TUES. - PIZZA SPECIAL -
LADIES' NITE - MIKE ED-
WARDS
WED. - SALAD BAR
SPECIAL
THURS. - SPAGHETTI
SPEC.
FRI. & SAT. - HAPPY
HOUR 4-7 - KENNY SHORE
SUN. - LASAGNA SPECIAL
MON. - COUNTRY COOK-
ING
THURSDAY
Grinderswitch
in Concert
FRIDAY MATINEE
wHarvey Dalton
Arnold � Happy Hour
4-7
SATURDAY
Happy Hour 6-8:30
FRI & SAT. NITE
Harvey Dalton
Arnold

EAST CAROLINA'S
PARTY CENTER
TUESDAY
ARM WRESTLING
CONTEST
WEDNESDAY
HUMP NITE
THURSDAY
COLLEGE NITE
FRIDAY
END OF WK. PARTY
SATURDAY
BEST IN DANCE MUSIC
SUNDAY
LADIES' NITE
zazzzsy
It takes 12 inches
to make a hero . .
Mi $ondwkt�.� - Solodi -
Vafitorion SondwicHct
Homemodr Soups - H�o� on freshly bofcad ro4H
Live Music
Is Back!
Feb. 18
Harry & Scrappy
9:00 p.ml a.m.
Good Food � Good Times
VIDEOGAMES
Attitude Adiustment Daily � 4 p.m7 p.m
(OjapfrrX
v
TUESDAY
Zoo Nite � 25C ponies
WEDNESDAY
Ladies' Night
THURSDAY
Happ) Hour � Free
Admission til 10 �
25C ponies til II
FRIDAY AFTERNOON
END OF THE WEEK
BUCKET PARTY-
saturday
JOHN MOORE
SUNDAY
Nickel Nite
Call ?si �7�s tor mtrt into.
109 E. 5th St. 752-1341
GOOD TIMES
Mon. (3-4 p.m.) FREE Pinball
(8 p.m.) Dart Tournament
HARRY & SCRAPPY
SAT FEB. 20
FREE PINBALL 3-4
MON FEB. 22
HAPPY HOUR from 4-7
every day with the
coldest beverage in town.
NtwopM 7�ayia wNt - Jpm i p.m.
"t EAST $th STREET
7S2 �7I!
Cartoon Contest
Call for details-752-8711
NOW OPEN FOR
HAPPY HOUR
DAILY AT 4:30
Not open to the general public.
t
1





@Ur East (Earnlintan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Jimmy Dupree, eo, � cw
Ric Browning, Mm� ,4dwwii Tom Hall, NewsEduor
Fielding Miller, flu wa�t��fr Charles Chandler, �,�, ��,���
Alison Bartel, nwiwi Mau(rf Steve Bachner, bmmmmmm 4'
Steve Moore. com Mm William Yelverton, hw
February 16, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Drinking Age
4 Icohol Still A vailable To A nyone
Governor James Hunt's Crime
Commission recently recommended
to him that the state's legal drinking
age be raised from 18 to 21 for all
types of alcohol. In theory, this pro-
posed increase is aimed at lessening
the number of alcohol-induced traf-
fic accidents in the state.
Obviously, the governor's com-
mittee feels that raising the drinking
age three years will drastically
reduce the annual figures. And
perhaps this change will look good
on paper, but the adverse effects of
such an increase outweigh by far the
theoretical improvements.
In the first place, raising North
Carolina's legal drinking age would
be a sham. How can the governor
expect a decrease in drunk-driving
fatalities, when current laws aren't
even being enforced? Recent
statistics have shown that the state's
conviction rate for drunken-driving
arrests is a mere 50 percent. Thus,
lessening traffic fatalities requires,
first and foremost, proper im-
plementation of any legislation,
whether that concern 18-year-olds
or 21-year-olds.
Secondly, it is difficult, even
foolish, to believe that changing a
law on paper will actually prevent
persons aged 18 to 21 from continu-
ing to consume alcohol. Rather, an
increase in the drinking age would
provoke secrecy. Those who wish to
drink will continue to do so, and if
they cannot purchase alcohol in
public, they'll drink in private,
behind closed doors, even closed car
DOONESBURY
I&ADNEMB.S HEPKMrt twzrr
� - :J
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XZ- j3(j7-�
doors. In reality, a law aimed at
lessening alcohol-induced accidents
could be an encouragement for the
exact opposite.
Furthermore, in the United
States, there seems to be some con-
flict of Gpinion as to the age at
which a person becomes an adult.
Since the resurgence of draft
registration in 1979, all 18-year-old
males are required to file with the
Selective Service. Isn't it
hypocritical that a person con-
sidered old enough to serve his
country cannot enjoy a glass of beer
with friends? Critics will complain
that this argument is overused, and
perhaps they're right, but sound
logic is sound logic.
Finally, and perhaps of somewhat
lesser importance, is the monetary
consideration. An increase in the
legal drinking age from 18 to 21
would not only decrease a valuable
revenue to the state, but would also
pose financial difficulties for hun-
dreds of businesses statewide,
especiallv those in college towns.
With more than half of ECU's
students under 21, it is conceivable
that a new drinking law could
necessitate the closing of many
Greenville "night spots Rather
than going downtown to dance and
socialize, students would have to
revert back to gathering at "Mary
Lou's to play records Of course,
the night clubs could always convert
from seling beer to pouring Kool-
Ade.
by Garry Trudeau
MAKE
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�mF
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Conservative Views Draw Criticism
Campus Forum
By JAY STONE
This column is addressed to the two in-
dividuals who co-authored a New Right
manifesto of sorts, in response to the alleg-
ed liberal bias of The East Carolinian.
Mr. Jones and Mr. Kilcoyne, you raise
three good questions: how much of a
responsibility do we as citizens have to
alleviate the suffering of those who are less
fortunate (in other words, should charity
be compulsory?); is ther really a significant
number of people who simply cannot help
themselves? and how efficiacious can large
federal agencies be in the war on poverty?
As for the question of compulsive chari-
ty, it seems evident from an examination
of history that people will attempt to
secure their own survival by any means
available to them. Either you give people a
means of obtaining food, shelter and
clothing or they will rip you off and
possibly kill you. An irrevocable dilemma
of class antagonism arises between the
haves and the have-nots, possibly even
leading to violent revolution.
It is far less expensive to practice com-
pulsive charity than it is to maintain a
police state. The spiritual ramifications of
this issue are almost infinite. They can,
perhaps, best be summarized by saying
that the progress of society as a whole can
only burgeon as rapidly as the progress of
the least evolved or fully realized in-
dividual in it. Or, a chain is only as strong
as its weakest link. An organism is only as
healthy as its sickest cell. Besides, feeding
someone is an investment, not a burden.
Now, you may wonder if the assertion
that there are really people who will starve
to death without financial assistance is a
valid claim. The unemployment rate is cur-
rently 8.5 percent nationwide. Keep in
mind that this figure is only representative
of the number of people who have any in-
come. Anyone who has ever done any
work with a charity organization or has
talked with anyone who has is keenly
Campus
Spectrum
aware that there is certainly a substantial
number of people who simply cannot sur-
vive without some form of financial
assistance. Yes, there are cases of welfare
fraud, but from my experience, I am
satisfied that the majority of the people
who receive financial assistance from the
government are proud, independent people
who are embarassed to be receiving charity
and would support themselves and their
families if it were at all possible. I must
question whether or not those who have
never been poor or done any work with the
poor have any right to question the
legitimacy of programs designed to benefit
the poor. Why should the burden of proof
be on social workers and political activists
who are willing to sacrifice for other
human beings? Why shouldn't those who
cry "welfare cadillac" at the mere mention
of food stamps or school lunch programs
have to prove that the recipients of finan-
cial aid are really shiftless and lazy?
Although Reagan claims to be sparing
the "truly needy they will bear the brunt
of the new social cruelty. The working
poor, much beloved in conservative
Republican mythology, will also be
punished.
Some 25 million Americans are living on
incomes below the federally established
poverty level of $3,790 a year, and signs in-
dicate their numbers are increasing. Many
of these people are attempting to support
families on their meager incomes. Some of
them are deserted mothers left to care for
their children alone.
WZMB Praised By 'Alternative9 Listeners
It is my desire to respond to the article
in the February 9th issue of The East
Carolinian concerning the questioned
format of WZMB in relation to its
minority representation (or lack
thereof)- I see no grounds on which the
Society of United Liberal Students
(SOULS) can firmly base us argument.
"Representation in the course of
this argument, is the key word. In addi-
tion to station manager Sam Barawick's
fine defense of the format in the article,
I would like to add what 1 believe are the
impractical aspects of true representa-
tion in this particular case.
To begin with, we mustn't forget (as
we often do) that a minority group (as
SOULS describes itself") is not necessari-
ly solely a black interest group, but a
group that must also represent the in-
terests of other minority racial and
ethnic groups as well. It follows, then
that SOULS' demands for representa-
tion must include music appealing to
both blacks and the many various ohter
minorities.
Therefore, to represent SOULS and
all minorities in WZMB's format would
mean not only including "funk" and
soul as is generally the preference of
blacks, but also those preferences of
other minorities representative of their
respective tastes. Obviously, this is im-
practical. Another consideration must
be made also.
What about the representation of the
whites who have tastes other than that
which is played on WZMB? What about
those who like classical, gospel, beach,
Top-40, and country music? Do they not
pay student fees also? Is this not
analogous with the complaints of
SOULS? Of course it is. The point be-
ing! The whole idea of true representa-
tion of those to be represented in the for-
mat of WZMB is highly impractical.
It would also be contradictory to the
purpose of creating WZMB. There are
many commercial radio stations in the
area which provide the music to meet
most any individual's tastes, with the ex-
ception of what is played on WZMB.
The station was created to provide an
alternative to those stations.
I do not doubt the legitimacy and the
contributing potential of SOULS in
campus activities. In the future,
however, I would prefer to see SOULS
be more careful and realistic in choosing
its battlegrounds.
KEN BARNES
Soph Pre-med.
Special Consideration
In response to SOULS President
Russell Parker, what exactly is special
consideration for minority listeners?
Until WZMB went on the air, I con-
sidered myself a minority listener
because there was not one single AOR
(album oriented rock) station in the
listening area. I do not classify music in
categories dealing with racel I classify it
in categories dealing with preference to
tempo, vocals, rhythm, etcpreferred
by the individual. Stevie Wonder word-
ed this philosophy perfectly in "Sir
Duke" by singing "Music is a world
within itself, with a language we all
understand, with an equal opportunity
for all to sing, dance, and clap their
hands
Obviously those who say Z-91 is not
providing for the black "minority" do
not look beyond and take note of some
of the artist that fit into 91.3's format.
Artists like, the Doobie Brothers, Jimi
Hendrix, Joan Armatrading, Mothers
Finest, Tina Turner, The Bus Boys, Bob
Marley, Clarence Clements, and Gary
U.S. Bonds, just to name a few that fit
into AOR. Other artists like George
Benson, Earth, Wind and Fire, Diana
Ross, The Commadors, plus all time
famous jazz masters are featureed in the
jazz segment of the format.
WZMB also provides for the classical
listening minority that has been ignored
in the airwaves available to Greenville.
But for people that prefer other types of
music, whether it be Top 40, soul,
religious, country; in Greenville it is now
just a flick of the dial.
The area and ECU should be thankful
to Sam Barwick, John Jeter, Elton
Boney and staff for providing an
"alternative" station. Now no matter
what mood you are in or music you ears
are seeking to hear you FM receiver will
find it loud and clear. And also, please
remember, WZMB is an Educational
Station providing experience and on
hand training to students interested in
communications. I find ECU fortunate
to have this station.
So to both Parker and Hunter: "You
can please some of the people all of the
time
SUSIE MAGHAN
Freshman, Communications
'Bland And Insipid'
"I'd like to buy an argument" so says
Monte Python's Other Album, and so
say I. It seems there has been no little
discrepency over WZMB's format.
Well, you can't please everyone I
generally don't dig on classical music,
either! But I also know that if I want to
hear any "reggae" music, all's I have to
do is go up and down the dial from 88 to
108 MHZ and I got it! They're a dime a
dozen.
Having lived in this area for
something like 13 odd years, I know
what's around and 1 must confess, it's
not much. I decrie the railing accusa-
tions against WZMB. It's only 1 little
spot on a bland and insipid scale where
there's a new wind blowing. I support
your format, and anxiously observe
your potential. I enjoy your Stevie
Wonder, Miles Davis, Maynard
Ferguson, and Al Dineola.
Could I make a request for some more
Frank Marino!? And finally to quote a
friendI love Rock-N-Roll, so put
another dime in the juke box baby
SCOTT ELLIS
Sophomore, Pre-Pharmacy
Overall, the cuts in the feeding programs
� including food stamps, WIC, school
breakfasts and summer lunches � total
about $3 billion, so far. More than half of
the cuts come in the food stamp program,
which will lose up to $1.8 billion. Approx-
imately 900,000 people will stop receiving
benefits. But the reductions are aimed
primarily at those who remain on the food
stamp rolls � those who even Reagan
thinks are deserving of aid. These people,
whose benefits will be slashed by 10-15 per-
cent, will simply have less to eat.
"The Reagan Administraiion claims it is
eliminating abuse says Jeff Kitsch of the
Food Research and Action Center in
Washington, D.C. "But no one in the
White House has yet explained why those
people who are still on the rolls should
have less milk to give their children. What
it means is that these people will be haid
pressed to feed themselves properly
It also seems somewhat paradoxical that
Reagan's whittling down of federal
bureaucracies will, in fact, result in a
reduction in the ranks of the very people
who have a responsibility to investigate
cases of welfare fraud. When people are
angered by the cost of crime they seldom
fire half the police force and then pat
themselves on the back for saving money
Reagan and his allies argue that their
programs will eventually help the poor.
With lowered taxes and reduced govern-
ment spending, inflation will ease, invest-
ment will increase and the economy will
boom. But, Reagan is not reducing govern-
ment spending; he's shifting money from
social programs to the Pentagon and his
tax rebate program will primarily benefit
those people who make in excess of
$60,000 per year.
According to Reagan economic theory,
businessmen will use the excess capital
from his cuts for investments which will
eventually create more jobs for the work-
ing class and the poor. This theory of
economics, however, does not take into ac-
count the fact that the primary
beneficiaries of the tax cuts, multi-national
corporations, often spend part of their
revenue in underdeveloped countries or on
corporate mergers.
In underdeveloped countries they can
build factories inexpensively, hire labor for
$2 a day and manufacture their goods tax-
free. This sort of investment creates no
jobs for the American unemployed and
does not benefit the poor either.
Also, the Federal Reserve, which con-
trols the growth of money, has not let
credit grow faster to pay for the federal
deficits, so the government's borrowing
demands are pushing up interest rates.
The result is the current staggering
levels, which threaten to choke off the
private investment boom that the tax cut is
supposed to bring about. Because the
defense expenditure is finar mg the pro-
duction of non-consumable goods and
because the unemployment rate has a high
correlation with the inflation rate,
Reaganomics will not work.
In conclusion, allow me to say that
liberals benve in government bureaucracies
and their ability to deal with social
pathology. They believe that only a few
minor cosmetic changes in government are
needed to correct our contemporary social
malaise. 1 do not.
I believe that far-reaching fundamental
changes are needed in the very tenets that
our social order has been founded upon.
While it is evident the average citizen
does not have time (or the inclination) to
do the work that HEW does, it is also evi-
dent that large federal agencies are
cumbersome, expensive and inefficient.
Our social reality has changed. We no
longer live in a simple entrepreneuial free-
enterprise economy. We live in a
militaristic corporate state economy. Until
this very basic flaw is corrected, more and
more people will continue to be brutalized
by a rapidly constricting marketplace. Old
solutions to our problems no longer work.

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I ML EAS1 CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
FLBRUARY 16, 1982 Page 5
Alan Bates Is
Back In Cult
Film Hearts'
BvJOHNWFYIFR
S1�H W filer
'The Nada Gang'Invades MendenhalVs Hendrix Theatre Sunday
Claude Chabrols Hitchcockian thriller The ada Gang is the Cinema
Societ of Greenville's second offering this season. The film will be
shown this Sunday, February 2t. at 7 p.m. in MSC s Hendrix Theatre.
Refreshments will be served at 6:30 p.m. Subscriptions for the remain-
ing five films will be sold at the door for $9 and can also be obtained b
contacting Glen Brewster or Karen Blansfield at 757-6041.
Phillippe De Broca's King of
Hearts is a classic cult film. Releas-
ed in 1967 to popular and critical ac-
claim, it has gone on to become a
much-loved favorite of college au-
diences and art movie patrons. They
adore King of Hearts for its com-
bination of comedy, stylish satire,
superb performances and direction,
and thought-provoking moral
theme.
The film will be shown tomorrow
evening at 8 p.m. in Mendenhall
Student Center's Hendrix Theatre.
There will be no admission charge.
Alan Bates stars as Private
Charles Plumpick, one of a troop of
Scottish soldiers stationed in France
during World War I. He is given a
special mission when his troop en
counters a group of people fleeing
from their small village, which faces
destruction due to a booby-trap
bomb left behind by the Germans.
Plumpick is sent to dismantle the
bomb, which is set to explode when
an armored knight on the church
steeple clock strikes midnight with
his mace. Instead of a deserted,
terror-stricken town, the young
soldier finds the village filled with
happy, joyous life.
Barber, bordello madame,
bishop, general, duke and duchess.
and more, a strange race of charm-
ing, care free people have
repopulated the village. Plumpick
finally realizes that they are escapees
from the nearby insane asylum.
They name him the King of Hearts,
and announce that pretty young Co-
quelicot (Genevieve Bujold) will be
his Queen.
He defuses the bomb, but still the
war rages while the lovely lunatics
engage in merry revels. While they
play, the soldiers fight � the Scot-
tish and German regiments savagely
slaughter each other. For the
townspeople, insanity is preferable
to the evils "sane" people
perpetrate on each other.
The theme of lunacy versus
"normalcy tomfoolery versus the
carnage of war, is best symbolized
by the image of Private Plumpick,
naked, carrying a bird cage, seeking
admittance to the asylum, willing to
be a crazyman i at her than a killer.
"The image said Vincent Canby
in The Sen York Times) like all the
others in this beautifully
photographed film, is funny. The
scene, however funny, is also dark
and sad, which pretty much
describes the mood of this ex-
travagant and highly comic morality
playa moral fable that is not only
funny but also wise and touching in
a very gentle way
Horror Of Party Beach' Just Another Horror
Bv JOHN WFYI.KR
ni�H Wnlrt
()h everybody do (he zombie stomp!
Ooo-doo-doo-doop.
lust land your foot down
with an a tui hump' .
Ook doo-doop,
Babv, baby, don't you care
Something here looking kinda weird.
Honey, I'm no Frankestein.
Oh euh baby, really I feel fine.
� "The Zombie Stomp' .
sung by the Del-Aires in
The Horror of Party Beach
Billed as "The First Horror Monster Musical The
Horror of Party Beach was an insane attempt to com-
bine the popular 60's phenomenon known as beach
movies with the standard monster sci-fi genre. The
advertising used upon its initial release tells it all:
"Fantastic The big-beat sound of the Del-Aires sw-
ingin' out with six rockin' hits! Horrifying Teen-age
slumber party ravaged by demons from the dead!
Wierd Ghoulish atomic beasts who live off warm,
human blood
Or, as the editors of TV Movies describe it:
"Monsters from the ocean floor go on rampage
against harmless teenagers � or is it the other way
around? Oh. never mind
The movie may be seen in some respects as an
environmental-consciousness film warning against the
dangers of radioactive waste dumping. The thoroughly-
researched scientific hypothesis of the film is that
radioactive waste carelessly dumped into the ocean
causes microscopic sea parasites to invade the bodies of
sunken sailors.
n-roll revel, dancing to the delerious beat of the rightful-
ly unremembered Del Aires, blissfully unaware of the
danger surrounding them. The unattractive and
atrocious-acting teens are among the worst ever seen on
screen: even Annette and Frankie wouldn't be caught
����
idwwyiffi
Bad Sci Fi
Over the old bones, a new form of life is created,
categorized by Dr. Gavin, the deadly, dull but brilliant
scientist examining them, as a giant protozoa, both
plant and animal.
The doctor's diagnosis seems correct, as the creatures
look like human bodies covered with artichoke leaves,
topped by a huge fish-like head, the always-open mouth
of which appears to be stuffed with several large
sausages. For some reason these bizarre beings need
blood for sustenance, though it's a pity people can't eat
them instead as the monsters have the makings of an ap-
petizing, if unusual seafood salad.
It is not necessary here to fully recount the plodding
plot of The Horror of Party Beach. Suffice it to say that
the sea-beasts attack the innocent, empty-minded
habituees of Party Beach. These dark sunglassed and
bikini-clad teenagers spend their days in continual rock-
l t any pcat,n.
. Gavin fjJjcU a soluffoh'tb the' surreal siege when
Eulabelle, his Aunt Jemima-like, black-stereotype ser-
vant, accidentally knocks a container of sodium on a
severed sea monster's arm that the doctor was studying,
causing the arm to go up in smoke.
In The Fifty Wont Films Of All Time, an elite group
to which The Horror Of Party Beach belongs by natural
birthright, the extremely unexciting climax of the film is
described:
"Dr. Gavin and the police arrive just in time to save
his daughter from the ubiquitous weirdos. Gavin and
the police throw tons of sodium onto the creatures as
they turn into walking forest fires and slowly disappear.
These actors throw the sodium with so little elan that the
scene looks like some sort of a monster multiple wed
ding in which Dr. Gavin and the police are the
bridesmaids throwing rice at the happy couples
This movie is so bad that it become very entertaining
and has gone on to become a cult classic. It's director.
Del Tennev, has deservedly been long forgotten. His on-
ly other claim to fame is Theurse of The I iving Corp-
se, which often shared a drive-in double bill with The
Horror of Party Beach.
History Lessons
RedsV'Ragtime' Battle Norms
ByJOHNWEYLER
�Maff �nlrf
Reds and Ragtime, this season's biggest-budgeted,
boldest and possibly best films, have finally reached
Greenville. It will be interesting to see how this city, a
typical, small, closed-class system American town,
reacts to these two daring, intelligent movies about class
struggles in early 20th century America.
Cinema
Reds playing at the Buccaneer, is starscreen-
writerdirector Warren Beatty's epic about radical jour-
nalist John Reed. Ragtime, at the Plttt, is director Milos
Forman's adaptation of E.L. Doctorow s bestselling
kaleidoscope of turn-of-the-century celebrities, sin and
assassination. The two films are parallel political and
period pieces, and share a number of other similarities
Both Reds and Ragtime are lenghty (Reds the longer,
at 1 minutes plus intermission), lovingly and carefully
crafted films. Both are freewheeling mixtures of fact
(especially Reds) and fiction (especially Ragtime). Both
are hugely budgeted, with much expense and expertise
lavished on sets and costuming.
Both have large and unusual cast lists � Reds not on-
ly has Beattv but Diane Keaton, Jack Nicholson and bit
parts by Gene Hackman and Jerzy Kozinski. Ragtime
stars James Cagney, Mary Steenburgen, and several ex-
cellent newcomers including Howard E. Rollins and
Elizabeth McGovern. (Both films also feature what
must be this season's cinematicliterary fad: using
famous writers as actors. Reds has Kozinski. Ragtime
enlists great American novelist Norman Mailer).
Both films are awe-inspiring artistic and financial
gambles. While Ragtime is a popular book, coming to
the screen with a bulletin audience, Doctorow's novel is
quite complicated and eccentric, difficult to film. War-
ren Beatty took an even bigger chance, risking whether
or not the tight-fisted, close-minded American 80's
would support a multi-million dollar, more-than-three-
hour epic about anything, especially heroic Com-
munists.
Any Hollywood enterprise is shaky � what seems to
be a sure bet often bombs at the box office. Film pro-
ducers might as well dish out the cash blindfolded, with
as little assurance as they have of ever getting it back
again. But to knowingly stand on the brink of financial
oblivion by bankrolling a politically unpopular film is
breathtaking. Can Hollywood make heroes out of anar-
chists, American Communists (Reds) and black ter-
rorists (Ragtime) What ever happened to Knute
Rockne, A11-American!
It is precisely on taking these unpopular political and
economic stands that Beatty and Forman and crew
should be applauded. It doesn't matter whether you
agree with their viewpoints, or even enjoy their films.
What matters is that the filmmakers tried to produce in-
telligent, artistically risky entertainment during the ad-
ministration of Indiana Jones and Luke Skywalker.
Though Reds and Ragtime both have their faults,
they triumph because the people who made them and
the studios that backed them dared to care.
Diane Keaton and Warren Beatty embrace in a scene from the climax of kis highly
film Reds.
f

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I
T





THfc EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 16, 1982
Road Manager Carder
Steps Into The Limelight
NEW YORK (UPI)
Joe Carder is no
stranger to show
business. It's just not
often that a road
manager gets to step
out and face the
cameras usually reserv-
ed for his clients.
That's why, for all
the failings of big-time
television and the in-
herent snobbishness of
Hollywood, he's
grateful to CBS and its
upcoming mini-series,
"The Blue and the
Gray
For one brief mo-
ment, Carder, whose
regular job is to make
the concert tour path
smooth for Art Fer-
rante and Lou
Teischer, got to take a
path of his own back
in time to Robert E.
Lee's surrender of the
Confederacy at Ap-
pomatox.
Carder, a writer and
talent agent who has
both acted and taught
the craft for 20 years, is
one of a growing bat-
talion of Americans
who, steeped in film
and television, occa-
sionally find a chance
to live for a moment as
part of the dream.
He was one of
several thousand
"extras" hired for the
CBS movie and,
because of his profes-
sional credentials, one
of only 40 or 50 who
were given coveted
speaking parts when it
was filmed last
Christmas on location
in Fayetteville, Ark.
Only the terminally
jaded would fail to
savor the thrill.
"The 'Blue and the
Gray' was magnifi-
See CARDER, Page 7
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SPECIAUZES IN:
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DUPLICATION
Located Across From Campus
I n The .Ge"Sr)jBtn Shjjsf I j j J
� Copies Cost 60 to 30copy
� Phototypesetting
� Binding Service
� One Day Camera Work
� Geotype Supplies For Art Students
OPEN 9-7 m-f 9-2 sat.
758-2400
All Paperbacks, Hardbacks
and Stationery On Sale
kjJ OFF
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rTflT
NEWS
& CARD SHOP
321 Evans St. Maii-Phone 752-3333
Open 9 To 6 Seven Days A Week g
Master Card & Visa Accepted
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Apply with Media Board
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DISCOVER
"BROTHERHOOD
OF VALUE"
W rtvN -
A
LH
O
IF YOU ARE HAVING PROBLEMS WITH DRUGS OR ALCOHOL �
WE CAN HELP � "STUDENTS HELPING STUDENTS"
CAMPUS ALCOHOL & DRUG CENTER � 757-6793
IN RECENT MONTHS, THE ARRESTS OF COLLEGE STUDENTS
INVOLVED IN DRUG RELATED INCIDENTS HAS INCREASED
DRAMATICALLY. Because of our concern and in our quest for
RESPONSIBILITY, we would like it known to all the students the new
drug laws now in effect. These are the laws and hence will be enforced!
1. Possession of SO lbs. and less than 100 lbs. of marijuana � minimum
prison sentence of 5 years.
2. Possession of 100 lbs. and less than 2,000 lbs. of marijuana � minimum prison sentence of 7
years.
3. Possession of 2,000 lbs. and less than 10,000 lbs. of marijuana � minimum prison sentence of 14
years.
4. Possession of 10,000 or more lbs. of marijuana � minimum prison sentence of 35 years along
with fines.
5. Possession with, or intention to sell 28 grams or less of cocaine � presumptive sentence of 3-10
years along with fines.
6. Possession with or intention to sell 28 grams or more, but less than 200 grams of cocaine �
presumptive sentence of 7 years along with fines.
7. Possession of 1,000, but less than 5,000 dosage units of methaqualone (qualudes) � 7 year prison
sentence along with a $25,000 dollar fine.
8. Possession of 5,000, but less than 10,000 dosage units of methaqualone (qualudes) � 14 year
prison sentence along with a $50,000 dollar fine.
9. Possession of 4 grams, but less than 14 grams of opium � 14 year prison sentence, along with a
$50,000 dollar fine.
508 W. 5th St. 758-7441
RUSH PARTY
WED. NIGHT � 9 UNTIL
CALL FOR INFO ANDOR RIDE
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. � � �





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 16, 182
Carder Makes Move To Television
Continued From P.
cent he said in a
telephone interview just
before leaving on a
60-city concert tour
with his famous clients.
"It was a lot of fun.
My scene probably will
wind up on the cutting
room floor, but I doubt
it. It really is a very im-
portant scene in the
movie.
"But it's most
portant of all to
13-year-old son.
lm-
my
He
really wants to see me
in a movie

Since Carder runs
Talent Inc in Little
Rock, Ark and is
known in show
business, landing his
role as a Union staff
colonel to Rip Tom's
Gen. Ulysses S. Grant,
was fairly easy. What
came next was not.
��They said, 'of
course you can ride
Well, I wasn't about to
say anything else, so I
said 'of course Now I
did ride when I was a
kid, but my God, it's
been years!
"So I went out
and I rented a horse.
An old horse. It could
barely move. It thought
it was a turtle. The next
day, I rented a more
spirited one and that
way started working
my way up.
"I found 1 hadn't
forgotten, but then I
got the script and right
off the bat it said,
�colonel spurs horse
The one I had was no
nag. It was a cutting
horse and I didn't
know how it would
take to spurring. But it
worked out. The horse
was just wonderful
Carder spurred his
horse on cue,
thundered up behind
Grant as he rode from
Appomotox and
reminded him that it
might be well to let the
folks in Washington
know that the war was
over.
Then it was back to
the business of the road
and of pursuing the
theater he loves at the
grassroots level.
Carder will miss his
segment in "The Blue
and the Gray" when
CBS first airs it next
fall. He'll be on the
road again with Fer-
rante and Teischer, but
when he isn't out lining
up stands and television
talk shows for the
piano duo that has been
packing houses for
nearly 30 years, he pro-
duces and directs his
own brand of show
business plays and
musicals for communi-
ty theater where most
of today's stars got
their start.
They arc productions
he thinks someone
from Hollywood
should be watching
with an eye for talent as
yet untapped by a big
time that could use it.
"They really don't
trust anyone outside of
Hollywood he said.
"There were 40 or 50
small speaking parts
one-liners and the like
(in the CBS Him) but
the rest were all
Hollywood actors.
"They even wanted
to bring in their own
horses! They were fair-
ly amazed to learn that
Arkansas horses could
act
Still, there was a mo-
ment in the network
sun for Joe Carder, and
he won't really miss its
airing.
He can count on his
son to videotape the
show. When you're on
the tube with the likes
of Gregory Peck, Stacy
Keach and Rip Torn,
the event belongs in the
family archives.
'Barefoot' Opening
ECU graduate Dwight Eastwood is playing the
role of Victor Velasdo in Greenville Little
Theatre's production of Barefoot In The Park,
opening February 22 at the Methodist Student
Center. For information or reservations, contact
the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall or the
Methodist Student Center.
C.I C.����u!�.���� ! F.i'iMui .I'M
T Sim ' S'i�� pum f
rt.n � w.Mfc C.ilriM.im tquip
m, m S" � 1 ' i" H Stiui �
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Pi





Sports�
ECU Blows
By Panthers
Photo By DAVE WILLIAMS
ECU forward Charles Green (34) rolls one into the basket-
ballor two of his game-high 20 points during the Pirates'
win over Eastern Illinois Monday night.
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Kdllor
East Carolina broke open a close
game by outscoring Eastern Illinois
20-0 during an eight-minute span in
the second half and cruised to an big
78-54 win Monday night.
Forward Charles Green
spearheaded the Pirate burst offen-
sively, scoring eight points during
the span. He finished with a game-
high 20 points.
The rally began after Pirate coach
Dave Odom was signalled for a
technical foul. Panther forward Jim
Williams connected on both of the
ensuing free throws to put his team
ahead 44-43 with 13:31 remaining in
the game.
Williams' pair of points from the
charity stripe were the last points
Eastern got until Leigh Hankins
made a field goal at the 5:46 mark,
which cut ECU's fast-growing lead
to 63-46.
A tough Pirate zone defense
keyed the 20-0 burs ECU had pro-
blems early in the contest with a
sharp Panther offense and altered
their defense plan, Odom said.
"We were prepared for their of-
fense but they were so crisp early on
with their patterns that they lulled
us to sleep at times and got some
cheap backdoor shots. We decided
to adjust our defenses back and
forth and it seemed to unnerve
them
Eastern Illinois coach Rick
Samuels felt his team's poor
shooting may have been the key to
the game.
"ECU certainly confused us for a
while with their defense but we ad-
justed to that Samuels said. "We
just simply could not get the shots to
fall. We had plenty of open shots
The Panthers kept the game close
during the first half, and trailed by
just four, 3-31, at the half.
The lead exchanged hands six
times during the first seven minutes
of the second half before ECU made
its move. It was in the middle of that
move, Odom said, that the Pirates
won the game. Instead of squander-
ing a lead, like the club has done
twice over the last two weeks in
close losses, ECU increased its
margin.
"We were up 53-44 and they took
a timeout Odom explained. "I
told the team to look at the
scoreboard. The, were up by nine
just like with Long Island, Rich-
mond and Old Dominion. We had
blown those leads before, but I told
them that was not going to happen
tonight
The Pirate win, the club's tenth in
21 games, was highlighted by a
number of spectacular plays. Both
forward Bill McNair and guard
Charles Watkins had a pair of
dunks, while Green had a lone slam.
ECU will look to reach the .500
mark this Wednesday against James
Madison. Tip-off time in Minges
Coliseum for the big ECAC-South
encounter is 7:30 p.m.
The Dukes are 18-4 overall and
atop the conference standings with a
7-1 mark. ECU is fifth in the league,
at 2-3.
E. ILLINOIS (541
RoMuoi 7 2-2 16. Williams I 2-2 4. HmMm 6 0-1 12.
lorrawa I 1-2 3. Startler 4 (Ml.rook 0 2 -2 2. TirorrOS-4)
0. Pattoa 1 1-2 V Bvksin 1 0-0 I Hopkins 0 0-0 0
TOTAI-S 23 1-12 54
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4 0-0 1. Prartm 5 1-1 II. t.tkrhmi 0-0 6. rot 0 0-4) 0.
McLaurin 2 v-0 4. Bl� 2 13V McNair 3 0-4)6. Brova 10-0
2. I�l I 0-0 2. (.ibv.n 0 0-10 Rricbrarkrr I (M) 2
TOT MA 37 14-22 M
Photo By Chap Gurley
Hal'tiia
Teraafc-ah
- 1(1 35. rW.
ECl hraca A -
31. ronkd mil
1.750.
Soar.
ECU guard Bruce Peartree proved he can get up in the air
with this pin of an Eastern Illinois layup. Peartree scored 11
points in ECU's 78-64 win.
Pirates Host League-Leading JMU Wednesday
B CHARLES CHANDLER
sptM. I dtinr
"1 he thing we must understand is
that we are playing a team that will
not beat themselves
last Carolina head basketball
coach Dave Odom obviously is
aware of the challenge his team is
facing tomorrow (Wednesday) night
when it hosts ECAC-South leader
James Madison. Tip-off time in
Minges Coliseum is 7:30 p.m.
"They play percentage basket-
ball. They've got good talent, great
coaching and they make their
system work. They're sound in
every phase ot the game. They're
like no team that's been in this col-
iseum in years. If we beat 'em we've
got to do exactly that, beat 'em �
and for 40 minutes
Indeed. The Dukes are 7-1 in the
ECAC-South, two full games ahead
of second place Old Dominion (4-2).
JMU is 18-4 overall, with two of
those defeats coming to number-one
ranked Virginia.
The Pirates will be looking to
reach the .500 mark for the first
time in quite a while. The Bucs are
10-11 after an impressive, 78-54,
win over Eastern Illinois Monday
night. ECU is in fifth place in the
conference at 2-3.
James Madison not only leads the
conference in wins, but also in
several statistical categories, par-
ticularily in team defense, allowing
just 53 points per game while scor-
ing 63.7.
The Dukes are led by linton
Townes, a sure all-conference selec-
tion. Townes, who is best known for
his outstanding outside shooting, is
Doubleheader Scheduled
It's doubleheader time
on Wednesday night, as
the ECAC-South con-
ference matchup between
East Carolina and James
Madison will be preceded
by a jayvee contest.
The Pirate JV's host
Mt. Olive at 5 p.m. The
ECU-JMU game
follow at 7:30.
will
ECU's junior varsity
has won two in a row and
now stands 2-2 following
a 75-61 win over
Louisburg Monday
night.
the league's third-leading scorer (17
ppg) and sixth-leading reboundr
(6.1 rpg).
Center Dan Ruland averages 11.9
points, 12th best in the league, and
6.6 rebounds, putting him at fifth in
the ECAC-South in that category.
JMU coach Lou Campanelli says
despite the impressive stats of
Townes and Ruland, there are no
stars on his team.
"We play a team concept he
said. "There's nothing tricky about
what we do. We're just a lot of blue
collar guys that work hard and plav
hard
The results have been superb. The
Dukes tied Old Dominion for the
regular season championship a year
ago, then went on to win the post-
season tournament to win a trip to
the NCAA Championships. There,
the Dukes pulled off a major upset
by defeating highly-rated
Georgetown.
The team was the pre-season pick
to rule the conference again this
year and has been no disappoint-
ment. JMU has beaten every team in
the conference at least once, in-
cluding an earlier 72-50 win over
ECU.
"Right now we're just striving for
consistency Campanelli said. "In
the position we're in (first place) a
lot of teams are shooting for us.
That's something we're learning to
deal with. We just can't have a let-
down, especially this late in the
season
The Dukes came on strong last
year, peaking by tournament time.
Campanelli said the club is playing
just as well now but has a tougher
road ahead.
"We had more lightweights on
our late schedule last year he said.
"That's not the case this season.
Anv team we plav can knock us
off
Campanelli included East
Carolina in that group.
"We know we have a very tough
road game ahead against ECU.
They're a very good team and are
very well-coached
Byles May Miss
Rest Of This Season
ECU point guard Tony Byles may
have played his last game as a
Pirate.
The 6-foot-4 senior injured the lit-
tle finger on his right hand in last
Saturday's win over UNC-
Wilmington. It was not known until
Monday afternoon, though, that
Byles' injury was anything but
minor.
It is now believed that the finger
has torn ligaments. Byles was to
have had X-rays taken of the finger
this (Tuesday) afternoon. After the
results of the X-rays are studied a
decision will be made on Byles'
availability to the team for the re-
mainder of the season.
"The doctors will get no pressure
from me ECU coach Dave Odom
said Monday. "This is a decision
between them, Sports Medicine and
Tony. I want what's best for Tony's
health. Whatever they tell me is
gospel
Byles, who sat out two weeks with
an injury to his left hand, is leading
the Pirates in assists
and averages just over 10 points per
game.
The Brooklyn, N.Y. native played
in the team's 78-54 win over Eastern
Illinois, contributing five points and
five assists.
Peartree Honored Again
Charles
Chandler
ECU freshman guard Bruce Pear-
tree has been named the ECAC-
South rookie of the week for the se-
cond time in three weeks.
The Pantego native scored 33
points in ECU's two games last
week, against Old Dominion and
UNC-Wilmington.
Peartree earned the same honor
two weeks ago. During the past six
games he has averaged 13.7 points.
For the year, Peartree is now
averaging 7.3 points per contest.
A Whamming, Slamming Affair!
East Carolina's 78-54 win over
Eastern Illinois Monday night was
filled with spectacular plays. As a
matter of fact, one could almost
nickname most of the crowd-
pleasers.
Take the game's first dunk for ex-
ample. ECU's Charles Green is on
the end of a wide-open fast break.
He goes flying through the air and
comes up with a pull-behind-the-
No. 3 Old Dominion
A voids Lady Pirates
ECU Plays Duke Tonight
�Haa By DAV WILLIAMS
One Of Two Watkins Jams Monday Night
head-then-dunk-straight-ahead
slam. A-�h, the crowd loved it.
Late n the game Charles
Watki received a length-of-the-
court s and fancied a left-hand-
to-bea -the-band-grand-slam.
In the second half it was Bill
McNair's turn. The Dunn native put
two in the faces of Eastern Illinois
defenders.
On the first he took off from the
top of tne key and soared to the
basket and slammed home a gorilla
dunkenstein.
Just before the end of the game
McNair came downcourt on a
fastbreak and hit teammate Mike
Fox, who quickly touch-passed the
ball back to McNair. Whew!
A-return-to-sender-alley-oop-in-yo-
face. Minges Coliseum rocked.
However trite all this may seem,
the point is the Pirates played a ex-
citing brand of basketball Monday
night. It's just a shame that only
1,750 people were on hand to watch.
When a team such as the Lady
Pirates of East Carolina takes a
nine-game winning streak on the
homecourt of Old Dominion
University's nationally third-ranked
basketball team, something has to
give.
And it surely did. About 13 feet
worth.
The Lady Monarchs, behind the
play of 6' 8" Anne Donovan (11
points, 21 rebounds, seven assists
and seven blocked shots) and 6' 5"
Janet Davis (28 points and seven re-
bounds), stopped East Carolina's
streak, 72-63, in a game closer than
the final score indicated.
East Carolina coach Cathy An-
druzzi was not pleased with the of-
ficiating, saying she didn't want to
take anything away from ODU but
could not believe the number of
three and five-second situations not
called.
East Carolina trailed by as many
as 11 points in the first half, but
rallied behind Mary Denkler (28
points, 15 rebounds) and Sam Jones
(16 points, six assists) to take a four-
point advantage at 35-31 at inter-
mission.
In the final half, the Lady Pirates
twice had a seven-point lead � the
last coming at 46-39 with 14:30 re-
maining � but Old Dominion
worked the ball inside to Donovan
and Davis, and the Monarchs led,
57-50.
However, East Carolina rallied,
cutting the lead to 58-57 with four
minutes to play. But again, Old
Dominon worked the ball inside,
building a six-point lead that grew
to as much as 11, after taking ad-
vantage of two Lady Pirate tur-
novers.
In the first 20 minutes, the Lady
Pirates played good defense,
limiting Donovan to only two
points.
Hellen Malone added 15 points
for Old Dominion, while Jones and
Denkler were the only two Lady
Pirates in double-figures. East
Carolina outrebounded the taller
Lady Monarhs by one in the first
half, but lost that contest by 11 by
game's end.
Old Dominion is now 19-4 after a
loss to Tennessee Sunday night
while East Carolina is now 13-8 with
five games � all at home � remain-
ing.
Duke travels to Greenville
tonight. Gametime is 7:30 p.m.
9
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V
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 16. 1982
"
'�y
a
in the
mg
.jher
aid.
on.
us
ough
ECl .
d are
on
es
d � the
4:30 re-
ominion
I Donovan
irehs led,
a rallied,
ith four
tain. Old
inside,
that grev
tkmg ad-
lirate tur-
thc Lady
defense,
inly two
15 points
ones and
vo Lady
res. East
It he taller
the first
by 11 by
4 after a
lav night
13-8 with
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ireenville
p.m.
Mile Relay Is
9th In Millrose
By CYNTHIA
PLEASANTS
Ai. s�.m Wttm
The East Carolina
men's track team ran in
the prestigious
Millrose Wanamaker
invitational this past
Friday, placing ninth in
the mile relay, which
had 52 entries.
The invitational,
which is considered the
number one indoor
meet in the country,
featured the top com-
petitors in the nation
and was held in New
York's Madison Square
Garden.
The foursome of
Carlton Frazier, Keith
Clarke, Terry Ford,
and Tim Cephus com-
bined for an impressive
time of 3:20.26 in the
mile relay.
Head coach Bill Car-
son said the experience
of the indoor meet pro-
ves to be valuable.
"Everytime you go
to an indoor meet and
expose them to the
track, they're going to
do a little bit better next
time
The Pirates also ran
in The Delaware Invita-
tional in Newark, Del.
this past Sunday, but
did not place in any
events.
Frazier, Clarke, Ford
and Cephus all ran in
the quarter-mile event,
but did not place.
The team had plann-
ed to run in the mile
relay, but were unable
to after Frazier pulled a
hamstring.
According to Car-
son, the injury is not
serious.
"It's not a season-
ending pull he said,
"He should be able to
run by the Domino's
pizza meet (to be held
in Tallahassee, Fla. on
March 19-20)
That meet will be the
Pirates' first outdoor
meet of the season, and
Carson is looking for-
ward to taking his team
outdoors after a long
indoor campaign.
"We're running a
lot, but we're not get-
ting any better he
said, "We'll just have
to get ready for the out-
door season
The Pirates' next
meet is at UNC-Chapel
Hill on February 20.
Six teams will be com-
peting, including Ap-
palachian State and
Campbell.
Jayvees Win Second
Sophomore forward
Bill McNair scored 25
points and pulled down
11 rebounds to pace
East Carolina's junior
varsity basketball team
to a 75-61 win over
Louisburg Junior Col-
lege.
The win, the team's
second in a row, evened
the Pirates' record at
2-2.
ECU led at the half
by just four, at 29-25,
but broke the game
open in the second half.
Three other Pirates
besides McNair scored
in double figures.
Center Jeff Best finish-
ed with 15 points, 17 re-
bounds and a blocked
shot.
Six-foot-eleven
freshman David
Reicheneker added 12
points and seven re-
bounds, while guard
Mike Fox tallied 12
points and dished out
three assists.
Marcus Keith and
James Cooke were the
pace-setters for
Louisburg, totalling 19
and 12 points, respec-
tively.
The Buc JV's are
back in action this
Wednesday night,
hosting Mt. Olive at 5
p.m. in Minges Col-
iseum. The game will
precede the ECU-
James Madison varsity
game, which will begin
at 7:30.
Golf Season Nearing
ECAC-South
Action
ECU
vs.
James Madison
Wednesday, 7:30
Minges Coliseum
Photo By DAVE WILLIAMS
ECU forward Bill McNair (40) taps in
for two of his 25 points in the Pirate JV's
win Monday night. Also pictured is
ECU'S J.C. Plott (52).
ifieds
LOST AND
FOUND
REWARD: Lost Mon. Feb �h
Brown Cordoroy Ladies Pocket
Book witti Bamboo Handles Lost
in Food Town and Fosdick's Area
Please Call 754313 Home and
7S Ml) Business Ask tor Danny
or Ginnv
LOST T�n umbrella in Old
joyner Library If found please
call Tom at 7S7 3 and leave
message.
LOST Time watcn 1st or Jed
floor "stacks' Joyner Library.
Call Trudy 752 -�l
FOUND Pink ond White reversi-
on raincoat Called number m ad,
but disconnected. Must identify.
Call 757 �237
ATTENTION
Classified ads will be taken ONLY
during the following hours:
Monday � 115-3 00
Tuesday � 300-300
Wednesday � I IS 3 00
Thursday � 3:00-3.00
Friday � 115 300
You must place the ads m person
and pay tor them in advance
Rates are 51 tor the first 15 words
nd t.05 per words after the first
fifteen.
FOR SALE
WATERBEDS: DON'T pay retail
for your heated waterbed buy
direct from mgf and save. Buy a
complete 1st quality pine wood
heated waterbed with 15 yr war
ranty tor as low as �18t (Queen)
1199 (King) Layaway avail. Call
David for appomtment: 7SI-14M
BUGGED UP '71 Chevy Wagon,
want to sell fast. $350 or best offer
Dean 750 2173
8UNDY II Tenor Sax Good Condi-
tion Asking 5270 also Crate IR
Amplifier. 25 watts, with reverb
and pre � post gams. Good Condi
tion Asking 5150 75H073 Brian.
DORM SIZE refrigerator. Good
condition Call 'So
ROLLING STONES IMI tour
posters, still in wrappers, serious
offers only. 75 33U
7 TRIUMPH TR 7. 4cyl. � speed.
Air, AM FM Cassette, stereo,
sunroof, Mag wheels. Beautiful
sports car SMOO 757 MM
JVC PORTABLE AMFM
Cassette Player. RC .54 JW.
Dolby. Normal Cr02.
ManualAuto Recording. Sep
Bass and Treble Controls. 4
speakers. Automobile plug. Ex-
cellent Cond Must Sell $225
75�-�4
USED YAMAHA guitar owned 2
years m good condition $120
negotiable Call 757 3107 ask for
lOhnllO East Tenth Street.
TOYOTA in good condition. $770or
best �erCaii JSTMOt
FOR RENT
RTOMMATEliEEDED to l�re
one-bedroom apartment. $75 plus
one-half utilities. Call Scott at
7S2-4S47
TWO PEOPLE wanted to share
large house with young couple in
Lake Ellsworth, Greenville. Con-
venient to hospital and university.
$120 per month plus 14 utilities
Deposit required. Call 754 4300
after 5 p.m.
TWO BEDROOM townhouse apt.
fully furnished, available tor sum
mer. Georgetown apts. Great
Location! CAII 750 4095
WANTED: FEMALE roommate.
Kings Row Apts 2 bedroom. AC
Furnished, Pool HBO $12Smonth
plus 12 electric. Call after 7 p.m.
7S2-7752
MALE ROOMMATE wanted.
Forest Acres Apts $117.50 is 12
rent and 12 utilities - Heat Pump.
Carpeted. Pool Call 754 5577 or
757 4024
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 3 bedroom apt at
Eastbrook $90 plus 13 utilities
Call 75 2504
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
$80 per month, furbished, cable
TV. 13 utilities. Call after 4 30
p m 752 4509
THREE BEDROOM House tor
rent March 1st. Located in nice
development 2714 Shawnee Place,
across from Pi Kappa House, off
Hooker and Millbrook. all electric
wret. and deadbotts. $240, Mrs.
Richardson 7S4-2S70 or 754-S0M.
WANTED HOUSEMATES 3
rooms available in 4 bedroom
house six blocks from campus.
Rent $40 and utilities. Call 752 5047
TWO ROOMATES needed Large
three bedroom house located ap
prox. three miles wesi of campus.
House is fully carpeted with
fireplace. $04 monthly rent per
person, plus utilities. Please call
3S5-3ao9 between hours of 9:30 pm
and II pm. Deposits required.
SERVICES v,
CARICATURES BY WEYLER
Greenville's original personalized
art service. Have Cartoon done of
yourself or a loved one a unique
gift idea. $10 tor I x 10. black and
white or color. Call 752-5775
TYPING: TERM, Thesis,
Resumes, Dissertations, etc. Pro
tessional quality at lowest rates
Call Kempie Dunn anytime
752 4733
NOTARY PUBLIC Call Amy at
757 3734
Want to know HOW TO IMPROVE
YOUR GRADES Booklet
available at ECU Bookstore.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST: Term,
Research. 0,��ertation�. Thesis,
etc Fast and Efficient. Low
Rates Call 757 1370
SIX PRINTED T shirts $12 Free
Shipping Satisfaction guarenteed.
New quality production over runs
at below mill cost. Different
designs Specify Size desired
Papillon, PO Box 133. Rocky
Mount, N C 27001
RIDERS
RIDE NEEDED to Nashville TN
Spring Break or any weekend.
Willing 1o help with expenses. Call
757 0710
RIDE NEEDED to Winston Salem
area. Can leave anytime after 10
am Friday Call 752 3449.
ARE YOU student teaching in
Pinetops or Washington? Car Pool
ride needed Call Tee 752 2410
RIDE NEEDED to Virginia
Beach or surrounding area any
weekend
C
Will
with gas
help
PERSONALS
HELP
WANTED
COUNSELORS FOR western
North CArolina coed summer
camp. Room, meals laundry,
salary and travel allowance. Ex
penence not necesary, but must
enpoy living and working with
children Only clean cut non-
smoking college students need ap
ply For applicationbrochure
write: Camp Pinewood, 1801
Cleveland Rd Miami Beach, Fla.
33141
WANTED PART TIME help
now, Fulltime during the sum
mer Must be neat, have pleasant
voice, and willing to work the
hours you are needed May involve
some shift work during the sum
mer. Apply in person at Overton's
Competition Skis between 3 and 5
weekdays.
NEED MONEY: You won't 9et
rich, but the East Carolinian has
openings for writers at the present
time. There is also a possibility of
training tor editor positions and
training on computer terminals.
Apply at the East Caolmian office,
Old South Building.
ECU SUNBATHERS: We still
have space on your Spnngbreak
Trip to Ft Lauderdale $129 - 7
nights. 8 days tennis parties
and much more. For more infor
mation (800) 348 3004 TOLL
FREE. Space is Limited.
NEEDED: I or 2 girls to share ex-
penses with 2 other girls tor I wk.
in Ft. Lauderdale. March 7-14.
Ocean Front MofeL Call W-M�
TOTHOSE WHO WERE THERE :
Well, well, the storm is over and
the huricane died. Oh my God, we
were all so fried. The dogs barked
and the corks flew, formal was the
occasion, but it was shouts tor a
few. And if you weren't there you
surely missed a sight because
later that afternoon. Boot Boot out
go the lights.
Pi Kapp's I heard that OC and
Stiggs have asked ST Hicks to help
with National Lampoon's Annual
Gaslt report. Dan Ray comments:
"Sammy could write his own after
that bash, we called Founder's
day. " Hope everybody had 12 as
much tunas: - Sfjt. Yukon Debbs
BROTHER OOUGThanks a lot
tor th you know what Friday. C.
and I appreciate iT T.
Wanna meet people? Check out
CORSO. We're having fun. For all
the intimate details, see the an
nouncements.
JO So sorry I missed V Day edi
tion Anyway, it's the thought that
counts! Amy
SECOND ANNUAL B3 Party Bui
don't be square. You know where
See ya there Saturday. Feb 20,
8:30. From Ann, Connie, Donna.
Eileen. All "SAM V welcome
PJ- Thanks tor the date, you were
a little late, and all the while I
could not wait Bui things went on,
almost til three, and after that, it
was ail you and me. You said I was
your Valentine, as you are mine,
amd all day Sunday I felt so fine
So babs, let me m, I want to be
your dreams and visions Cause
baby we were born to run.
CANYOU ZOOM? Would you know
what to do if you were lorched'
Yes. you to can become a proles
sional loom lorch player Pay
careful attention to this exclusive
offer of the OFFICIAL ZOOM
ZORCH Players Rule Book This
special edition is easy to read and
is disposable because it is made ol
biodegradable recycled 2 ply toilet
paper This book is one ol Green
ville's hoteest items, mainly
because they were stolen from the
Student Store. Purchase your copy
fro any SFer on campus Who can
be found in front of Rawl between
classes. Be there
CAT. remember no remember
mg' (Ask Drinky) Did they think
you queer in Bogart's and Belk s?
Please don't sleep m the Attic and
let's buy a port a 0hn (Are we
here for school?) As for truth or
dare, we all took truths and found
that one want it with two, one
wants it doggie style, one does it
behind the haunted house, and I
love it on the beach (no sandspurs,
thank you) How about 14 yr old at
the beach? Did he consent or was
it statutory rape? Don't forget
nights when the head was
speeding and the body moving
But it's your B day so go ALL THE
WAY Put it into OVERDRIVE on
244 cos I know I can RIDE WITH
YOU. Road trip crews lake
chances and build snow whores
(and bad reps??) I'll listen to
country if you'll listen to new wave
and we'll bolt down to pig sty
palace and get radical with ole
John Boy and Billy Bob DON T
MISUNDERSTANO ME but no
more for the road becos there is
NO VACANCY in my heart for it.
No more infamous nights in Lon
den - you could too that night but
nooo - cos you're so RESPEC
TABLE (DID HE WANT TO KISS
YOUR PINEAPPLE??) Well be
RIDERS ON THE STORM but
first you'll have to START ME UP
becos SHE'S SO COLD. Can You
handle the STROBELIGHT? If
you can. I'LL GIVE YOU FISH,
I'LL GIVE YOU CANDY but
one last thing, turn your RADAR
LOVE on cos THE WAIT is over,
so take him tonight (BUFU) and
PROVE IT ALL NIGHT. Happy
10th and sorry I won't be there.
WIN A weekend for two at the
beach, including hotel accomoda
tions. meals, lots of spending
money, passes to clubs. 2 hours of
Jet skiing and more. Come to
Reaction Times Grand Opening
Week Starting Feb. 14 Behind Sub
way Sandwich Shop.
Anl. Sports Editor
The spring season is
drawing near for the
ECU golf team. An
eight-tournament spr-
ing schedule is set to
begin February 26-28 at
Florida State.
Tryouts have been
held and all 12 spots on
the team are set. ECU
Head Coach Bob
Helmick calls the team,
"the strongest at ECU
since I have been here"
The top five
members include Don
Sweeting, Don Gafner,
Jerry Lee, Mike Moye
and Chris Czaja.
"1 expect them to
carry the bulk of the
season said Coach
Helmick. "They are
capable and strong
golfers
Helmick expects
Dave Wagoner, Steve
Larogue and Czaja to
provide extra help.
"We've got the
horses now; its just a
matter of getting the
job done said
Helmick. "We're hit-
ting the ball very well
now
Helmick says if the
Pirates beat 90 teams
this spring, the season
will be a success. The
squad will compete
against 149 teams in its
eight-tournament
season.
Once the season
begins, ECU has six
straight matches in a
32-day span.
The Pirates look to
begin the season on a
good note in the
Florida State tourna-
ment. "I think we can
get off to a good start
and this will help our
momentum going into
the meat of our
season Helmick add-
ed.
J.A. UNIFORMS
SHOP
All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes,
shoes, and hose. Also � used ECU
nurses uniforms. Trade ins allowed.
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive.
Near HolloweM's Drug and old hospital.
xutilus
THE
FITNESS
CLUB
for men and women
Are vou the
Sole Survivor?
Come by or call TODAY and sd
up an appointment for a free workout
1001 EVANS STREET
GREENVILLE, NX,
OLYMPIC BARBELLS
�COED HOURS
� FEMALE HOURS
AND DUMBELLS
�SAUNA, SHOWERS &
LOCKERS �WHIRLPOOL
� DIET PLANS
NO
Then send our
RUNNING SHOES to:
Carolina Resolers Inc.
P. O. Box 7211
Wilson, N. C. 27893
FOR our complete LIFE SAVING
PRICE
$14.50
Stretching Exercise Classes
M-W-F 10:00 & 11:00 T Th. 5:00 & 6:00
Aerobics and Dancercize Classes
M-T 3:30-4:30
Features Included: Male & Female Instructors
� Nautilus Machines
(12 of the most sophisticated exercise mochines mode).
process of REPLACING
11 Ihe ouler rubber sole
2) the worn mid-sole material
3 ihe innerMtle wilh mil Of I I r
Mill DM) innersolt
41 I he hoe laei -
W.c JW. 11 h, Kl 11 KMH.� I ��� J-l
11 h, MM l.x H.4.I. i.� ���' � � -��'��
Special Student Rates
Gioup rates for 5 or more students.
$67.50 per student.
ATNA UTIL US FITNESS IS OUR SPEC I A L TY
Planning a spring break fHng in
Florida? Then make plans to Hve it up
inside the Watt Disney World Magic
Kingdom! There, you'll find more than 40
exciting attractions and, we're in
easy reach of the surf and sand of your
favorite Florida beaches!
This spring is an especially good time
to "break down" to Disney, during
Tencennial -the Walt Disney World 10th
birthday celebration highlighted by
the sensational Tencennial Parade, and
all-new musical extravaganzas.
So, give yourself a break a spring
break to remember - inside the Magic
Kingdom of Walt Disney World!
$13 � ADMISSION AND UNLIMITED USE OF ALL
ATTRACTIONS (Except ShoorltV Gallery)
SPECIAL EXTENDED SPRING HOURS
March 7-12: 9 a.m9 p.m.
March 13 - April 1: 9 �.m10 p.m.
USED
TIRES
10.00
inquire at
Evons Seafood
Co �
madid ttwd� �1 "T T
� t. u, tral h�"dr�d '
�Ko�ortH�� ��t. �� �rrr
EH. . . m ��? ��
Cmmtmtl
t.S.A.�.Hl�l
pMl�,�Ks
KMtuiriv.
� I.y- H.C. Z7M
CYPRESS
GARDENS
APARTMENTS 2308 e. 10th si.
CANNON
COURT
APARTMENTS
Luci Drive
Two bedroom apartments easily accessible to cam-
pus. Low electric bills. Cable TV provided. Call us or
come by to see these apartments available for im-
mediate occupancy.
Professionally managed by
Remco East, Inc. 758-6061
t
!
"ii mm. niimjM�y
T





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 16, 1982
West, Dukes Lead Stats
Madison Leads In
Two Categories
ECAC-SOUTH LEADERS
SCORING
hCAC-South leader
James Madison ob-
viously has had a fine
season thus far, stan-
ding at 7-1 in the league
and 8-4 overall. The
Dukes, not surprising-
ly arc also doing well
statistically.
IMU is leading the
league in team defense
and points differential,
and is second in free
throw percentage and
field uoal percentage.
The Dukes are
holding opponents to
but S3 points per con-
test, while scoring 63.7,
for a plus-10.7 points
per game points advan-
tage.
Old Dominion, se-
cond place in the
ECAC, is the con-
ference's top-scoring
team with a 71.3 points
per game average.
George Mason is just
behind at 70.9.
William and Mary
leads the team in field
goal accuracy, shooting
at a 51.9 percent clip.
JMU is next at 50.6.
George Mason tops
the loop in free throw
shooting, hitting on
73.1 percent from the
charity stripe. Madison
is second at 73.0.
East Carolina, 2-3 in
the league, is third in
two categories � field
goal percentage and
team offense. The Bucs
are making 49.6 per-
cent of their shots and
scoring 65.4 points per
game.
The Pirates are not
fairing so well, however
in the other three team
statistical categories.
The club is sixth in
scoring defense, allow-
ing 67.3 points. ECU is
seventh in both free
throw percentage (62.4
percent) and point dif-
ferential (minus-1.9
points per game).
Player, Team
Mark West. ODU
John Schweitz, Richmond
Linton Townes, J.Madison
Andy Bolden, G.Mason
Carlos Yates, G.Mason
Andre Gaddy, G.Mason
Ronnie McAdoo, ODU
Rob Romaine, Navy
Keith Cieplicki. W&M
Mike Strayhorn, W&M
Billy Mann, ODU
Dan Ruland, J.Madison
Charles Green, F.Cl
Morris Hargrove. EC I
Dave Brooks, Navy
REBOUNDING
Player, Team
Mark West, ODU
Ronnie McAdoo, ODU
Andre Gaddy, G.Mason
Mike Shannon, G.Mason
Dan Ruland, J.Madison
Morris Hargrove
Linton Townes, J.Madison
Jeff Pehl, Richmond
Gary Price. Navy
Brant Weidncr. W&M
ASSISTS
ECAC-SOITH TEAM LEADERS
Field Goal Perc.
learn
William and Mary
James Madison
aslarolina
Richmond
Old Dominion
George Mason
Player, Team
Grant Robinson, ODU
Billy Barnes, W&M
Rob Romaine, Navy
Tom Bethea, Richmond
Billy Mann. ODU
Player, Team
Mark West, ODU
Dan Ruland, J.Madison
Andre Gaddy, G.Mason
Mike Strayhorn, W&M
Jeff Pehl, Richmond
G-Pts.Avg.
22-38517.5
23-39317.1
22-37417.0
22-35216.0
22-35015.9
22-34615.7
22-33615.3
19-25813.6
21-26812.8
17-21112.4
22-26412.0
22-26111.9
20-23611.8
20-22611.3
19-20710.9
ING G � Reb.Avg.
22-23310.6
22-1888.4
22-1757.9
22-1506.8
22-1466.6
20-1226.1
22-1356.1
23-1365.9
20-1115.6
21-1125.4
G � AAvg
22-1074.8
21-934.4
19-804.2
23-753.3
22-703.2
fAGEPere
64.9
60.7
56.5
55.0
54.3
FREE THROW PERC
Team
George Mason
James Madison
Richmond
Navj
W ilham & Mary
Oid Dominion
East (. arolina
SCORING OFFENSE
learn
Old Dominion
George Mason
EaM Carolina
Richmond
James Madison
William & Mar
SCORING DEFENSE
learn
James Madison
William and Mary
Richmond
Navy
Old Dominion
Eastarolina
George Mason
POINT DIFFERENTIAL
learn
lames Madison
William and Mary
Old Dominion
Richmond
Navy
Cieorge Mason
East I arolina
Off. - Def.Diff
63.7 � 53.010.7
63.3 - 54.78.6
71.3 � 64.46.9
65.4 � 61.73.7
63.2 � 63.6-0.4
70.9 � 71 5-1.4
65.4 - 67.3-1.9
Souths No. 6
Reck Nightclub
RS.
REDUCE
POR ECU SI
ISSION
SON WEDNESDAY
FOR SALE
4 BEDROOM HOUSE
614 Maple St.
2 full baths � 2 half baihs
800 sq. ft. family room
Will finance 75 long term.
See Jimmy Brewer or call Hooker &
Buchanan � 752-6186 or 752-4433
HARBIN HIGHLANDER CENTER. INC.
Coin-Operated
Laundry
and Dry Cleaners
Cleanest laundry in town!
Color T.V. and Video Gomes
Across from Highway Patrol
Station on 1 Oth St.
Hours: 8 a.m10 p.m.
7 days a week
Center
Leads 4
Old Dominion center
Mark West continues
to dominate nearly
every individual
statistical category
among ECAC-South
players.
The 6-foot-10 junior
leads the conference in
scoring, rebounding,
field goal percentage
and blocked shots. He
also tops the nation in
the latter category.
West is averaging
17.5 points and 10.6 re-
bounds per game. He is
also making 64.9 per-
cent of his shots from
the floor.
Just behind West in
the scoring race is Rich-
mond guard John
Schweitz, who is
averaging 17.1. James
Madison's Linton
Townes is next at 17.0.
Two George Mason
players, Andy Bolden
and Carlos Yates,
round out the top five
with averages of 16.0
and 15.9, respectively.
Ronnie McAdoo, a
teammate of West's at
ODU, is second among
the rebounding leaders.
He is averaging 8.4
pulls per game.
East Carolina's Mor-
ris Hargrove is the
league's 14th leading
scorer (11.3) and sixth
leading rebounder
(6.1). Pirate Charles
Green is 13th in scoring
at 11.8.
THE SHOE OUTLET
(Located beside Evans Seafood)
Featuring name brand shoes at bargain prices.
Up To 75 OFF regular prices
Bass Steward-MeGuire Brouse Abouts
201 W. Washington St. Within walking distance of campus.
m@8x�m
TiK.FB.lt
FINALS
BS.f&ff
�g0PBDSC
ft
EACUWQGUT CUSS
M&VY 2DO0?
199 iMJfcf?
175? 0NDGK
-���
lUIWKtR OF 6ACM CLASS
win Compete r$33
or oUeJuiP TO
EAST CAROLINA UNtvQ&rTY
m 0)& SEMfcCTER
22PgUTBVFfcC
ft&JSTtf? AT &30
FfcftloTVRUW.
i
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
e advertised items is required to be readily available for
below the advertised price in each AAP Store ecept as specifically
in this ad
sale at o�
noted j
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT FEB. 20, AT AAP IN GREENVILLE, N.C.
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
703 Greenville Blvd.
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville, N. C.
NOW SAVE MORE WITH A&P's
Super SaverCoupons
AND THE NEW
paQ
SSrA BRAND!
Rib Eyes
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
Whole Boneless
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED JJEEF
Boneless
Chuck Roast
A&P QUALITY
3 lb. pkg.
or more
Freshly
Ground Chuck
lb.
EXTRA LEAN SPECIAL TRIM COUNTRY FARM
Boston
Butt
1U.S.D.A. INSPECTED
Pork Roast Whole Fryer Leg!
29 18ec QQ0
ck Grnrv. ib. J3
TROPIC ANA GOLD N PURE
Orange Juice
98
�-����ngsJB
�Sav
12 gallon
carton
FROZEN
Ann Page Pizzas
89
� Hamburger
�Sausage
�Pepperonl 10oz
� Vsfieese dKq
GOLDEN QUARTERS
Mrs. Filbert's
Margarine
Save 54c
On 2 Pkgs.
211b. I
pkgs. �
ANN PAGE BUTTERMILK OR
Homestyle Biscuits
Save 20
4 690
cans m0
LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON AND 7.50 ORDER 621
GOOD THRU SAT FEB. 20, AT AAP IN GREENVILLE, N.C
Pjj) SUPER SAVER COUPON )�'
� YELLOW-Bl
Cottonelle
Bath Tissue a.
f s 3C WHITE � YELLOW � BLUE
i
69
e
uv
REALLY F1NESE������)"
Ann Page
Mayonnaise
32 oz.
jar
69
c
AT
UMIT ONE Wrr COUPON AND 7.50 ORDER
GOOD THRU SAT FEB. 20, AT AAP IN GREENVILLE, N.C.
622
TAYLOR
Lake Country Wine
359
� Gold
�Pink
�Red
� White
DR. PEPPER
DIET DR. PEPPER
7-UP DIET7-UP
1.5 liter
btl.
2
Liter
Plastic Bottle
89
GOOD ONLY IN GREENVILLE
" FRESHWTTH QUALITY '
GOLDEN YELLOW RIPE
Dole
Bananas
CAUFORNIA RED RIPE
Strawberries
JANE
PARKER
tcakes
�69
First Of
The Season!
qt.
basket
188
it I
N.C�SWEET
ft JUICY A
Rome Apples
Q"38�

m
T





Title
The East Carolinian, February 16, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 16, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.179
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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