The East Carolinian, February 9, 1982






'I
�he
Carolinian
2,
I
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol
SNo(f
Tuesday, February 9,1982
Greenville,N.C.
12 Pages
SOULS President Dissatisfied
WZMB's Format Questioned
B TOM HALL
e fr d�tt"
The president of ECU's largest
minority organization questioned
W ZMB's selection of music for the
minority listener Thursday � less
than two das after the campus
radio station went on the air.
A! a Media Board meeting, board
member Russell Parker, president
of the Societj of United Liberal
Students (SOUS), asked station
manager Sam Barwick why "special
considerations" had not been made
for minority listeners.
"I am president of an organiza-
tion with 2(XX) people, and none of
m people are happy Parker said.
Barwick. who was presenting a
report on the radio station at the re-
quest of the Media Board, said a
majorit) of the calls the station had
received had been favorable.
However, board chairman Carter
Fox said her "phone has not stop-
ped ringing with negative com-
ments
The station manager responded
that WZMB was trying to present an
alternative to other stations in the
area, and that duplicating the kind
of music they play would be "a
waste of money
Parker questioned the use of
minority students' fees for a station
that ignores the minority listener,
but Barwick noted the jazz in the
station's format. "The majority of
jazz artists are 'black Barwick
said.
The station manager compared
WZMB to The East Carolinian and
the football program. According to
Barwick, not all students read the
newspaper or attend football games,
but these campus activities are sup-
ported by student fees.
Barwick added that WZMB's for-
mat � based on a random survey by
former station manager John Jeter
� "in essence closed the gap to
radio listening in Greenville. We
cannot legally compete with com-
mercial stations (by playing Top 40
and soul music)
Parker questioned the number of
minority students on Jeter's survey
and Barwick's selection for the sta-
tion of the most popular albums in
Billboard magazine.
Barwick claimed that 13 of the 51
albums the station has acquired
since October are by black musi-
cians, and said he was working on a
10- to 20-minute "minority show
The show was to have been hosted
by former Ebony Herald associate
editor Edward Nesbitt, but Barwick
said Nesbitt had left ECU and woud
have to be replaced.
After more than 45 minutes and a
suggestion by Student Union presi-
dent Ron Maxwell, Fox tabled the
discussion. She suggested that the
board "give WZMB a chance" and
that Parker further survey the
minority opinion of the station for-
mat.
In other business, the board ap-
proved a study by Dr. John Ebbs of
the "moral principles" of the media
for a "code of ethics" to used by
The East Carolinian, WZMB. The
Buccaneer, The Ebony Herald and
The Rebel.
Lester Nail, president of the Stu-
dent Government Association, si'id
he would be meeting with Buccaneer
editor Amy Picket! in the next two
weeks about removing the printing
of the freshman register from tIr-
responsibilities of the SCiA.
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
SOULS President Russell Parker questioned WZMB's format Thursday
Congresswoman Challenges Students
Bv PATRICk O'NEILL
Mill Wrilrr
�it is difficult for me to understand how Americans,
in this point in time, can sit quiet. Are we tired? Are we
forgetting that eternal vigilance is the price you have to
pa tor liberty?"
rhese were the words of Rep. Shirley Chisholm,
D-N.Y . during her lecture Thursday night in
Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix Theater.
hisholm was greeted with a standing ovation. She
thanked the audience for the welcome and called North
Carolina "one of my favorite states in the South"
Kause of the support its residents gave her when she
tor president.
Chisholm, whose topic was "America's Impoverished
Spirit, challenged the audience to respond and speak out
when they see injustice.
"We have got to find time when we can meditate,
analyze, and study so that we will be able to participate
in meaningful and relevant debate and ask questions
about our own destinies Chisholm said.
Chisholm was born in Brooklyn, N.Y in 1924. She is
now representing New York's 12th Congressional
District and is the only black woman in the House of
Representatives. She became nationally known as the
first black woman to seek the Democratic Party
nomination for U.S. president. She said she prides
herself in being "Unbought and Unbiased" � the title
of her autobiography.
In her years in Congress, Chisholm has campaigned
for what she calls "people's programs She said "we
are entering a new era of limits" that will have
devastating consequences for many Americans.
Chisholm said "that by June of this year, close to 25
percent of the young people in college will not be able to
finish because of program slashes in student aid and
families running oui of money. "When we finally do
wake up, it's going to be :oo late she added.
Chisholm claimed the Reagan administration's play-
ing a game of "blame the victim' is the cause of infla-
tion.
"We hear how stopping pollution, paying adequate
salaries . . . feeding the hungry and clothing the poor
have all caused prices to soar Chisholm said.
"Somehow we do not hear so much about the growing
corporate profits . . . for the 2.2 trillion dollars of our
nation's resources diverted into non-productive military
spending since 1945
"1 et's get it straight by expecting a decent standard
of living she added. "American workers and
American consumers do not cause inflation
Chilholm accused Reagan of using "charm" to
"mesmerize" the American people. "Fverv time our
president comes on television, we sit there and talk
See CHISHOLM, Page 3
On The Inside
The little tramp is coming
to vAendenhall's Hendrix
Theater. For a review of
Wednesday's Charlie
Chaplin Double
Feature, see page 6
RA Positions To Be Available
B TRACY i.RW
Mafl Mrtur
About 50 residence advisor posi-
tions will become available next tall.
according to Jon Rogers, central
campus area coordinator.
"Manv students don't realize that
Vandalism Wave Hits Campus
B GREG HIDEOUT
Mjtl Wrilri
Vandalism in Jarvis dormitory
and automobile break-ins dominate
the police blower for Jan. 28 to Feb.
7.
"I he vandalism has been
unusual)) high the past two
weekends said Jarvis head resi-
dent Laurie Austen. The consensus
among residents of Jarvis is that the
vandals are not residents of the
dorm, according to Austen. The in-
cidents include broken windows,
break-ms. and the larceny of the
house phone.
The automobile break-ins during
this period were most prevalent in
the lot at Fifth and Reade Streets.
Assistant Director of Security Fran-
cis Wiggins commented that this
ma be because of its "accessibility
and location
He added that ear break-ins run
m cycles. "During one period
break-ins are "concentrated in a
certain lot he said. The Campus
Security Department advises all
students to lock their vehicles when
parked.
The following blotter includes
campus related incidents.
Jan. 28. 12:10 a.m. � Stephen D.
McDonald of 114-B Scott reported
that person(s) unknown had covered
his car with toilet paper.
Jan. 29. 12:20 a.m. � Officer
Karpovich reported the breaking
and entering and larceny from a
coin operated machine in the can-
teen of Belk Dorm. 4:30 p.m. �
Doug Brannon, director of Umstead
Dorm, reported that someone had
set fire to the door of 150 Umstead.
Jan. 30. 1:30 a.m. � Rebekah
Pollard reported that her vehicle
had been broken into while parked
in the Fifth and Reade parking lot.
12:07 p.m. � Laurie Austen, head
resident of Jarvis Dorm, reported
the vandalism of the building's rear
door and window. 12:14 p.m. �
Dr. Butai advised that he had been
physically attacked by a male sub-
ject whom he believes is a student.
He later reported it as a attempted
armed robbery. 8 p.m. � Donna
Anderson of 314-C Belk reported
the vandalism of her car tires while
her vehicle was parked west of Belk.
Jan. 31. 9 a.m. � Sgt. Cannon
reported that the glass on the
southwest door of Aycoek had been
broken. 3:09 p.m. � Laurie
Austen, head resident of Jarvis
Dorm, reported the larceny of the
house phone. 3:40 p.m. � Kenneth
Legget reported the breaking and
entering and larceny of his vehicle
while it was parked in the Fifth and
Reade parking lot. 11:45 p.m. �
Thomas Dixon of Grimesland
reported the larceny from his person
of a money bag belonging to
Famous Pizza.
Feb. I. 2:10 a.m. � Gina Lynch
of 421 Fletcher Dorm reported
damage to her vehicle while it was
See VANDALISM, Page 5
it is a prominent position on cam-
pus Roeers said in an interview
last week. As well as receiving a
paycheck as the end of each month,
the resident advisor experiences the
responsibilities of leadership,
Rogeis said.
The resident advisor is in charge
ol as manv as 60 to 100 students.
"Because of the responsibilities of
working with and helping students,
these positions have progressed to
become primarv student leadership
positions on campus Rogers said.
"This type of experience has
become valued by recruiters of
business and industry for employ-
ment references
Rogers said large corporations
have called the university to check
up on references received on ap-
plications, and that they are im-
pressed that the student has taken
on responsibilities such as that of a
residence advisor.
In general, the main concept of
the program is "students helping
students
"The R.A. is the front-line con-
tact for students with all university
services and administration said
Rogers. He emphasized this by say-
ing that sometimes students just res-
pond belter to other students.
Specifically, the R.As help plan
activities and programs tor i he oilier
students, whether it is a social with
another dorm or just relaying infor-
mation to the students. The R.As
assist in housing administration and
are also the primary referral source
for students to all campus helping
agencies.
The R.As aie trained to be
"eood listeners" and to know where
to get the answers to students' ques-
tions and concerns. Rogers said, ad-
ding that thev should know all I he
available resources on campus. The
R.A. goes through specific training
sessions in the spring, at the beginn-
ing of fall semester, and periodically
throughout the year.
"This year with economics so
tight, there are probably a lot of
students out there who would like to
consider these jobs Rogers said.
Although this is true, the pay is ac-
tually an after thought for some
R.As, according to Rogers.
Everyone needs the money, Rogers
said, but the applicant must be
prepared to dedicate his time to the
needs of the student.
The pay carries a rate of S3.35 an
hour; the student is paid for two
hours of work a day. This totals up
to over $1350 for the year. Ex-
Vice President Braxton
Questions Appropriation
By DIANE ANDERSON
SUM W nlcr
The SGA announced Monday
that elections for the 1982-83 school
year will be held on March 24.
Deadline for filing as a candidate is
March 5.
Regarding an appropriation the
legislature approved last week for
$500 to save the Cape Hatteras
lighthouse, SGA Vice President
Marvin Braxton stated that he had
"problems with that, due to the
three or four weeks of debate" on
the NAACP bill earlier in the year.
The controversy was raised over
the NAACP constitution and its
compliance with the appropriations
committee guidelines.
Braxton further stated that he will
request that President Lester Nail
veto the lighthouse bill.
The legislature approved by con-
sent an appropriation of $200 to the
Nurse's Association for members to
attend a convention in Fayetteville
this month. The association has
raised some of the funds to Finance
the trip through bake sales and raf-
fles. Pitt County Memorial Hospital
has also provided funding.
Constitutions were approved for
REAL volunteers and the ECU Col-
lege Republicans.
Five openings will soon be
available for students interested in
holding day-student representative
positions on the SGA legislature.
Photo By DAVE WILLIAMS
Shining Example
A student concentrates beyond the glass of Mendenhall Student Center.
perienced R.As can be promoted
to positions of head resident and
programming assistant - which in-
cludes a furnished apartment in the
dorm.
Tommv Overcash, residence ad-
visor on the thud tior of Aycoek
dorm, is new to the position this
semester. He said he enjoyed his
position thus fat and liked getting to
know Ins fellow students.
When asked if his job took too
much of his time, Overcash
responded. "Not a whole I'M, but
the time that H does lake is times
when you really don't need ii being
taken; like at night when people
wake you up to come open their
doors This type of commitmnI
sometimes goes a little beyond two
hours a day, but Overcash added
"the time that it does take is well
spent
There are a list of qualifications
for this job that the student should
know before rushing down t pick up
his or her application. He or she
must be a full-time student with a
2.2 CiPA and a cleat judicial iccord.
A certain amount of involvement in
residence hall activities would help
the applicant.
See RESIDENCE, Page 3
ECU Co-op
Program Slates
Conference
On Thursday, Feb. 11. from 8:30
a.m. to 4 p.m the ECU
Cooperative Education program
will hold a conference at
Mendenhall Student Center.
According to Betsy Harper, direc-
tor of the program, the conference
is "designed to increase awareness
if benefits to participating
employers and students
"This conference will provide a
forum for employers, educators and
students to discuss mutual concerns
and expectations
The conference will touch upon
the history of cooperative educa-
tion, implementation of co-op pro-
grams, student-employer-university
relations and the pros and cons of
various programs.
Registration will be from 8 to 9
a.m. on Thursday.
For further informal ion about the
conference, call Harper at 757-6979
or 757-6375.

r

WV





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 4, 1982
Announcements
PHYSICS
The Society ot Physics is spon
soring a series of lectures on
"Nuclear Power and Safety " To
be discussed are the parts, opera
tions, and safety of a nuclear reac
lor, and the accident at Three Mile
island Or Jim Joyce of the ECU
Physics dept will begin the series
with "The Basics of Nuclear Reac
tor " This will happen Thursday
Feb II at 4 30 p m in Rm 303 of
the Physics Building We invite all
interested persons to attend
DEATH
Is God the one who brings
death? NO! NO! NO! Death is not
from God (I Corinthians 15 76)
God is love and God is ighi and in
Him there is no darkness (I John
4 81 S) God, through His Son
Jesus Christ, wants us to have an
abundant lite, to be more han con
querors m all'hat we do (Romans
5 37) Come to our fellowship and
learn more about this and other
truths in the Bible Thursday, f-eb
It, at 8 p m in room 242.
Mendenhall.
UTILITIES
The Board of Commissioners of
the Greenville Utiliiies Commis
sion wiM meet m regular session a'
1 30 p.m. Tuesday, feb 9 m me
Board Room ot the utilities
Buildmq
TRAFFIC COMMISSION
Will mee' at 10 30 p m in third
floor conference room a' Corn
muni'y Building or February 10
SIGMA BIG BROTHER
There will be a mandatory
meeting for an Sjma Big
Brothers on Thursday Feb 11, a'
the house a' 5 45 All brothers
must be presen"
AMA
The American Marketing
Association will mee'on Feb 17 a'
5pm in Room 221 in Monoenhaii
The gues' speaker vv.� ll be Terr.e
Trayior. director ot marke'mo
a-io sales promotion a' Carolina
Easi Man All members arc rn
fourageo to a'tena We invite
anvone interested in toining anci
par tic ipa'ino in our marketing
organization I c a"eno this
-ing
CADP
The Campus Alcohol and Drug
Proqram will hold its bi monthly
meeting en Feb 15 at 3 30 p m in
the second floor conference room
ot Erwin Hall S'uden's int
,n turthpi-tng responsible attitudes
toward the use ol chemical
substances are encouraged to at
tend. For more information ran
757 6793 or 757 664V
JAZZ EXERCISE
This course offers a chance '0
work on toning up trouble areas of
the body while learning some
basic ian dance routines Loose,
comfortable clothing leotards, or
st.rrup tights are recommended
Class begins Tuesday, Feb 23 and
ends May 4 and will bei taught in
Room 1)5. Theatre Arts buiidng
The time will be from 6 30 7 30
p m and cos' is S30 00
VOLUNTEEERS
The Student Cour-c I for Excep
tional Children has planned a
Valentines Day party ai REAP
Anyone interested in participating
please comae' Sue vaienii a'
758 8869 ah your help will be ap
preciated
SCEC
Alt those interes'eo in seeing
what me S'udent Council for Ex
ceptional Children is an abou' are
invited 'o attend our next meeting
on Feb 15mSp 129 at 4 p m We
look forward to seeing ALL our
members 'here
GENERAL COLLEGE
PREREGISTRATION
CHANGES
General College s'uden's should
contact their advisers prior 'o
February 22 to arrange for
prereyistrahon
BASEBALL SOFTBALL
OFFICIATING
This course will provide a work
mg understanding of baseball
Softball officiating including posi
tions. stance, voice control, rule
interpretation, ball and strike
calls, and equipment While the
primary purpose is to prepare par
ticipants for Ob opportunities in
umpiring, the course is also
designed to be ol interest to spec
tators. players, coaches, and
school athletic intqramural
teachers.
The class will be held m Room
145, Mmges Coliseum February 22
April 5, Irom 7 00 to 9 00 p m
The cost is $25 00
CALLIGRAPHY
Calligraphy is last becoming a
wide spread art form Ths course
will concentrate on a graceful
style called Chancery Cursive
which once mastered, can become
a basis lor many other lettering
styles. A minimal amount ol sup
plies is required lor the course and
will be distributed at the first class
session
The class will be held n
Brews'er B 101 on Tuesday. Feb
23 Apr 6 Irom 7 00 9 00 p m The
cost is $30 00
CAMERA 1
Want to take better p� lures?
This course will examine 'he tune
hons and uses ol cameras, indoor
and outdoor photography will be
explored, and vanou methods for
taking better pictures will be ex
plored The student should have a
camera 'o use. prelerably a 35mm
or larger
The course beqins Tuesday
Feb 23 and ends Marrt 30 11 Nil
be taught at Deans Photography
203 S Evans and the time is 7 00
9 00 P m and 'he cos' is S30 00
MEMBERSHIP DRIVE
The Student Council lor t �
tional Children iSCEC is having
their membership clrivi "� . � , �
ot Feb 15 Students h
lOrs are mv � � asi si i
by the SCr M � ipeighl
now, and see what
or come b rl
durinq trip if Fel 15a
to a representative tor some (irsl
hang experiences Don't f.
up
INVESTING IN THE 80S
This cours-tl.rs a inorouQt
review ol 'hi, nL,rtvesl
men' oppor'u
those seeking' � � i a
�� ��.
va'ive at '��. . . - �
vestor ana is .�
have I��� �;
westing
The course Ihl '
day, Feb 25Apr8 from 6 30 till
9 30 p m The co�t is S35 00 per
person or S60y and ano
w,tt i will bt
B 203
CONVERSATIONAL
GERMAN II
This course is designed to lur
ther develop oral skills lor persons
who wish to travel in German
speaking sounlnes, and to com
municate with native speakers
here and abroad Text will be
available lor sale at the lirst class
meeting The class will be held in
Brewster. C 301 beginning Tues
day. Feb )6 and ends Apr 27 The
time is 7 00 8 X pm and tuition
is 130 00
HOW TO MAKE A GOOD
MARRIAGE BETTER
This workshop is lor couples in
stable marnaages who want to im
prove an already good relation
ship Each session will locus on
practical aspects ol marital living
enhancing communication,
reducing conlhct, and increasing
the satisfaction ol each spouse
The class begins Monday, Feb 22
and ends March t and will be
taught m Brewster, C 302 The
time is 7 00 9 00 pm and tuition
is J25 00
ANNOUNCEMENTS
II you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcements column
please send the announcement !as
brief as possible) typed and
double spaced to The East Caroli
n.an in care ol the news editor
There is no charge .lor an
nouncements, but space is olten
limited
The deadline lor announcement
are 5pm Friday lor the Tuesday
paper "and 5pm Tuesday lor the
Thursday paper
The space is available to all
campus organizations and depart
ments
PHYE MAJORS
ludents nr plan Jo cv Cl t"
a i ducation as a maior dur
ng change pt ma r weefc lor the
hould report to
1 00 3 00
� I � i. Fet) 10 (or a
' � I I pi , Sit ai ti'ness test
� ;� f tor mance on 'his
red : as a prerequisite
' � Hi ia admittance to the
al education maior pro
grain More detailed information
' � lestiS available by
S7 6441 r Ci442
SOULS
Souls w.ii hold its annual Miss
igeant on March 28 at 7
Mendenhall Student
. . a lions loi
lants an now avaiiat rhey
� btaned irom an, Si uts
application deadline
, - II and a ei 'ed
� � : 111 sc heduled Souls
TALENT SHOW
Fel .5 'here will be a talent
a' 'he Agnes Follilove
on Dickerson Avenue bet
woen the hours ol 1 3 p.m. All ECU
organizations and students have
been cordially invited to a"end
part pa'e in this event All
�� � r s ns should contact
Floyd a1 758 0817 or
COR SO
There will be a CORSO meeting
on Thursday, February 1) at 5
p m in Mendenhall Student
Center, room 221
The Kast C arohnian
PubHSllO every TuCSO.i.
Thursday during rhj � iden
year and ev, i . .� � �,
ing the summer
The East Carohn.an ,s "�
11 c i a l newspaper , � East
Carolina University
operated ano puni'S'x-u h-r and
by 'he s'udems ol Eas- Care na
University
Subscription Rate HO yearly
The East Carolinian oldces
are located m the Old South
Building on the campus ol ECU
Greenville, N C
POSTMASTER Send address
cmnqes to The East Carolinian
Old South Builoinq. ECU Greet
v.ile, NC 27834
Telephone: 757 6364. 6367. 6309
Application to mail at second
class postage rates is pending at
Greenville. North Carolina
PHILOSOPHY
The Philosophy Club will meet
on Tuesday Feb 16 at 7 p.m. in
Brewster D 313 Dr. James Smith
ol the Philosophy Department will
speak on "Thoughts on
Metaphor " All interested persons
are welcome
AFRICAN ART
An exhibition of Aftican Art, on
loan Irom the permanent collec
tion of Duke University, may be
seen at East Carolina University's
Gray Art Gallery from Feb 1
May ). )982 This exhibition con
tains work Irom twenty one
Alncan tribes, and represents a
wide variey of styles. On display
are numerous ceremonial objects
as well as decorative utilitarian
pieces
Thisexhibition will be of interest
to artists, photographers, students
and the general public A tour ol
the exhibition will be given to the
public by Or Robert Burger, ECU
Anthropologist and specialist on
Black History and Atrican
Culture The tour will take place m
Gray Art Gallery 7 30 p m Mon
day, Feb 8 The public is invited
GMAT
The Graduate Management Ad
mission Test (GMAT) will be oi
lered at East Carolina University
n Saturday. March 20 Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to GMAT, Educational
Testing Service. Box 966 R
Princeton. NJ 08540 Applications
must be postmarked no later than
February 15, )982 Applications
may be obtained Irom the ECU
Testing Center. Room 105. Speight
Building, Greenville, NC 27834
ASSERTIVENESS AS A
WAY OF LIFE
Assertiveness can open new
doors lor you Learning to tell
others what you want, feel, and
believe, as well as increasing sell
confidence, are goals of this class
You will learn to identify areas in
which you would like to be more
asseriive and prac tice in a suppor
five atmosphere Classes will be
held m Brewster B 204 beginning
Monday. Feb 22 March 22 Irom
7 00 9 30 p m Cos' is �30 00
BANJO
This is a basic introductory
course m banio Participants
should have little or no banio ex
perience and should bring their
own banios The class begins Mon
day, ceb 22 and ends April 19
The time is 6 30 7 45 p m in
Brewster B 101 The cost is 30 00
NCSL
There win be awieeting of North
Carolina S'udent Legislature on
Tuesday. Feb 9 a' 7 p m in
Mendi nnali 212 The plans tor the
IC a' Charloi'e will be discussed
AH interested persons please a'
lend New members are welcome
MSC CO REC BOWLING
LEAGUES
There is still room for three (3)
more teams on Tuesday moghts
Co Rec Bowling League Official
play begins Tuesday. February 9,
at 6 00 PM
FAITH & VICTORY
FELLOWSHIP
Are you tired of the downtown
scene? Looking to lill 'hat empty
void m your life? You can walk in
total victory have all your needs
met and ever? prayer answered
Come and see what the word ol
God has to say about it It will
change your life!
AEROBICS
For ECU staff and lacuity.
aerobics classes are offered by the
Hpers department on Monday,
Wednesday, and Friday at noon in
memorial gym. Room 112 There
is no charge (or this service Just
your effort for lots of fun while get
ting m shape For furher mlorma
tion, call Mrs Jo Saunders,
757 6000. or the physical education
ollice, 757 6441
SUMMER WORK
The Office of the Associate
Dean, Orientation and Judiciary,
Whichard Building, Room 210, is
now taking applications lor Sum
mer work in the New Student
Orientation Successful applicants
will not be allowed to attend Sum
mer School The deadline lor sub
milting an application is February
26
HARBIN HIGHLANDER CENTER. INC.
Coin-Operated
Laundry
and Dry Cleaners
Cleanest laundry in town!
Color T.V. and Video Games
Across from Highway Patrol
Station on 10th St.
Hours: 8 a.m. 10 p.m.
7 days a week
HIS DICKS
1890 Seafood
2311 S. Evans St Ext
ALL YOU CAN
EAT SPECIALS
Mon. Night
Trout and Salad
$4.95
Tues. Night
Flounder and Salad
$5.95
Wed. Night
Fried Shrimp and Salad
$6.95
Thurs. Night
Steamed Shrimp
and Salad
$9.95
Mon Tues Wed.
DINNER
FOR TWO
$7.95
Choice of shrimp,
trout, clams or
deviled crab.
i $1.00
J OFF COUPON
WORSHIP
A student Episcopal service ol
Holy Communion will be
celebrated on Tuesday Feb 9 in
the chapel ol St Paul's Episcopal
Church 406 4th Street tone block
Irom Garrett Dorm I The service
will be a' 5 30 p m with the
Episcopal Chaplam the Rev Bill
Hadden. celebrating Supper and
Fmeside Conversation on C S
Lewis Screwtape Letters will
lollow the service
EQUIPMENT RENTALS
An outdoor recreation equip
men! rental service has been pro
vided through the department ol
Intramural Recreational Ser
vices Hems available for rent in
dude backpacks, tents, canoes,
and a Tandem bicycle. The Out
door Recreation Center is located
in the Equipment Room (115)
Memorial Gym Hours ol opera
tion are 2 3 30 pm Monday
through Friday Information is
available on state and iederal
campgrounds, backpacking trails,
day hiking trails, and canoeing
rivers
EQUIPMENT
CHECK-OUT
The Department of Intramural
Recreational Services provides an
equipment check out service for
students faculty and staff if you
have playful notions but lack the
right equipment stop by the equip
ment check out room located in
room 115 Memorial Gym Equip
ment is available for basketball,
football, fnsbee, horseshoes, soc
cer. volleyball, Softball, racquet
ball, tenms and badminton to men
tion iusl a few items This is a free
service (excluding late fees) so
take advantage of a good oppor
tunity
FREE PLAY
Effective Feb 9 free play hours
for Memorial Gym will be
Monday Thursday, 3 4 45 pm ,
Friday, 3 6pm, Saturday and
Sunday,5 p m . Mmges Col
iseum Gym Available for free
play on various weekend days
Check with the Im Rec Office in
Memorial Gym for exact days and
times ECU ID required!
SPORTSTACULAR!
Mmges Coliseum Gym will be
open and supplied with equipment
lor vollelyball, badminton and
b ba" (Last resort) on these
dates Jan ?9. Feb 5, 19, 26.
March 26, and April 2, 16 Bring a
friend or a team lor a
"Sportstacular evening in Green
ville
SURFCLUB
Meetmq m Colleehouse at
Mendenhall on Wednesday (Feb
10! at 7 p m All members are ask
ed to attend New members are
welcome to Oin
CO-OP EDUCATION
The Cooperative Education Of
fice. located in 3)3 Rawi Building,
currently has job openings for
Summer and Fall i�t? with the
foiling agencies Social Security
Administration Baltimore. MO.
Morth Carolina internship Office
Raleigh, NC, Camp Day, NC in
stitute of Government Raleigh,
NC
For more information, contact
the Co op office m 313 Rawl
Building.
AED
NEWORLEANS
A special meeting will be held on
Tuesday, Feb 9 to discuss plans
lor the Regional Convention to be
held March 11 13, in New Orleans,
La All members interested in at
tending the convention should plan
to attend The meeting will be held
m Flanagan 307 at 7 30 p m
BAKE SALE
The SociologyAnthropology
Club is having a Sweetheart Bake
Sale on Feb 11 Irom 10 a m until 3
p m outside ol Brewster B 302
Coffee and baked goods will be on
sale Come by and pick up
something sweet for your Valen
tine1
ILO
The International Language
Organization will hold a meeting
on Feb 10 at 2 p m The meeting
will be held m BC 305 All
members are encouraged to at
tend and anyone interested is
welcome to attend
ISA
The International Student
Association invites any interested
ECU students to come to its
meeting tonight, Tuesday. Feb 9
at 6 30 p m in the International
House, 306 East N,nth Street At
this meeting we will be planning
our next International Dinner and
entertainment
SOULS ELECTIONS
All people interested in running
for SOULS oflicers are asked to be
present at the Feb II SOULS
meeting Your attenoance will be
greatly appreciated
ECU LAW SOCIETY
Will meet Wednesday, Feb 17 at
7 pm. in Room C 103. Brewster
Guest lecturer will be North
Carolina Attorney General, Rufus
Edmisten For further mlorma
t'on. please contact Diane Jones.
756 6556
SCIENCE MAJORS
On Monday. Feb 15, American
Chemical Society Student Affiliate
will meet at) pm in Flanagan
202 Mr Owen Kingsbury will be
the guest speaker He will present
a show on "Glass blowing" All in
terested persons and members art
urged to attend Pictures will be
taken for the yearbook
INTER VARSITY
CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Will be meeting Thursday night
instead of Wednesday this week in
order tor Dr Moye, a dentist from
Raleigh, to come speak on the
topic "How to Deal with
Grudges " The meeting will still
be held at the same time. 7 30 m
Mendenhall Room 210
METHODIST STUDENT
CENTER
We are now accepting appiica
tions Irom maies and lemaies for
housing at the Methodist Student
Center or at Wesley House for the
19�2 83 school year and for 19�3
summer school Call 758 2030 for
more information
Interviews lor summer iobs at
Camp Don Lee and other church
related summer camps will be
conducted a1 the Methodist Stu
dent Center on Monday, Feb 8
from 2 5 Call 758 7030 for more in
formation
We have an opening for a
graduate student couple to serve
as resident advisors Those in
teres'ed should contact The
Me'hodist Student Center, 501 E
Sth St by Feb 15 Call 758 2030
BINGOICE CREAM
The next BingoIce Cream Party
is scheduled for Tuesday.
February 9. 1982 a' 7 00 PfA in
Mendenhall Student Center's
Muiti Purpose Room Students,
faculty. staff, and their
dependents are nviled to iom on
on trie fun Win prues. eat ice
cream, play bingo, an absolutely
l r e e � '
MSC CO REC BOWLING
LEAGUES
There is still room for rhrae (3)
m'gre teams on Tuesday moghts
Co Ret Bowling League Official
play begins Tuesday February 9
at 6 00 PM
SUMMER WORK
The Office of the Associate
Dean. Orientation and judioarr
Whichard Building. Room 210. is
now taking applications tor Sum
mer work in the New Studen'
Orientation Successful applicants
will not be allowed to attend Sum
mer School The deadline tor sub
milling an application is Februar t
26
NCSL
There will be a meehng of Not"
Carolina Student Legislatu
Tuesday Feb 9 at 7 p m .n
Mendenhall 212 The plans lor the
IC at Charlotte will be discussed
All interested persons ptease at
lend New members are welcome
VOLUN EERS
NEEDED
The Pitt County Juvenile Ser
vices Restitution Program ,�,
urgently m need of volunteers '
serve as on site supervisors for
luven s as 'her perform various
community service tasks
You may volunteer any numbf
of hurs per week or per monn
Monday through Saturday a'
you can be reimbursed for an.
program related 'ravel
for further information pleas'
call Cookie Rodgecs at 758 4223
come by 'he Juvenile Cour'
Counselors office on the lo-
floor of the Pitt County Cour
'house
CONVERSATIONAL
FRENCH
This cou'se 'S des-gnr-
develop oral skins lor persons r
wish 'o travel m French speax
coun'ries. and to commyr
yy.th native speakers rtre and
abroad The textbook will be
available lor sale a' 'he t'rs' a
meeting
The class will be he'd
Brews'er C 706 Beginning Tues
day Feb 16 Apr 27 trcm 7 00
8 30 p m the 'uit'on .s 130 00
Plaza Gardens I ����
The
Greenville's Newest Banquet
and Party Facility
(FORMERLY BALLENTINES BUFFET
withis Marathon
Restaurant
"s-
PITT PLAZA, GREENVILLE)
V
Winter & Spring
FORMA LS
� MEETINGS
qoo BANQUETS
COMPl.tn E F(M)I) SERVICE AVAILABLE
SPfct I ALlZINi; IN OUTSIDE C ATERING
&r
Call BOB SAUTEK - 355-1361 or 756-042
CONVENIENT MM 6.TIOV AMPt r "AMONG
The Best in
Greek food, Pizzas, and Subs.
Try our delicious Souvlakia
Special only $2.55
Now delivering
II FREE
ll Conveniently
ff Located Across From ECU
1 Phone 752-0326 at 506 Evans St.

-me Quesr ofjHe sealer city
i
Good towards any
meal and our all you
can eat specials. NOT
good towards other
j specials.
FOSDICK'S 1890
SEAFOOD
here's a city in Europe- C(nM free.
So unravel these riddles, and uncover its key.
i
KM
1 2 3 A 6 6 7 ft 9 HO U
TO PLAY THE GAME:
Answer each of the riddles that will appear here each
week in February. Write your answer in the blanks below
each riddle. The letters with numbers below them corres-
pond to the numbered spaces in the master key. As you
fiH in the letters of the master key, you wiU be spelling the
name and location of a secret city in Europe. Send us
the solution, and you and a friend could win a trip there, free.
TO ENTER SWEEPSTAKES:
1. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY.
2. Grand Prize consists of two regular rourKj-tnp economy airfare
to the secret city 30-day Eurail passes. American Mouth Mortal
passes, two backpacks and $1000 in cash.
3. Cut out master key for use as official entry blank or use 3" � 5
cara. Print your answer along with your name and address Mai
to Secret City Sweepstakes, P.O. Box 6018. Norwatk, CT 06862
4. The first 1,000 correct respondent wiU receive a poster as an
entry prize.
5. Al entries must be received by 3182. Enter as often as you
wish, but each entry must be mailed eparatery
6. A random drawing of al correct entries wiH be held 32282 by
the Highland Group, an independent lodging organization whoa
decision is final
7. Sweepstakes void where prohibited, taxed or otherwise restricted
8. Al potential winners may be required to sign an affidavit of et-
gtoility to verity compliance with the rules within 30 days of receipt
of same. For a list ot prize winners, send sett-eddn�eed, stamped
envelope to Secret City Sweepstakes co Highland Group, 16
Knight St NorwaJk, CT 06851
WHCTAMl?
Upon a staff 1 sit,
I tell the name and pitch,
Not one, not two, but three,
Instruct the symphony.
J 7 9
(Answer to Wxk 1 RtddU SNAIL)
I
QeNBRAL FOODS' INTERN ATIONAL COffeeS
MAKe QOOD COMPANY.
O General Foods Corporation 1962
t





THEEAS1AKol I MAN
t 1 HKI Ak 9. 1V82
Is
Chisholm Speaks On Campus
i utinned From Page 1
about his charm she said.
"He's a charming man, I must
sa this. He's a very charming per-
son Chisholm said, her voice ris-
"Bul wc arc not talking about
charm. We are talking about
policies that may have a verv
lerious effect on your lives right
w and ihe lives of future genera-
o come
� 1 he new federalism concept is a
return to the states-rights doctrine
iholm said. "The state govern-
ment didn't do the job; that's why
we changed it Chisholm called the
sion ,n "abdication of federal
ponsibilities
S i noted that the proposed shifts
ion binding and that many pro-
grams vmH be at the mercy of the
states foi continued funding. She
state governments
aditional icebergs of indifference
he needs of the poor and the
vei less
SI e added that it was unlikely
stale governments will
Idenh overnight become loaded
with compassion, loaded with
rage, and loaded with concern. .
I adies and gentlemen, this is a
out
I nder the general revenue-
iring program, many of the
anized groups "and unions with
money and power would be able to
ie funds while "the scraps that
were left and the crumbs that were
and fell ofi the table" would be
"scattered for . . . the rest of us
c n said.
Summing up her opinion of the
new tederalism concept,
Chisholm said, "you can call it any
A o name you want. It really
'them's that's got gonna
o get "
olm said if the present rate
of inflation continued for 20 years,
a package of Alka-Seltzer would
cost $20. "But rare is the pension
check, rare is the unemployment
check, rare is the pay check that
keeps pace with inflation she said.
"We must not permit ourselves to
be mesmerized by the rhetoric of
over-regulation or bloated
bureacracy Chisholm said,
because this would detract attention
from "the real ball. The real ball
right now in the United States of
America, is a cynical destruction of
the quality of life for the citizens of
this great land
According to Chisholm, inflation
has struck many of the productive
citizens of this country while
Reagan is promising a tax cut.
"What does this tax cut mean in an
economy where close to a million
Americans who are employable are
not working?" Chisholm asked.
�"Who is fooling whom?"
She said Americans always res-
pond to the promise of a tax cut
without realizing who will really
benefit and whowill suffer from a
tax-cut program. She added that
programs such as CETA, employ-
ment training, unemployment and
other human resources would be cut
to replace the deficit. "Within nine
months, they'll ask back for those
tax cuts Chisholm said.
Shifting patterns indicate that the
United States might be moving
might be moving into a period of
"social Darwinism where few will
succeed, some will survive and, by
gollv, a lot will succumb she add-
ed. '
She challenged Americans to
study, ask questions and analyze.
"We must not sit down and plav
dead and roll over in a Rip Van
Winkle syndrome of accepting a
trillion dollars from now until 1985
on the military She called it
"senseless preparation" for a war
with no winners. "We can't have
any winners in this kind of warlike
madness
According to Chisholm, all this
military buildup is taking place at a
lime when "the people's programs
that we fought for and built up over
the past 20 years are maimed or kill-
ed by the budget doctors
Chisholm noted that it is accep-
table to criticize social programs as
being inflationary or unproductive,
but criticism of other programs,
such as the military budget, could
easily give a person an
"anti-American" or
"anti-patriotic" label.
"Well Chisolm continued,
"I'm here to tell you this evening
that 1 love this country, but nothing
is going to stop me from speaking
out about the grievances and in-
justices in our nation. And by seeing
the truth, the truth shall help to set
us free
"We don't want later generations
to compare us to Christopher Col-
umbus, who was convinced he had
been to India. He didn't really know
where he was when he got there and
never knew where he had been when
he got back
Praising Martin Luther King as
"a man ahead of his time, a leader
in every sense of the word
Chisholm explained that it is the
case with many great leaders that
they are not appreciated or
understood until they are gone.
"The new generation tends to be
selfish. It doesn't want to be
bothered she added. "Leave me
alone, and I won't bother you She
criticized ihc young people who
don't carry on the struggle that
made certain this generation
"would not have to go through
what we had to go through
Chisolm challenged the older
Residence Association
A ccepting Applications

( ontinued From Page 1
Applications can be picked up
from the offices ol ihe residence
, area coordinators, or the
i e dean and director of
Residence Life, Carolyn Fulghum.
Ihe deadline for applications is
1 5. They must be fill-
ned into the Residence
in 214 Whichard
Monday Feb.
ed ui and tui
Office
Building.
After the application is com-
pleted, the student will go through
an interview at the end of February,
A small team of students, a coor-
dinator, and a director of Residence
hall will conduct the interview. The
selections will be made at the end of
March.
THE SHOE OUTLET
(Located beside Evans Seafood)
Featuring name brand shoes at bargain prices.
Up To 75 OFF regular prices
Bass Steward-MeGuire Brouse Abouts
201 W. Washington St. Within walking distance of campus.
.O
wieu&m
iieefiMgM
when only the finest will do.
Valentine s Day
Cards & Candy
CENTRAL NEWS &
� CARD SHOP
321 Kvans St. Mall � 752-3333
Open 9-6 � 7 Days a Week
CENTRAL BOOK
& NEWS �
Greenville Sq. Shopping Center
Open 9:30-9:00 � 7 Days a Week
756-7177
ZIGGY "
C Untwrrwl Press Syndicate MCMI XX IX
Sm,Ue!
I C.lHIU'jl .III' (I f ,li lJ S .Hill
T Shu i . Slrepxtq B-rq1.
B,icHo.tt�s Crnpitrq Equip
�inhi S . I T u� U Shoi s '
0 n s .mi) O.i ' '00 Dill, ichi
Ni'W ,ltiO U id IV�n- TowtKJV
ARMY-NAVY
STORE v '
ft
Current underroduot p-
medic ol �t�d�rrr� may now com-
per for ie��rol hundred Air
Force icroloi�"ip� The�e
icnotonrupt ore to be oworded
to student! accepted into
mediccr) ichooh ai freshmen or
of the beginnino, of then
sophomore yeor The schoior-
ship provides for tuition, books
lob tees ond equipment, plus a
$S30 monthl. ottowonce In
� estigate this Imonciol alter-
native to the high cost of
medico! education.
Contoct-
I s. Vr. Mf l III
PROrfsslONN
KH HI HIM.
Ssirte GL-1. 1100 Noroho Dr
S0le.9r.HC 27689
Phone Collect (919)75S-�134
generation noi to sit back and turn
away from the struggle. "Are we
passing on the principles and ideals
to our children? Have wc abandon-
ed the younger generation in our
own rush for self gratification?
"All of us in this room � black
and white � must be awakened
from the deep slumber that placed
us in a kind of quiescence jeopar-
dy
Later in her lecture, Chisolm
reflected on the tragedy of the Viet-
nam conflict. Speaking about the
55,000 American lives lost there, she
commented that they were "the
cream of the crop of this country,
gone, never to return She prasied
"the young people on the campuses
of this great nation" for getting the
country's leaders to realize "that
that kind of insanity, that kind of
madness could not continue any
longer
She also noted that the struggle
would not be getting any easier, as
the trend to more conservativism in
Congress is apparent. "Never did I
dream that I would live to see the
pervasiveness of fear amongsi
politicians she said, commenting
on ihe alleged hit lists of right-wing
groups.
A congressman or senator who is
targeted by a conservative group
will often "run and hide she said.
"The allies that we have had in Con-
gress arc no longer there. . . .Bui,
my friends, in a sense, it is only our
principles and our ideals that can
help to insure our future
During questioning, Chisolm said
that she was not planning to run for
re-election, as she wishes to spend
some lime with her family. The life
of a congresswoman is difficult, she
said. "In terms of what happens to
your spirit, 1 don't know how I've
lasted Still. Chisolm concluded
that "this has been one of the most
agonizing decisions that I've ever
had to make
Are you the ��
Sole
Survivor?
NO? Then send your
RUNNING SHOES to:
Carolina Resolers Inc.
P. O. Box 7211
Wilson, N. C. 27893
1 FOR our complete LIFE SAVING
process of REPLACING:
11 Ihr outer rubber solo
2 Ihr worn mid-sole material
J, the innersole iih oul DELUXE
Mill DED innersole
4) the shoe laces
ur hH.�n�iH hr kr It KNU) in I �Hki�diw
� ill or billed lor Ihrm upon w.ur in�pcili"� jixl
salcfat imn
PRICE � $14.50
Q?
JOLLY'S
PAWN SHOP
Large inventory of new and
used merchandise
We Have
Lay away
�Accepting any items of value for collateral
�AH transactions confidential
WE BUY GOLD & SILVER
ACROSS THE RIVER - Corner of N. Green & Hwy. 33
� Pactolus Hwy.) 752 5759 Mon. Fri. 9 to 6 � Sat. 8 to 4
BICYCLES
GUNS
JEWELRY
STEREOS
MUSIC INSTRUMENTS
TOOLS
&&&&&
S
lv�R
I
SP0RTSW0RUJ
756-6000

X
104 Red Banks Rd. (Behind Shoney's)
Tuesday Night
ECU NIGHT
JUST $1.00 with ID includes Skate Rental
7:00-10:00
Every Friday & Saturday Night
ECU Students are admitted for
JUST $2.00 including Skate Rental

Just
received!
The
Lady
Oceania.
The running flat
that's reasonably
priced Nylon upper
Available in
Teal'Roya! Blue and
Tan'Brown
THE YAIbXH. Wl WD IT FOR TK MONH.
Now Available
DOWNTOWN
Wesoler. Inc.
H. L. HODGES
BOND'S
SPORTING GOODS
ARLINGTON BLVD
ATiTIC-
SOUTHS 6 1 ROCK NIGHTCLUB
Q&
WEDNESDAY
SUPER GRIT
ECUSTUDENTSGET
FIRST BEVERAGE
FREE
THURSDAY
SUPER GRIT
FRI. & SAT.
SUBWAY
HAPPY HOUR ON FRIDAY
4:00-7:00
SUNDAY
3 PM BAND
tetilKfcfS'
Acrosi
trom
U.B.E
DAILY SPECIALS
(Sun.) � Lasogna Special $2.99
(Mon.) � Country
Cooking Special - S2.99
(Tuet.) - Pino Buttet
$2.79 (Ladies' Nite)
(Wed.) - Salad Bar Special $2.15
All you can eatf!
(Thurv) - Spaghetti Special - $2.49
(Fri. & Sat.) - Happy Hour 4-7
Pitchers $2.50. All other
beverages specially priced.
Dinner specials good from 5-9.
THURSDAY
COLD DUCK
(Rock'N Blues)
FRIDAY
Super Matinee
wTommy KG. &
the Beans
Happy Hour 4-7
Sat. in Concert
STILLWATER
EAST CAROLINA S
PARTY CENTER
TUESDAY
DRAFT NITE
WEDNESDAY
HUMP NITE
THURSDAY
COLLEGE NITE
FRIDAY
END OF WK. PARTY
SATURDAY
BEST IN DANCE MUSIC
�T SUNDAY V
w LADIES NITE
VALENTINES PARTY
Op�n
Mon. Sat.
(:30a.m.
. . . It takes 12 inches
to make a hero . . .
Del. S�i4�Kk�t - Salads -
Veg.lorio" Sandwich
Horrwmoac Soupt - H�ro�i en rmhly halo roll�
Live Music
Is Back!
Sat Feb. 13
Fiddlers Jam II
9:00p.ml a.m.
Good Food � Good Times
VIDEOGAMES
Attitude Adiustmcnt Daily � p.m. 7 ��"�
fflijaptrrS
TUESDAY
Zoo Nite � 25C ponies
WEDNESDAY
Ladies' Night
THURSDAY
Happy Hour � Free
Admission "til 10 �
25C ponies til 11
FRIDAY AFTERNOON �
END OF THE WEEK
BUCKET PARTY
SATURDAY
JOHN MOORE
SUNDAY
Nickel Nite
Call 7Sl-f74 tor rfiert infa
109 E. 5th St. 752 1361
GOOD TIMES
Mon. (3-4 p.m.) FREE Pinhall
(8 p.m.) Darl Tournament
THURSDAY
HOMETOWN BOYS
FRIDAY
STEVE AND JAMES
HAPPY HOUR from 4-7
every day with the
coldest beverage in town.
Now opart 7 days a wack � 3pm l a.m.
IItEAST ith STREET
752 �711
NOW OPEN FOR
HAPPY HOUR
DAILY
AT 4:30
Not open to tk General PuMic
A
1





QJije �cifit Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins, td��r ma
Jimmy DuPREE, nammmnrmm
Ric Browning, n,r ,�,�j Advenum Tom Hall, NtwsEdnur
Fielding Miller, mmmm w�n�.v Charles Chandler, spmn Ed,m,
Alison Bartel, pr ����.�, Steve Bachner, En�rawm,n, Ednr
Steve Moore, cmimmmMmmw William Yelverton, svv ���-
February 9, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Fiscal 1983
Defense Budget Threatens Others
When Ronald Reagan was cam-
paigning for the presidency he said
that, if elected, he would balance
the federal budget by 1984. Sure,
other candidates had been making
the same promise for years, but
somehow it seemed more likely that
Reagan � who had made a career
of touting fiscal restraint � would
live up to his pledge.
Now, in budget projections
released this week, the president has
predicted deficits of more than $90
billion for each of the next three
years, and it is likely that the debt
will be more than one trillion dollars
in fiscal 1984 � the year Reagan
said he would have the budget
balanced.
What went wrong? Where did the
president's so carefully laid plan go
awry? Why can't he balance the
budget? There may be a number of
answers to these questions, but the
most obvious is that the administra-
tion has gone overboard on what it
plans to spend on defense.
Let's take a look at some figures.
In the budget Reagan plarrs to sub-
mit to Congress for the next fiscal
vear he projects federal spending of
about $740 billion. Of this, $216
billion is targeted for defense. This
DOONESBURY
CALL&. 7e PCK-lPOF
HOUR WTiOFHATW.
SPORJ H9�M�N 6
Oh ?K
: fc. KMSffTt
SOOP
�syne
06Ar
f�AP
7000?
m sue. aohouoh :m eooo
hot su& wen have -ye LAST
tOR.AU 200 IZW HE&GAN
7�M V 8RA& H&K OH BOAAC
c-wdax Hxcmcrr
5�2JAO�5
figure represents an increase of $34
billion from the previous year or a
15 percent hike.
To offset the increase in defense
spending, the president proposes to
cut spending in already hard-hit
social programs by another $13
billion.
If we add this all up, however, it
doesn't take a Ph.D. in
mathematics to figure that you can't
eliminate the deficit by increasing
spending in one area by $34 billion
and reducing it in another by $13
billion. It just don't add up.
If he really wants to balance the
budget, President Reagan will have
to realize what many of his fellow
Republicans have begun to say: a 15
percent increase in defense spending
is just not practical or possible.
What will it take before the presi-
dent realizes that it isn't realistic to
pour billions and billions of dollars
into stockpiling weapons while
thousands � or perhaps millions �
of Americans are being severely
hurt by cuts in social programs.
If America spends $216 billion on
defense next year, we will be pour-
ing billions of dollars down the
drain.
by Garry Trudeau
Super Bowl Euphoria Shattered
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
SAN FRANCISCO � We're Number
One, I think. Actually, it's a little hard to
know just who "we" are, as the reality of
the San Francisco 49ers' victory over the
Cincinnati Bengals in the Super Bowl sinks
in. Like most Bay Area residents, I am
happy to see the long-suffering Niners
finally ascend to football heaven, but
unlike most, I have trouble associating my
immortal soul with the victory.
1 guess 1 just don't identify. 1 didn't suit
up for the game, nor did I have the time
and money to jet to the Pontiac Silver-
dome (where a cup of beer went for $3) to
see the action live and in-person. I don't
own any stock in the 49ers, and neither
does virtually anyone else in San Fran-
cisco. The principal owner, Eddie DeBar-
tolo, Jr lives in Youngstown, Ohio,
where he's big in shopping centers. His
connection with his team's turf is purely
financial.
" Ditto with rriCst of the players. Joe Mon-
tana, the star quarterback with the ail-
American moniker, grew up in Penn-
sylvania and played college football at
Notre Dame. Hacksaw Reynolds, the heart
of the defense, toiled for the Rams last
season and lives in the Bahamas � clean
out of the country, for chrissakes. These
guys are superb ballplayers, but they're not
exactly homeboys, if you know what I
mean.
"Home" is a foreign concept in the high
rollers' world of pro football. Last year's
Super Bowl champs, the neighboring
Oakland Raiders, tried to move the fran-
chise, lock, stock and barrel, to Los
Angeles last summer, but were restrained
by a judge. It's not as though Oakland
didn't support the Raiders � the club sold
out its home games for umpteen con-
secutive seasons before last fall � just that
L.A. offers more money. As last year's
celebrants discovered, to their sorrow, the
Raiders management doesn't give a damn
for them, their proven loyalty of their city.
Like every National Football League
franchise (save the municipally-owned
Green Bay Packers), the Raiders and 49ers
are private corporations that make use of
the name and image of the cities in which
they are based for private profit. The
49ers' windswept home. Candlestick Park,
was built for them and another private cor-
poration, the baseball Giants, with tax-
payers' money. The city now rents
Candlestick to the pro clubs on exceedingly
generous terms, like most professional
sports cities, San Francisco pays dearly for
its rare moments of jock-induced
euphoria.
And euphoria it was for the half a
million people who jammed the streets of
San Francisco to celebrate the Niners'
triumph. That is, if by euphoria we include
such fun things as kicking out the windows
of city buses (also paid for with scarce tax
dollars), slugging and being slugged by
cops and breaking bottles on the sidewalk
when not heaving them at passersby. It
seemed as though a city that has won a
reputation as Kook Central was trying to
show it could be just as wholesomely
violent after a big sports win as the rest of
America.
Like the rest of America, San Francis
suffers from innumerable ills: high
unemployment, crime, shrinking social
services and sky-rocketing prices �
especially, here, for housing. Mere than
merely marking a football victory, the
post-game party provided a shattering.
shared orgasm of release from .he bump
and grind of daily life. Never mind that it
was momentary, it was something.
I guess that's what H was for the host
cities, too � something. Lord knows.
Detroit and Pontiac are up against it more
than most, and the influx of tourist dollars
must have helped, if onlv temporarily. 1
wonder, though, how mam unemployed
auto workers could afford those S3 beers
and how many were invited to share the
view from the luxury boxes in the Silver-
dome (one guess). I could almost hear the
rueful laughter from Poletown � the
Polish-American neighborhood in Detroit
that General Motors razed for a new plant
� when a moment of silence for Poland
was announced. Funny how folks who care
so much for workers in other countries
care so little for them here.
Viewed in a social context, Super Bowl
XVI ran true to form. It afforded a spec-
tacle to take our minds off of high prices
and low, low temperatures, a collective
catharsis in which we could let it all hang
out before hanging up our vicarious,
media-made selves for another year. In the
process, fans of the winning team get to
feel that we, too, are Number One. What a
shaky reality that turns out to be, when
you really look at it.
Campus Forum
'Random Remarks' Spoil Review Of Police Concert
Being an avid Police fan, I was pleas-
ed to see an article in the February 2
issue of The East Carolinian concerning
the recent appearance by the Police and
the Go-Go's in Greensboro. For the
most part, I agree with the review of the
concert, because I did attend it.
However, I felt that the inclusion of the
reporters' opinions concerning the
album dhost In The Machine were
definitely uncalled for. When writing a
concert review, it is basically unfair to
throw in a few random remarks concern-
ing the group's latest endeavor, because
the remarks cannot be sufficiently sup-
ported unless they aie incorporated into
an album review.
Apparently, the reporters felt that
Ghost In The Machine is a "debacle"
because it includes horns and syn-
thesizers, and doesn't have the same ar-
rangements as past Police albums. These
criticisms are confusing mainly because
these same reporters referred to the au-
dience as being "progressive How can
a band be progressive if they do not put
some variation into their music, not only
instrumentally but lyrically? The mood
of the album is relative to one current
world situation. And which type of song
would be more relevant in 1982:
"Roxanne (1st Album: Being in love
with a prostitute) or "Invisible Sun"
(4th Album: A political tune about tur-
moil in Ireland).
Also, when the Police decided to in-
clude horns into the Album, the move
turned out to be a positive one, because
the saxophone is an importnat part of
Regae and Ska music, which is a
backbone to a majority of Police music.
Not only has the addition of horns on
songs like "Too Much Information
"One World (Not There)" and
"Demolition Man" give the album an
all-around, complete sound, they also
helped to bolster-up the Reggae sound
on "Bed's Too Big Without You" in
concert. One can plainly see that horns
are not "out of place
The Police could've played it safe with
this 4th album, and continued to record
the music that so-called "Police Fun-
damentalists" are used to listening to.
But, of course, this would be ludicrous
for such a ground-breaking band. It is
interesting to think about where bands
like the Stones, The Beatles, The Who,
The Kinks, and The Clash would be if
they had continued to play the same type
of music they had on their first few
albums. Probably hanging-out
somewhere with The Cars.
DOUG MACMILLAN
Freshman, General College
WZMB
It is with great sadness and a heavy
heart that I come before you to relate my
tale. It is a tale of many strange goings-
on and filled with dark and brooding im-
ages, but I swear upon my last gasping
breath, as I write you now, that every
word of it is true.
It had been over three years since the
announcement went out "A new, ex-
citing radio station is to be born � East
Carolina's Alternative Radio �
WZMB Long had the folk of East
Carolina waited for their deliverance
from the forces of evil � the commer-
cial radio programmers. Through thick
and thin they waited, hoping and pray-
ing for a savior. Then, as all faith began
to dwindle, a blast of shining light
covered the land � "WZMB would go
on the air Tuesday night, Feb. 2. Glory
be to God on high That night I sat by
my receiver, desperately awaiting the ar-
rival of our new-born messiah
At 6:02 p.m. I as greeted by the
sounds of Led Zeppelin. "Not exactly
what I was expecting I said to myself,
"but then again, it's just the first song
As the night progressed, I began to
become violently ill. The airwaves were
filled with the sounds of Journey, Styx,
Billy Squire, Loverboy, and REO Speed-
wagon. Boston was never so popular
when they were still a group! In a state
of shock, I ran to my dictionary and
looked up the definition of
"alternative" � an opportunity for
deciding between two incompatible
courses or propositions, offering or ex-
pressing a choice Of course 1 thought
the worst. "Oh my God I thought,
"some terrorist group has taken over
our station and is forcing the disk
jockeys to play this trash I ran back to
my stereo and check my tuning � 91.3
� I was right! I decided to call the sta-
tion and try to contact the program
director. Someone with a thick foreign
accent answered the phone. "Could 1
please hear some reggae music I said
most timidly. "Reggae?Is that
anything like-a New Wave-a music?" 1
hung up the receiver. The worst had
happened. All through the week I listen-
ed as the clever terrorists manipulated
our disk jockeys, using who-knows-what
diabolical tortures to force them to play
Foreigner � get it? And the jazzit too
had befallen the same fate as the rock-
and-roll, lots of saxaphone and a gospel
choir behind every number!
And so I write you, the student body
of East Carolina, to join with me in the
liberation of your comrades who are be-
ing held, against their will, at our radio
station, WZMB. Surely I cannot be the
only one who has stumbled across this
clever plot to usurp our airwaves! If so,
please speak out, it depends on you!
CONRAD JAMES HUNTER
Senior, English
Fuller
I am writing in regard to the
discourteous treatment of Buckminster
Fuller during his brief visit to ECU in
November. To have a man of his in-
tellectual caliber among us is noteworthy
in itself, but to have as a guest a man
who, at 86 years of age, is fueled by in-
tense compassion for people and by his
keen awareness of the traps the human
race is setting for itself certainly war-
rants the announcement of his ac-
cessibility to the student body and facul-
ty-
It was distressing to learn that Mr.
Fuller sat alone in Mendenhall's cor-
ridor, waiting for his "signing party" to
begin. The event was unannounced
(even though the auditorium was filled
during his lecture the previous evening)
and Mr. Fuller was approached by only
one person who luckily recognized him.
Who was in charge of publicizing the
signing party?
The story is available for those who
are unaware of it. I am only interested in
pointing out the lack of dignity with
which Buckminister Fuller was received.
At best it was a case of casual disrespect.
"Be not forgetful to entertain
strangers; for thereby some have enter-
tained angels unawares � HEBREWS
13
JOPUMPHREY
Graduate Student, Art
Chisholm
"We are not free yet" was the clarion
call of Shirley Chisholm (D-NY) this
past Thursday night. I agree! The
freedoms that have accumulated over
the past decades are now being eroded
partially through the lobbying efforts of
conservative elements and also through
the apathy and lethargy of the benefiters
of those rights. We are unwittingly wat-
ching the demise of social progress; in
fact a regression is occurring.
The college campus, once a breeding
ground of revolution, are now the
perpetuators of the philosophy of
Meism. Tom Wolfe's "me generation of
the seventies" appears to be alive and
well int he eighties. It's time that this era
of extreme introversion cease and a
renaissance of social activism arise. The
abrasion of our social, political and
economic privileges should provide an
ample incentive to spark such a move-
ment. Through awareness, unity and
hard work we can continue the unending
quest for a more egalitarian society.
TOMSAV1DGE
Senior, Social Work
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Letters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
days.
t
l





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARYS 1912
oil
Iplant
and
era
id a
The
and
an
Kve-
and
dme
i tters
Vail or
South
vary,
n'tters
and
vnher
.e tters
pages,
Ullet-
irevity,
nal at-
1v the
ach 30
Students Offered Opportunity To Study Abroad
ECU is offering an
opportunity for
students to study and
travel in Morocco. The
program, which lasts
from May 11 until the
end of June, is
equivalent to a full
summer session on
campus, according to
Robert E. Cramer, of
the Department of
Geography.
Cramer, who is
directing the new
Morocco program, says
this is the second
overseas study program
offered by ECU, the
first being a semester in
Costa Rica.
Morocco is a
democratic constitu-
tional monarchy on
friendly terms w-ith the
United States, accor-
ding to Cramer. The
culture is a blend of
French and Arabic in-
fluences; Morocco
gained its independence
from France in 1956. In
southern Morocco are
indigenous tribes of
Berbers from the
S,ahara.
In cooperation with
the Experiment for In-
ternational Living,
students will be placed
in carefully selected
Moroccan homes for
Anti-Nukes Arrested
B PATRICK O'NEILL
sun Wni.r
Approximately 165 people, many
of them studenis at the University of
California at Berkley, were arrested
last week for forming a human
blockade at the main gate o' the
Lawrence Livermore nuclear
research laboratory.
I he protesters were charged with
obstruction o traffic, a misde-
meanor under Califoria law.
Among those arrested was former
Pentagon analyst Daniel Ellsberg,
who published m The Sew York
s � he famous "Pentagon
Papers a compilation of the US
decision-making policy in Vietnam.
"We want ihem (the Livermore
lab) shut down, as tar as building
nuclear weapons, andconverted
ovei to peaceful uses said U-of-C
-miJem Mike Slessarev, who was
one of the organizers of the action.
"To me. it's pretty obvious ihai
students are concerned tor the same
reason everybody is � it's a ihreal
to then lives
Slessarev believes thai I ivermore
1 aboratory can easily be converted
o use for peaceful means, such as
alternative energy research, because
many of the personal and technical
capabilities are already there.
� � r h e com plain i of t lie
demonstrators is to slop nuclear
apon research. We Jo nuclear
weapon research said Bill Perry, a
spokesman for the lab. Perry noted
that many of the 3,000 scientists
employed by Livermore also teach
at the university. "But we arc staff
at the Livermore lab and not faculty
at the University of California
"I think the students of the
University of California are par-
ticularly involved in the thing
because their own university is
responsible for developing those
weapons Slessarev commented.
"It's the labs that are pioneering
and making those things (first-strike
capability and tactical weaponry)
possible, not some general in
Washington, D.C"
The demonstration was organized
by the Livermore Action League,
who claimed that other demonstra-
tions would also take place all over
the country at similar facilities.
"The anti-nuclear movement is con-
siderable here in the Bay area said
a member of the U of C staff.
"I do think that it is ridiculous to
continue making weapons at this
rate, when there's 3,000 of them
now another student noted.
"I (hink that the threat's growmg
everyday Slessarev concluded,
"and a lot of it originates here
Livermore Laboratory is
government-owned and is managed
by the University of California for
the Department of Energy.
the first dVi weeks.
Cramer says the
students will gain
firsthand knowledge of
local culture, further
their language skills
and make good friends
in this time.
Before they leave the
United States, par-
ticipants can corres-
pond with their Moroc-
can "families
Morocco's capital,
Rabat, is the center for
the program.
Nine consecutive
days plus most
weekends will be
devoted to field trips,
Cramer said, when
students can see the im-
perial cities of Fes,
Merrakesh and
Meknes, the Sahara,
Berber tribes, camel
herds, century-old
addbe cities, oases,
Roman ruins, exo'tic
desert vegetation and
local handcraft.
Classes will be held
mornings in the
American Language
Center. All students
will participate in a
non-credit French Con-
versation course; there
will be a brief introduc-
tion to Arabic. Taught
in English, other classes
are offered in north
African geography, dependent study pro-
Moroccan cdture and grams are available
international relations with prior ar-
of north Africa. In- rangements.
Vandalism Incidents Numerous At ECU
Continued From Page 1
parked in the Fifth and
Reade St. parking lot.
11:15 a.m. � Valoria
Sweet of 620 Fletcher
Dorm reported the van-
dalism to her car while
it was parked in the
Fifth and Reade St.
parking lot. 4:45 p.m.
� Steve Cherry of 108
Jarvis reported the
breaking and entering
of his room and the
larceny of a watch.
Feb. 2. 10:45 a.m. �
Crystal Lynn McCall
Whaley, a day student,
reported breaking and
entering and larceny
from her vehicle while
it was parked in the lot
at the bottom of Col-
lege Hill Drive.
Feb. 3. 6:05 p.m. �
Bethany Grace Berry of
312-C' Belk Dorm
reported the larceny of
a grass rug from the
guard rail on the third
floor of Belk. 6:50 p.m.
� Georgie M. Collins
reported the attempted
larceny of the battery
and starter from her
vehicle while parked in
between Garrett and
Jenkins.
Feb. 4. 7:40 p.m. �
Brian Keith Holt of 481
Aycock reported the
vandalism to his vehicle
while parked east of
Aycock.
Feb. 5. 1:52 a.m. �
Mike Craig Bellinger of
113-A Scott reported
the larceny of four
wheel covers while
parked south of Scott
Dorm. 1:15 p.m. �
Karen E. Andrich of
160 Jarvis Dorm
reported the larceny of
her bicycle from the
rack east of Jarvis.
Feb. 6. 12:14 a.m. �
George Bennet of
116-C Belk Dorm
reported the vandalism
to glass in his room.
1:38 a.m. � Douglas
Young of 201 Aycock
reported the larceny of
his tuxedo and shoes
from a Trailways Bus
parked east of the
music building.
Feb. 7. 3:47 a.m
Sandra Bell of 126 Gar-
rett Dorm reported the
breaking and entering
of the first floor east
wing bathroom of Gar-
rett Dorm.







I
?


, �
I �
!
I

I
ATiTIC
SOUTHS
NOCK MtOMTCUW

WEDNESDAY
SUPER GRIT
All ECU STUDENTS receive
first canned beverage
FREE
PLUS FREE TICKET TO
WINTERTREAT �
FEB. 2S(See Calendar)
THURSDAY
SUPER GRIT
HS6W
SUBWAY
wHAPPY HOUR from 4:00-7:00
Love
Arrives Feb. 14
Greenville Flower Shop
1027 Evans St.
758-2774 MC& Visa
The Medical Store
2205 W. 5th St. I P.O. Box 59
Greenville, N.C. 27834
Phone 756-8371
�Diagnostic Sets �Gloves
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Any Type of Product for
The Health Care Professional
WHY BUY RETAIL - WHEN YOU
CAN BUY FROM THE DISTRIBUTER
East Carolina Medical Supply Co.
Write

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We are currently taking applications for paid writing posi-
tions. We also hope to train some applicants for salaried
editors positions. Are YOU interested? Come by our office
and fill out an application. What have you got to lose?
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Old South Building Second Floor
With the temperature down and the
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BONUS TRIP TO SALAD BAR $.49
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PERFUMES FOR HER:
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.HOLLOWELL'S -1 & 2 �OPEN SUNDAY 14th)
t





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
FEBRUARY 9, 1982
Page 6
Chaplin Films
Play Hendrix
On Wednesday
B JOHN WEYLER
A list of the most important ar-
tists of the 20th century would have
to include Charlie Chaplin � actor,
writer, director, composer, the poet
of pantomime. Above all, he was an
entertainer, whose superb slap-stick
yet sentimental style entrances au-
diences of all ages even today, half a
century since his major work was
completed.
Chaplin died a couple o' years
ago, but the little tramp, the funny.
fellow with the battered derby hat,
cane, and oversize shoes, is immor-
tal � and he can be seen in two of
hi finest films this VYednesda
evening in Mendenhall Student
(enter's Hendrix Theatre.
City I iglits will be shown at 7
p.m. and Modern Times at 9 p.m.
dmission for both films is by stu-
dent II) and activity cards or MSC
membership. The double feature is
sponsored by the Student Union
Films Committee.
1 hough Chaplin's films are
primarily comedies, jam-packed
with ingenious gags and hilarious
physical humor, they also contain a
strong sense of pathos. Chaplin's
life was marred by much personal
tragedy, beginning with his birth in
England in 1889 to alcoholic third-
rate music hall performers. He
escaped the extreme poverty of his
youth by exploting his innate
abilities at entertaining, arriving by
1914 in Hollywood.
Chaplin took the fledgling film
industry b storm, soon becoming a
superstar by way of his now-classic
silent comedies which he wrote,
directed and starred in.
Francis Wyndham, in his in-
troduction to Chaplin's My Life In
Pictures, stated that "he alone
dared to go on making silent pic-
tures long after the advent of the
talkies � and. of course, he trium-
phantly got away with it. City
lights, which canie out in 1931. is
perhaps his most perfect film; and
Modern Times, which followed five
years later and in which he still did
not speak himself (apart from an in-
spired wordless song), is among his
most inventive and original. Both
are timeless classics
Modern Times mixes slapstick
with a statement about the
mechanization o' mankind.
Fspeciallv memorable are the scenes
in which the tramp tinned factory
worker gets caught in the cogs of an
See CHAPLIN, Page 7
Best Foreign Film Winner Coming To Campus In March
lrina Muravvova, on the left, and era Alentova in a scene from 1981
Best Foreign Film Winner Moscow Does Sot Relieve In Tears. The film
Mill be shown March 3 in Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix
Theatre.
Surfs Boot Camp Provides Stars With Training
B G. CHRIS CHAVEZ
JUPITER, Fla. (UP!) - The call it Bun's Bool
C amp, but the big name actors and actresses who per-
form and teach at the Burl Revnolds Dinner Iheaier
hardlv need basic training.
Sally Field Martin SheenCarol BurnettElliot
Gould Far rah Fa wcett Julie Harris. I hen names on
a nunie marquee can cause lines to wrap around the
block; an appearance on television can make the
Nielson ratings skyrocket.
They are accomplished stars who don't need to beg
for scripts, lei alone travel to a liny town on Florida's
east coast to find work. But thev come anyway - to act
and teach � and most of it is due to the theater's
namesake and sometimes director, Bun Reynolds.
Sheen and Adrieune Barbeau just completed a four-
week run o Ken kesev's One Flew Over the Cuckoo's
Sest, Sheen's third appearance at Reynolds' theater.
The performance was one in which he shed his
"tortured man with a mission" image he used as Cap-
tain Willard in Apocalypse Sow and John Dean in
Rlind Ambition.
"One o mv problems is that 1 don't always know
where there's a laugh. I don't have a great sense of com-
edy, and Bun has a tremendous sense. I've always
plaved heavies, heavy emotional stuff said Sheen,
who was encouraged by Reynolds to bring as much
humor as possible to the character Randle P. McMur-
phy.
Sheen said the courage of trying something new, risk-
ing failure, pervades the creative atmosphere Reynolds
has established in his theater. Sheen said he only returns
to the stage for two men: New York Shakespeate
Festival's Joseph Papp and Reynolds.
Theatre
"Bun's idea is to gather people for a community tvpe
professional theater and take risks. It means sticking
your neck out. There's nothing sate. You only learn by
making mistakes. If you're not willing to make
mistakes, you're never going to grow Sheen said.
After some 250 television shows, unheard of success
in a phenomenal string o major motion picture hits, it
would be easy for Reynolds to retire. But Reynolds said
he has a deep desire and commitment to be "constantly
stretching myselfto erow
It is that commitment to his craft which has led him to
direct three very succesful films, Sharky's Machine,
Gator and The End. He has also directed 18 plays, with
Sheen and Julie Kavner in Two For The Season
Ms. Barbeau, who has been featured in the movies
The Fog and Fscape from New York, is better known
tor her role as Carol in television's Maude series, despite
a Tony nomination for her role as the street-wise Rizzo
in the orginial version of Grease on Broadway
She said she is reallv more interested in doing movie
work than appearing on stage, but for the role as the
coo)) wretched Nurse Rached, Sheen and Reynolds
lured her to Jupiter.
"I think that what (Reynolds) did for me was to cast
me in the first place. Bun had a feeling that this would
be something I would do well. Most people think of me
and think, 'Oh, Carol on Maude said Ms. Barbeau,
who had a featured role opposite Reynolds in Cannon-
ball Run.
The theater offers an apprentice program in connec-
tion with a SI million endowed chair at Florida State
University, Reynolds alma mater. About 20 aspiring
actors and actresses, all graduates of Florida colleges,
audition in April for a spot in the apprentice program at
the Bun Reynolds Institute for Theatre keep up with
their required classwork. Most of the students earn their
masters degree while participating in the program.
Cuckoo's esi marked the beginning of Kenneth
Kay's professional acting career. Kay, who played a
technician in the production, recently completed the one
year internship.
Kay described the experience as "theatrical boot
See STARS. Page 8
Ice Cream Bliss
Swenson's Has All And More
BvKATH WEYLER
Swenson's ice cream parlor has held a special place in
my memory for some time, since n was at their
Charleston, S.C. location thai mv husband and I ate our
first lunch on our honeymoon.
Naturally I was elated to discovei ihat Swenson's had
found its way lo Greenville, but I was also somewhat
dubious. Maybe it wouldn't be quite as good as I
remembered, since memories do have a wa of distor-
ting over lime.
Cuisine
Photo By CHAP GURLE Y
Stars A nd 'Stripes' Forever This Weekend
This display, located in the reading area of Mendenhall Student Center, summons the wrath of this
weekend's Pop Film Stripes, starring Bill Murray and the women of the U.S. Army. Free color Student
Union films posters are being given away at the site of the display.
I'm pleased to announce thai my memory has not
failed me. Greenville's new Swenson's, located in the
Georgetown Shops downtown, is truly an "elegant
nostalgic ice cream parlor as their menu proclaims,
and has lots of terrific yummies you may find impossi-
ble to resist.
As you might guess by the picture of the ice cream
sundae on the door, Swenson's is predominantly an ice
cream parlor. Begun in San Francisco, the chain is now
international. One glance at the menu ar.J it's easy to
understand why people in such places as Singapore and
Japan clamor for Swenson's old fashioned ice cream.
Simply put, Swenson's has it all. Purists can get a
single ice cream scoop for eighty cents, and for a col-
ossal "pig-out" you'll never forget, there's the Earth-
quake � eight scoops and eight toppings (your choice
ot flavors) for $6.75.
Somewhere in between you'll find a deliciouslv wide
variety of sodas, sundaes, parfaits, malts, banana splits
and, for an old-time treat, sarsaparilla and phosphates.
Prices average around $2 or a little over and, speaking
tor the sundaes my companion and 1 enjoyed, portions
are quite generous.
If you want a meal imiead o, or in addition to, ice
cream. Swenson's has practicallv anv kmd o( sandwich
or burger you could want (prices ranee from SI 65 to
$3.75).
Don't miss the quiche, salads, soups, chowder, chili
and even (ironically) collage cheese listed on the back of
the menu. In short, Swenson's offers jusi aboui
everything except alcoholic beverages
As if the food wasn't enough to lure you in, Swen-
son's also provides a pleasant atmosphere for dining.
Ceiling fans, Tiffany lamps, plants, attractive bent wood
chairs and praciical marble-iopped tables presem a pic-
inre of a real, old-lime ice cream parlor.
If you sit in the very back, you might even be able to
catch the doings in the ice cream factory.
For people on the go, Swenson's provides a complete
lake-oui service so you can enjoy their -ce cream in yout
home, office, car or wherever. A wide .ariciy tM sics
are available, as are a few ice cream novelties, such as
chocolate covered bananas.
I predict ihat Swenson's will soon be almost as
popular around Greenville as the Attic. Don't wan for
warm weaiher to try iheir old-fashioned treats - Vou
may not be able lo find a table!
G
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Greenville Little Theatre Revs
For Play 'Barefoot In The Park'
rickets are no available tor
Greenville Little Theatre's produc-
tion of Neil Simon's comed
Barefoot In The Park, being per-
tained at the Methodist Student
Center February 24-28 at 8:15 p.m.
Preview performances are
scheduled for Monday, February 22
and Tuesday, Februar 23 at a dis-
count cost of $1 (all preview seats
sold at the door). Student tickets for
regular performances are $2.50;
general public are S3.50. Group dis-
count rates are available.
For further information or reser-
vations, contact the Central Ticket
Office at Mendenhall or the
Methodist Student Center.
Copyright 1982
Kroger Sav on
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold to Dealers
on
Chaplin Films Slated
Continued From Page 6
immense machine, is force-fed bv an
automatic feeding device and. men-
tally unhinged by his assembly line
job, goes comically berserk.
City I ights is a sensmc story of
star-crossed lovers: the genteel vaga-
bond and a blind flower-seller. The
New York Daily News said during
the Film's original release, "City
I ights is excruciatingly tunny and
terribly, terribly sad. It makes you
chuckle hysterically. You have the
greatest time imaginable, and yet,
occasionally you find little hurty
lumps in your throatWe love Mr.
Chaplin because he is the clown.
We'd love any other artist who
might give us this delightful
character. And vet we don't believe
there's another man in the world
who can do it. Charlie is the one and
only! He'll always be the one and
onlv
600 Greenville Blvd Greenville
Open 8 a.m. to Midnight
Open Sunday 9am to 9 p m
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re
quired to be readily available for sale m
each Kroger Sav on. except as specifical
y noted in this ad It we do run out of an
item we will offer you your choice of a
comparable item when available reflec
ting the same savings or a ramcheck
which will entitle you to purchase the
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withm 30 days
Cliffs specials
rr Located 1 mile oast
Hastings Ford on
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Ocean Perch & Fries Plate , t
Crab Cak'
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Popcorn Shrimp ?
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Fried Shrimp Plate � �
Fried Oyster Plate � �
Fried Shrimp & Oyster Plate
yTTT777-rrrT7T7TrTT77T77TT7T7TTrIflt 777777m
v-9-V
x�Ncox
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LISA BIRNBACH
PRESENTS
THE OFFICIAL
REPPY
ANDBOOK
The first guide to The Tradition.
Mannerisms, Etiquette,
Dress Codes, The Family. How to
Be Really Top Drawer.
The Legacy of Good Taste, Proper
Breeding & the Right Nickname.
'
Essays on:
THE VIRTUES OF
PINK & GREEN
REGULATING
THE CASH FLOW
ORIGINS OF THE
PREP SCHOOL
THE OLD BOY
NETWORK
CLUBS AT THE
BIG THREE
BASIC mmm
BODY TYPES
"Look, Muffy, a book for
The Crucial
Element Top- Siders, ,
Loafers, Tassels.
Cuffs a Must.
The Sock Contro-
versyPAGE 138
US.
w
"Uproarous
Comedy
Tonight, Feb. 9
8:00 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
TICKETS: ECU STUDENTS.
$2.00
Faculty and Staff: $3.00
General Public: $4.00
All tickets at door: $4.00
A presentation of the
Student Union Special
Events Committee
�-�.
EDITED BY
LISA BIRNBACH
Mummy
The Schools.
Boarding vs. Day,
Coed vs. Single-Sex.
Chapel, Lights-Out,
Dining Halls
and Study Halls.
Daddy
A Sampling
of Mottoes and
Memorabilia.
The Importance of
Getting Kicked
OutPAGE69
'� SV1
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 9, 1982
LCrtftNIMG A&ouf CougGg- Ty� WUP Way
By Plvip AJos
History Exam.
I. Essay.
ihe entire history of
Western Cvroft. Yoi
Kave 15 hour to
complete this question.
& J.A. UNIFORMS
SHOP
Stars Get The Boot
Continued From Page 6
camp, but well worth the sweat He also work-
ed in several apprentice productions and was
critically acclaimed for Ins portrayal of Biff
I oman in Heath t a Salesman starring Julie
Harris and Vincent Gardenia at the BRD1 .
Charles Nelson Reillv and Dom Del uise fre-
quently visit the theater and leach classes.
DeLuise, who has worked with Reynolds in
several movies, said lie fell in love with the area
on his first visit in W9 and subsequently bought
several eondommums and acres of property
along the coast.
Reynolds built the theater three years ago, just
a tew miles from his ranch on the Atlantic Ocean
north o' Palm Beach. 1 he 406-seal theater sells
out 97 percent of the performances. Inevitably
J fie actors elect to perform benefit shows for area
groups or for the apprentice program.
Will Sampson, the Indian-actor-artist who was
McMurphy's deceptively silent friend in the 1975
movie version of CmcAoov Yes, joins a long list
of film and television actors who made their
debuts at theBRDI. Sampson, who played Chief
Bromden in the movie and i) stage, also helped
arrange for members of Florida's Miccosukee In-
idan tribe 10 see rehearsals of the production.
Farrah Fawceti made her debut at the iheatei
m Sufferlies ire tree. Singer-songwriter Jim
Stafford made his stage debut at the theater with
his starring role in Robber Hrufegroom.
Stafford said he wanted logei into theater, bui
was unsure of what lypeol par: would be a good
role for a debut, "hen his former wife, Bobbie
Gentry, saw a performance ol Rubber
BrittegrtHun, and encouraged him to go foi the
lead in the bluegrass musical. When he read the
part, he knew u wanted ii.
'Ihai's the wav lungs work around here �
people want to come It) this theater and ask Bun
if they can work for him Stafford said. "I like
to call this Bun's Boot Camp because it gives
people like me who have never acted a chance to
try it and learn.
"I have my moments of terror and other limes
I'm pretty confident. This is either the smartest
thing I've ever done or the dumbest laughed
Stafford, who is best known for his humorous
songs like "Spiders and Snakes" and "My Girl
Bill
The plush, red-carpeted theater does not cater
to any specific type of patrons, bul most are
from the exclusive Boca Raton and Palm Beach
area because the two-nour drive is often too far
for those living in Miami or Fort Lauderdale.
Tickets range from SIS.50 to $23.50, depen-
ding on the time and the da oi the show. The
ticket price includes the show and the dinner,
which almost always has prime rib on the menu
in addition to a large wine and champagne selec-
tion.
Egyptians had big ideas, with
some keys as big as 2 long
and carried on the shoulder!
All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes,
shoes, and hose. Also used ECU
nurses uniforms. Trade ins allowed
Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive.
Near Holloweli's Drug and old hospital.
wmmmmmm
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�mm:
J? J?
MHiUltliHIi
U3 W TH STREET PHONE 7S8 0204
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
: DOORS FROM COX FLORIST
We repair Shoes, Boots, Hand
bags. Belts and some suitcases.
We now have Leather and
Leather Goods for sell.
Larqt- selection ot leather tooled belts
Come by. pick out one ot our designs Let
us make you one
With the price ot NEW SHOES, we can
saj vou money by havinq your old ones
repaired
" ' v
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Pitt County Heart Association
dftF preset! is
m MAURICE WILLIAMS
&THE ZODIACS
Friday, February 12, 1982
Doors open at 8:00 $5.00 Admission
2 for the Price of 1
All proceeds go to the Heart Association.
All beverages at Happy Hour Prices
K
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)
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Denkler, Jones Pace
Lady Buc Upset Of State
By J1MM OuPRKF.
Manaitinjt t diior
The I adv Pirates of East
a would like to make it an
event the annual upset
vei nationally-ranked
Hna State in Minges Col-
iseum.
� rowd crowd o 3.(XX) cheered
the Pirate to a 68-60 triumph over
the sixth-ranked Wolfpack Sunday,
as ECl ran its two-season total to
? 1 against State.
Neithet team managed more than
point lead in the opening
is I oletha Harrison's jumpei
complete a Fran Hooks assist
gave the 1 ady Pirates an 8-4 advan-
tage less than five minutes into the
game.
Though she had half of net
teams' points at the time. Harrison
added onl two more in the game
but left her mark defensively.
Though only 5-foot-8, the spirited
freshman unnerved the taller
Wolfpack front line with her strong
inside play. Harrison went into the
locker room with 10 rebounds and
three blocked shots.
Still, the Wolfpack held the scor-
ing advantage, as 6-7 Ronda
Falkcna's inside jumper with :11 re-
maining until intermission gave
NCSl a 29-27 edge
The status of junior center Mary
Denkler was uncertain at gametime,
but the ankle injury suffered against
East Tennessee State earlier in the
week didn't prevent her from net-
ting seven of her first half points in
the final 6:43.
"The past three practices we've
had were difficult because of Mary's
injury said ECU coach Cathy An-
druzzi. "We didn't know if she'd be
readv or not. We knew she hadn't
shot in that time, but she's impor-
tant to our game plan. The 'Denk' is
back
The second half proved to be
another see-saw 20 minutes of
basketball, but offensive spurts bv
ECU stunned their touted visitors.
Senior Sam Jones watched the
final 8:34 of the first half from the
bench, but quickly made up for lost
time as she fired in 11 o the Lady
Pirates' 17 points in the opening five
minutes of the decisive frame. Her
bucket at 15:41 gave Past Carolina
the largest advantage through that
portion of the game at 42-37.
State coach kav Yow countered
with freshman I inda Page who
quickly poured in 10 of her team-
high 16 points.
"When they have Page in there
said Andrui, "they're not looking
for defense � they're looking for
.offense. She had 20 po.nts in 12
minutes against Clemson recently.
A field goal from 15 feet by
Denkler with 9:22 left put the
Pirates in front to stay, as they
fought from a 47-44 deficit to a
S4-47 advantage with 6:53 remain-
ing Denkler free throws provided
the I adv Pirates with this margin.
A Falkena lavup with 4:30 left cut
the lead to three, but the Lady
Pirates called on Denkler and Jones
to ice the victory. A pair of free
throws bv Jones with :18 remaining
gave ECU their largest advantage ol
the afternoon at 67-58.
"It wasn't a grudge game or
anvthing like that Andruzzi said.
"But 1 think our kids got a little
fired up at some things said about
the game.
"I've got to give the kids a lot ot
credit for the last three minutes of
the game; they didn't let up any �
they kept the pressure on
The Lady Pirates improved their
record to 13-7 on the season, while
the Pack moved to 19-3.
"I don't think we played this
game with the intensity we needed
to said State coach Kay Vow.
"The thing I'm disappointed in is 1
don't know why.
"The intensity was lacking from
Ronda; Ginger Rouse (senior for-
ward) never got into the game � 1
can't answer what their specific pro-
blems were
Denkler led the Lady Pirates with
26 points and 15 rebounds, while
Jones notched 21 points and handed
out six assists.
"Sam Jones � the shots she
made were incredible sighed Vow.
"She came out and played out of
her mind in the second half. At least
we were on Jones when she shot;
Denkler � I can't say the same for
her.
"We know Mary Denkler scores
from the free throw area a lot, but
do you think we were there?
"Sam � I can live with her points
because we were on her. What really
disgusts me is Denkler; we were not
on her
The I adv Pirates travel to Nor-
folk Thursday to face third-ranked
Old Dominion, while State hosts
Duke Wednesday in an Atlantic
Coast Conference matchup.
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ECU'S Man Denkler (35) Moves To Basket Ayainvt state
Pirates Have
Easy Time f
With Baptist
l asi Carolina head basketball
Idom has rarelv been
e static during his three-year tenure
i Pirate m i ()ne ot those occa-
1 hursday night when
. ed Baptist College,
Odom has long been concerned
about the Pirates' apparent inability
at their peak level against
lesser competition. That was not a
ncern last Thursda).
"1 am very pleased with our total
performance he said following his
cam's eighth wm in 18 outings.
"Perhaps elated is a better word.
rhis is the first game this year we
aid relax a little
I -ward Charles Green led the
Pirates with 19 points despite play-
isl 22 minutes. Morris
Ha e added 14 points and nine
unds. Bruce Peartree, with 11.
� arles Watkins, with 10, were
other ECU double figure
lust one Baptist player, Howard
Richardson, registered double
digits He finished with 12.
rhe Pirates both outshot and
� ifrebounded Baptist en route to
e win. ECU pulled down 43 re-
bounds to 28 for the visitors. The
Pirates shot 60.3 percent from the
r. while Baptist fired in just 37.3
percent.
E I lumped to a quick 20-4 lead
and never looked hack. By halftimc
the Pirate margin was 41-22.
The second half was no different
as ECU pulled out to a peak lead ol
31 points, 72-41, with 8:32 remain-
: n g.
The 88 points was the most scored
bv the Pirates all season and the vic-
margin c 2 was also a season-
h total.
"It's nice to have a game and be
on top from wire to wire Odom
said. "Our effort was unselfish. We
passed well. We played smart.
"This was a good game to build
upon We have some tough ones
ming up. This is the type contest
catch your breath, build con-
fidence and build momentum
ECU is back in action this
Wednesday night, hosting Old
Dominion in Minges Coliseum in a
key ECAC-South conference game.
Both the Monarchs and Pirates are
2-2 in the league.
On Saturday the Bucs ravel to
UNC-Wilmington looking to avenge
an earlier loss to the Seahawks. The
"irates then take on Eastern Illinois
on Monday even.ng. That game will
be played in Minges beginning at
7:30.
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HITALSSS l�-2M
Lies Meet West, OD
Big ECAC Matchup Here Wednesday
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Finger Roll
ECU center At Mack rolls a shot in against Baptist last Thursday night.
ECU won big, 88-62. (Photo Bv Gary Patterson)
spurt V t1it"i
East Carolina head coach Dave
Odom says his clubs needs a win
over Old Dominion th Wednesda
nfchi if it is to challenge lor the
E&AC-South regular season crown.
"The conference winnet might
lose three Odom said, "but not
anv more than that. We've got a lot
of games down the road and we
really need to win this one
Action in Minges Coliseum for
the important conference clash
begins at 7:30 p.m.
Both clubs carry 2-2 conference
records into the contest. The
Monarchs are 11-9 overall while the
Pirates are 8-10.
Odom says Old Dominion's
record is deceiving because ol the
caliber o competition the team has
faced. Indeed, the Monarchs have
gone up against the likes o DePaul,
Duquense and St. Joseph's.
"1 think this is by far the best
schedule Old Dominion has ever
played the third-year ECU men-
tor said.
ODU is led by 6-10 center Mark
West. The junior pivot man is the
leading candidate for ECAC-South
Player of the Year honors. He cur-
rently leads the league in scoring
(17 7 ppg), rebounding (10.6 rpg),
field goal accuracy (64.5 pci.cn!).
)l. a ds the conference and na-
tion in blocked shots.
Monarchs also boast ol
anoihei ol the conference's top in-
side forces. Ronnie McAdoo a 6-6
forward, is second in the league in
ending (8.6 rpg) and seventh in
scoring (15.1).
"Wc have got to stop their inside
game Odom admitted. "They've
dominated the inside in many games
this vear. In West ihev have pro-
bably the leading candidate tor
Playei ol the Year honors, and in
McAdoo the have the most ex-
perienced player in the league. He's
been starting for tour years.
ODl not onlv has the inside
players to get the job done, but also
iheperimetei players capable ol get-
ting the ball inside to the big duo.
Guard Grant Robinson leads the
conference in assists, averaging 4.9
a game. Icammatc Billy Mann is
fifth with a 3.2 average. In addition,
Mann scores 11.8 points per game.
West and McAdoo provide much
more than just an offensive threat.
Ihev are defensive specialists as
well. West alone is averaging nearly
nearly five blocked shots per game.
"f don't think we'll change
anything offensively odom - �
"W c wan: to c mtinue to try to i
Bui we must concentrate and
ight shots at the ri
1 he Pirate attack was given a I
boost las! week when pom; guard
T'onv Byles returned to the I
after a two-week absence du
hand muirv.
While Byles was a
ted freshman Bruce Peai
alongside regular Charles v -
Peartree gained valuable experi
and confidence, giving Odon
three-man rotation at gua
Center Ai Mack has also come
strong o late, supplying -
needed offensive firepowei fi m the
post position.
Forwards Charles Green a
Morris Hargrove have probably
been the most consistent Pira
Green leads the team in scot
a 11.5 average, good enough for
13th in the ECAC-South. Hargrove
is second on the team and I St 1
the league in scoring, tallying l '
Hargrove is eighth in the loop in re-
bounds, pulling down 5.S pet game.
The ECl -ODU game will be
televised live into the ridewater, .1
area bv WN H-TV. A delayed
telecast will be beamed nationwide
beginning at midnight (LSI) bv the
CBN sable network.
Hires Coaches, Will
mmn � 4i. ��' " "�
�son
East Carolina head football coach
Ed Emorv completed the hiring of
his staff for the 1982 season over the
past week and announced in the
process that the Pirates would
switch from the wishbone offense to
the 1-formation.
Larry Beckish, who mastermind-
ed the Wichita State club that finish-
ed ninth in the nation in total of-
fense last season, was named Friday
to replace Wright Anderson as
ECU's offensive coordinator.
Anderson resigned recently to take
the head coaching job at Elon Col-
lege.
Today, Emory rounded out his
staff with the hiring of John Zer-
nhelt as offensive line coach. He
comes to the Pirates from Marshall,
where he held a similar position.
Before going to Marshall Zernhelt
worked lor four years at Ferrum
Junior College. He replaces Terry
Lewis, who is now at Navy.
Zernhelt played his college ball at
Maryland. He was a part of the Ter-
rapin teams that won a record 20
consecutive Atlantic Coast Con-
ference games in the late 70s. He
also played in the the Liberty, Gator
and Cotten Bowls.
Beekish's arrival at ECU marks
the end of the wishbone offense, an
attack the Pirates have run since
1974. Instead, the Bucs will operate
from the "1" and from a variation
�t the shotgun formation that
Beckish helped develop at Wichita.
"It's really a pleasure to come to
East Carolina Beckish said. "The
possibilities for an outstanding pro-
gram here are unlimited. With time,
effort and a continuation of the
great recruiting effort that Coach
Emory has begun already, we can go
to the top.
"I look forward to providing East
Carolina with not only an exciting
offensive concept, but also a very
productive one
A productive offense is just what
Beckish developed as offensive
coordinator at Wichita State. The
Shockers ran and passed for 424
yards a game last season and their
quarterback. Prince MeJunkins,
finished 12th nationally in in-
dividual total offense. The Wichita
State offense led the Missouri Valley
Conference in both rushing and
passing.
Before his three-year stint at
Wichita, Beckish served as an assis-
tant at Clemson twice (1968-70 and
1972-76); Miami, Fla and Tampa.
During his second spell at Clemson
Beckish worked with Emory, and
calls the ECU coach "one of the top
recruiters in the country
Beckish, a graduate of Wichita
State and captain of the 1963
Shocker team, plans to arrive for
work in Greenville this week. He is
married and has two sons.
Emory said filling the offensive
coordinator position was a task he
viewed as extremely important. The
third-year ECU mentor said he con-
sidered about 50 people and inter-
viewed 11.
"We had a nationwide search and
took the time to find a man who
best fits the needs o Last Carolina
University Emory said. "I've
known Larry since 1972. He's one
of the premier offensive minds in
the nation. We're forturnate 10 have
him. We're excited about 1982 and
our new offensive concept
The ECU coach often hinted last
year that a change in the Pirates' of-
fensive philosophy was forthcom-
ing. , .
"We have contemplated the
change since the end of the season
he said. "We're turning to the of-
fense that Larry has developed
We've come up with a package to
best utilize our personnel. It'll be ex-
citing for the players. We'll be able
to move the football a great deal.
"Our fans are excited with the
run and pass concept and that's
what we'll have in the 80s. We have
the opportunity to open up offen-
sively with the outstanding skill per
sonnel we have here. 1 believe that
our offense will be verv. very pro-
ductive
Recruiting Principles
ECU head football coach Ed Emory talks with Bob Sanders,
a Pirate assistant who today was named the team s recruiting
coordinator. Both Sanders and Emory are busy, as the na-
tional signing date is Wednesday.
Emory announced today the new
staff coaching responsibilities for
1982.
Beckish will head the offense and
serve as quarterback coach. Spencer
Presseott will coach the running
backs. Rickv Bustle the wide
receivers, and Garry Fast the tight
ends. Assisting Zernhelt with the of-
fensive line will be Charlie Elmquist
and vjary Nelson.
Norm Parker will, for the third
year in a row. be defensive coor-
dinator. He and Dave Jones will
coach the defensive ends, Jim
Holland the defensive tackles. Bob
Sanders the linebackers, Gary
Weller the nose guards and Jim
Bengala the defensive backs.
Sanders will also serve as
recruiting coordinator.
T





10
THE FAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 9, 1982
West Dominating
Conference Stats
Old Dominion center
Mark West continues
to dominate nearly
every individual
statistical category
among ECAC-South
players.
The 6-foot-10 junior
leads the conference in
scoring, rebounding,
field goal percentage
and blocked shots. He
also tops the nation in
the latter category.
West, who with his
ODU teammates will
play in Greenville's
Minges Coliseum this
Wednesday, is averag-
ing 17.7 points and 10.6
rebounds per game. He
is also making 64.5 per-
cent ot his shots from
the floor.
Just behind West in
the scoring race is
James Madison for-
ward Linton Townes,
who is averaging 17.0.
Richmond's .1 o h n
Schweitz is next at 16.9.
Two George Mason
players, Carlos Yates
and Andy Bolden.
round out the top five
with averages of 16.2
and 15.8, respectively.
Ronnie McAdoo, a
teammate of West's at
ODU, is second among
the rebounding leaders.
He is averaging 8.6
pulls per game.
Gran I Robinson,
also from ODU, is the
conference leader in
assists. He has dished
out 99 in 20 games,
which translates to a
4.9 average.
Easl Carolina's Mor-
ns Hargrove is the
league's 15th leading
scorer (10.9) and eighth
leading reboiinder
(5.8). Pirate Charles
Green is 13th in scoring
ECAC-SOUTH LEADERS
SCORING
Player. Tram
Mark Wesi. ODU
Linton Townes, J.Madison
John Schweitz, Richmond
Carlos Yatcs, C.Mason
Andy Bolden, Ci.Mason
Andre daddy, Ci.Mason
Ronnie McAdoo. ODU
Rob Romanic Navy
Keith Cieplicki. WAM
Dan Ruland. J.Madison
Kills Mann. ODU
Mike Sirayhorn. WAM
Charles (ireen. ECU
Bills Hve. Richmond
Morris Hargrove. K'l
torn Byles. ECU
(. - Pts.
20-354
20-340
20-339
20-324
20-316
20-313
20-302
18-252
19-244
20-245
20-236
15-176
I-207
20-224
18-197
14-149
REBOUNDING
Player, team
Maik West. ODl
Ronnie McAdoo, ODL
Andre Gaddy, G.Mason
Dan Ruland, J.Madison
Mike Shannon. G.Mason
I inion low lies. J.Madivo
let! Pehl. Richmond
Morris Hargrove, ECl
Bill Five, Richmond
Garv Price, Navj
G - Reh.
20-211
20-172
20-149
20-136
20-135
20-124
20-119
IS-MS
20-107
19-101
ASSISTS
Player, team
dram Robinson. ())l
Rob Romaine, "saw
Billy Barnes. WAM
Tom Bethea, Richmond
Bills Mann. ODL
(, -
20-99
18-78
19-80
20-65
20-65
Avg.
17.7
17.0
16.9
16.2
15.8
15.6
15.1
14.0
12.8
12.3
11.8
11.7
11.5
11.2
10.9
10.6
Avr.
10.6
8.6
7.4
6.8
6.7
6.2
5.9
5.8
5.4
5.3
Aj.
4.9
4.3
4.2
3.3
3.2
ECU forward Charles Green, shown
here dunking against UNC Chariotte, is
the 13th leading scorer in the ECAC-
South. He averages 11.5 points per
game. (Photo By Dave Williams)
Relay Team Finishes 2nd
K.PKRC1M MA
Player. I ram
Mar West, ODl
Dan Ruland. J.Madison
Andre Gaddy. G.Mason
Oar Price, Saw
lefl Pehl. Richmond
at 11.5.
Pirate point guard
Tony Byles is 16th in
scoring (10.6) and
seventh in assists i2.9).
WIN A GIANT
6 FOOT SUB
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BVCYNTHIA
PLEASANTS
twU, sp�.ris ililor
The ECU men's
traek team performed
will in the Princeton In-
vitational this past Sun-
day in Princeton, New
Jersey, garnering both
a second and a third-
place finish.
Jeff Ci o 1 d e n. a
freshman from High
Point, placed fifth in
the 55-meter event with
a time of 6.51. Michael
Gullins placed sixth in
the same event with a
time of 6.60.
The foursome of
Shaun Laney, Ray
Dickerson, Golden and
Ciullms placed second
on the sprint medley-
relay with a fast time of
3:32.17.
The Pirates were in
third place in the one-
mile relay after runner
Tim Cephus injured his
leg with only 110
meters left in the race.
The track team will
run in the Millrose
Wanamaker Invita-
tional in New York,
NY, this Friday, and
head coach Bill Carson
is looking forward to
the meet.
"We should be one
of the top eight (teams)
in the meet Carson
added the team is now
eighth in the east, ac-
cording to their relay
times.
ASPECIALTHANKS
The ECU delegation of the
N.C. Student Legislature would like to thank
JEFFREY'S BEER & WINE CO
THE ELBO ROOM &
COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO
for helping host the
NCSL IC on January 23 & 24.
It was a great success! Thank You!
LaUUUUU
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758-6121
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Every Day - Buffet 11:00-2:002.79
Mon. & Tues. - Buffet 5:00-8:002.89
Wed. - "All You Can Eat" Spaghetti 5:00-8:002.25
Thurs. � Lasagna 5:00-8:00Two for 3.60
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THE
FITNESS
CLUB
for men and women
Come by or call TODAY and set
up an appointment for a free workout.
101 EVANS STREET
GREENVILLE, N.C.
OLYMPIC BARBELLS
�COED HOURS
�FEMALE HOURS
AND DUMBELLS
�SAUNA, SHOWERS &
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Stretching Exercise Classes
M-W-F 10:00 & 11:00 T-Th. 5:00 & 6:00
Aerobics and Dancercize Classes
M-T 3:30-4:30
Features Included: Male & Female Instructors
�Nautilus Machines
(12 of Hie most sophisticated exercise machines mode).
Special Student Rates
Group rates for 5 or more students.
07f5U per student.
AT NAUTILUS FITNESS IS OUR SPECIALTY
I
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available for
! below the advertised price in each A&P Store except as specifically
in this ad
sale at or
noted J
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT FEB. 13, AT A&P IN GREENVILLE, N.C
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL
DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
703 Greenville Blvd.
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20' Per lb. OFF!
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THE EAST CAROl INIAN
HBRUARY 9. IS�K2
11
I
m
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
,J
I
I
I
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I
Best, McNair, Light Lead Classifieds
Buc Jayvees By Louisburg
FOR SALE
i
The East Carolina
junior varsity basket-
ball team got help from
a faulty scoreboard in
defeating Louisburg
Junior College, 60-56,
Monday night.
ECU led by two,
58-56, with 13 seconds
left when Pirate J.C.
Plott missed a free
throw. Louisburg got
the rebound and hur-
ried downcourt. With
seven seconds remain-
ing L o u i s b u r g' s
Thomas Rawley at-
tempted a desperation
SO-foot shot.
What was the cause
for Rawley's premature
shot? A faulty
scoreboard light made
seven look more like
one, so the Louisburg
player thought he was
his team's last hope.
In the end he was,
Herbert Gilchrist ad-
ding a pair of free
throws to ice the ECU
victory.
Center Jeff Best pac-
ed the Pirates with 18
points. Forward Bill
McNair added 16
despite missing all
seven of his free throw
attempts. Gilchrist
finished with 12 points.
James Cooke led the
Hurricanes with 15.
The win was the first
of the season for ECU
after two losses.
Louisburg fell to 9-14.
Women Get Two 3rds
B CYNTHIA
PLEASANTS
i ipurti f diinr
The East Carolina
women's track team
traveled to the Tar Heel
Classic in Chapel Hilt
this past Saturday and
placed m several
events.
Freshman Arnette
Kelly placed third in the
440-yard dash with a
time of 62.4333.
Eve Brennan, a top
long distance runner,
placed third in the one-
mile event with a time
of 5:21.0.
Davene Cherry,
Carolyn Moore, 1 iz
Graham, and Kelly
combined for a fourth
place finish in the mile
relay with an im-
pressive time of 4:20.6.
I isa Whttley, a
treshman walk-on,
placed sixth in the
880-vard event with at
lime of 2:31.0.
The Lady Pirates
also ran in the distant
medlev relay, but
because officials did
not count the laps cor-
rectly, the event was
disqualified.
Head coach Pat
McGuigan commented,
"We gained a lot more
experience because of
this meet She added
that the team is work-
ing hard to prepare for
the outdoor season,
with an emphasis on
improving their speed-
work.
WATERBEOJ DON'T pav �'�
lor your hea'ed walerbed buy
direct trom mgt. and s�ve Buy a
complete 1st quality pine wood
heated yyaterbed with 15 yr war
rsmty tor as low as V (Queen)
�1� (King) Layaway avail Call
David tor appointment 7H ?�
4.1 It. refrigerator, good condition.
Perfect for dorm room For mfor
mation call 7S� 177 after I on
MWF
TECHNICS STEREO Integrated
Amplifier Model No SU 7100. 4t
watts per channel �I3S Garrard
Turntable Model No 0�J (without
cartridge) SIS Call Jetl 7S IS60
after s
I TRACKS lor sale, soul and Rock
Wide selection, low prices Call
7S8 S077
74 TRIUMPH TR 7, 4 cyl .4 spd.
Air AM, FM Cassette Stereo,
Sunrool. Mag Wheels. Beautiful
sports car S1800 757 1715
l�78 CJ 5 Renegade 3 speed, V 8,
excellent sound system. Hardtop,
sunroof, chrome nmv plus much
HMMriMMMi
1974 TOYOTA COROLLA. 4 sp.
AM FM, air, super condition, 27-
mpg. S2500, 754 8727
PIONEER KP500 underdash
FMcassette Good condition S45
Call '757 1442 or drop by 302A
East brook
CHALLENGER SURFBOARD �
4 Single Fin. Good Condition Call
752 92. Ask for Bobby Price
Negotiable
FOR RENT
TWO PEOPLE wanted to share
large house with young couple m
Lake Ellsworth, Greenville Con
venient to hospital and university
SI20 per month plus 14 utilities.
Deposit required Call 75 108
after S p.m.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
Across trom campus 495 a month
ptus 12 utilities. 75 797
TWO BEDROOM townhouse apt
fully furnished, available for sum
mer Georgetown apts Great
Location! CAII 7 58 095
ROOMMATE TO share apt Near
Campus Call Chuck at 757021;
after 7 call 757 1474
WANTED: FEMALE roommate
Kings Row Apts 2 bedroom AC
Furnished. Pool HBO 5125monlh
plus 12 electric Call after 7 p.m.
752 77S?
FEMALE ROOMMATE lo share 2
bedroom townhouse Rent to be
split 4 ways. S57 50 each plus 14
utilities Call anytime 752 9540
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
Lawrence Apt Ond block from
campus 487 50 monthly Call
758 5497
ROOMMATE NEEDED: 4
bedroom brick house, nice
reesidential area Fully carpeted,
central heat and air S100 monthly
plus 14 utilities 758 0004
FEMALE ROOMMATE Private
bedroom, S83 monthly plus 12 ex
penses 710 mile trom campus
758 5245 Pets allowed
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
Chare 12 rent and utilities Phone
757 114
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
M0 rent, 11 utilities. Furnished.
cable TV, wasmg machine. 1
blocks from campus Call after .
752 4409
MALE ROOMMATE wanted
Forest Acres Apts 4117 40 is lI
rent and 12 utilities Heat Pump
CArpeled Pool Call 75 5577 or
757 824
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 1 bedroom apt. at
Eastbrook 590 plus 1J utilities
Call 7SS 250
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed I
12 blocks from campus Student
St. Partially lurmshed 3 bdrm
house Rent 474 plus 11 utilities
758217
HELP
WANTED
COUNSELORS FOR western
North CArolina coed summer
camp. Room, meals, laundry,
salary and travel allowance Ex
penence not necesary, but must
enioy living and working with
children Only clean cut non
smoking college students need ap
ply. For applicationbrochure
write: Camp Pmewood, 1801
Cleveland Rd , Miami Beach, Fla
11141.
WANTED PART TIME help
now. Full time during the sum
mer Must be neat, have pleasant
voice, and willing to work the
hours you are needed. May involve
some 4hilt work during the sum
mer. Apply in person at Ovtrton'
Competition Skis between 1 and 5
weekdays.
NEED MONEY You wont get
rich, but the East Carolinian has
openings for writers at the present
time. There is also a possibility of
training lor editor positions and
training on computer terminals
Apply at the East Caolmian office,
Old South Building
SERVICES
CARICATURES BY WEVLER
Greenville's original personalued
art service. Have a cartoon don
os yourself or a loved one a uni
que gift idea! 410 for 8x10. bw or
color Call 7S2 5775
TYPING TERM, thesis,
resumes, dissertations, etc Pro
lessional quality at Lowest rates
Call Kempie Dunn anytime
752 4711
NOTARY PUBLIC Call Amy at
757 1714.
Want to know HOW TO MAKE IM
PROVE YOUR GRADES Booklet
at ECU Bookstore
PERSONALS
SHARON, guess who loves you.
painting, but especially me Hap
py Valentines I love you Keith
TO CLARENCE, the man of two
extremes: you date a MARRIED
woman by day but at night you
dream of Charloteen (14 or ISA!
Signed J.M.
ERICA Beware and don t fear the
dawg. So you want to have a par
ty The Flipper boys weren't
enough for you this weekends Ask
Pete if we can use his stereo
Speakers included
E J So you want to know who has a
problem Can,i stay to talk got to
go Like the song says. Talk to yo
later, tator
TRYING TO impress someone
special Have a message balloon
delivered to your valentine for on
ly 4 50 compliments ot Delta Zeta
Sorority
FLIPPER BABIES You boys had
better slow down and wipe that
shit eating grin off you lace This
stuff should be illegal On. it is'
You must hive pu tA �n his beer
for Better Beers
AUOREY Downtown will never
be the same without you M th-
green sweater
Do you know an interesting person
on campus Then Lets us know
Call 757 4501
RIDERS
RIDE TO CHARLOTTESVILLE
Virginia Weekend ol February i?
Leave anytime Will Pay lor Gas
Call Debbie 7S1 724
CLEMSON. SC Riders wanled lor
trip on February 19 21 Ask lor Jay
at 757 8141 ASAP
RIDE FOR two people needed to
Winston Salem or turiner Going
to WV Help pay qas Phoni-
757 9143
Bill McNair, shown here jumping center
in a 1981 name, combined with Jeff Best
for 34 points lo lead the Pirate jayvees to
their first win of the season Monday
night.
CASH PAID FOR
DIAMONDS AND GOLD

FLOYD G.
ROBINSON JEWELERS
407 EVANS MALL DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
MIKE ROBINSON VALERIE HARRIS
JO SPARROW
BUSINESS (919) 758 2452
INDEPENDENT
JEWELERS
WE HAVE BARGAIN PRICES ON ALL THE
NEWEST GOLF EQUIPMENT!
SKI BOOTS25-75 OFF
ALL USED SNOW SKIS50 OFF
ALL NEW SNOW SKIS30-50 OFF
ALL MOON BOOTS12 PRICE
ALL SKI POLES25-50 OFF
THERMAL UNDERWEAR 30 OFF
ALL SKI GLOVES & MITTENS30-50 OFF
ALL SKI HATS & CAPS50 OFF
J7i i Irk SALOMEN 202 STEP-IN BINDINGS 25.00
r UlP ALL MEN'S & WOMEN'S SKISUITS, SWEATERS
BIBS, HATS AND VESTS 40-50 OFF
ALL IZOD V-NECK SWEATERS 16.00
ALL IZOD LACOSTE SHORT SLEEVE SHIRTS -
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NOW! 9.00 - FANTASTIC SELECTION
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QUANTITY OF RENTAL SKIS AND SELL
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AT GREENVILLE COUNTRY CLUB
756-0504 OPEN 7 DAYS
ING SANDWICH
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E. 10th Street
Between Village Green & King's Row
ALL NEW HOURS
7:30 a.m9:00 p.m.
To serve you better!
the bizarre bedrooms of The Bear Flag
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abandoned boiler where Doc
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the spirit of John Steinbeck's
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an irresistible irascible
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7:30 a.mJll.OO Early Rird Breakfast
2 eggs, bacon, grits or hashbrowns, toast & coffee
$1.85
(Other choices available.)
Il:00a.mClosing Lunch Menu A vailable
Sandwiches & Subs of AM 'inds
6:00 p.m9:00 p.m. Great Dinner Specials
MONDAY � Cheese Steak, Fries, Tea$2.75
TUESDAY � King Club, Fries, Tea$2.75
WEDNESDAY � Hamburger Steak, Homemade Potato
Salad, Tea$2-25
THURSDAY � Fried Shrimp, Fries, Slaw, Tea$2.75
FRIDAY � Fried Shrimp, Fries, Slaw, Tea$2.75
ATTITUDE ADJUSTMENT HOUR� 2.00-6:00
2 �12 oz. glasses for $1.00
From 2:00-6:00 p.m FREE PITCHER OF BEVERAGE
for highest score on Electronic Machines.
Devg'fi ft
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER Presents
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OPENS AT A THEATRE NEAR YOU IN FEBRUARY!
?
r
I K





12
HI 1 M I K� II IM i t UK1 U
Both ECU Swim
Teams Defeat Devils
B I MOM s hk M
V , v, I ,1,1,�
I h e ii iii
Duke
laves broki
backsirokv
Ill's men's a d
mien's stinuiinu
earns ended i he i i backsi i ok
reguiai seasons� ver records In
iphi noies aeainsi new varsit u
1 )uke Sal in da
I he 1 ad I'n ales up
d lo 4-3
illO
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lames
11 eslimen 1i.
s( binterfb aiiI
ol 27.46 K
bo Ih v a
freshman
ihe 200 li,
.iiu! loakin Svenson
ihe onl double
its foi i he I'n ales.
Stan illtams, loe
on, and Done
MeMillian also
� foi ihe men. I he
relax leant lo win
was ihe 400 medics
1 he I'n ales coin lud
mlai st
1-5 record
i i action t"i
n vill In
I s I e K
� � udi
sW 111
men I he i ein
will be held Man h 1 '
ii I' h Pa

W
SCOREBOARD
I , v Mil IM �! AMMN�.s
( �,�i 1 iHeraH
I I imlifla
I lll WIIK HUM II
: i
I v� I
( head coach Pave Odom and ussislunt Tom Barrisse
(kneeling to left oj Odom nive die Pirates a few pointers
during it timeout.
i o l �
acv '
he meel i. i

K
� S
VKOKIIONs
' ' di Ddvs
L r OI t FREE
USED
TIRES
$10.00
i n q u i r e a t
Evans Seafood
WE SEW
LEATHER COATSl
WHAT'S IT LIKE TO BE
A SINGLE PARENT?
jnani U -
is a i
� . �
The Children's Home
Society of N, C.
752 5847
UtWLmc Wfjy ia
rtv
p�f
u

Catherine
Styron
Nicky
Harris
iAADS
SHOE REPAIR
1 13 Gr.HUh Av
758 1228
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM Hit
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
SIIS 00 Pregnancy Twt, Btrtti
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counitiinij For hir
ther information call IlKUi
(Toll Frit Number
�00 221 2VM) between f A M
and i P M Weofcdayi
RALEIGH WOMEN S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
�17 Writ Morgan $t
Raleign. N C
sJ�
L.
WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH
FOR:
CLASS RINGS
WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS
ALL GOLD & SILVER
SILVER COINS
CHINA & CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
&RING
Of �V SMIK COi,�;
401 S. EVANS ST. 0H � MON A'
(HARMONY MOUSE SOUTH! PHONE 752-3866
! YOUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER
?
sZ
A personal ad in the classifieds is a c
to say ou care
These Ads will be taken from:
2:00-3:00 Tuesday, Feb. 9
15-5:00 Wednesday, Feb. 10
Rates are
SI for the first 15 a
and S.05 pei a
(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH)
OPEN 9:30 5:30 MO 1st SAT
Nicky Harris band
Roy
Richardson
Geep
Johnson
Casablanca
Nicky Harris Band appearing Wednesday � Happy Hour
4:30-9:30 Wednesdays �
Ladies' Free � Double Shots � 2for 1





Title
The East Carolinian, February 9, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 09, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.177
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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