The East Carolinian, February 4, 1982






�to Iraat Carnltnia
;
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 58 No.38
Thursday, February 4, 1982
Greenville,N.C.
After Four- Year Struggle
WZMB Is On The Air
By TOM HALL
News i dtni
For the first time in most East
Carolina students' memories, the
campus community has a radio
station.
WZMB Station. Manager Sam
Barwick began the first regular
broadcast at 6:02 p.m. Tuesday.
He said the obstacles that kept
the campus radio station off the
ail had been removed, and thank-
ed the administration, students
and former station manager John
Jeter for removing them.
'If we can please a majority of
the students, we'll be satisfied
Barwick added, and urged
listeners to call the station with
suggestions and requests.
He then put on his first record
� Led Zeppelin's " "he Song Re-
mains the Same" � and stayed
on the air until 8 p.m.
The first request came from a
student who wanted to "hear
some C DC When the sta-
tion began playing jazz, another
student telephoned and told
News Director 1 ori Niven to "get
this jive off the radio and play
some rock and roll
Barwick said the WZMB oft ice
in Old Joyner I tbrar received
fom 4X) to 500 calls with sugges-
tions and requests Tuesday night,
with "99.99 percent" of them
favorable.
Jeter told station workers that
listeners would soon grow ac-
customed to the WZMB's mix of
rock and jazz. Jeter, whom Bar-
wick called the "granddaddy" of
the radio station, took over the
second two-hour slot.
"This station belongs to you
Jeter said near the end of his first
� and only � broadcast for
WZMB. "I've invested a lot of
blood, sweat and tears in this sta-
tion. By all means, hang onto it
Jeter, who served as station
manager from -1978 to August
1980, said he had left the broad-
casting business. He has returned
to ECU to pursue a career in
medicine.
John Davidson had the last
show of the evening � from 10
p.m. to 1 a.m.
In addition to music, Niven
said the station would broadcast
news from UPI eight times daily.
"One Moment Please a series
of W ZMB-produced interviews
in two-minute segments, will be
broadcast at 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday. Host Jim En-
sor's first interview will be with
Interim Chancellor John Howell.
Niven said Thomas Cormier
will host a 10- to 15- minute show
at 3:45 p.m. Wednesdays with in-
tramurals director Wayne Ed-
wards.
When asked Wednesday for his
opinion of how the station ran
the night before, Barwick said he
was "pleasantly surprised"
although he was expecting the
worst.
"I expected guys to come out
B MIKE HUGHES
"We want a program or for-
ai is different, one thai the
t c l mass will enjoyWe think
thai album rock and some jazz
will provide what students
I it
Sound familiar'1
In Ami 1978, John Jeter, then
� ei ineerat WECU-AM,
ised what was destined to
become the format of WZMB-
FM However, it took four years
and countless struggles betore the
station Jeter spoke oi became a
reality.
Hack in 1960, East Carolina
lege had an EM station.
WWWS. However, a hurricane
blew down the tower, and, accor-
ding to Jeter, "bv some mistake,
maintenance cut up the tower
with a blowtorch Following the
u n f or t u n at e accident, "a
makeshift tower was used, but
the station never really got back
on the air
Later in the decade, the station
switched to AM, or carrier cur-
rent. WECU-AM was, at first, a
success, but the reception became
poor, and eventually the station
went under.
After the funds for the AM sta-
tion were cut sharply by the SGA
in 1977, the proposal to convert
WECU to EM went before the
Media Board. After that Board's
approval in 1978, Jeter predicted
the switchover would be com-
pleted by February 1979.
with tape wrapped around their
necks Barwick explained, but
said he was pleased with the way
the disk jockeys were handling
themselves.
Barwick said the station took
calls from as far awav as New
Bern Tuesday night. No one from
New Bern called WZMB during
the day Wednesday; Barwick said
he assumed the signal could only
reach that city during the night.
Sec CAMPUS, Page 3
ECU Campus Radio A History Of Delays
1 he station experienced the
first in a string of delays in 1978
and 1979, when the Federalom-
munications Commission held
the processing of the FM license
for 18 months. Debates ovet wai
tage output had also delayed pro-
cedures. Finally, with the aid of
first district Congressman Waltei
B. Jones, D-N.C. the license was
processed and approved on
January 16, 1980.
During the respite, many
students and members of the
WECU staff became enraged,
when Chancellor Thomas B.
Brewei expressed his belief that
the station should not simply give
the people what they want to
hear. "The station should also
give the people what they ought
to hear Brewer said, "as well as
act as a recruiting tool for the
university
Brewer also suggested the hir-
ing of a professional adviser and
expressed concern that the for-
mat of WECU would be
detrimental to the university's
public image.
However, a new tower was
elected atop Tyler dormitory in
March 1980, at a cost of approx-
imately $2,300, and in .April, the
station underwent several
changes. The staff awaited both
ICC approval of the station's
new call letters, WZMB, and the
arrival of new equipment from
the state. At that time, Jeter
predicted the station's first show
would air the following month.
Sens director I nn ncn (center) and forme
Maion belongs ����"
Photo By JILL ADAMS
stainm manager John Jeter (turnout): "Thh
However, following a mixup
with WNCT-TV in early May
in which a transmitter which had
been donated was missing an in-
tegral pan. the exciter � the sta-
tion's an date was further
delaved.
The WNCT-TV transmitter
was intended to have been used as
a backup unit, since the new
equipment was still on order. t
that nine. Jeter admitted the
studio had enough equipment to
broadcast, but the station would
have had to air in "simulated
stereo" rather than the "real
thing1
Also in June 1980, at a Media
Board meeting, Jeter asked the
members if he could stay on,
See YEARS, Page 3
Confidentiality A REAL Center Essential
Running A muck � OAV mmMsmm
While it made great art, the short cut at College Hill Drive made a big mess
during Tuesday's downpours.
B PATRICK O'NEILL
stall Wnlrr
"Confidentiality � that's the
number one thing about REAL �
we believe in it solemnly.1 said
Mary Smith, Director of the REAl
Crisis Center, concerning the firm
committment REAl maintains to
keeping all of their counsuling con-
fidential. "People don't even have-
to tell us their names
REAL is a non-profit human sei-
vices organization located on Evans
Street, which provides support to
people who are faced with a crisis
situation in their lives. According to
Smith, REAL counselors are trained
to help people with a wide range of
problem areas. She noted drugs,
alcohol, family, general depression
and interpersonal problems are the
more common among most clients,
but that anyone is welcome to call
even if they "just need someone to
talk to
"Statistically about 35 percent of
our contacts are coming from ECU
students and faculty Smith said.
She added that many of the contacts
concern interpersonal problems
such as "boy-girl relationship pro-
blems, roommates, and just getting
along with other peaple problems
Smith defines a crisis as a short-
term situation lasting from four to
six weeks with which a person may
need a little support in coping. If the
crisis continues it becomes a long-
term problem, in which case REAL
will help the clients decide on what
options they can take.
"We let them know what
resources are available to them for
their particular problem and let
them make their own choice con-
tinued Smith.
Real has an up-to-date referral
file containing over 300 available
resources and provides a listening
ear 24 a day. A person may call their
111 1 P-LINE (758-HELP) or visit
the center anytime, according to
Smith.
RIAL handles 400 calls per
month on their HELP-LINE as well
as 3(X) referrals. Two-thirds of their
contacts are by phone and the others
are walk-ins to the center.
Besides Smith and her husband,
who is program coordinator, the
REAL staff is composed of
volunteers who have undergone an
intensive 10-week training course.
Smith added that a new coor-
dinators training course begins next
week. She invited any East Carolina
student or other interested persons
to sign up.
After completing the course �
the most extensive in the state � the
volunteer is given a final review
before they are permitted to begin
an internship at the center.
"Crisis Intervention itself is a
sub-culture movement in the 60's to
address the needs of the youth
Smith said. REAL and many hot-
line-type services grew out of this
movement.
Problems with drugs are still the
major concern, as well as abortion
and the draft, according to Smith.
"REAL provided an environment
for a person going through that dif-
ficult period (the 60's) to come to
for help added Smith, who has
been at REAl for six years.
REAL is chartered bv the
Secretary of State, licensed bv the
North Carolina Department of
Human Resources, accredited In
the North Carolina Drug Commis-
sion, and has "a very good working
relationship with ECU Smith
said. "We work with at! the services
on campus
Dr. George Wetgnd, director of
the 1 CU Counseling Center, agreed
uitf. Smith, saving that both
organizations work well together
See CRISIS, Page 6
Saving Energy 'A Must'
By PATRICK ON El I I
SUM Wriln
Last oj Two Puns
Energy conservation has become
a major issue at East Carolina
University. Student fees continue to
increase because o among other
reasons, rising utility costs.
However, Dr. Prem Sehgal, an
ECU biology professor, warns
against conserving energv for the
sole reason of saving money.
"Energy is the ultimate raw
material, and we cannot be wasting
it
According to Sehgal. the
Ameriean people came to unders-
tand the interdependence of all the
nations of the world when the
energy crisis first hit in the mid 70s.
Sehgal theorized that the United
States could someday be faced with
another situation like the one in Iran
and have its energy supply cut oil.
Even if the US were to opt for a
military solution, Sehgal siad that
the US would be faced with the
same type of problem in 10 or 15
years.
According to Sehgal. the cost of
energv will go so high that all ser-
vices and products relying on energv
will have to cost more. "It will af-
fect the kind of students we arc ee-
ting here As to the subsequent
0Ki of education, Sehgal feels that
"on!) the rich will be able to afford
it '
Sehgal suggested that ECU charge
"two different rents" to dorm
students "based on the use of elec-
trical gadgets Segregation of
"users and non-users" could be
regulated by central controls, Sehgal
said, and higher fees could be charg-
ed to heavy users. This system
would prevent "those who don't
want to use" from "subsidizing the
users
Environmental considerations
should be recognized as well, he
said. "Energy is the ultimate pollu-
tant and it is causing long-term
damage to our environment.
Rhonda Gentry, an energy
representative from Garrett dorm,
has been praised for her work in
conservation. Since she has
represented her hall, Garrett has
See STUDENT, Page 3
"PHlpll-
t





THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 4. 1982
KVF
The Kings Youth Fellowship
will hold ifj next meeting on
February 4 in Room 247 at 8 p.m.
at the Mendenhali Student Center
Topics discussed will include the
coming o� our Lord Jesus Christ
Visitors are welcome anc
refreshments will be served at the
conclusion of the meeting.
NON CREDIT COURSES
There is still room in some of the
non credit courses being offered at
Mendenhali Student Center in
order to be enrolled in the follow
ing courses, one must register im
mediately M These courses in
dude DRAWING.
CALLIGRAPHY.
BASKETRY. WOODWORKING.
POPULAR CANCE. AND WEAV
ING M For further information
call 7S7 66lext 260
GMAT
The Graduate Management Ad
mission Test TGMAT) will be of
tered at East Carolina University
n Saturday. March 20 Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to GMAT, Educational
Testing Service. Box 966 R.
Princeton, nj 0540 Applications
must be postmarked no later than
February 15. 1982 Applications
may be obtained from the ECU
Testing Center, Room 105. Speight
Building. Greenville. NC 27834
ASSERTIVENESSAS A
WAY OF LIFE
Assertiveness can open new
floors for you Learning to tell
others wha' you want, feel, and
believe, as well as increasing self
confidence, are goals of 'his class
You will learn to identify areas m
which you would like to be more
assertive and practice in a suppor
tive atmosphere Classes will be
held m Brewster B 204 beginning
Monday, Feb 22 March 22 from
7 00 f 30pm Cost is 130.00
BANJO
This is a basic introductory
course m banio Participants
should have little or no banio ex
perience and should bring their
own banios The class begins Mon
dy. Feb 22 and ends April 19
Tne lime is 6 30 7 45 p.m in
Brewster B 101. The cost is S30 00
BUDDISM
A qroup is forming to encourage
'he discussion, study and practice
ot Tibetan Buddism A meeting
will be held Wednesday. Feb 3 a' 4
r m. a' 1113 S Evans Street Ail in
forested persons are invited to at
tend For information call Jim
Boone at 758 8238, or John
Spagnolo at 758 4255
PHILOSOPHY
The Philosophy Club will meet
on Tuesday Feb 16 a' 7 pm in
Brewster D 313 Or James Smith
of the Philosophy Department will
speak on Thoughts on
Metaphor " All interested persons
are welcome
USED
TIRES
$10.00
inquire at
Evans Seafood
Announcements
CAMERA 1
Want to fake better pictures?
THis course will examine the func
tions and uses of cameras, indoor
and outdoor photography will be
explored, and various methods for
taking better pictures will be ex
plored The student should have a
camera to use. preferably a 35mm
or larger
The course begins Tuesday,
Feb 23 and ends March 30 It will
be taught at Deans Photography.
203 S. Evans and the time is 7 00
9 00 p m and the cost -s 130 00
BINGOICECREAM
The next BingoIce Cream Party
is scheduled for Tuesday.
February 9.1982 at 7 00 PM in
Mendenhali Student Center's
Multi Purpose Room Students,
faculty. staff. and their
dependents are invited to join on
on the fun Win prizes, eat ice
cream, play bingo, all absolutely
free! !
PIG PICKIN
Thursday, February 4, 1982 there
is a Pig Ptckm Rush Party at the
Kappa Delta Sorority House. All
girls are invited to attend the
house al 7:00 at 2101 E Fifth St. If
you need a ride, call 758 3386 See
ya' there
CONVERSTIONAL
FRENCH
This course is designed to
develop oral skills for persons who
wish to travel m French speaking
countries, and to communicate
with native speakers here and
abroad The textbook will be
available tor sale at the firsi class
meeting
The class will be held in
Brewster. C 206 beginning Tues
day. Feb 16 Apr 27 from 7 00
8 30 p.m The 'uition is S30 00
HOW TO MAKE A GOOD
MARRIAGE BETTER
This workshop is for couples in
stable marnaages who want to im
prove an already good relation
ship Each session will focus on
practical aspects of marital living
� enhancing communication,
reducing conflict, and increasing
�he satisfaction of each spouse
The class begins Monday, Feb 22
and ends March 1 and will be
taughi m Brewster. C 302 The
time is 7 00 9 00 p.m. and tuition
is S25.00
RESIDENCE HALL
CHORUS
The Residence Hall Chorus has
grown during its first semester to
a mixed chorus of sixty members
The group, open to any student
who enjoys singing, has se� a goal
of eighty members for this year
The Chorus, which meets each
Monday from 7 to 8 p m m Biology
103, has already presented its first
concert under direcor Charles F
Schwartz, Dean of the School of
Music
Newly elected officers of the
group are students Daphne
Dunston. President, Jayne
Nichols, Vice President, and Ted
Pehowic, Secretary Treasurer
They invite any interested
students 'o come next Monday
night
CALLIGRAPHY
Calligraphy is fast becoming a
wide spread art form. Ths course
will concentrate on a graceful
style called Chancery Cursive,
which once mastered, can become
a basis for many other lettering
styles A minimal amount of sup
plies is required for the course and
will be distributed at the first class
session.
The class will be held in
Brewster. B 101 on Tuesday. Feb
23 Apr. 6 from 7 00 900 pm. The
cost is 130 00
SECOND UNITED
NATIONS
The Campaign for the Second
United Nations Special Session on
Disarmament is encouraging par
ticipation in its activities schedul
ed for June 12th in New York City.
A local group is planning to travel
to the UN at that time to add their
voices to the already great
number of peole calling for Global
disarmament. Enough nuclear
weapons now exist to destroy the
world many times over Our
response to this escalation is
critical A local task force for the
UN Campaign is now forming to
discuss various ideas and plans of
action Anyone interested par
ticipate by calling 758 4906 or at
tending our local task force
meeting on Friday evenings at
630 pm at 610 S Elm Street.
INVESTING IN THE 80S
This course offers a thorough
review of the numerous invest
ment opportunities available for
those seeking to maximize their
return en each investment dollar
The course will provide valuable
information to both the conser
vative as well as the aggressive m
vestor and is a must tor those who
have little or no experience in m
vesting
The course will be taught Thurs
day, Feb 25 Apr 8 from 6 30 till
9 30 p.m. The cost is U5.00 per
person or J60 00 tor husband and
wife it will be taught m Brewster,
B 203
VOLUNTEERS
NEEDED
Tne Pitt County Juvenile Ser
vices Restitution Program is
urgently m need of volunteers to
serve as on site supervisors for
luveniles as they perform various
community service tasks
You may volunteer any number
of hurs per week or per month.
Monday through Saturday and
you can be reimbursed for any
program related travel
For further information, please
call Cookie Rodgers a' 758 4723 or
come by 'he Juvenile Cour'
Counselors office on the fourth
floor of the Pitt County Cour
t house
COLLEGIATE 4-H
On February 4, Thursday, the
ECU Collegiate 4 H Club will meet
at 7 p.m at the club advisor's ad
dress. For more information and
location call Carrol Anne at
756 4287 or Ivey at 758 9535. All
members and interested persons
are urged to attend.
CONVERSATIONAL
GERMAN II
This course is designed to fur
ther develop oral skills for persons
who wish to travel in German
speaking sountries. and to com
municate with native speakers
here and abroad Text will be
available for sale at the first class
meeting The class will be held in
Brewster. C 301 beginning Tues
day, Feb 16 and ends Apr. 27 The
time is 7 00 8 30 pm. and tuition
isWOOO
HANDICAPPED
AWARENESS WEEK
Plans are being made for the
1982 Handicapped Awareness
Week on the ECU campus Anyone
who has suggestions or would like
to participate in any way, please
contact either Sharon McClung.
756 9913. Jim Warren. 756 8156. or
Ramona Lopez. 758 7381. Any in
put suggestions or participation
will be welcomed.
FLYING DISC CLUB
We are Jamming Warm
weather is only a few weeks way
The new year has brought new
members and enthusiasm like
never before Interested men and
women come meet a' the bottom
of college hill Thursdays at 3 00
and Saturdays II 00 �o 1 00 a'
Memorial gym Watch tor the
Na'ural Light Flying Disk Classic
(April 17th and 18th on the campus
of ECU) with proceeds going to the
March ot Dimes If interested m
loming the frisbee club and (or)
helping manage this maior tour
namen meetings are on Mondays
at 8 00 m Mendenhali Room 247
RADIO SHOW
Saturday and Sunday nights
from 10 00 1 00 o'clock, WZMB
presents "The Electric Rainbow
Radio Show with Keith Mitchell
This is a Rock N Roll program
with feature albums This week on
Sa'urday. the feature album will
be the first album by "Rush " Sun
day's feature album will be Ozzy
Ozbournes" latest, "Diary of a
adman " Both will be played in
their entirety without commercial
interuption. of course
GAMMA BETA PHI
We will have a meeting on Feb 4
at 6 00 p m in 221 Mendenhali
Anyone having a cumulative 3 Oor
better is invited 'o a'tend All
members are urged to attend
CumHrt MudwyudMHU pra-
Foicf �ckolor�kip� Tfctu
tcfcoJorfk.j� tntokt tmmtmt
fe ttud�M occep' iato
iwdicnf sckoof as fmhna or
at ta� bagiaauia. of tkair
lOflunill year Th� icholo.
ikip proviso tor tvitioa. book,
lafc foot and oQutpmcat. plat o
SS30 monthly allo-OKC In
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native to Mm fcigfc cott of
atoa'kal aaWatioa
Contort
ll.VA.r. HEALTH
PHO��MO�
KM Kl IIINt,
Sort GL 1, 1100 Naafco D
laleiak. M.C 27609
P�o�. Colloct (919)755-41 34
Not all clinics are tne same.
is a difficult decision that's made
easier by the women of the Fleming Center.
Counselors are available day and night to sup-
port and understand you. Comfort, safety,
privacy, and a friendly staff that's what the
Fleming Center is all about
All inclusive Um
Wo hidden charges
Call 781-88B0 day or night.
Saturday appointments
?�ry early prag. test
Tne Fleming Center
t tne difference.
OFF OUR.
COMPLETE
INVENTORY
FEB. S,fc 7T
11 fflDflftOnN

1
i
ALL CAMERAS! LENSES
ALL PROJECTORS
ALL PHOTO SUPPLY i
AEROBICS
For ECU staff and faculty.
aerobics classes are offered by the
Hpers department on Monday.
Wednesday, and Friday at noon in
memorial gym. Room 112 There
is no charge for this service Just
your effort for lots of fun while get
ting in shape For furher inform,
lion, c-11 Mrs Jo Saunders.
757 4000. or the physical education
office. 757 6441
NATURE
PHOTOGRAPHY
The public is invited io the
February meeting of the Sierra
Club. Cypress Group The pro
gram this month will feature Dr
Floyd Read giving pointers on im
proving your outdoor photos The
meeting will be in the basement of
the First Presbyterian Church,
corner of Elm Street and 14th
Street (across from Rose High) at
8 p.m Monday. Feb 8 The Sierra
Club is a national canoemghik
ingconservation organisation
LOVE?
Do you true love in your life?
What is love' The only way to real
ly have love in your life is to know
God and his word, the Bible (I
John 4 7 12) D.d you know that in
the New Teatament the word
"love" is translated from different
greek words that have different
meanings? Come to our fellowship
and find out more about this and
other truths in the Bible Thurs
day. Feb 4, Room 242 at 8 p m m
Mendenhali Student Center
BASEBALL SOFTBALL
OFFICIATING
This course will provide a work
ing understanding of baseball
sol'ball ottioattnq including posi
tions, stance, voice control, rule
interpretation, ball and strike
calls, and equipmen' While the
primary purpose is to prepare par
ticipants for Ob opportunities in
umpiring, the course is also
designed to be ot interest to spec
ta'ors. players. COACheS, and
school athletic mtqramura!
teachers
The class will be held in Room
145. Mmg. - Coliseum f ebruar y 22
April 5 from 7 00 �(� 9 00 p m
The cost is J25 00
NUTRITION AND
WEIGHT
I nere will be general nutrition
and weight reduction classes of
fered at the Student Health Center
for next five weeks (Jan 26, Feb
2.9.16,23) Call 757 6S41 to enroll
free of charge m the 9 10 a m or
10 11 a m class classes individual
counselling tor special diet pro
blems are available on these dates
from 8 9am by referral of a
physician For more information,
contact the Student Health Center
POETRY FORUM
Will meet February 4 at 8 p m
in Mendenhali, room 248 Anyone
interested in poetry, please come
PUO
Phi Upsilon Omicron meets Feb
9 at 7 p m in the Van Landingham
Room all members please attend,
the Phi u District Counselor will
attend the meeting
FAITH & VICTORY
FELLOWSHIP
Meets every Friday night at 7
p m in Jenkins Auditorium, Art
Building Everyone invited Free
concert February 5. starts at 7
p m - Be there!
HANDICAPPEO
STUDENT SERVICES
The Office of Handicapped mu
dent Services needs reserve
drivers for the handicapped van
Anyone interested who has the
afternoons tree from 12 00 noon
until 6 00 p m should contact the
Office of Handicapped Student
Services at 757 6799 or come by
Whichard 212
PHYE MAJORS
All students who plan to dec lare
physical education as a maior dur
ing change of maior week tor tht
fall Semester, should report to
Mmges Coliseum from 1 00 3 00
p m on Wednesday. Feb 10 lor a
motor and physical litness test
Satisfactory performance on this
test is required as a prerequisite
for official admittance to the
physical education major pro
gram More detailed information
concerning the testis available by
calling 757 6441 or 6442
CO OP EDUCATION
The Cooperative Education Of
fice. located in 313 Rawl Building,
currently has iOb openings for
Summer and Fall 1982 with the
foiling agencies Social Security
Administration Baltimore. MD
Morth Carolina Internship Office
Raleigh, NC. Camp Day. NC In
stitute of Government Raieiqh.
NC
For more information, contact
the Coop office in 313 Rawl
Building
AFRICAN ART
An exhibition of Aftican Art, on
loan from the permanent collec
tion of Duke University, may be
seen at East Carolina University's
Gray Art Gallery from Feb 1
May 1. 1982 This exhibition con
tarns work from twenty one
African tribes, and represents a
wide variey of styles On display
are numerous ceremonial obiects
as well as decorative utilitarian
pieces
This exhibition will be of interest
to artists, photographers, students
and tne general public A tour of
the exhibition will be Qiven to the
public by Dr Robert Burger ECU
Anthropologist and specialist op
Black History and African
Culture The tour wiM take plai e m
Gray Art Gallery 7 30 p m Mon
day. Feb 8 The public 'S inviteo
SAB
Student Athletic Board will nave
a meeting Tuesday. Feb 9 in
Mendenhali Room 248 at 5 p m
Final plans for the Lady Pirate
Classic will be made We will also
talk about baseball and track
Anyone interested in these sports
is asked to come and pom us
WALK FOR HUMANITY
The 11th annuai Greenville
"Walk tor Humanity" conducled
Oi the ECU Hunger Coalition, is
our biggest event of the yeat The
Walk" will wind through the
streets of Greenville and everyone
is invited
Each year the money that is
raised has been divided between a
local hunger rwed and for a na
tional or international relief pro
iect In the past ECU students
have been the maior contnvuters
to the success of the "Walk"
We have 12 weeks left until the
"Walk" and many things to be
done We need help from
everyone You can walk, donate,
organize, speak to groups, invite
us to speak to your group, dome to
our meetings, do art work, help us
plan the route put us m contact
with other enthusiastic people.
make suggestions, prepare the
after the "Walk lunch, ect
Peole don't have to suffer from a
lark of food We can make a dit
ference! Make the "Walk" your
groups social protect for the spr
mg semester Come on "Put a
httie heart m your Soul"
We invite you to come to our
meetings on Thursday's at 7 30
p m at the Newman House (953 E
I0tn St I or call us to find Out
more 752 4716
ACTING CLASS
Stephen B Finnon. artistic
director of the newly formed
Greenville Li"le Theatre
(sponsored by tne Aesley Founoa
tion of Greenville is inviting par
tic ipants to Oin a beginning acting
class The class will begin on
Saturday. Feb 6. and meet from
11 00 a m to 1 00 p m tor eight
successive Saturdays The cost
will be 48 00 per participant Fin
non, formerly of ECU'S Drama
Speech Department, stresses that
the class is an introduction It
various basic techniques con- .
'ration, sense memory, relaxa
tion. improvisation For additional
information call Nancy Omen a'
the Methodist Student Center
i758 2030i or Stephen Finnon
(757 3546)
JAZZ EXERCISE
This course offers a chance t(j
work on toning up trouble areas of
the body while learning somi-
basic iau dance routines Loose
comfortable clothing, leotards, or
Stirrup tights are recommended
Class begins Tuesday Feb 23 ana
ends May 4 and win bei taught in
Room 115, Theatre Arts buldmg
The time will be from 6 30 7 30
p m and cost is $30 00
ACM
The ECU chapter of ACM win
meet this Thursday, feb 4 at 3 30
in room 132 Austin This week
Tom Lamb, the Univac Sys
Analyst at 'he ECU Comput.rtg
Center, will speak on the system
ertormance evaluation Anyone
"iterested is invited to a'tend
MSC CO REC BOWLING
LEAGUES
There is still room for three
more teams on Tuesday mogh's
Co Rec Bowling League Off
play begins Tuesday, February
a' 6 00 PM
The Kasi Carolinian
Sff llflv !tw i U"lH I ' UMMMlffj ,
urn e l92i
Published every Tuesday ami
Thursday dunng the acactem
year and every Wednesday dur
ing the summer
The Fast Carolinian is
ficial newspaper of Eas
Carolina University, ownec
operated and published for am:
br the s'udents of East Carol "o
Universe
Subscription Rate $20 yearly
The East Carolinian officer
are located in the Old South
Building on tne campus of ECU.
Greenville. N C
POSTMASTER Send add
changes 'o The Eas' Can-
Old Sou'h Building. ECU Grep-
vile NC 27834
Telephone 757 4344. 437, J0
Application to mail at second
class postage rates is aending r
Greenville North Carolina
JpS?KW
7 56-60001

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THEEASTCAROIINIAN I;I BKl ARY4,9823
Students, Experts Agree; Energy Conservation A Necessity
H ��
Injan

0G
Continued From Page 1
won every major con-
servation project. "1
tust tried to keep peo-
ple interested in what
was going on she
said
It's (energy) not
always gome to be
rre she emphasiz-
ed Just don't use it if
you don't need it
Participation in
energy-saving projects
has been low .
However, Carolyn
1 ulgh um. associate
ectoi foi residence
life, said, " 1 his is real-
ly the tiisi yeai. It's -till
relatively new
Fulghum hopes to get
the w oi d out for more
student interest this
year.
"1 would like to see
more students involved
in every phase of East
Carolina adds Barry
Seay, ECU Energy
Committee chairman.
Some problems of
energy conservation are
beyond student con-
trol, such as the heat in
Joyner I ibrary and in
many dorm rooms.
"A lot of times the
heat will come on even
when it's turned off all
the way said Heidi
Mockenhaupt, a resi-
dent of Garretl dorm.
I en d uring t he
u n seas o ti a b I e
temperatures tins week,
the heat is still on in
mam dorms. "It's wa
too hot, so people open
the windows Seay
adds.
"I think it's a real
wase of energy
Mockenhaupt c o n -
tinuesThey're always
complaining about the
cost of energy, and it's
coming out of our
pockets
Dan Woolen, direc-
tor of housing opera-
tions, said that any
complaints concerning
heat problems should
be brought to the atten-
tion of the dorm direc-
tor. "We follow them
up he said.
Woolen said he had
received only one com-
plaint about the heat,
from a resident oi Cot-
ten dorm.
�"Whenever housing
gives us a complaint,
we work on it affirms
ECU Plant Manager
Larry Snyder. He said
that many temperature
problems result from
students tampering
with thermostats
located in hallways.
According to Snyder,
many students use in-
struments like knitting
needles to get under the
thermostat cover to
turn up the heat. "We
keep them set around
70 degrees he added.
"If the heat is still on
after 70 degrees, I'll bet
you s o m eone's
tampered with it
Snyder added that
the extreme heat is fell
on warm days because
no one has turned it
down. If the problem is
not reported, plant
engineers have no way
of knowing about it.
According to Seay,
one reason for the con-
servation problem is
the age of some of the
residence halls. "These
dorms were built back
in the 50s, and they just
weren't built for energy
conservation
Snyder said that a
new control system will
be used in all the dorms
next year. "We plan to
have an override system
that works on remote
control in dorm offices,
so each residence hall
director can control the
heat. With this, the
dorm director can
make the adjustments,
Snyder said.
A spokesperson for
Joyner Library con-
firmed that some
substantial im-
provements have been
made there concerning
the heat problems.
"And now we'll see
whether they're going
to hold up or not
The spokesperson,
who wished to remain
anonymous, said that
higher-than-usual out-
door temperatures are
the major factor for the
uncomfortable heat at
present. "The interior
of the building couldn't
adjust" to the high out-
side heat. "Generally,
it has been better, but if
you call me tomorrow,
it mav feel different
Despite the im-
provements, high
temperatures have still
been reported by staff
and students, some
complaints of
temperatures in excess
of 80 degrees. The pro-
blem still exists.
"I think it's a good
idea to make college
students aware that n is
good to save energy
Mockenhaupt conclud-
ed. "We should learn
to conserve energy; we
might not have as much
as we need later on
Campus Radio Hits The A ir
With Mixed Signal Reception
Years of Delays Postponed Station's Airdate
( untinued From Page 1
pa. mi! i! t he station got
tii Jetei claimed that he
at ted to make the iran-
easiet lot Glenda Kill-
who had been ap-
c neral managei. to take
ug. I. His request was
but Jetei remained on as
. an ad isei
e mid-summer of lso.
and the WZMB staff
ited he station would be
o bioadcast b August.
Wl MB was furthei
ay ed h . quipmeni holdups,
k � � took the helm.
- at ose, including a
t and eventual-
ettei � �! resignation,
3, 1980, Jetei
K i 11 i n g s w o r t h' s
ad l ni iniuallv
attempted to meddle in the runn-
ing of the station.
Jetei churned that he had made
several appointments with Kill-
ingsworth so he could brief hei
on "procedures and technical
aspects but she never showed up
for the briefings. Jetei resigned
after more than tout years of ser-
vice to ECU radio.
Five days later, on Sept. S. Van
Brown and lorn Zietinski, two
friends ol Jeter's, began cir-
culating a petition calling for
Killingsworlh's resignation and
the reinstating ol Jeter as general
managei.
After receiving approximately
600 signatures. Brown com-
mented that the Media Board had
not considered "the ramifica-
tions ol (Jeter's) resignation
s had been the ill fate oi the
station for three years, WZMB
and the Media Board were in-
formed in October 1980, that the
transmitter would again be
delayed until December.
In November, after the Media
Boaul approved WZMB's pur-
chasing of a microwave transmit-
ter, it was estimated that the sta-
ll.mi would make it on the air bv
late summer or early fall oi 1981.
B the spun; oi 1981, the
Media Board was looking for a
new general manager for WZMB
On April 8, Sam Barwiek, who
had previously had six years oi
radio experience, was appointed.
1 he delav s weren't i er,
however, as technical problems
postponed the airdate for weeks
� sometimes months � at a
time.
I icense mixups, transmute!
problems and troubles with signal
tuning kept the station off the air
for the entire fall semester of this
year.
But Tuesday night at 6:02, the
dream of a station on campus
became a reality. WZMB hit the
airwaves with the "alternative
concept" that was four years in
the making.
On his first and only two-hour
radio show, Jeter repeatedly ad-
mitted, "I just can't believe we're
finally on the air
And how did Sam Barwiek feel
when he flipped the switch?
"1 fell great. 1 was a little ner-
vous, with all the camera lights,
which is unusual for me. but after
a while. I just felt great. It really
didn't hit me until this morning
(Wednesday), when I looked out
and saw everyone walking by.
Ihev all looked happier
Continued From Page 1
Listeners from
Washington and Farm-
ville called in Wednes-
day, but Barwiek said
he would have been
satisfied if the signal
only went as far as the
Greenville city limits.
The station received
a number of complaints
from listeners living
near the transmitter on
Tyler dormitory. The
"oversaturation" that
distorts reception can
be alleviated if listeners
disconnect or lower the
antennas on their
receivers, Barwiek said.
The WZMB staff is
now "getting rid of
nervousness" and
"working out bugs
according to Barwiek.
"Right now, I'm trying
to keep things running
like�a machine
Barwiek said he
would make no major
changes in the station
until "the pulse of the-
public" had been
taken.
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EAST CAROLINA
RUGBY
RUGGERS
Appreciation
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SUNDAY, FEB. 7th
East Carolina Rugby Team, in cooperation
with PANTANA BOB'S would like to show
their appreciation for your support of Rugby
here on campus.
After 8 o'clock PRIMO PRICE BUSTERS
One Dozen Rugby Shins To Be Raffled
So Gome Down � Gel Wild & Crazy
!





r
Qttr last Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins. ,��� �,�
Jimmy DuPREE, nh,�imt
Ric Browning. ��� ,� i Charles Chandler. v����
Fielding Miller, km thw Tom Hai l. ��&�.
Alison Bartei . wv taM Steve Bachner. .��.�.�����.�
Steve Moore. ��,��nw�rcn w'n 'am Yelverton, �rt��.�
February 4. I9S2
Opinion
Page 4
Rockin' Out
WZMB� Worth Waiting For
On the air and rockin' � Z-9l
February 2, 1982 was a
monumental day for the East
Carolina University community, as
the long-awaited WZMB-FM began
broadcasts with general manager
John S. Barwick signing the station
on the air at 6 p.m.
After over five years of planning
and waiting for Federal Com-
munications Commission licensing,
the station is now a reality. For
anyone who has been around during
any of the aforementioned period,
it's obvious now that it was worth
the wait.
The station had been on the air
less than an 24 hours when the cam-
pus was buzzing with the news of
the arrival of an alternative to
top-40, soul and country. Program-
ming on WZMB consists of album-
oriented rock, jazz, new wave and
classical, as established on their
FCC certification.
Another facet of WZMB which
merits commendation is personnel.
Volunteer announcers will be pro-
viding music lo the campus com-
munity 19 hours a day, seven days a
DOONESBURY
week.
VOLUNTEER??
That's right. Those guys you hear
on the air receive no financial
gratification. They're there to serve
you.
WZMB did not � to say the least
� happen over night. It took a lot
of time and effort to bring it about.
Whet.her you agree with
everything he did while formally
associated with the station or not,
everyone who now enjoys WZMB-
FM owes a debt of gratitude to
former general manager John Jeter.
While an undergraduate at ECU,
Jeter envisioned what is now
available for all to enjoy. It is un-
fortunate that delays in licensing
made it impossible for the station to
begin broadcast during his term of
office. It was gratifying to see the
current staff honored Jeter with two
hours of WZMB's "maiden
voyage
As John Jeter put it Tuesday
evening, " WZMB is your radio sta-
tion. Never, never let anyone take it
away from you. Nurture it be
proud of it
by Garry Trudeau
Like Scouts, We Can Still Decide
By KIM ALBIN
If you were ever a Boy Scout or a Girl
Scout, then you might remember those
times when the iroup leaders would let the
members decide how to spend the dues
money for the month. Would it be a
weekend camping trip, or a roller skating
party?
Well gang, the grown-ups have not
taken away our decision-making powers
yet. This campus, although it is only an
itsee-bitsee representation of what the rest
of civilization is like, is a step up from the
Scouts. We are still paying dues (or rather,
fees), but the choices are now called issues.
Will it be an Emergency Medical Loan
Fund or an eternity of debate over the issue
of abortion?
Granted, this campus is only a
microcosm in terms of the world, but I
would hate to see a large-scale version run
by the same array of clowns.
Here we have an SGA president who
would impose his own morality on the rest
of us by trying to settle the abortion issue
single-handedly (and, 1 might add, under
handedly). Also, we have a great deal of
confusion and wasted time in determining
what President Nail did and how to undo
it. To top it all off, there are people on this
campus who still do not understand that
abortion is not a women's issue but an
issue for all of humanity to solve.
As for Mr. Nail, 1 think it was rather
nervy for him to suspend the loan program
last summer when most of us were gone. 1
trust, however, that he now realizes that he
does not hold a blank check from the
students of ECU.
It is distressing to see how the students
of ECU are reacting to the can of worms
opened by the loan fundabortion issue. I
refer you to a letter printed in Tuesday's
"Campus Forum in which Sandra
Thomas attacked the entire male gender,
saying, "History attests that man in all his
glory is the most irresponsible species ever
to emerge on this planet. . .When will the
male population come to terms with its ir-
responsibility and join women in a
peaceful co-existence?"
Now that's not very nice.
I cannot understand why some women
feel the need to lash out so bitterly against
all men under the guise of feminism.
Feminism, as 1 understand it, suggests
equality between the sexes � not the
prevalence of women.
When abortion is a political issue, these
pseudo-feminists demand that men mind
their own business and allow women to
control their own bodies; when abortion is
a financial problem, these same women are
quick to remind men that it is. after all, at
least "half" their fault.
As long as women use men as scapegoats
for unwanted pregnancies and
simultaneously refuse to grant them the
opportunity to aid in the decision-makine
process, then they should pay for their own
abortions. The problem will soon take care
of itself: when the psuedo-feminists are in-
dependent of men, men will no longer
desire them, and abortions will no longer
be an issue for them.
If we are going to tackle such h.av
issues as abortion, then we should be abte
to deal with them in a reasonable way. We
should also not confound them with other
issues, such as whether or not to hac an
Emergency Medical Loan Fund. Wha: w
it be, a loan fund or a roller skating par
r- Campus Forum
ECU Conservatives Speak Out Against Liberal Views
The left, reeling from the first real
battles of the conservative revolution
has just begun to launch its counterat-
tack. ECU's liberals have been effective-
ly using The East Carolinian as a vehicle
for this counterattack.
Led by the daring mud-slinger
Weyler, who portrays Reagan as a
social-program-slashing axeman and a
paver of the "road to hell and backed
up by the slightly misguided David Arm-
strong, who shows us a modern Horatio
Alger, a man witrh a "child's vision of
the adult world the liberals have had a
few good laughs at the expense of con-
servatism. It is time now to make a ra-
tional reply to the leftists' barrage of
misrepresentation and political blind-
ness.
The most outraged cries of anti-
Reaganism have focused around
Reagan's social spending cuts. We are
bombarded with inferences that Reagan
is anti-poor, anti-minority, anti-elderly,
and, idealogicaliy, antediluvian. Of
course, the underlying assumption
behind such charges lies in the belief that
social programs, if uncut, would
somehow work. That social programs
don't and can't work in America can
readily be seen in their growth. If such
programs did work, the reasons for their
existence would be gone and the pro-
grams would gradually be cut back. In-
stead, these programs, have ballooned.
The plain truth is America was not
built on the principles that allow such
programs to exist. "Horatio Alger's"
individualism and volunteerism worked
to build America and still works. Those
who doubt this simple fact should take a
look at their local volunteer fire depart-
ments and the floods of donations that
pour in to the families who suffer sud-
den losses to fires, catastrophic illnesses,
auto accidents, etc.
Why, when billions of dollars are
poured into social programs, has the
number of people dependent on these
programs increased rather than decreas-
ed? One often overlooked reason is that
an arbitrary standard of poverty has
been set up to tell the poor they're poor!
Any American who has indoor plumb-
ing, a stove, a refrigerator, or a televi-
sion set is immeasurably richer than
most of the people in the world. What
objective standard of poverty can be set
in America, a country that has running
water, telephones, video games, Fast
Fares, chewing gum, etc? And how
many "poor" welfare recipients sit at
home smoking cigarettes (an expensive
and totally useless habit) while watching
soap operas on their television sets? The
number of truly needy people in this
country must be small indeed!
How dare the liberals set a standard of
poverty everyone must pay for, based,
not on some objective standard of real
need, but rather on the sudden jerking
of an anxious knee? And how dare they
force the producers of wealth (the
largest group of which is the middle
class) to sacrifice their profits, the blood
and sweat of their labors, for those who
do not produce? When I mention non-
producers 1 am speaking not about those
who can't produce (the severly han-
dicapped and some of the elderly), but
rather about those parasites whose
"concern" for the poor translates into
maintaining their own government agen-
cy jobs.
No rational human being would ob-
ject to the lives of the poor being made
easier. But only a rational human being
can see that keeping an omni-expanding
public dole is not the answer. The
economic equality the liberals long for is
possible only in the sense that those with
more can, by government confiscation,
be reduced to the status of those with
less. The largest share of such transfer-
red or "redistributed" wealth would in-
herently go to those who seize it. Say
hello to your friendly neighborhood
bureaucrat!
Yes, some people may be hurt by
Reagan's social spending cuts. Such is
the fate of the parasite who discovers his
host no longer desires his presence. The
liberal alternative would shackle us to
the present overwhelming social burden.
We have already taken too many
disastrous steps down that path. To con-
tinue is to walk blindly down the road to
economic self-immolation. How many
poor people could the government help
then?
JEFFRY SCOTT JONES
Freshman, English
DENNIS KILCOYNE
Freshman, Pol. Science
Valuable Media
Speaking from the viewpoint of an ac-
complished satirist, I can appreciate Kim
Albin's comments about WZMB-FM
radio. However, as a staff writer from
WZMB, I demand equal time.
In her January 28, 1982 column, Miss
Albin stated:
17 think the 'reason' they are not on
the air yet is because those in charge over
there have not yet decided whether they
want a radio station or a cause for which
students can become acquainted with the
local and federal bureaucracy. "
Is The East Carolinian trying to pro-
vide us with interesting reading or a
spelling lesson?
By providing space for personal ads,
The East Carolinian has subjected us to
implications of lewd and immoral acts.
Is The East Carolinian trying to provide
students with a means of com-
municating, or is it trying to spice up our
sex lives?
If you'll look through the ads of The
East Carolinian, you'll find an ad for an
abortion service. Is The East Carolinian
trying to provide access to medical ser-
vices or influence our morals?
In the past, the editorial page of The
East Carolinian has been the scene of
bigotry and blatent lies. Is The East
Carolinian providing students an oppor-
tunity to spout off, or is it giving us
lessons in yellow journalism?
Satire is an interesting and intriguing
form of writing. However, 1 feel it has
no place in news. Let this be a lesson.
I hope this letter is taken in the spirit
in which it wa's written. Here at WZMB,
we look forward to a good working rela-
tionship with The East Carolinian � our
sister media.
JIMENSOR
WZMB News Staff
Rickover
Your Tuesday story featuring Ad-
miral Rickover was timely and well-
written.
There was one mistake. Rickover said
last Thursday, January 28, (as reported
in the next day's New York Times): "I
am not proud referring to his nuclear
contributions. The word "not" was
omitted in your story.
What sad irony that Rickover feels
that way about a major part of his life's
work. I guess Albert Einstein felt the
same when he wished he had been a
plumber instead of helping gift his
species with power it was too young to
control. (I had such a feeling when one
of my best students went to work for
Lockheed's missle division.)
CARROLL WEBBER. JR.
Solidarity
The Random House Dictionary
defines solidarity as a union or
fellowship arising from common respon-
sibilities and interest, as between
members of a group.
Bear in mind that solidarity is not a
passing idea with passing goals, but is
becoming a universal term that does not
end in Poland. It is a symbol for unifica-
tion against oppression in all its forms, a
coalition for freedom, wherever
freedom is absent.
It may sound trite, but freedom is
something we Americans often take for
granted. Freedom of speech, press,
religion, to hold meetings, etc. In
Poland, the people through Solidarity
are striving for these basic tenets of
freedom. On Dec. 13, Poland's Com-
munist Government enacted martial
law.
Let us now pull together in a unified
show of support for the Poles who are
struggling for freedom and not dismiss
the issue as "their problem for it is
our problem as well.
JOETR1PP
Soph Geology
Equal Rights
Upon reading Sandra Thomas's
response to a letter written by Mr.
Agate, I was so offended that I un-
sheathed my Bic and set forth on the
"Quest for the Lowly Male This lowly
male considers himself to be fairly
liberal to the injustices of the day, in-
cluding the lack of equal rights for
women.
As for abortion, I have not yet come
to grips with my feelings. If 1 was of
lesser intelligence the idiocy of your let-
ter would have decided the issue for me.
Mr. Agate presented a reasonably in-
telligent opinion, yet only an opinion,
which granted was biased by his gender.
To point this out, you reply not only in
an unintelligent manner but in an ex-
tremely biased manner as well. I agree
that the male shares responsibility for a
pregnancy and should be held accoun-
table as such. There ends my agreement.
To begin with, society in general has
tended toward sexual permissivene,
and a college campus usually leans even
further in that direction. As a remit.
women have becom almost as sexually
agressive as men. Yet, you state men put
on the pressure for sex. Well a dah of
superglue between each knee will stand
up to an incredible amount of pressure.
Furthermore, women, like men, do their
share of neat inspection and aim for
grade A.
To top off your inane hodgepodge of
turbulent emotions you contradict your
very premise. You stateWomen give
life and by nature are preservers of life
This is a valid ending to a letter defen-
ding abortion? Even if this supposition
was true, your earlier statement was that
men are at the very least one-half
responsible for pregnancy. Yet, it's
women who give life?
In conclusion, I would like to express
genuine concern for your attitude
toward men. Possibly the result of a
traumatic experience at the hand of an
unscrupulous male. Whatever the
reason, the problem needs attention and
as a psychology major you should
recognize this. Think about it.
GEORGE H.YOUSE
Jr. Accounting
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Buiding, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s).
thl
mj
I
y �
i. i

I
m
:s
1
H
d





I HI 1 AS1 (. AROl IN1AN
Style
M MKI AKV 4. 1982 Pal
1 Miracles In Wood On
Display At Gallery
The Desk
u pieci , is on display at Gray In (.alien titan Milliams)
B JOSt.l'HOI.IMCk
Sljll W nil I
I c U's Gray An Gallery is
costing the 11H2 Annual School ot
�n 1 acuity 1 xhibition an exhibi
lion that can be appreciated anil en
joyed In all.
I pon entering the gallery, one
first notices the largest piece in the
show, ('hern I ice, a piece ol scup-
lure by Robei! 1 dminston. Con-
structed ol light blue steel beams
and a beam ol cherry wi �od, ii is a
realistic vision ol a vice, grasping a
beam, definitely meritting some al
tention.
: nhet scupture, Saltei I'
SV . by Norman Kellei seems to
ip mi. :he image ol ocean swell
ihe come on lo the shoreline.
Rt ing perpendicularly on a san
ired plane ol wood, an
amai int. c I n n 1 w � � �d, carv ed
in the smooth, cut age ol �,i
eies one the image ol waves as they
Done in earth ware, Attic
Memorabilia: The Bowling Bag is
an exceptionally realistic work that
captures the true sense of a bowling
ball in a bowling bag which has been
sitting in an attic for some time.
I wo very elaborate ceramic
works, Round Birdfeeder and
Greens-leaves by Chuck Chamberlin
show some very elaborate and
del .aie ornamentation. Clearly,
some time, creativity and excellent
workmanship were put into them,
and they should not be overlooked
by any gallery goei
Desk bv lenv Smith is a func-
tional piece f furniture, a desk and
is very well finished and styled.
Done in a very modern style, it is
very smooth, curvy composition.
( Iverall, it is a very function, yet,
unique piece.
In the media ol intanglio prints,
Donald Sexauer's "Scotia Series
aside from demonstrating superior
talent, portray their subject matter
extremely well. Depicting scenes of
Northern fishing harbors, they
arouse the image of a sea breeze,
filled with the brisk smell of ocean
mist and the longing tail ol seagulls
Clearly, they represent tht mtic
sense ol a small fishing villa.
Although Paul Hartley has many
I works at the show. Bout ht �
Two one ol his works, is ex
tional. Besides being very im-
aginative, it has inner der.
tery and a mystical feelii
intrigues the viewei More ivei
hues, tints and methods that H �
are very stril ing,
Some ol Ed Keep paintings are
too repititious and sy metrical, but
painting, the West Was I
I as Vegas is worth noting. In it, an
arrangement of the Las Vegas Strip
is juxtaposed against a reflection-
like image which is directly below.lt
seems like a cool, calm image th
definitely interesti
Isolation Tanks
'Free From Gravity'
B LINDA HALL
Sljlf Wfl.r
Two (Dan II illiartis).
Veiled rears h Iran (.ordley (Dave Williams).
Them Dukes
Poor Acting And Listless Plots Major
Downfall In Show Depicting South
BvII l Bl H KIN
�r, the cat
e -s, wit houl i
But foi
i an nev ei
(ieneral 1 ee and
n and out ol the
1 a '
,ei
.op-de-loops
roes enough kmi-
wr k a tank V
a indows.
rhe othei two members ol the
ke family are cousin Daisy,
� �d bv Catherine Bach, and the
' l nele lessie, played bv
i i � Pyle. Daisy Duke is pro-
haracter keeping the
. � the ail 1 his dark-haired,
.ged beauty doesn't own but
in! ol clothes a white blouse
� the top five buttons missing
and a pair ol cutoff, cutoff leans
that are sprayed on her before the
tan ol each episode
Uncle lessie, the only smart one
on the show, is perfect tor his pan
"i u an close your eves as he talks
and almost smell the hay and
chicken manure. He's a white-
haired old gem who never uses a
comb or a razor and always wears a
pan ol laded blue overalls. Normal
lv. I nele Jessie tays in the
background until his nephews get
"accidentally involved over their
heads" m an illegal plot, such as
moonshing or counterfeiting. I hen
he steps in, picks his teeth for a few
seconds with a broom straw and
tells the boys how to get out o the
mess.
Usually, the boys are being
troubled bv Boss Hogg (Sorrell
Booke), an old, bald, fat man who
wears three-piece white suits and a
white hat. Boss Hogg owns and runs
the town, the county and his
brother-in-law sheriff, Roscoe P.
Coltrain (.lames Best.)
1 he biggest part ol each show is
spent showing a car chase between
the Duke boys and the Sheriff
Roscoe, with the Dukes always com-
ing out ahead. I he final chase o the
hour always ends in a crash between
the Dukes, the F.B.I , the bad guvs
and the sheriff, who always arrives
late and smashes his car into the
others.
Finally, at the point, the show
Starts to gel interesting I he Duke
boys go down to the local beet joint
where Daisy works. There, they
have a couple o brews and listen to
a big-time singer like Freddie Fendei
oi Hank W illiams, Jr who just
happened to be passing through
Ha.zardounty and stopped off to
rest a spell. Daisy, meanwhile, pet
ches hersell on a stool in the cornet
and starts crossing and uncrossing
hei legs. V everyone gives a big
round ol applause foi the singer, the
show comes to an end.
I he coi n pone, country style
depicted on The Dukes oj Hazzard
is not excessive to the point that it
becomes ridiculous. It is moderate
and adequate I he plots in the
episodes are not complex enough to
be realistic and are win ten in such a
manner thai they miss the mark ol
being humorous. An old lady who
makes counterfeit money in hei kit-
chen, to name one example, isn't
likely to occui in everyday life. 1 he
cat crashes and the .base scenes
have been worn out since the days
when Broderick Crawford starred in
Thi Highway Patrol The series has
no value ol any description other
than to displav the talent ol the ac-
tors - which isn't too good So you
could say thai the show should be
used as a stepping stone for the a
tors' success because if they can'l do
any better, they should get out ol
the profession, Vide from being
unrealistic, the show docs nothing
but enforce bad drivinghabits .nd
give the national television audience
a bail impression ol Southern living.
ou are floating in a Ugh ;
soundprooj rank filled with .
t heatt d water contain
500 pounds oj salt a; a depth o) 10
es. In the absence oj fight and
sound in 'he highly how
��- ed from
wit) . A o) its 'h
are c ' � � "�'
i mat stimulation is present.
it here is vour body? Floating in an
� ati( �
Isolation tanks have been highly
successful in exploring mental p
.esses and inner consciousness
developed into an alterna
therapeutic tool.
Floatation tanks have been used
successfully in stress management
prgrams of athletic teams, notably
the Denver Broncos. the
Philadelphia Eagles and the
Philadelphia Phillies. In fact, the
tank's main therapeutic application
so far has been in stress reduction
programs tor such groups as police,
aii traffic controllers and the I v
Air i or e
1 he concept of float tanks
ina.d in Malibu, Calif in 1954
with research o 1
neurophysiologist Dr. John I illy, a
pioneer investigator o dolphin
communication. Emerging from
classified experiments with the
Department of Defense, and evolv-
ing further through work with the
National Institute o Mental Health,
the concept ot the isolation tank has
been exhaustively tested.
From a medical perspective.
relaxation tanks fall into the
category of Restricted Environmen-
tal Stimulation Technique (REST).
Kl SI is an outgrowth o sensory
deprivation studies of the earlv
1950s. Dr. 1 illv's research goal at
the time was to disprove the prevail-
ing scientific assumption that the
brain "goes to sleep" when all sen-
sory and visual stimulation is cut
off.
He subsequently proved that the
brian creates its own input in the
deprived sensory environment.
Dr. 1 illy and others have reached
one very important conclusion. For
the type of rest leading directly to
stress alleviation, no device can
match the results which can be
achieved with regular use of the
tank. As he states in his book The
)�� Self, "For a businessperson. a
scientist or a professional of any
sort, this is a boom, to be able to
think free o' physical fatigue in the
body. The method allows one to
become free within a few minutes
Research in sensors deprivation
lies on the threshold of answering
some profound questions on the
woi kings ol the inner mind. Sources
of interest in the techmquemclude
the new and stressful environments
in which military personnel now
operate, the "brainwashing"
techniques and the success of man's
future in space.
Darkness, silence, solitude -
studies in sensors deprivation report
a variety I cperu
from night ma
a! experience- i
deepesi lev f relaxa
hue md thai l

machine reaches its
� rma
B � a meel
ce which stimulates the p
Delta brainwve;
science's closest answer to the max-
imum achieveable physica
from sensory input.
The Delta state is reached when
iral acti rmally involve
processsing sensory pei is
liberated In the is ink, the
. in-
put and fre I i from muscular ten-
sion makes the Delta state the
nature response. Fortunately, since
most people have difficulty achiev-
ing and maintaining the Delta state
sufficient periods, the tank can
pi wide an access route to profound
relaxation. The ease ol tension leads
to improved health and a cleani.
thought.
Some researchers believe that
the tank is valuable therape �ol.
The rationale is that problems su
as stress, anxiety, dd hypertt
are caused or complicated by an ex-
cess f external stimulation.
Any process which reduces this
stimulation is seen as useful in
alleviating these d -�
number of investigators nave
teported therapeutic benefits among
psychiatric patients Positive fl
on personality have nee n
documented.
Steve Cohen, practicing chiropr-
ctor m Winterville who specialize
neurospinal rehabilitation, has an
isolation tank in his office. He
states, "The tank can be extremely
effective in arthritic conditions since
it relaxes the body and its jom
muscles, and ligaments. This relaxa-
tion helps to enhance the positive ef-
fects of the adjustment
According to Dr. Cohen. "Al this
time, 1 use the tank with certain pd
tients in conjunction with tl
chiropractic care. It is helpful
headache cases w he
musculature of the upper trapezium
can be relaxed. In certain types of
lumbar strains, the same principle
applies. Relaxaton of the broad
muscles in the low back leads to
faster healing. I would lecomm.
the tank also as an aid in unwinding
from everyday tension so common
in our stressful society
Isolation tanks, exotic diversions
from southern California, are on
their way to becoming a national
self-therapy craze. For moderate
fees, people can relax in tanks in
many major cities coast to coast
Obviously, the tanks are not foi
everyone. Their use would not be
recommended for claustrophobics
or for those who fear that isolation
mav bring them into contact with
portions of their mind which they
do not wish to explore. But the
relaxation tank is relaxing.






r

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 1982
Crisis Center Stresses Confidentiality
Continued From Page 1
"We refer students
back and forth at
times he explained.
The ECU Counseling
Center provides similar
services to students and
has a staff of five full-
time counselors.
Weignd said about 10
percent of the student
body takes advantage
of the services available
at the ECU center for
all kinds of problems.
East Carolina also
operates a campus
Alcohol and Drug Pro-
gram under Director
Jerry Lotterhos. All
students are invited to
use this facility at any
time.
Many of the
volunteers at REAL,
house are students
themselves. Some have
become familiar with
REAL through their
Student Volunteer Pro-
gram on campus.
Others, like Sharon
Mullally, are doing
their study field work
there. Mullally is a
senior in social work
and said she really en-
joys her work with
REAL.
"We're exposed to a
lot of areas that other
field placements
wouldn't be Mullally
said. "It's a lot dif-
ferent than in the
classroom setting �
you learn things here
that they don't tell you
about in textbooks
"REAL trusts
Students said ECU
Social Work and Cor-
rections Professor Ted
Gartman, who along
with Anita Brehm of
the School of Elemen-
tary Education act as
campus contacts for the
Student Volunteer Pro-
gram. The Student
Volunteer Program is
"a group of people
�who want to learn how
to practice the skills
that they have or are
learning about counsel-
ing continues Gart-
man.
Gartman said any
person who wants to
offer themselves to help
other people can get in-
volved. Gartman feels
that many students feel
a sense of "empathy"
when they talk to
another student.
"Help is not always
theraputic threatment,
it may just be some
kind of peer group sup-
port Gatrman added.
REAL r ec ieves
strong community sup-
port. It also bridges
communication bet-
ween East Carolina
Universtiy and the local
commmuniiy. Students
get the opportunity to
work with community
volunteers and become
more familiar with the
area nd the needs of
Greenville residents.
According to ECU
Counselor Education
student Becky Stewart,
many students who
visit or call REAL are
generally unfamiliar
with the types of ser-
vices offered at the
center. "You just never
hear about it adds
Mullally.
"1 would love for the
students to realize that
they are welcome to
come" here or call us
with their needs and
concerns said ECU
psychology graduate
Blake Noah. "It's go-
ing to be confidential,
no name or identifica-
tion is necessary.
Noah said "contacts
from the ECU sector
have gone down" and
that it is difficult to
keep new students in-
formed about REAL.
Smith added that the
"transient nature" of a
university town makes
it hard to keep up with
new people.
Funding for REAL
comes from the United
Way, The N.C. Dept.
of Human Resources:
Division of Mental
Health, Mental Retar-
dation, and Substance
Abuse Services, and
some community dona-
tions.
"Two-thirds of our
funding comes from
junited Way Smith
noted. Most of the
other third is picked up
by the Department of
Human Resources.
REAL has a board of
directors that function
ias policy and procedure
coordinators for the
center. There are
presently 15 board
members, but more are
needed, Smith said.
"REAl HOUSE" is
in fact a home for three
in-residence counselors
who alternate the night
shifts while twelve
other counselors and
four interns coordinate
the da v time work
dribble into.
Western Sizzlin
No matter whether it s
before, after, or even during
the baiigame. anytime is the
perfect time to enjoy a del i
cious steaX from Western
Sizzlin Steak House All West
ern Sizzlin steaks are USDA
Choice cute of western beef
broiled to mouthwatering per
fection. and served always
complete with
n choice of
potato and Texas toast If
perhaps you are watching
your weight these days
Western Sizzlin features the
all-you-can-eat salad bar with
your favorite garden fresh
flxlns. So don't let the baligame
stand m the way of you enjoy
ing a delicious, affordable
meal right nowt
�� Western
SlZZilR
FRIDAY SPECIAL
RIB EYE STEAK
W Baked Potato or French Fries
& Texas Toast
2903 East 10th St
610 W. Greenville Blvd. ONLY
Hlair Brown and John Helnshi in Continental Divide, playing only this Friday and Saturday (5, 7,
9 p.m.) at Hendrix Theater, Mendenhall.
NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY
offers for
your enjoyment
T Slliils ik'ipmq Bdqs
ti.iikp.ti C.impniq Equip
mrtii. SHrl Tu�0 ihorV.
D. .�. s .�"d O1 700 Dill, i cut
Ni� .nit! UiO Hi-iis Cob�y,
B- � it
ARMY-NAVY
STORE
ABORTIONS
App't's. Made 7 D,iv
CALLTOLL FREE
1-800 321 0575
&JT
a. y
ABORTIONS UP TO
1 2th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM Hit
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AT FURTHER EXPENSE
S1IS.04 Pregnancy Test, fert
Control, and Problem
Prtfnancy Counseling For fvr
ih�r information call U1-OS3S
(Toll Fru Number
�00-21 ISM) oetwaan AM
and S P.M. Woofcdays
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
tWWott Morgan St.
Raloifti. N.C.
�VH
ik

I THE VILLAGER
A ROFFLER FRANCHISE
BARBER AND STYLE SHOP
LOCATED 10th ST
NEXTTO VILLA ROMA
SPECIAL HAIRCUTS RrX S5.00
NOU $4.00 WITH THIS AD
Call 758 3768 or come by � Hrs. 8 5:30 Wed. Sat.
Are you the
Sole
Survivor?
NO? ensen our
RUNNING SHOES to:
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P. (). Box 7211
Wilson, N. C. 27893
1 OK our complete LIFE SAVING
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li ilu inner-olc ��� "�t DELUXE
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ADVENTURES IN BRITISH THEATRE
July 4-17, 1982
Two Weeks In London
7 British
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Tours Of Historic London
Covent Gardens Theatre Area
Stratford - On - Avon
660
Includes Room and
2 Meals Daily
at the Univ. of London.
Ik 4m
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PRICE � $14.50
v. A
Does not include trans-
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For more information contact
Charles Martin Thompson Theatre,
Box 5746, NCSU, Raleigh, N. C. Zip
27650. Phone (919) 737-2405.
CASTING NOTICE
We are auditioning for over 200 singers, dancers, musicians variety artists
and technicians for The Old Country Busch Gardens 1982 Entertain
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The Old Country. America's most truly themed theme park will
provide you with a paycheck and an opportunity to polish and display
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So get your act together and show it to us. Then get ready to show it tc
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Special audition for those unable
to appear at our previous audition:
UNC Chapel Hill
Wednesday. Feb 10: 12 5 pm
. Student Union Auditorium
BUSCH 6ARDCX1
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Whaft a true nature lover
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Continental
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science fiction,
mysticism, sex,
violence and rock
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"HEAVY METAL is
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- Jay Scott, GLOBE & MAIL
"An enormous amount
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space flights, sword
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"Wild, uninhibited lany
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t





IMF EAST CAROl INI AN
Sports
I ebruarv 4, 1982. Pag� 1
Lady Pirates To Host
No. 6 State On Sunday
Rv (HKI sc m KK
N.t State-ECl women's
wn into a
n ! ev enl years 1 hai
enew ed this Sunday
in Minges Coliseum
vo �. lubs have had some real
ce Caihy ndrui look
.o head coach ai
! v I S av s seemed to win,
rht rival v was held back
t Pack's dominati v
. . : as yeai
week the 1 ad
w gi aduated stars
Man i Girven and
and
winning
I ai snapped
f4 game w inning
competition,
I ady I
k
trip to the l W championship
lourney followed for both teams.
1 his season was an entirely dif-
ferent matter, though. 1 he 1 adv
Bucs losi five semois to graduation
and faced a real rebuilding effort.
I he Wolfpack, on the other hand,
was ranked as one ol the nation's
best
1 he Pack has lived up to its bill
ing, standing 19 2 following a win
ovei (.1 em son lasi night
(Wednesday). N.C. State is current
U ranked sixth nationally and will
bring an eight-game winning sneak
10 Green ille Sunday
ECl also lias won eight in a rim
aftei getting off to a slow 4-7 start.
Ironically, ECl took an eight-game
streak into last year's Greenville
game againsi the Wolfpack
rhe two vluhs met once earliei
this season, the Wolfpack winning
Raleigh, h2 56. Andruzzi hopes
ngs will he different this nine
ai nind.
"1 know we've improved a lot
since (hen she said. "State has
though. It's gome to be in-
o sa the least. I do tee! it
will be a competitive game in every
aspect, one we're looking forward
to "
N.C. State coach Ka Yow hinted
via telephone Wednesday that the
came with ECU may nol mean as
much to hei club as it has in the
past. With the NCAA expanding
after last season to include women's
sports, there is no longet an
NCA1AW (ol which ECU was a
member) tegular season or tourna
merit. State's women's program
now is a full fledged member of the
Atlantic Coast Conference, while
ECU is an independent.
rherefore, State now puts more
emphasis on ACC games, whereas
that attention used to go to
NCAIAW matchups. In the pasi
State needed an impressive showing
in the NC.MAVs regular season or
tournament to gel an invitation to
rhe nationals.
"Out games with 1 asi Carolina
definitely meant a loi more last yeai
and in other years � ow sard "It's
still big, but it doesn'i couni in the
Lady Bucs Roll To
Eighth Win In Row
same wav
As a result, Now saidshe had no
m
idea how her club would approach
playing in Greenville.
"I can't put my linger on it
We've been concerned with Clem-
son most ail week, so 1 can't tell yet.
1 certainly hope we will be up But
you can't be sky-high for every
game. That's something I'll just
have to wait and see about
Stale is led by Ginger Rouse, who
is averaging 14.2 points per game.
Guard Angic rmstrong is the only
other Woltpaek player in double
figures, scoring at a 10.4 clip.
Forward-Centet Mary Denkler
leads ECU, and the slate, with a
19.9 average. She is also the slate's
second leading rcboundei. averag
ing 8.3 pulls a game
Sam Jones adds 16 4 pomis from
her wing position. She leads the
siate in assists with a 5.9 average
and is second in steals witha 2.6
average.
NCSU's Armstrong is lones'
mam competition in the lattei two
categories. She is second behind
lones in assists with a 5.6 average
and is first in steals, averaging 2.7
ECUs Mania Girveit, mm graduated, made this shot last
year to gel the lady Pirates rolling en route to an upset of
V( . Mate. I he two teams meet again in Mingesoliseum

Kv IIMSn DuPKI �
ti minutes oi i
aim
mi
uuh about oui pla;
� ietK
I r u 1
A ,0
hai
wuh her
ortlv
before Dcnk lei's
u returnee
1 near the
ame.
the sp
d
uar
Mils lasieu
ne nip
�s u i! n
(. P. Mll'uls
and
I
I ostei netted 1; pomis
�in field eals. c haney
mpressiv e
'I nn. e
json w i'
I lo carom
IW Ii! I ot
our earns wa
Ine; we
ill season.
e had our
aid An-
coal sliooime
et
wc slopped Marcia
been averaging 24
She had no points in
,j only rime in the se-
� i v e
!)eI ! I I Mil
lh points "ii
ol nine held coal attempt
lessee
Staii
i
I adv
B
laffke added 14, while
lips netted Iwith eight
he b
h
nevei losi
i he lead in
. i.
as we neve
ucial moments sai
ECU On
Tentative
I-A List
- :
am is one o
hed
92
euuie.
he cl
V .i news
NCAA
rssj.
flu
d V
onc(
K I
a . ne upcoming football
.eason win
licked up by se.

am would be dropped
'
! V ranks.
uesaw
1 C I 1-AA
A
be anvthiriL' h
. � rename
Apparently a
ius next -
dispelled by the c
c api i . Cop;v
ics at the 1 s Naval
i t
and chairman ol the c
mitt ee
reclassil
aid I u esd a
II become I
n
Septembei 1
preliminai v
lassification was release
.lid.
in response u
C A A
cout
lh
requ
up
"Instead ol bringing the
wly we kept pushing M up
Reaching For Rebound, M ins
U!Ci
tnd gelt ing good shois.
1 ad l'naies now prepare
11
Michael Gibson (left) and Moms Hargrove
their eighth win. Tip-ofj tin ��
n Minxes C ol-
:ai ly listing would allow to
ontmuc normal reci
edures.
1 hirtv nine schc
. ere t av u
aironallv ran
ked N.C . Slal
u
ill be hitting the boards hard tonight when iseum is
to.
Ilda
urn
v at
vm in
Minges Col- the Pirates host Baptist College in search oj
dropped from Division I A A stat
Among them was all teams in
sou'tier n Conference,
Richmond and William & V
Harris � Not Your Ordinary 'Jock
ppalachian
State and v
Readying For Hit
ECU safety Clint Hams (48) combined with teammate
Chm k Bishop (8) to make tackle after this opponent's catch.
Bv CYNTHIA PI EASAIMTS
Don'l be surprised il Clini Hams
isn't at all what vsm expected.
He is a two sport standout at Easi
( arolina, starring in both ftwtball
and track. He contradicts those
qualities normally associated with
an accomplished athlete. He is
quiet, very likable, well-mannered,
and refreshingly modest. He is an
athlete who hates the lenn "jock"
because it tends to stereotype.
A sophomore from Chesapeake,
Virginia, Harris signed with ICl
after being heavily recruited bv
schools all over the United States.
including every Atlantic Coast Con-
ference member. Ohio State. I'm
due, Cincinnati, and I C I A also
desired his services.
Harris initially signed a letter-ol
intent with North Carolina but.
alter much deliberation, signed a
full football scholarship wuh ECU
on national signing dav
The Pirate free safe!) seems lo
relish playing against the far Heels.
He had 17 tackles against UNC two
years ago, and had an interception
in this past year's ECU-UNC game
Harris said he enjoyed playing
againsi Tar Heels I am Griffin and
William Fuller, a couple of his old
high school huddles
V doubt, 1 lai i is has pi oven ins
athletic ability on the football Held.
bui he has also proven ii on a track
Hams won many lilies in high
school. He was ihe irginia siaie
record holdei in the 100 meters,
slate AAU champ in the inn and
200-meter dashes. Aid was on the
national Junioi Olympics 400-yard
relay squad.
�s a Pirate, Hams is running in
ihe 55-metei event, placing first in
the team's lasi indoor meet. He also
urns in the 100 and 200-metei in-
dividual events, and 4(M) and
800-metei relay races.
Al 5-11. 198 pounds. Hams is
bulkiei than most sprinters.
"Hersehel Walkei (football ak
iiask standout al Georgia) and I are
probably the two largest sprinters
around Hams said. "Everyone
thinks 1 belong in ihe shotpui area
Developing more endurance and
becoming stronger both menially
and physically are a few reasons
Harris cites for running track.
"1 iust want to help oul ihe
school in whatever wav I canhe
said
Hams also believes the compeli
lion he is facing now will be in
valuable to him later in life. "This
( arolina also were ii
Six s hools were listed as
mined. Included was S
I ousiana, a
iwo seasons
Pirai
e opponeni
� W! Mir-
i tF
i
Harris 48) broke up this pass play
against Western (arolina
world is competitive he said,
'iid competing in spoi is is one way
ol leaching von io deal with it
Harris s,tvs he makes a point
nevei io ovei psych himselt loi
compel ii ion a trap many athletes
fall into bui he dtes feel propel
menial preparation is ol the utmost
importance.
� know what I have io dohe
said. "It von do yout best, you
haven't tailed
See HARRIS, Page 8
Ihe 59 reclassified schools would
brine the numbei ol I members
IO Ss
The programs lentively classified
as I included, in additi ECU,
South Carolina, irginia rech and
all Atlantic Coast (
members
1 he 2 scheduled foi 1 can r�
tank easy. an NCAA offical said
Wednesday. Ihe offical claimed
that she could not foresee the status
o any ol the 2 being changed
Those programs that were drop-
ped failed to meet the following
standards.
� Play a minimum ol (n percent of
schedule againsi Division 1
members;
� Have averaged 17,000 paid atten-
dance at home foi the past tour
veais oi play in a stadium thai easts
30.000 and averaged 17,000 paid
home attendance in at least one ol
the last four years;
� sponsor at least eight vaisiiy
sports
The only way a school can remain
1-A and meet that criteria is to play
in a confernce in which at least six
members play football and halt ol
them meet the l-A standards.







8
FHF I AST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 4, 1982
Harris Escapes Norm
Continued From Page 7
Playing two sports can be dif-
ficult, even for an athlete of Harris'
abilities.
"It's very time-consuming he
said. "Sometimes there just aren't
enough hours in the day to get
everything in
There is always schoolwork to
contend with as well as athletics and
Harris has found self-discipline to
be a key factor in his study habits.
After one-and-a-half hour practices
every day. Hams usually tries to
make adequate time to study.
r-ven though playing two sports
can become tedious, Harris feels
there is a definite advantage to ex-
tending himself.
' "here's more glory he said
with a Minle. "If 1 continue to do
well, 1 will gam more publicity on a
national level
So far, Harris has performed ex-
ceptional!) well in both football and
track this year. He recovered very
well from an operation last year that
removed a bone chip from his knee.
One might think Harris would be
content with his accomplishments,
but he is not. "I'm never pleased
he said. "If I was satisfied, there
would be nothing else to ac-
complish
Harris says he is constantly busy
making new goals to replace his old
ones.
"I want to make All-American in
football he said the former high
school All-America. He also has
high hopes of running in the na-
tionals this March with the
400-meter realy team. The finals will
be held in Detroit, Mich.
Despite his interest in track and
his desires to make a splash on the
national scene, Harris says he
prefers the gridiron to the track.
"1 just find football more ex-
citing. If I'm frustrated I can take it
all out on the field
Classifieds
ATTENTION
Classified ads will be taken ONLY
during The lollowinq hours
Monday i IS 3 00
Typsday 2 00 3 00
Wednesday I 15 3 00
Thursday J 00 3 00
Friday - I IS 2.00
You must place the ads in person
and pay tor them in advance
Ra'�. are 11 for the first IS words
and i OS per words after the first
fifteen.
FOR SALE
WATFRBFDS DON T pay retail
oi your heated waterbed buy
direct from mqf and save Buy a
complete Is quality pine wood
lieatnl w.iterbed with IS yr. war
ranty for a ow as il9 (Queen)
Sl�� iKmq Layaway avail Call
David loi appointment 7S8 5408
OFFICIAL JOVAN posters of the
Roiiinq Stones ivfti American
Tour Lim.ted Quantity Call Bill
?58 802
4 8 ft refriqerator qood condition.
Perfect foi dorm room For tnfor
ma'ion call 7S8 3767 after I on
MWF
NE E D A brown furry friendi Mow
abou' a miniature bunny Cut
soft and cuddily Can Nancy or
LeiQh at 752 82S0
POLLING STONES 1981 toui
posters (Si still in wrappers
Best offers 7SA 339
TECHNICS STEREO imeqrated
Amplifier Model No SU 7300. 41
waits per channel it 3S Garrard
Turntable Model No 092 (without
cartridqel i35 CaH Jeff 758560
after 5
8 TRACKS tor saie soul and Rock
Wide selection low prices CaH
758 5077
FOR RENT
JSO PER MONTH 3 blocks from
campus Ronmate Needed S50
deposit and on� third utilities
'5 3018
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE
wanted to share 2 bedroom
townhouse " rent is 1112 50 plus �
utilities Non smoker prefered
Call 752 4694
TWO PEOPLE wanted to share
large house with younq couple in
Lake Ellsworth, Greenville Con
venient to hospital and university
$120 per month plus 1 4 utilities.
Deposit required Call 756 6308
after 5pm
FEMALE ROOMATE needed for
a three bedroom apartment at
Easbrook 58 and 13 utilities
Call 752 1412
FEMALE ROOMATE needed
Across from campus $95 a month
plus 12 utilities lit 797
TWO BEDROOM townhouse apt
fuily furnished, available for sum
mer Georqetown ap's Great
Location CAII 758 6095
ROOMATE TO share apt Near
Campus Call Chuck at 757 6021.
after 7 call 757 3474
WANTED FEMALE roomate
Kings Row Apts 2 bedroom AC
Furnished. Pool HBO $125 month
plus 11 electric Call after 7 p.m.
752 7752
FEMALE ROOMATE t6 share 2
bedroom townhouse Rent to be
split 4 ways. $57 50 each plus 14
utilities Call anytime 752 9540
FEMALE ROOMATE needed
Lawrence Apt Ond block from
campus $87 50 monthly Call
7 58 5697
ROOMATE NEEDED 4 bedroom
brick house, nice reesidentiai
area Fully carpeted, central heal
and air $100 monthly plus 14
utilities 758 0004
HELP
WANTED
COUNSELORS FOR western
North CArolina co ed summer
camp Room, meals, laundry
salary and travel allowance En
perience not necesary, but must
enioy livinq and workinq with
children Only clean cut non
smokinq college students need ap
ply. For applicationbrochure
write: Camp Pinewood. 1801
Cleveland Rd , Miami Beach, Fla
33141
SERVICES
CARICATURES BY WEYLER
Greenville s onqinal personalned
art service Have a cartoon donw
os yourself or a loved one a uni
que 91ft idea' $10 for 8I0. bw or
color Call 752 S77S
TYPING TERM thesis,
resumes, dissertations, etc Pro
tessional quality at Lowest rates
Call Kempie Dunn anytime
752 6733
NOTARY PUBLIC Call Amy at
757 3734
Want to know HOW TO MAKE IM
PROVE YOUR GRADES Booklet
at ECU Bookstore
PERSONALS
ATTENTION Do you have an in
terestinq or unique dorm room?
The Buccaneer is searching for
those special rooms on campus for
a few photographs All interested
persons contact The Buccaneer at
757 6S01
RICKY You are the most
gorgeous, se�y, interesting witty,
sweet, and mtelliqient man on
earth! My life would be monumen
tally empty without you I crave
you. think about you miss you
need you every minutr ol i-vty
day You make me happier than
I've ever been in my life.
Sweetheart, you are my sunshine,
and with all my heart I Love You
Your H H Lori
RIDERS
RIDE TO CHARLOTTESVILLE
Virginia Weekend of February 12.
Leave anytime Will Pay tor Gas
Call Debbie 752 7247
�SO i alentine? �SP
Icll 1 he �
lucky person z
�� �
m
? EAST T
mCAROI.INIANJi
PHI
MU
ALPHA
ROCK-N-
ROLL
SHOW
THURS
FEB. 4
JJ's
WIN A GIANT
6 FOOT SUB
Just complete these questions:
NAME
ADDRESS
PHONE
How did you learn
about SUBWAV
MALE ?
FEMALE ?
AGE
What radio stat.on do
you listen to lost9
OFFICIAL
ENTRY FORM
What newspapers do
you read9
DRAWING FEB. 28
We've Got More Toste.
208 E. 5th St.
J
beginning February 1st
The Galley
Snack Bar
(Located Ground Floor Jones Dorm)
will be open until
11:00 p.m.
Come Watch Prime Time TV
On the New 6' Wide Screen
Ti"K - -
Ha"1
Chicken Filet
Steak Sandwiches
Fishwich
4&
fc"�,
f0,r?Q

'o.
's
WOMEN'S
BASKETBALL
This Sunday at 3 p.m.
Minges Coliseum
6th Ranked N.C.State
vs.
E.C.U.
� Both Teams have Won 8 Straight �
m
she
m

m
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L.
ITS WAR!
BOOM! BOOM! BOOM!
To introduce you to our mouth watering style of pizza, we re mak
ing two incredible offers With this coupon save $1 00 on a
medium or $2 00 on a large Godfather's Pizza
What's holdin' ya? The doors are open now1
Godfather's Pizza
$100
XOFF
Medium
s
2
00
OFF
Large
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville Boulevard Phone 756-9600
Offer expires January 31 st
Limit one puza per coupon
Otter expires Jan. 31. 19K2
5
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
QUIXOTE TRAVELS, INC.
SPRING BREAK IN
FT. LAUDERDALE
March 8-15 �5 nights
Holiday Inn Oceanside$95 tax
per nite
We got the rooms �
don 7 miss your fun in the sun
Q
4Wi
Call now:
QUIXOTE TRAVELS, INC. -v i
319 Cotanche St.
Greenville, N. C. 27834
Phone: 758-3456
Copyr.qht 1982
Kroger Sa-
Quantity Rights Reserve
None Sold to De.i
REMEMBtft YOUR
Valentine
Feb. 14

5Z
600 GreeniMe Bivd Greenv
Open 8 a.m. to Midnight
Open Sunday 9am to 9 p m
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised tprr-s
quired to be readily avaiiab loi il
each Kroger Savon except as sr- I i
ly noted m this ad If we do run out of an
item vve will offer you your choice I �
comparable item when available
tmg the same savings or a ran I
which will entitle you to r
advertised item at the adverts,
within 30 days
'
COST CUTTER
Orange Juice
Meal plans accepted.
12-Oz -
Can
MADE FRESH DAILY
CHEESE OR GROUND BEEF
Pizza
ALL VARIETIES
SERVE 'N SAVE
t5
WASHINGTON STATE
EXTRA FANCY
GOLD OR RED
Delicious Appiesl
0
.� ELMERS
ASST, CHOCOLATE
Decorated
Heart
$577
U-Oz.
Bll
Luncheon
Meats
$-18
CONCENTRATED
SPRAY
Epris
ilo
1.3-oz.
Btl
BAGGED
Chips & Snacks A
COSMETICS A
IFttAORANCES
SfeBJ
16�

m�mmmmm





Title
The East Carolinian, February 4, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 04, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.176
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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