The East Carolinian, February 2, 1982






,
Hepburn, Fondas Shine
With 'On Golden Pond'
Page 5
Basketball:
�Spiders' Comeback Downs Pirates
�Peartree: Up-And-Coming Freshman
Page 8
Si
She
Carolinian

Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 58 No36
Tuesday, February 2, 1982
Greenville,N.C.
10 Pages
WZMBTo
Broadcast
Tonight
By MIKE HUGHES
si-ianl Nes r dilnr
"We're shooting for next week,
and barring new developments, we
should be able to begin broadcasting
then
No, don't crumble" up the
newspaper in utter disgust. That was
Sam Barwick's goal of last week.
So. here it is "next week and
for the first time in nearly six years,
LCI's radio station is ready to roll,
or rather rock 'n' roll.
However, Barwick, WZMB's
general manager, advises against
premature expectations. "If nothing
else goes wrong, we hope to be on
(he air by 6 p.m. Tuesday
According to Barwick, all that re-
mains to be done is a final calibra-
tion of the transmitter to the
studio's remote-control meter
readings. When that tuning is com-
pleted, the station will transmit on
91.3 FM.
"We're going up there tonight
(Monday) at 7 to make the final
changes Barwick said. "If our
telephone line at the transmitter site
is hooked up, the whole thing
should only take an hour or so.
"The only thing that can hold us
up now is some problem with the
equipment. Everything else is ready
10 go
Barwick explained that a majority
of the delays experienced by WZMB
in the past have been due to the fact
that the station must depend on the
actions of other sources. "Some
things, like FCC licensing, just can't
be sped up
However, licensing problems are,
at least for now, a thing of the past
for WZMB.
"When we get on the air Bar-
wick explained, "there are going to
be a lot of announcers who've never
had any air time. People are going
to hear mistakes, but it's not fair to
criticize the quality of the an-
nouncers. So I hope the listeners
won't expect them to be perfect
Still, Barwick is confident in the
abilities of his announcers and staff.
Campuswide
Energy Bill
57,3 74,000
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Slaff Wrilrr
First of Two Parts
One-million-three-hundred-
seventy-four-thousand, or
$1,374,000, that's what the utility
bill is expected to be for the 15
residence halls on East Carolina's
campus.
This figure represents 31 percent
of the dorm fee for the approx-
imately 5,580 students living on
campus.
According to John Gardner,
assistant to the vice-chancellor for
student life, the electricity usage in
the dorms has risen at a rate of five
percent annually for the last eight
years.
Much of this rise in electricity
usage is attributed to the increased
use of heat-generating appliances in
the rooms, such as hair dryers and
toaster ovens. Stereos and TV's
don't require as much electricity, ac-
cording to Gardner. However, these
are also being used in greater
numbers.
The utility bill includes the cost of
hot water, electricity, heat and cold
water. The cost of cold water was
$78,936 during the 1979-1980 school
year. Two dormitories used more
Ptwto �v OAVB WILLIAMS .
The Student Legislature, at a meeting Monday, voted by an overwhelming majority to override SGA President Lester Nail's veto of the Emergency Medical Loan Lund.
SGA Overrides President's Fund Veto
By DIANE ANDERSON
M�ff �ni�c
By an overwhelming majority, the
student legislature Monday over-
rode SGA President Lester Nail's
veto of a bill to reinstate the Medical
Emergency Loan Fund approved by
the body in the,session two weeks
ago.
Speaker of the Legislature Gary
Williams stepped down from his
chair to express his reason for tak-
ing offense to the veto, in view of
the fact that the bill was approved to
be reinstated by the legislature two
weeks earlier with only three votes
against it.
The Medical Emergency Loan
Fund was suspended by the summer
legislature with the stipulation that
some studies be done to determine
the necessitv and financial stability
of the loan. As of this dale, no such
study has been conducted.
"I am totally convinced that the
majority of the student population
out here doesn't want their money
spent in this way stated Nail in his
comments to the representatives. "I
think you're making a serious
mistake if you don't study this situa-
tion more
Nail later said he thought the
issue was not abortion but whether
students want a medical loan pro-
gram.
"I wasn't surprised the least little
bit Nail said. "1 was disap-
pointed, (houteh, about them over-
riding the cto
Nail also expressed his disap-
pointment that no study was made
on how the program would be used,
citing this as the main reason for his
veto.
The veto was not a "total loss
Nail said, because students are now
more aware about the program and
for what it is used.
Dr. James McCallum, director of
the Student Health Services, ad-
dressed the question of the loans be-
ing used for abortion. "During the
year that 1 have been here I have
signed or helped obtain more money
for non-abortions than abortions. I
think it is sorely needed by the stu-
dent body he said.
McCallum stated that the money
has been used to replace broken
ulasseN, lor emergency appendec-
tomies and fractured noses. "There
are just limitless possibilities he
said.
Although the loan has been
reinstated, the legislature has not
specified when the money will be
come available to students.
In other business, the SGA ap-
proved a revised set of election
rules, which included several
amendments. In future elections, an
absolute majority will be required
for a candidate to be declared a win-
ner in an SGA election. In a three-
person race, if none of the can-
didates receive an absolute majori-
ty, then a run-off will be held 'wo
weeks after the election between the
two leading candidates.
The Air Force ROTC was fund
ed S610 for expenses including a five
day trip to an n Force Academy.
The Department of Environmen-
tal Health and Chemist rs. Depart-
ment received S974.H to help with
the cost of a seminar on hazardous
waste.
The Alcohol and Drug Abuse
program was appropriated $775 to
pay for educational materials regar-
ding such things as the mandatory
penalties and other serious conse-
quences of alcohol related situa-
tions.
There was also a $500 appropria-
tion to the Save Cape Hatteras
lighthouse Committee, formed by
Senator Jesse Helms and Governor
James Hunt to investigate and solve
the problem of the deterioration ami
possible destruction of this historic
landmark.
The following individuals were
sworn in as new legislators; Becky
Crulchly for Garreit dorm; Ashley
DeLappe tor Jarviv; Jackie Rowe
tor Clement; and Marshall Heath,
knk Shelley and Robin forbes as
da student representatives.
Naval Officer Speaks On Nuclear War
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Sl�n Whirr
"The lesson of history is 'when a
war starts, every nation will
ultimately use whatever weapon has
been available ' said retiring Ad-
miral Hyman Rickover in his last
address to a Congressional Joint
Economic Committee Thursday.
Rickover, 82, also called for the
abolition of the Department of
Defense and said "we'll probably
destroy ourselves" in a nuclear war.
Rickover has been called "the
father of the nuclear navy" and
w. frw
"the father o the atomic sub
marine" in recognition of his
30-plus years as director of the
Navy's nuclear power program.
"I'm proud of the part I played
Rickover said. His responsibilities
included overseeing the develop-
ment and operation of all nuclear
propulsion plants as well as heavy
involvement in designing, testing
and operating submarines and
nuclear-powered warships.
While Rickover commanded
respect on Capitol Hill, he drew op-
position from many builders in the
defense industry for his outspoken
criticism for their operations.
According to Ensign Patrick
Nickens, action officer at the Pen-
tagon's Navy news desk, Rickover's
words "were all his own comments.
Admiral Rickover was not a
spokesman for the Navy
When questioned about
Rickover's reasoning behind his
statements, Nickens replied, "Do
you know anything about Rickover?
This is in his nature. They don't
reflect the Department of the Navy
policy
President Reagan and Navy
Secretary John Lehman announced
Rickover's retirement last
November, saying that an "orderly
transition" was needed'for the post.
It was stressed that Rickover was
not being fired, despite his vocal
dissatisfaction with the decision.
Rickover's predictions of a
nuclear war seemed to contrast
dramatically with the current
military deterrant strategy of MAD
(Mutually Assured Destruction),
which states no country will strike
first with nuclear weapons when
P��oto By DAVE WILLIAMS
With the heat still on in the dorms, students all over campus are enjoying the unseasonable weather in Greenville.
than $10,000 in cold water alone last
year, while some smaller residence
halls used under $2,000.
The cost of heat was between
$15,000 and $20,000 for the high-
rise dorms during that same period.
Electricity for the larger dorms was
also in the $20,000 range, with three
halls using more than $25,000.
However, the highest bill for the
residence halls was the hot water
tab, which reached $30,000 in
several dorms.
Carolyn A. Fulghum, associate
dean and director for residence life,
said that the costs eventually come
out of the students' fees. "The
largest part of the housing fee
(excluding salaries for workers) is
the utility budget she said.
"We are facing increases in fuel
cost bills and in consumption said
Barry Seay, chairman of the energy
committee of the Student Resident
Association (SRA). Seay also noted
that student fees will probably in-
crease as much as $60 per semester
next year, primarily because of ris-
ing energy costs.
Seay oversees a committee of
energy representatives for each
residence hall. The group of 15
students (one representative from
each dorm) come together for bi-
monthly meetings to discuss new
ideas and proposals for saving
energy. "We come to them witn
questions and ideas he said
Fulghum and Gardner are both
advisers to the SRA Energy Com-
mission.
Gardner announced that the first
week's results of the campus-wide
"Electricity Conservation Const"
were positive, with 10 of the dorms
saving in excess of Five percent Of
their normal usage. Any dorm keep-
ing an average of five-percent sav-
ings or better over a 10-week period
will win $100. "Everybody can
win he said.
The dorm with the best percent-
saved rate, based on expected usage
from previous years, will win $300,
with $200 going to the second-place
finisher.
Another recent energy contest
didn't fare with as much success. A
competition to design a lighting
switchplate sticker drew only six en-
tries.
Though disappointed with the
low number of entries, Fulghum,
Gardner and Seay expressed their
pleasure with the quality of the art-
work.
Lori Moore of White dorm won
the first-place prize. Second place
went to Terry Griffin of Tyler, and
Gwendolyn Martin of Fletcher took
third.
knowing another nation will cause
equal destruction in a retaliatory
nuclear attack.
Dr. H. A. 1. Sugg, a retired ECU
political science professor and a
former commander in the Navy,
agreed with many o Rickover's
positions and praised the admiral's
distinctive career.
" The perils of nuclear weapons is
one thing we have to be afraid of
Sugg said. "I'm not sure we have
the knowledge or the ability to use
See ADMIRAL, Page 2
UNC System
To Step Up
Integration
By MIKE HUGHES
Xtstini rv r dtii�f
The U.S. District Court in
Raleigh recently handed down a
decree which calls for further racial
integration in the 16 schools in the
University of North Carolina
system.
Under that decree, the system
must recruit blacks to attend the
state's 11 predominantly-white
schools and recruit whites to attend
the state's five primarily-black in-
stitutions.
Between the fall of 1980 and
August 1981, the system's
predominantly-white schools in-
creased their black enrollment from
7.4 percent to 7.53 percent.
Likewise, the percentage of white
students enrolled in the five
predominantly-black schools rose
during the same period from 10.88
to 11.78 percent.
However, according to the
decree, the UNC system must in-
crease black enrollment at the white
universities to 10.6 percent, and
white enrollment at the five black
schools must increase to 15 percent.
Also in the decree is a require-
See UNC, Page 3
f
�RMAteJftsi.





THF EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 2, I9�.
��
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would likf fo have an i�em printed
n the announcements column
please send the announcement (as
brief as possible) typed and
double spaced to The East Caroli
man in care of the news editor
There is no charge for an
louncements, but space is often
limited
The deadline tor announcement
are 5pm Friday for the Tuesday
paper and 5pm Tuesday tor the
Thursday paper
The space is available to all
campus organi?aiions and depart
men ts
CO OP EDUCATION
The Cooperative Education Of
tice loi aled m 313 Rawl Budding
currenlly has job openings lor
Summer and Fall 1982 with the
'oiling agencies Social Security
Administration Baltimore. MD
Morth Carolina Internship Office
Raleigh NC Camp Day. NC In
siitute of Government Raleiari
NC.
For mori' information, comae t
Hie Co op otficr in J13 Rawl
Building
NUTRITION AND
WEIGHT
There will be oeneral nutrition
and weight reduction classes of
tereci at the Student Health Center
�or next five weeks (Jan 26. Feb
2.9.16.23) Call 757 6841 to enroll
free Of charge in the 9 10 a m or
'Oil am classi lasses Individual
� I'unselling for special diet pro
blems are available on Ihese dales
from 8 9 am by referral of a
physician For moie information,
contact the Student Health Center
BUDDISM
A group is forming to encourage
the discussion, study, and practice
of Tibetan Buddism A meeting
will beheld Wednesday. Feb 3at 4
p.m. at 1113 S Evans Street All in
terested persons are invited to at
tend For information call Jim
Boone at 758 8238. or John
Spagnolo at 758 4255
CLOTHING &
TEXTILES
ASSOCIATION
Will be holding their monthly
meeting at 5 in the Varandinghem
Room in the Home Ec Budding
We invite all clothing and textiles
maiors and minors to become
members or iust come and sit in
with us We also welcome our
tormer and present members A
fashion field trip is being planned
tor spring II couldn't be a better
time to 0m!
NEW YORK
The East Carolina University
Student Union Travel Committee
is offering a fantastic spring break
alternative at an unbeatable price
Six days in New York City The
trip will run from March 5 mm
March 12 The cos' of the trip is as
follows Single occupancy
J289 00. Double occupancy
S185.00, Triple occupancy
SIS9 00. Quad ocupancy - JUS 00
Included in the price are the
following roundtrip transporta
lion via forty six passenger buses
and hotel accommodations at the
Hotel Edison The registration
deadline is February 22 and reser
vations can be made at the Central
Ticket Office located in
Mendf ntiall Student Center
SECOND UNITED
Nations
The Campaign for the Second
United Nations Special Session on
Disarmament is encouraging par
ticipation in its activities schedul
ed tor June 12th in New York City.
A local group is planning to travel
to the UN at that time to add their
voices lo the already great
number of peole calling for Global
disarmament Enough nue'ear
weapons now exist lo destroy (he
world many times over Our
response to this escalation is
critical A local task force for the
UN Campaign is now forming to
discuss various ideas and plans of
action Anyone interested par
ticipale by calling 758 4906 or a'
tending our local task force
meeting on Friday evenings at
6 30 p m at 610 S Elm Street.
ACTING CLASS
FAITH & VICTORY
FELLOWSHIP
Meets every Friday night at 7
p m m Jenkins Auditorium, Art
Budding Everyone invited Free
concert February' 5. Starts at 7
p.m Be there!
PHYE MAJORS
All students who plan to declare
physical education as a maior dur
mg change of maior week for the
fall Semester should report to
Minges Coliseum from 1 00 3 00
p.m on Wednesday, Feb 10 for a
motor and physical fitness test.
Satisfactory performance on this
test is required as a prerequisite
for official admittance to the
physical education maior pro
gram More detailed information
concerning the teshs available by
calling 757 6441 or 6442
Stephen B Fmnon, artistic
director of the newly formed
Greenville Little Theatre
(sponsored by the Wesley Founda
tion of Greenville) is inviting par
ticipants to join a beginning acting
class The class will begin on
Saturday, Feb 6, and meet from
11 00 a m to 1:00 p.m. for eight
successive Saturdays. The cost
will be $8 00 r participant Fin
non, formerly of ECU'S Drama '
Speech Department, stresses that
the class is an introduction to
various basic techniques concen
tration, sense memory, relaxa
tion. improvisation For additional
information, call Nancy Owens at
the Methodist Student Center
(758 2030) or Stephen Fmnon
(7S7 3546)
PSICHI
The psychology honor society,
will meet Tuesday. Feb 2 at 7 p m
m Speight 129 Interns in the
clinical, school and industrial
graduate programs in the
psychology department will speak
on their experiences Members
and interested others are welcome
to attend
SOCIOLOGIST
POSITION
The Department of Sociology
and Anthropology is conducting an
internal search to fill our instruc
tor's position in Sociology At
least, ABD in sociology required,
along with teaching experience in
deviance, criminology, social pro
blems, methods and statistics.
Salary is competitive Research
experience is required Apply to
John Maiolo. �hair, BA 415. Ap
plications will be received until
February 15
WALK FOR HUMANITY
The llth annual Greenville
"Walk for Humanity" conducted
by the ECU Hunger Coalition, is
our biggest event of the year The
"Walk" will wind through the
streets of Greenville and everyone
is invited
Each year the money that is
raised has been divided between a
local hunger need and for a na-
tional or international relief pro
lect In the past ECU students
have been the major contrivufers
to the success of the "Walk
We have 12 weeks left until the
"Walk" and many things to be
done, we need help from
everyone: You can walk, donate,
organize, speak to groups, invite
us to speak to your group, dome to
our meetings, do art work, help us
plan the route, put us in contact
with other enthusiastic people,
make suggestions, prepare the
alter the "Walk" lunch, eel
Peole don't have to suffer from a
lack of food We can make a dif
ference! Make the Walk" your
groups social project for the spr
mg semester Come on � "Put a
little heart in your Soul
We invite you to come to our
meetinqs on Thursday's at 7 30
p m at the Newman House (953 E
10th St.) or call us to find out
more 752 4216
HANDICAPPED
STUDENT SERVICES
The Office of Handicapped Stu
dent Services needs reserve
drivers tor the handicapped van
Anyone interested who has the
afternoons free from 12 00 noon
until 6 00 p.m. should contact the
Office of Handicapped Student
Services at 757 6799 or come by
Whichard 212
KYF
The King's Youth Fellowship
will hold it's next meeting on
February 4 in Room 247 at I p.m.
at the Mendenhall Student Center
Topics discussed will include the
coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.
Visitors are welcome and
refreshments will be served at the
conclusion of the meeting
HANDICAPPED
AWARENESS WEEK
Plans are being made for the
1982 Handicapped Awareness
Week on the ECU campus Anyone
who has suggestions or would like
to participate in any way. please
contact either Sharon McClung,
756 9913. Jim Warren, 756 8156. or
Ramona Lopez. 7587381. Any in
put suggestions or participation
will be welcomed.
ART SHOW
The Seventh Annual Art Show
will be from Jan 26 to Feb 5, 1982
m the Greenville Museum of Art
All ECU artists are encouraged to
prepare their best work to submit
Friday, Jan. 22. 1982 to the con
ference room in the office of
Jenkins Fine Arts Center, ECU
Cash prizes, provided bv the Attic
and Jeffries Beer ano Wine, Co
will fange from $10 for Honorable
Mentions to JlOO for Best m Show
CADP
The Campus Alcohol and Drug
Program will hold its bi monthly
meeting on Feb 1 at 3 30 p m in
the second floor conference room
of irwin Hall Students interested
in furthering responsible attitudes
toward the use of chemical
substances are encouraged to at
tend For more information call
7S7 6793 or 757 6649
PHI ETA SIGMA
Freshman Honor Srciety will
hold a general meeting in room 212
Mendenhall StuC:nt Center on
Tuesday, Feb 2 at 5 p m. Fund
raising and social activities will be
discussed All members are urged
to attend
TAU KAPPA EPSILON
Little Sister Program � All girls
interested in becoming TKE little
sisters should attend rush tonight.
Tuesday. Feb 3 Rush will be at
the TKE house from 9 to 12 pm on
Tuesday only
SAB
Student Athletic Board will have
a meeting Tuesday. Feb 9 in
Mendenhall Room 248 at 5 p m
Final plans for the Lady Pirate
Classic will be made We wiH also
talk about baseball and track
Anyone interested in these sports
is asked to come and Oin us
ILO
There will be a meeting of the
International Language Organize
tion on February 3 at 2 p m The
meeting will be held in Brewster
C 305. All members are encourag
ed to attend and all interested peo
pie are welcome to come
COLLEGIATE 4 H
On February 4. Thursday, the
ECU Collegiate 4 H Club will meet
at 7 p m at the club advisor's ad
dress For more information and
location call Carrol Anne at
756 4287 or Ivey at 758 9535 All
members and interested persons
are urged to attend
RESIDENCE HALL
CHORUS
The Residence Hall Chorus has
grown during its first semester to
a mixed chorus of sixty members
The group, open to any student
who enjoys singing, has set a goal
of eighty members for this year
The Chorus, which meets each
Monday from 7 to 8 p m in Biology
103. has already presented its first
concert under direcor Charles F
Schwartz. Dean of the School of
Music
Newly elected officers of the
group are s'udents Daphne
Duns'on. President. Jayne
Nichols. Vice President, and Ted
Pehowir. SecretaryTreasurer
They mvile any interested
students to come next Monday
night
IVCF
Everyone Is welcome to Inte.
Varsity Christian Fellowship's
meetings Wednesday nights at
7 30, in Mendenhall Room 221
This week Mark Acuff a North
Carolina I V staff leader from
Duke will be leading the discus
sion on "How to Survive Failure "
NATURE
PHOTOGRAPHY
The public is invi'eo to the
February meeting of the Sierra
Club. Cypress Group The pro
gram this month will feature Dr
Floyd Read givmq pointers on im
proving your outdoor photos The
meeting will be in the basement of
the First Presbyterian Church,
corner of Elm Street and 14th
Street (across from Rose High) at
8pm, Monday. Feb 8 The Sierra
Club is a national canoeinghik
ing conservation organization
POETRY FORUM
Will meet February 4 at 8 p m
m Mendenhall, room 248 Anyone
interested in poetry, please come
NAACP
There will be a NAACP meeting.
Wednesday. Feb 3 at 6 p m in
room 221 Mendenhall AH
members please attend
The (last Carolinian
V ' I tifa ifir , wnfitn i "tnttuitit i
�im I92i
Published every Tuesday anc
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
mg the summf
The Eas' Carolinian s the of
ficiai newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned
operated, and published for ana
by the students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate S20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located m the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU,
Greenville. N C
POSTMASTER Sena address
changes to The East Carolinian
Old South Building. ECU Green
ville. NC 27834
Telephone 757 4344. 4347, 6JW
Application to mail at second
class postage rates is pending at
Greenville. North Carolina
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Phi Beta Lamtxia will hoia its
next meeting Wed Feb 3 in Ra
130 at 4 00 in,wp 'rerested in
lOinmg Ph Beta Lambda is urged
to attend this meeting
Admiral Criticizes Nuclear Buildup
Continued From Hajje I
our knowledge
ultimately in our own
best interest
Sugg admitted his
tendency to be
pessimistic about
humanity successfully
dealing with the nuclear
weapons question.
"I'm afraid that the
fact thai they're
(nuclear weapons)
around and available
makes their use almost
inevitable. I completely
agree with Rickover on
that
Sugg, who has met
Rickover, recalled that
the crossbow was once
outlawed for its deadly
accuracy, and ultimate-
ly it was still used.
I n his address,
Rickover told the com-
Gl C.imoult.iq. n F.igu. : ,md
I 5liu t Sli . p.nq B.iqs
BiWLkjpafM C.impmq EquiU
tin "t St. . i . ford iftoi
Pi .hi in O�� yu Dili. i. '
. .Hci u � u Hi-Hi Ctnvbuy
i . ii
ARMY-NAVY
STORE
mittee, "in general, 1
think we're overarming
altogether. Today's
more advanced
nuclear-level weapons
are said to represent
enough explosive and
radioactive power to
destroy life on the earth
many times over.
His criticism of
nuclear proliferation
was also directed at the
commercial use of
nuclear power. It
"shows itself lo be
more economic, but
that's a fal - line of
reasoning because we
do not take into ac-
count the release of
radiation may do to
future generations
Rickover said.
He added that
"nuclear energy in
some form" can be ex-
ABORTIONS
1 24 week terminations
App't's. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1 800 321-0575
$
USED
TIRES
10.00
inquire at
Evans Seafood
Current undergraduate pre-
md�cot itudents moy now com
pete for several hundred An
Force icholorftttips. Tfceie
scKokmkipt ore to be awarded
to student occepted into
medical schools as freshmen or
at the beginning of their
sophomore year. The scholar
�ship provides for tuition, boots,
lob fees and equipment, plus o
$530 moatfily allowance In-
vestigate this financial alter-
native to the "igh cost of
medical education.
Contoct:
I .Wf IIr l IH
PROrrSMONs
KM Kl IIIM.
Suite GL 1 H 00 Novaho Or
Roieto.NC. 27689
Phone Collect 919)755-4134
WE SEW
LEATHER COATS
SHOE REPAIR
113 Grande Ave.
758-1228
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM IM�
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
HIS f RratMncy Ttl, Srt�
Central, and ProUlam
f�r�t�n(Ky Counsel Fr tor
leer information call tn-aSJS
(Tall Fraa Nvaibtr
mtWIMW aalwaaa f a.m
� S pm. WaaMaya.
RALSIOM WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
n� w��f mmtm si.
RaMflk, N.C.
PLAZA
DENS
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(FORMERLY BALLENTINS'S SUFFET
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Winter & Spring
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SPECIAl.I7.INf; IN OUTSIDE CATERING
fcfe
tall BOB SAUTER
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CONVENIENT LOCATION. AMPLE PAIRING-
CflP
pectcd to be used if a
serious war breaks out.
Rickover proposed a
disarmament con-
ference similar lo one
called for by the United
Stales in 1921 to discuss
arms reduction. "I
think it would be the
finest thing in the world
for the president of the
United States lo initiate
immediately he said.
Plans are being made
tor an arms conference
ai the United Nations
this spring called ihe
Second United Nations
Special Session on
Disarmameni.
A local campaign has
been initiated in Green-
ville b Dr. Carroll
Webber, rehred ECU
math professor, to
stud) Ihe plans and
hopes of the conference
as well as inspire more
citizen participation in
the U.N. program.
Webber also agreed
with many of
Rickover's positions,
saying he was pleased
that someone in
Rickover's position was
speaking out "because
he will get new people
to listen
"It seems to be un-
questionable that the
arms race is out of con-
trol Webber said.
On the question of
Reagan's participation
at the U.N. Special Ses-
sion, Webber said he
thought it would be
"symbolically signifi-
cant and helpful" if
Reagan attended. Web-
ber added that Reagan
"needs more education
in the complexity of in-
ternational affairs" lo
have any real impact.
"I'm not overly op-
timistic that Reagan
had a balanced world
view Webber ex-
plained.
During the First
Special Session on
Disarmament held at
the U.N. in 1978, then-
President Carter and
Soviet premier Leonid
Brezhnev did not par-
ticipate.
In his address,
Rickover noted the
military industrial com-
plex was a major
roadblock to achieving
nuclear disarmament.
He also noted the waste
in the Department of
Defense, calling
Defense Secretary
Caspar Weinberger "a
businessman
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Hwy. 264 E.

k
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P. O. Box 7211
Wilson, N. C. 27893
FOR our complete LIFE SAVING
process of REPLACING:
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PRICE � $14.50
He also charged
David Stockman, direc-
tor of the Office of
Budget and Manage-
ment, with ignoring
Rickover's list of sug-
gestions to trim waste
and inefficiency in the
Defense Department.
Rickover claimed
profits were the only
factor that motivated
business executives in
the defense industry.
He further stated that
this abandonment of
"traditional values"
was destroying the free
enterprise system.
"With their ability to
dispense money, of-
ficials of large corpora-
tions may often exer-
cise greater power tc'in-
fluence society than
elected or appointed
government officials �
but without assuming
any of the respon-
sibilities and without
being subject to public
scrutiny Rickover
said.
According to
Rickover, large cor-
porations are virtually
another branch of
government because of
their vast resources.
Rickover called con-
tracts between the
military and corpora-
tions "meaningless.
Today, defense con-
tractors can do
anything they want
with nothing to hinder
them
Rickover said this is
"a very preposterous
time when military ex-
penses are eating up so
See NUCLEAR, Page 3
,s� -� S4 �y y
oN

?�W sC VVs
s6
er- r ,o
�V
"me ouegr wTjje seCReT city
TO PLAY THE GAME.
Answer each of the ndd.es that will appear here each
week in February. Write your answer in the Wanks below
each riddle. The letters with numbers below them corres-
pond to the numbered spaces in the master key. As you
till in the letters of the master key, you wiH be spelling the
name and location of a secret cfty in Europe. Send us
the solution, and you and a friend could win a trip there, free
TO ENTER SWEEPSTAKES:
1. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY.
2. Grand Prize consists of two regular routxMrip economy airfares
to the secret city. 30-day Easel passes, American buth Hostel
passes, two backpacks and $1000 in cash.
3. Cut out master Key tor use as official entry blank or use 3" x 5"
card. Pnm your answer along with your name and address. Mail
to Secret City Sweepstakes, PO Box 6018, NorweJk. CT 06852.
4. Trfirstl.OOOaxrectrTSsrxxHntswarecerveapceterasan
errtrv prize.
5. All entries must be received by 31S82. Enter as often as you
wish, but each entry must be mailed separately.
6.Arsdomdrawirfgoallccfrectertjie8wi�beheW32282by
the HkjNand Group, an frKtependemjudcorrjanUattonwrioee
decision is final
7. Sweepstakes void where prohibited, taxed or otnerwise restricted.
8. All potential winners may be required to sign an affidavit of eii-
gibttty to verify compliance with the rules within 30 days of receipt
of same. For a list of prize winners, send self-addressed, stami
envelope to Secret City Sweepstakes co Hkjhkand Group. 18
Knight St Norwalk, CT 06861.
teSsiSsfe com
So unravel these riddles, and
So small and yet so strong
Life is never lielter skelter,
When I travel, the pace seems long
Yet I never lack a shelter.
pp
qeNCRAL foods'iNTeRNATioNAL coffees
MAKe QOOD OOMpAW
O General Foods Corporator. 1982
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
EostCorolino University
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THfcJ ASJ C AROI.IN1AN
MBRUARY2. IV82
lpm
� yooe
iome
lian
and
(DA
L
A
Love Seats Provided
Infants in the Pitt
County area will be
much safer because of a
new law and a major
project being launched
by the Tar River
Civitan Club of Green-
ville, in conjunction
with the Pitt County
Health Department.
Enacted by the N.C.
General Assembly to
become effective July
1, the law requires
parents to protect
children up to two
years of age by
restraints in motor
vehicles.
The project is a safe-
ty seat loaner program.
Tar River Civitans will
offer Infant Love Seats
primarily to low-
income families for a
small rental fee and a
deposit. The seats will
be available next
month, according to
Raye Troutman, Save-
A-Babe publicity and
advertising chairper-
son.
In addition to pro-
viding some financial
relief to parents com-
plying with the law, the
organization will at-
tempt to educate
parents on the proper
use of the seats and on
other aspects of car
safety. Club members
will receive training
through the N.C.
Highway Safety
Research Center in
Chapel Hill.
The Research Center
will study the results of
the law's first two years
of existence to deter-
mine its effectiveness in
reducing death and in-
jury to babies.
"The law is designed
to be educational rather
than punitive said a
Research Center staf-
fer. "During the first
two years of enact-
ment, violators will be
given warning tickets;
$10 fines will be levied
the third year. No
driver's license points
will be assessed.
Whether to continue
the law will be decided
by legislators in 1985,
based on the findings
of the researchers
Car accidents are the
leading cause of death
to children, according
to statistics. North
Carolina ranks only
below Texas and
California in the
number of car-related
deaths. However,
crash-tested restraint
devices can reduce the
probability of deaths
by about 90 percent
and of injuries by
about 70 percent.
"Helping to prevent
infant mortality and in-
juries is our goal em-
phasized Patrice Alex-
ander, Civitan projects
chairperson.
The club is soliciting
seat donations with a
goal of 150 seats. To
help expand the pro-
ject, the Highway Safe-
ty Research Center will
match on a one-to-one
basis the seats donated
to or purchased by the
club. "Public support
is vital Alexander
said. Many concerned
citizens already have
made contributions, ac-
cording to Troutman.
For making con-
tributions or obtaining
more information on
car seats and safety,
call Diane Hankins,
758-4552 or Raye
Troutman, 756-3871.
UNC System
To Integrate
Continued From Page 1
ment that the UNC system file a
yearly report with the District Court
showing the percentages of integra-
tion at all 16 campuses.
In the period between August
1980 and August 1981, black enroll-
ment in the system increased from
21,741 to 21,980. During the same
period, white enrollment rose from
91.882 to 92.509.
The UNC system is also required,
by the decree, to provide funds for
operation and maintenance to the
predominantIv-black schools, in an
amount to be in relation to the
number of full-time students at the
university. This funding must at
least equal the financial support
given to predominantly-white in-
stitutions with the same types of in-
struction.
The goals of the UNC system for
annual integration increases, or in-
creasing the "minority presence
are .53 percent for blacks in
primarily-white institutions and .63
for whites in predominantly-black
universities.
F.mma Wilkinson, a Civitan member, and her
four-month-old daughter Arm I.ynn demonstrate
the proper use of the Infant I.ove Seal � facing
the rear of the car.
Nuclear Proliferation Discussed
Continued From Page 2
much money. It's com-
pletely, unproductive
and using so much of
people's taxes
President Reagan is
proposing a SI.6
trillion defense budget
� $300 billion per sear
� for the next five
vears. The defense
budget is now less than
$200 billion per year.
W ebber also agreed
with Rickover about
the problem of waste
caused by arms expen-
ditures. "I would refer
particularly to the
September 1980 isue of
Scientific American to
an article by Wassily
Leontief, Nobel Prize-
winning Harvard
economist Webber
said. "You will note his
conclusion that only
drastic cuts in arms ex-
penditures offers major
promise of world
economic develop-
ment
Dr. Webber also
pointed out that
nuclear war "is occas-
sionally spoken of as
winnable He noted
such comments from
Vice President George
Bush and said he sees
danger in the move-
ment of some leaders
toward making nuclear
war a thinkable op-
tion
During his address
Rickover was recom-
mended for his second
Congressional Gold
Medal for his vears of
service to his country.
"Frankly I believe the
government is making a
terrible mistake in let-
ting you go" said Sen.
William Proxmirc (D-
Wis.) during his ques-
tioning of Rickover.
Other senators praised
Rickover for his ac-
complishments and ser-
vice.
Webber and Sugg ex-
pressed hope that ECU
students would begin to
take a more active role
in the questions and
problems raised bv
Rickov er.
"First ot all I'd like
to see more of them
(students)
knowledgeable about
world issues � that's a
first essential stated
Dr. Sugg. He added
that most students pro-
bably don't pay much
attention to crucial
world issues.
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mtilus
THE
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Come by or call TODAY and set
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GREENVILLE, N.C.
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V
ZUe ?Ea0t (Earaltmati
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins, e� �c.�-
Jimmy DuPREE, ifcwmri�n
Ric Browning, bmw ����� Charles Chandler, sp.�-� ��
Fielding Miller, ��,�.� mmm ToM Hall, mm �.��
Alison Bartel. ruwtiufumrtsmv Steve Bachner, tummmmmi aam
Steve Moore, a William Yelverton. so �d,�r
February 2, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
WZMB
Patience Finally Pays Off
So, we're finally getting a radio
station. It's about time; isn't it?
About time, indeed.
WZMB: for four years, the root
of hopeful expectations and, most
of all, controversy. Since its initial
approval in 1978, WZMB (then
WECU-AM) has met opposition in
one form or another from a handful
of administrators and Media Board
members.
But the most painful opposition
to the radio station hasn't come
from deans or chancellors. It hasn't
come from petitions or ad-
ministrative actions. The most pain-
ful opposition has come from the
students themselves.
No, not through any legislative
action, SGA or otherwise, but
through unfounded criticism, and
worse yet, through apathy.
Sure, we've all read about the
delays, and we've all heard the ex-
cuses. Our skeptic minds have
wandered and wondered if, in fact,
the station would ever get on the air.
But, despite the constant com-
plaints of us skeptics, the staff at
WZMB worked, waited and work-
ed, and today, thanks to their long
hours, we have a radio station to
show for it.
As college students, it is often
easier to make blind criticisms than
to participate. Participation certain-
ly takes more of our precious free
time. But why can't we just put
aside our petty complaints for a
while and show some appreciation
for a job well done?
Obviously, Sam Barwick and the
rest of the WZMB staff have had
their problems. No major undertak-
ing � and this is a major undertak-
ing � is ever without problems. But
thanks to the dedication of a few
ECU students, present and past, the
airwaves will soon be filled with
programs by and for the campus
community.
W;e have had to wait a long time
for this radio station, and there's no
guarantee that it will go on the air
today, but maybe it's time we tried a
little patience.
Granted, patience is a virtue, and,
at times, it's definitely a difficult art
to master. Maybe it's a virtue we all
need to work on.
Legislature Overturns Veto;
Presidential Powers Suffer
The veto power of the SGA presi-
dent suffered an unnecessary em-
barassment Monday, as the
legislature overwhelmingly voted to
reinstitute the Medical Emergency
Loan Fund.
Two weeks ago the legislature
voted to return the program to
operation. SGA President Lester
Nail addressed the group that day in
opposition to the reinstatement.
Many knew then he would veto the
bill if it were approved.
It was; he did.
With many legislatures of the
past, this veto may have been
upheld. But the 1981-82 legislature
has shown a certain degree of in-
dependence of the executive branch.
Perhaps the sour taste of power
gone awry left by recent presidents
has charted this course?
Speaker Gary Williams tem-
porarily stepped down from the
chair in order to address the
legislature. He convincingly spoke
of the virtues of "representative
democracy" and the lack of wisdom
involved in one person impeding
progress.
When the summer legislature, i.e,
Nail and Marvin Braxton, voted to
suspend the program, the need for
research to determine financial
feasibility was cited. No such study
began in the summer and the
legislators felt the loans are needed
by their constituents.
The cause of the confusion was
the issue of abortion. Opponents of
abortion used the Emergency
Medical Loan Fund as a tool to
have their opinions heard � Lester
Nail included.
Abortion is a moral issue; no
deliberative body can legislate
morality.
Williams wisely attempted to
avoid debate of the narrow issue of
abortion in favor of appropriate
discussion of the broad topic of
medical loans. But some people just
can't let sleeping dogs lie.
Nail's opposition of the Emergen-
cy Medical Loan Fund on the basis
of his abortion beliefs is understan-
dable, even admirable. But his lack
of foresight as to the fate of his veto
is inexcusable. The integrity of the
office must stand above the integri-
ty of the individual.
The power of veto is exclusive to
the chief executive. Wise manipula-
tion of that power is a true art.
Nail's attempt to intimidate the
legislature by making it known he
would veto the loan bill was a com-
mendable political ploy. His failure
to recognize the inevitable after they
passed the mandate is unfortunate.
Gary Williams accurately describ-
ed Nail's view as the "wolf in
sheep's clothing It's fortunate the
legislature saw through the disguise.
Landis Perseveres Despite Law Suits
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
Please understand, I'm not one of those
people who sees a CIA agent under every
bush and behind every keyhole. The Com-
pany is out there, however, and its agents
do some of the things they are accused of
doing � illegal, immoral things, like dos-
ing unsuspecting Americans with drugs
just to see what happens, spending $6
million to manipulate the Italian elections
and orchestrating the overthrow of the
Aliende government in Chile.
Comes not Fred Landis, a Los Angeles
journalist and critic of the Central In-
telligence Agency, who has some thought-
provoking theories about just how the CIA
does its dirty work. Landis is being sued
for $210 million by the Association of
Retired Intelligence Officers for his trou-
ble, and he's fighting another suit by one
David Atlee Phillips, editor of a rightwing
magazine called Eagle, to boot. Still, he
perseveres, determined to expose the con-
spiracy within.
According to the outspoken Landis, the
CIA has a media strategy for destabilizing
what it considers to be unfriendly foreign
governments. This involves infiltrating the
leading daily newspaper of a targeted
country and working the paper like a pup-
peteer works Punch and Judy, to knock
out the regime in question. The strategy
relies on disinformation and psychological
warfare, and has bseen used successfully in
Chile with El Mercrio and Jamaica with
the Daily Gleaner. Landis thinks
Nicaragua's La Prensa may be next.
Landis was working in Chile as a cor-
respondent for the Chicago Sun-Times in
September of 1973, when the military stag-
ed a coup d etat. El Mercurio, Chile's
dominant newspaper for over a century,
was, Landis arues, taken over by
"advisors" from the Inter American Press
Association prior to the coup. The visiting
journalists were secretly working for the
CIA. Their aim: to undermine public con-
fidence in Salvador AUende's
democratically elected socialist govern-
ment as a prelude to smashing it.
The first thing they did, Landis says,
was change the paper's staid, Wall Street
Journal-type format. "Suddenly, you have
color, where before it was only black and
white. You have headlines across the entire
page. You have large photographs, or
maybe just one large photograph. Before,
there was no propaganda there, you just
had a newspaper. Suddenly, everything in
the paper goes to push a few very simple
themes.
"The propaganda campaign he con-
tinues, "is authorized by the National
Security Council or the Presidenit of the
United States, and usually costs about half
a million dollars and lasts three months.
The first theme is economic chaos. After
economic chaos, you shift to social chaos.
After social chaos, you see character
assassination of government leaders. For
being president of the country, Aliende
almost never appeared in the newspaper.
When he did appear, he was always
associated with a word such as
'Communism 'Soviet 'Plagues
'Death'
In the months preceding the coup, El
Mercurio was awash in news of chaos and
crimes � many of which never happened
� and repeated predictions of imminent
civil war. The result, for readers of thai
opinion-making paper, was unbroken ten-
sion and gloom. This, Landis argues,
prepared Chileans psychologically for the
coup.
El Mercurio's propaganda was aimed a:
the middle and upper classes � no friend
of the socialist government, usually � and
Chile's militarv, which had a long tradition
of respecting democratic institutions. In
order to get the generals to violate the con-
stitution, they had to be convinced that tfie
"subversive" Aliende was ruining the
country. They were.
After the coup, the ruling mihtar junta
outlawed trade unions andstrikes and
adopted the supply-side policies of
American economist Milton Friedman.
Hundreds of thousands of Chileans were
thrown out of work. If they had the
temerity to criticize the junta or organize
against it, they were arrested and often tor-
tured and killed. Chile continues to be
cited by human rights organizations such
as Amnesty International as one of the
most repressive countries in the world.
Did this runaway train of events be
with fabricated stories in El Mercurio.
courtesy of the blazing typewriters of the
CIA? Is this just another paranoid con-
spiracy theory? I don't know. It's
something to think about, however, as the
Reagan administration pushes to liberate
the intelligence agencies, including the
CIA, from the mild restraints of the Carter
years.
-Campus Forum
Minority Rule On Abortion?
��SrjLffRRrWW6rTJRWf
WTunwioernifeTftRfiNriii
fmx
I would like to reply to Mr. Agate,
whose letter in the January 26 "Campus
Forum" indicates that student govern-
ment emergency medical loan funds
should not be used for abortions.
So you feel that the government
'should not come between a taxpayer
and his or her conscience and force him
or her to pay for a procedure about
which he or she has moral misgivings"?
As a taxpayer, I have serious moral
misgivings about this nation's
"defense" spending. I detest and abhor
the fact that a goodly portion of my tax
dollars go for bigger and better bombs.
What would you suggest I do about my
moral misgivings?
I could stop paying taxes, but I also
have serious reservations about being
prosecuted for tax evasion.
It is unfortunate that everyone cannot
be pleased about how tax dollars or stu-
dent fees are spent. If the SGA discon-
tinues the fund because a certain number
of students disapprove of abortion, it
should be pointed out that other
minorities will want their chance to veto
programs they don't like: the huge
athletic budget, student publications,
the concert and lecture series, certain
controversial fine arts exhibitions and
performances, etc.
Surely all these recipients of student
funds do not always produce satisfac-
tion, moral or otherwise, for those
whose fees support them!
FRANCEINE REES
ECU Alumna
Male Responsibility
Al Agate, in his former article,
January 26, mentions "insensitivity" in
the issue of abortion. I hope he includes
his own insensitivity as well as ignorance
for writing: "Abortion is a private deci-
sion and should be funded by private
means: either out of a woman's own
resources or by 'charitable' organiza-
tions
Where, Mr. Agate, are the resources
of a woman's partner; the male respon-
sible for one-half of the problem.
Perhaps the male is responsible for more
than a half of the problem as it is
generally the male who presses for sex-
ual relations.
Not too many women go around
pressuring men foj sex but many men
seem to think it is their due to win sex
from the women they are with. As a
mature woman, I speak from years of
experience.
When, oh when, will men ever wake
up and realize women are full human be-
ings, capable of decision making with
full rights to their own bodies? When
will men quit speaking of us as ihough
we were many cattle that they can select
from, the best meat.
A woman does not conceive alone, ex-
cept in mythoiogy; nor should she have
to bear the burden, either financially or
emotionally, of that conception.
If the male ducks out of his portion of
the responsibility of conception (which
many do), is the female then left to her
own resources as Mr. Agate proposes?
No more than if Mr. Agate accidentally
got hit by a truck while crossing the
highway and had to pay for his own
broken body out of his own resources.
Perhaps he might appeal to "charity"
for his hospital expenses as he suggests
women do for abortions.
History attests that man in all his
glory is the most irresponsible species
ever to emerge on this planet. Women
don't war nor do they hunt for pleasure.
Neither do they mess up the planet for
future generations. Women give life and
by nature are preservers of life.
When will the male population come
to terms with its irresponsibility and join
women in a peaceful co-existence?
SANDRA THOMAS
Senior, psychology
Shires Story
1 hope that East Carolina University
manages to get its communications pro-
gram off the ground. Hopefully, such a
program would give newspaper and
television reporters an added incentive
to learn their craft.
I also hope that the next time anyone
interviews my friend Bill Shires, they
will at least let him tell his own story.
Such a story would hae lots of direct
quotations and an understandable lead
paragraph.
I only wish 1 was there when Shires
read the article about him. He probably
rolled back in his chair, looked heaven-
ward and let out with one of his patented
sighs that says to the world, "There they
go again, murdering the English
language
MARC BARNES
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Letters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
days.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
FEBRUARY 2, IV82 Page 5
Congresswoman
Chisholm Here
This Thursday
1 he fighting Shirk) Chisholm has
more than earned hei name as one
of the most independent minded
members ol the I nited Slates Con-
gress and the Congressional Black
Caucus Now, under the sponsor-
ship ot the MSC I ecture Series
Committee, Shirley Chisholm will
appeal in Mendenhall Student
Center's Hendrix rheatre this
Thursday night
Mrs. Chisholm, an articulate,
light forward champion ot the
nehis of tht downtrodden, says she
derives hei powei "from the peo
pie' rather than from the regulai
part organizaiton I lie topic ot hei
lecture, scheduled to begin at S
p.m will be "America's Im-
P�v Spirit with a question
and answei period immediately
following.
Elected to the 91 si t ongress, Mrs.
Chisholm ts New York's
1 weifth v ongressional District,
which comprises Bed tor d-
Stuyvesant, perhaps the nation's
largest black ghetto. She is the first
black C ongresswoman in the history
of the I nited States and the first
woman and the first Black to seek
the nominal ion ot a major political
party for the presidency of the
I filled States.
A membei of the powerful House
Education and Labor Committee,
Mrs. Chisholm played a major role
in the passage of the minimum wage
bill in the House. She serves on the
Select Education, General Educa-
tion, and Agricultural Labor Sub-
committees.
She is a recipient of more than
eleven honorary degrees, and was
also selected to be the first recipient
of Clairol's "Woman of the Year"
award for outstanding achievement
in public affairs.
For the last three years she has re-
mained on the Gallup Poll's list of
the ten most admired women in the
world. She is the author of an
autobiography Lnbought and In-
bossed, as well as The Good Fight,
which told the full story of her cam-
paign for the presidency.
Tickets are on sale at the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
Student tickets are $2.50 and
faculty and staff tickets are S3.50.
Public tickets are priced at $5. All
tickets sold at the door will be $5.
On Friday of this week, "An
Ebony Revue" will be performed by
the University of North Carolina at
Greensboro Neo-Black Society
drama group. The performance will
be held in auditorium 244 of
Mendenhall Student Center.

'1TTH
United States Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm will appear on the
ECU Campus this Thursday at 8 p.m. in Mendenhall Student Center's
Hendrix. Chisholm will lecture on "America's Impoverished Spirit"
and a question and answer period will follow. She is the first black Con-
gresswoman in U.S. histor.
Birnbach Giving 'Prep Talk'
Lisa Birnbach's "The Official Prepp Handbook" comes to Hendrix
Theatre on Tuesday, February 9. at 8 p.m. Tickets for her foray into
"ultra-prep" are on sale at $2 for ECU students.
On Golden Pond' Not A Dramatic Quagmire
I dro
Saturda
1 was
and three I
if the film
B Wll I I AM YELVERTOIM
i i ii.i. i
niles to Raleigh in order to see a film
But when 1 arrived 1 began to wonder whether
� place or not. There were people two
: waiting in line, and 1 wondered
was supposed to have reviewed had been
replaced h the Lawrence ll elk Show.
But the entertainment began, and I could see why I
was the youngest there. These people grew up with
Katharine Hepburn and Henrv Fonda, and the event
they (wei were witnessing wasn't any ordinary film. It
was a special event; something that only comes along
once every 20 years.
On Golden fond was MAGIC. And there were no
tricks involved.
1 saw a beautiful, moving and mature film. It was a
tale of learning to love life and left the viewer with a
warm feeling inside about the pain of age. 1 here was no
gore, no sex, no violence. It was a picture thai has
restored my faith in film-makers.
Bill Morrison, entertainment editor of the Raleigh
News and Observer, seemed to think the film was a
dramatic quagmire. Well, Mr. Morrison wouldn't know
a good film if he was hit with the canister. I his picture
was anything but a dramatic quagmire. This adaptation
of Ernest Thompson's play was sensitively directed bv
Mark Rydell, who could have turned the picture into a
tear-jerker but chose otherwise, preventing a senseless
and meaningless Harlequin Romance.
We saw two of the great performers of our time in
two of their greatest roles. Fonda plays Norman
Thayer, an honnery old sonuvabitch who turns 80, retir-
ing from his job as a university professor. He is sure this
will be his last summer at their cabin on Golden Pond.
And we see Kate Hepburn as his wife, Ethel, a lover of
life and nature to the fullest, � she picks strawberries
and chops wood � and does her best to convince her
husband of 46 years that turning old isn't so bad
because they have each other. Together, they babble
playfully. He tries to become angry, but she refuses to
let him.
She does fail in trying to convince her husband that
his life isn't quite over. That task is left to Billy (Doug
McKeon) a street-smart, 13-year-old who becomes his
friend � a bond that becomes stronger as the story pro-
gresses. Norman learns about "cruising chicks" and
"sucking face" (kissing) from this adolescent.
Fonda's real daughter, Jane, plays Chelsey, the
Thayers' only child, a fortyish woman who is bitter
toward Norman, divorced and has yet to accomplish
anvthing in life.
And when she, boyfriend Bill Ray (Billy's father,
well-plaved by Dabney Coleman) and Billy venture up
to Golden Pond to celebrate her father's 80th birthday,
the bitterness erupts. "Not again Ethel says. "Your
father loves you To which Chelsey says, "I've never
known him
The reconciliation scene has been much-talked about,
which it should. It is not overplayed as it could have
been. We have the daughter who calls her father by his
first name and the father who has never shown any out-
ward love toward his "fat, little girl Together, they
create a scene of beauty and emotion that penetrates far
beneath the surface of acting 1 he scene is so realistic -
everyone knows of Jane's conflicts with her father. Bui
it does not leave the audience crying. Because if it had. ii
would have taken awav the film's dignity and turned it
into a meaningless rebirth with a soap opera effect.
We see a Henrv Fonda, who may have mined in his
best performance, reaching both ends of the emotional
spectrum. He is a man of humor. ("What's the use ol
having a dwarf if he won't work?" he savs to Ethel
when she makes Billy stop cleaning Fish.) nd he is emo-
tional. (Once, when Ethel sends him out to pick
strawberries, he becomes confused and loses his wa in
the woods and we see him stumbling back to the cabin in
agony. "1 got lost on a path we've been down 1000
times he says, tears rolling down his face. But Ethel
rescues her "knight in shining armour saving they �
walk down that path together tomorrow.
Even though Fonda should receive the Academy
Award for Best Actor for his portrayal of Norman
Mayer, the most remarkable performance comes from
McKeon, who is having conflicts with his divorced
father and mother. And when Chelsey and Bill R.o
leave him with Norman and Ethel for a month so they
can vacation in Europe, he tells the Thayers he knows
he's been dumped. He receives sympathy from Ethel but
none from Norman -� and grows up in the process.
The cinematography is excellent, from the opening
scene when Ethel and Norman get out of their cat and
walk to the lake to see the looms � "a husband and
wife says Ethel � to the end when waves slowly make
their way to the shore while the sky turns a dark shade
of orange, the film gives a glowing portrayal of life On
Golden Pond.
The same way Fonda and Hepburn give shining �
and memorable � performances in a beautiful film.
Police-A-Go-Go
Pop Giants United In Concert
Police vocalist Sting plucks away at custom stand-up model bass during last Tuesday's concert.
Ktwnr�p � kfis r� arri
By STEVE BACHNER
and CHARLES SUNE
Fans at Greensboro Coliseum last Tuesday evening
had a Police man's ball.
Beach Club Promotions' pairing of headliners The
Police with cutesy all-girl nostalgia act the Go-Go's
brought in a mixed bag of over 17,000 progressive music
followers and puerile, top-forty teens for a three-and-
one-half hour pajama party that delivered a sharply-felt
punch.
At 8 p.m. the Go-Go's, possibly the most successful
all-girl instrumental artists ever, took the stage and car-
ried on, as anticipated, with a set of music drawn almost
exclusively from their top-ten album, Beauty and The
Beat. After responding to overwhelming acceptance by
promising a return visit this summer, the arrestingly in-
nocent little dance band finished their 45-minute set in a
style no better or worse than than that displayed on their
album (which is very good indeed).
But as teasingly enjoyable as this time spent might
have been, it served as mere foreplay. After a brief in-
termission, a taped "Voices Inside My Head" summon-
ed The Police into their characteristically no-frills stage
environment.
The band's first complete number, "Message in a
Bottle opened hungry ears to drummer Stewart
Copeland's thundering, complex backbeat; Andy Sum-
mers expertly honed guitar licks, and cocky front-man
Sting's siren-like vocals and schooled bass lines.
They then went quickly from this into a song that
many bands might have reserved for an encore, "Every
Little Thing She Does is Magic destined to become a
staple of The Police on top-forty radio. After a quick
run through "Spirits in the Material World it ap-
peared that the concert might slip into a song foi song
rehash of latest techno-pop endeavor Ghost in the
Machine. By the grace of God, the band raced through
only five songs from this debacle.
Perhaps earlier than some might have expected, horns
were introduced in order to fully reproduce the studio
arrangement of "Hungry For You Dcpressingly, the
three-piece horn section, that lingered throughout the
rest of the concert, was as out of place here as it is on
Ghost.
The album is a bitter dissappointmcnt tor those
Police fundamentalists who still savor the raw, tight,
pared-down arrangements and simple production values
of songs like "Roxanne "So Lonely "Bring on the
Night and "Walking on the Moon" from their
groundbreaking first two LPs. (The band did perform
fine up-tempo versions of these songs during the even-
ing and gave everybody a dose of the ferocious stage
presence that is barely hinted at on their records.)
Encore number "Can't Stand I osing You" slid neat-
ly into a mealey of "Be My Girl � Sally" and the chan-
ting of title cut "Reggatia de Blanc" and back to
"Can't Stand Losing You
Even a casual fan of The Police, one who occasional-
ly raps knuckles on his steering wheel when he hears
"De Do Do Do, De Da Da Da" on his car radio, would
have to admit that the performance of this band rivals
anything done in what has been a sparse season for
supcrconcerts � Rolling Stones tour not excluded.





f

I HI EAST CAROl INIAN
FEBRUARY 2, 1982
Non-Credit Mini-Courses Being Offered
By Student Center For Spring Semester
Several non-credit mini-courses are now being
offered by Mendenhall Student Center. In-
dividuals who would like to participate in a mini-
course must register in person at the Mendenhall
Central Ticket Office between the hours of 10
a.m. and 4 p.m Monday-Friday. Registration
fees will be accepted through the day prior to the
first class meeting.
Each mini-course has a maximum and
minimum enrollment. No refunds of course fees
wil be made after the registration deadline unless
the course is cancelled due to lack ot enrollment.
Each registrant must show his her ID or
driver's license and activity card or Mendenhall
Student Center Membrship. with the exception
of a spouse or a guest who must be registered by
the participating card holder. Following is a list
of mini-courses:
YOGA, FLEXIBILITY, and MUSCLE CONDI-
TIONING � 6:30 PM - 7:30 PM
Mondays (March 15, 22. 29, April 5, and Tues-
day, April 13)
Instructor: Luc) Mauger � MSC Room 244 �
Fee SI0.00
This course offers the beginning student a
Hatha (physical) approach to inner serenity.
Controlled posture and breathing exercises will
be introduced as a way of relieving anxiety and
tension, stimulating circulation, improving
stamina, and increasing muscle tone and body
suppleness. Without becoming a contortionist,
the student can improve his health, vigor, and
piece of mind. (NOTE: The first class will be held
in MSC Multi-Purpose Room)
CALLIGRAPHY � Tuesdays (Februarv 2, 9.
16. 23 and March 2) � 7 pm - 9 pm
Instructor: Karen Podeszwa � MSC Room 247
� Fee: $10:00
Students can be expected to come away from
this course with a working know ledge of the
Chancery Italic, the most popular style of
writing. Its appeal is based on its ususable style
that is graceful, personable, and contemporary.
Chancery, once mastered will be the basis on
which to learn the other stvles.
POPl'LAR DANCE � Wednesdays (Februarv
3, 10, 17, 24. and March 3) � 8 pm - 9 pm
Instructor: Dolly Mitchum - MSC Multi-
purpose Room � Fee: S10.00
Have fun, exercise, and learn the latest dances
in this one tl) hour 5-week class. Beginners will
be instructed how to perform today's popular
dance steps as well as meet people and have a
good time.
CLOGGING � Wednesdsays(March 17, 24. 31.
April 7 and 21) � 6 pm - 7 pin
Instructor: Nancy Spain hour � MSC Multi-
purpose Room � Pee: $10.00
I cam basic clogging steps to music that makes
you uant to move. It's jusl plain hard to nii still
once you've learned a tew steps. I reestyle as well
.i- couple dancing vull be laughl C logging is a
wonderful aerobic exercise and a tension release
mechanism.
� variety ot crafts workshops have been
scheduled for Spring Semester I9S2 and and will
be available for enrollment immediately. The
workshops ate tree to all members ot the C rails
RIGGAN
SHOE
SHOP
DOWNTOWN
GREENVILLE
rWOMKMHFltOM
COXFLOUST
Ml�.�hM.
SHOE REPAIR
AT THE
VERY BEST
758-0204
HARBIN HIGHLANDER CENTER, INC.
Coin-Operated
Laundry
and Dry Cleaners
Cleanest laundry in town!
Color T.V. and Video Games
Across from Highway Patrol
Station on 10th St.
Hours: 8 a.m10 p.m.
7 days a week
NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY
offers for
your enjoyment
ADVENTURES IN BRITISH THEATRE
July 4-17. 1982
Two Weeks In London
7 British
Theatre Performances
Tours Of Historic London
Covent Gardens Theatre Area
Stratford - On - Avon
$660
Includes Room and
2 Meals Daily
at the Univ. of London.
Does not include trans-
atlantic Transportation
For more information contact
Charles Martin Thompson Theatre,
Box 5746, NCSU, Raleigh, N. C. Zip
27650. Phone (919) 737-2405.
Center. Each member may enroll in one (1)
workshop. The cost of a Crafts Center Member-
ship is $10.00 per semester which includes the use
of the facilities, tool check-out, use of librarv
materials, and aid of experienced supervisors.
All ECU students, faculty and staff, their
spouses and dependents who are Mendenhall
Student Center members may join the Crafts
Center. Dependents must be eighteen (18) years
of age or older to be eligible to join.
Crafts Center memberships are available dur-
ing regular operating hours, 3 pm until 10 pm,
Monday through Friday, and 12 Noon until 5 pm
Saturday. The workshops are included in the
semester fee, but personal supplies must be pur-
chased by the participant. Should the Crafts
Center furnish supplies for a workshop, a
materials fee will be charged. Additional infor-
mation about specific materials will be available
on the sign-up sheets in the Crafts Center. No
refunds will be made after the workshop registra-
tion deadline unless a workshop is cancelled due
10 low enrollment. All persons interested in tak-
ing advantage of these workshops must register
at the Crafts Center by the Saturday prior to the
first meeting of a workshop. Class space is
limited. If you have any questions about class
curriculum, materials, or fees please call
757-6611. et. 260
Following is a list ot available workshops:
FLOOR LOOM WEAVING I � (5 sessions)
Thursdays (Februarv 4, II, 18, 25, and March 4)
� 6 pm - 9 pm
Instructor: Terri Holtzclaw
This course, designed for a beginner, will in-
clude the basic techniques of weaving. The pro-
ject for this five week class will consist of a two
color pattern sampler. The student will be in-
structed how to warp and dress a four harness
counter balance floor loom. All the basic fun-
damentals will be covered including warp and
yardage calculation, pattern drafting, problem
solving, and finishing techniques.
FLOOR LOOM WEAVING II � (6 sessions)
Thursdays (March 18, 25. April I, 8, 15. 22) � 6
pm � 9 pm
Instructor: fern Holtzclaw
In tins m week class, the student will begin to
explore the uses of color, texture, and pattern in
the woven item. Emphasis will he made on con-
struction ot a garment or other functional item.
PHOTOGRAPHY � (5 sessions)
Tuesdays (Februarv 2, 9. 16. 23. and March 2) �
7 pm - 10 pm
Instructor: Peter Podeszwa
This course is an introduction foi beginners to
the operation of a 35mm single-lens reflex
camci a and to some basic photographic techni-
ques. Metsering, depth ot field, shutter speed,
aperture control, filters, electronic flash, and
types �! film will be discussed.
See NON-CREDIT, Page 7
��
Conic, terrifying and
erotic
- TIME MAGAZINE
��
A STEP BEYOND SCIENCE FICTION.
HEAVY METAL is
impressiveoff on its
own track, combining
science fiction,
mysticism, sex,
violence and rock
music
� Janet Maslin. NY. TIMES
"HEAVY METAL is
first-class
entertainment
- Jay Scott. GLOBE & MAIL
"An enormous amount
of funfull of grand
adventures, including
space flights, sword
battles, sex scenes and
shootouts
� Gene Sis' el. CHICAGO TRIBUNL

Wild, uninhibited zany
entertainment for the
eyes and the ears
� Norma McLain Stoop. AFTER DARi
"HEAVY METAL is the
animated film
equivalent of 'Star
Wars The film is a
visual feast. It has
something for
everyone
� Frank Sanello. LA. DAILY NEWS
WEEKEND LATE SHOW FEBRUARY 5th & 6th - 11:00 � HENDRIX THEATRE -
Pre-Registration Issue �
Wednesday, February 17
Place your ad early
I THE VILLAGER!
A ROFFLER FRANCHISE
BA RBER A M) S TV I F SHOP
LOCATED 10th ST.
NEXT TO VILLA ROMA
NOU
Call 758 3768 or come bv � Hrs. 8 5:30 Wed Sat
SFCAl HAIRCUTS REG. $5.00 g
()U $4.00 WITH THIS AD
v Call
IsMrr
Un�v
Summer Job
Opportunities
In Camping at
FOR:
Counselors
Lifeguards
Crafts
Sailing & Canoeing
Camp Don-Lee
Camp Chestnut Ridge
Camp Rock fish
Nurses
Salary
Room & Board
Benefits
N.C. United Methodist Camps
Interviews and Information February 8, 1982
at ANNUAL CAMP DAY
THE SHOE OUTLET
(Located beside Evans Seafood)
Featuring name brand shoes at bargain prices.
Up To 75 OFF regular prices
Bass Steward-McGuire Brouse Abouts
201 W. Washington St. Within walking distance of campus.
Dine
With Us
Marathon
Restaurant
The Best in
Greek food, Pizzas, and Subs.
Try our delicious Souvlakia
Special only $2.55
Now delivering
FREE
Phone 752-0326
Conveniently
Located Across From ECU
at 506 Evans St.
YOUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER
OFF OUR.
COMPLETE
INVENTORY
FEB. 5,6 j(
mmmmmm

The Medical Store
2205 W. 5th St P.O. Box 59
Greenville, N.C. 27834
Phone 756-8371
�Diagnostic Sets � Gloves
�Liftman �Drs. Bags �Dissecting Kits
Stethoscopes � Blood Pressure
�Tuning Forks Equipment
Any Type of Product for
The Health Care Professional
WHY BUY RETAIL - WHEN YOU
CAN BUY FROM THE DISTRIBUTER
ALL CAMERAS LENSES
! ALL PROJECTORS !
. ALL PHOTO SUPPLY
ALL ART SUPPLIES
i

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i
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East Carolina Medical Supply Co.
ha
All
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Non-Credit Mini-Courses
Being Offered By MSC
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 2, 1982
Continued From Page 6
Participants will be required to shoot film and
have it processed for reviewing during class time.
Also, participants must have a 35mm SLR or a
twin-lens reflex camera to use during the course.
DARKROOM TECHNIQUES � (4 sessions)
Mondays (March 15, 22, 29, April 5) � 6:30 PM
- 9:30 PM
Instructor: Greg Moll
This workshop will provide instruction in
developing black and white film, contact prin-
ting, enlarging techniques, use of filters, types of
paper, and some basic photographic techniques.
Participants must have a 35mm or double lens
120 camera to use during the duration of the
workshop.
DRAWING � (5 sessions)
Tuesdays (February 2, 9, 16, 23, March 2) � 6
pm - 9 pm
Instructor: Greg Moll
The goal for this workshop is to help each in-
dividual find hisher own unique approach to in-
terpreting objects visually as they draw. Basic
techniques of drawing will be explored but in-
dividualized methods will be stressed so that the
student feels comfortable with his own style o'
drawing.
WOODWORKING � (5 sessions)
Wednesdays (February 3, 10, 17, 24 and March
3) 6:30 PM - 9:30 PM
Instructor: Pat McDermott
This workshop will offer the basic instruction
in simple jointery, construction techniques, and
finishing processes of woodworking. Hand tools
construction will be stressed for those who do not
have elaborate power tools.
BASKETRY � (5 sessions)
Wednesdays (February 3, 10, 17, 24 and March
3) � 6 pm - 9 pm
Instructor: Terri Holtclaw
In this beginner's workshop, the student will
be shown how to construct baskets using two dif-
ferent methods � weaving and twining. Cover-
ing handles, manipulating shapes, and develop-
ing a personal approach to basketry will be ex-
plored.
POTTERY � (5 sessions)
Section 1 - Tuesdays (February 2, 9, 16, 23, and
March 2)
Section II - Tuesdays (March 16, 23, 30, April 6
and 13)
6 pm - 9 pm � Instructor: Cindy Spivey
This workshop will provide basic instruction in
clay by teaching wheel-throwing, as well as hand-
building techniques. Using a potter's wheel, par-
ticipants will learn the fundamentals of wheel
throwing with instruction including types of clay,
clay preparation, centering, opening, forming a
cylinder, and lifting from the wheel. Also, glaz-
ing and firing processes will be covered.
Participants can expect to have some com-
pleted ceramic pieces by the end of the
workshop.
Glazes will be provided for the workshop. A
materials fee of $2.00 will be charged.
WATERCOLOR � (5 sessions)
Tuesdays (March 16, 23, 30, April 6 and 13) � 6
pm - 9 pm
Instructor: Greg Moll
Basic instructions in watercolor painting will
be explored in this workshop. Mixing colors,
stroke techniques, stretching paper, and com-
position are some of the areas that will be
covered in this five (5) week course.
JEWELRY METALS � (5 sessions)
Mondays (March J5, 22, 29, April 5 and Wednes-
day, April 14) � 6 pm - 9 pm
Instructor: Margo Manning
In. this five (5) week course, basic fabrication
and metal techniques will be introduced. The stu-
dent will work on low fire metals such as coppet
and brass and cost will be kept minimal.
MIXED-DOUBLES BOWLING LEAGUES
Mendenhall Student Center Mixed-Doubles
Bowling leagues will begin February 1st and
2nd. Each team is required to have two (2) male
and two (2) female members all with validated
ECU ID cards. The Monday night league will
have an organizational meeting on Monday,
Februarv 1st at 5:30 PM in the MSC Bowling
Center. The Tuesday night league will meet on
Tuesday, February 2nd at 5:30 PM. League play
will begin directly following each organizational
meet inc.
�mm
doing
Whaft a true nature lover
with an animal like this?
JOHN BLAIR
BELUSHI BROWN
Continental
Divide
THURS FRI & SAT. - 5, 7, 9 P.M. - HENDRIX THEATRE - FREE
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traffic light
Going Out of
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100 to 500 Sale Rack
50 to 75
Reduction on
All Winter
Merchandise and
30 to 50 OFF
All Spring &
Summer
Merchandise
The best fashions in town
are now the best value
in town.
traffic
pitt plaza
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STUDENT UNION
UST UMOUNA UMtVHKrrt
STUDBfT UNION
Chair People
&
Committee Members
Student Union is now taking ap-
plications for chcir people and
committee members. Sign up at
Mendenhall information desk
before February 12.
HAVING PROBLEMS
with
DRUGS? ALCOHOL?

k3S
We Can Help
Students helping Students
CAMPUS ALCOHOL & DRUG PROGRAM
501-303 Erwin Bldg.
757-6793
In a Boston hospital
a love affair ends,
a new one begins,
a Doctor battles
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and a man learns
the true meaning
of courage.
Whose life is it anyway?
Metro-GoWwyn-Mayer Presents A COONEY-SCHUTE PRODUCTION
RICHARD DREYFUSS � JOHN CASSAVETES
A John Badham Rim
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Based on the Stage Play WHOSE UFE IS IT ANYWAY?" by BP4AN CLARK Produced by LAWRErJCE P BAOIMANN Dir
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f





THE FAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
982 Ii. '
Pear tree Shining As A Starter
Peartree slips a pass to a teammate in an earlier iame
�� ' C State. Guardim foi the Wolfpack at left is
Derrick H hittenhurg. Peartree says the State name ave
him some much-needed confidence. (Photo Bv ken
Man in)
B HAR1 KS( HAND1 KK
Sp��fl, I til tut
The nine-year-old sal on the
iteps oi his house; he was crying
He mauled to go play basketball
with his oldei brothers, who were
six oi seven years his elders. I he
would not allow him, at least not
until one I eon Whitney stepped
in.
Whitney made a point to hr m
the youngster along. I hough his
brothers would not select him to
plav on their team during a pick
up game, young Bruce Peartree
was always selected b the cordial
Whitney
"Yeah Peartree says, "I'll
nevei forget Mr. Whitney. He'd
always make sure 1 got a fail
shot
The scene was PantegO, N C
and (hose were the days when the
young Peartree was just learning
about the game ol basketball.
1 ater on Peartree got the last
laugh, lust last year college
recruiters were hot after the
guard who had led Pantego High
School to two consecutive state
I-A titles. Among them was las!
ai olina's Dave Odom. The
others included 1 ouisville's Den
ny t mm and North Carolina's
Dean Smith.
Smith look himsell
picture aftet he signed i s Wilni
ington 1 aney standout Mil
Jordan. Odom then outdu
the rest ol the crowd, agning
Peai tree eai ly last spi ing
I he inking ol the 6 I all
point guard hai turned in
crucial move foi (dom v
ECl 's startei ai the point, I'ony
Hles, went down with a brol
hand two weeks ago, I
stepped in and has not shitted in
to a lower geai since.
In the tour games thai B
has Keen out Peat
50 points. 11i.i: avera
12.5 points pei gamt. set. i
on the learn during the 1
span H;s seas m; a ei i
been boosted to 5 9 ,
the recent sui.
"We knew that Hi u
a fine playei said I
lain coach David Pend
"but he has come kei
I han any ol us imagined
Pendei
tree's quick adjustment
i A high st hool to a
lege to simple hard wi
"Bruce is a fierce
He likes compeiitii m ai
atraid ol a challenge
ol a fact, he welcon
Spider FT's
Defeat Pirates
BvHVR1 1 s IIWDI I R
i
11 (
Mid hall bui ha
�n 12th eann �
R
the wax
M A
dav
Sou �
1

I he Ri
� 2-1
possess
"I
m
conference ' I hey pla
�' pe ol
game hat playing hard was noi
N i mi must play smai R
Ml' HMMSII �
II ire a
( d 'in said k i
� � � .
� �. nsiv e b ai d
"Id
: ' I . e I V
dt tense we trie . iem
It's to

� '
�evasions,
k a 36-34 - � oom ai
lunnt
hall Ricl I 10-2 to
i ady hv h n. 4' ���
( harles Gi een lay up.
. aindei I anu
belonged so lev to R
as the Spid.
ECU duard Bruce Peartree Beats Richmond's Press
lohnson was one ol six Spiders K .
anu who scored in double figures He advantagi
nd. finished w ith 14. w hile lohi
ored Schweitz tallied 16, I"om Bethea 13, 45 6 pei r I (. I
be I final 17 Bill Five 12, and Jeff Pehl and And
minutes to steal lv Heher 10 apiece
Richi I's I ing Freshman guard Bruce Peartree 14.
late in the same a perfect, led the way foi ECl with a game- I (. I bad
'4 � h and career-high of 20 points. Junioi day, hostinu Ba
tnd 12 in centei AI Mack added 16 and 7:30 p.m. M
ist 2:(K) Ml of the sophomore forward Mori's jseu
tinal 12 came me op Hargrove scored 14. atu
portunit j em were cann Hargrove also pulled down a when Old l
. Keh I hnson game-high ten rebounds. Greenville
James Madison Wins Pair, Raises Lead
sv Scoreboard on page 9 for stan-
dings, schedule and results.
JAMI S MADlSt took a firm
grip on the ! I A South lead last
week with wins over Navy and
ie i ge Masm.
I he I hikes, last season's con
representatives in
N AA tournament, are now 6-1 in
nee play and. 15-3 overall.
William and Mary is two games
back in the league standings with a
3 2 mark Anothei halt game bad
are 1 as!arolina and Richmond,
both standing al 2 2.
1 ast Wednesday the Dukes got 19
points and nine rebounds from
senior lorward Linton rownes to
dispose of Navy. 59-49. Guard Rob
Romaine paced the Midshipmen
with 20 points
I Ml came hack on Saturday lo
dump ieorge Mason, s stenter
I )an Ruland had a big night, tally ing
24 points, fhe ever-dependable
rownes added 16 points and 10 re-
bounds.
1 HI GAME ol the week was pro-
bably Saturday's William and
Mary Navy game, which went into
overtime before the Indians canu
away with a 4"? 46 victory.
Guard Billv Barnes made both
ends ol a one-and-one with 14
seconds remaining to put V illiam
and Mary up by one. A lai second
shot by Rob Romaine failed tor
Navy as ihe Midshippmen dropped
to 1-3 in the league and K-9 overall.
ECAC
South
Report
father in the week the Indians
had played tlantic v a Con-
ference membei Maryland a close
game bet ore falling 50-43. I he con
test was closer than the final score
indicates, as the two clubs were tied
with at 43 with just 16 seconds re-
maining
Nil BIGGES1 of the week's
games was perhaps Saturday'
Richmond-EC I matchup
I he Spiders overcame a nine
point deficit to win by ten, 81-71.
Richmond made 14 ol its last u free
i hr iw s to sec ure the v ictory.
Bothclubs ate now tied for third
place with identical 2 2 marks. An
1( I win would have left the Pirates
at J-l and in sole possession of se-
v ond place
I he Puaics had earliei pulled ofl
a 71-M upset of I N( Charlotte on
Wednesday I he 49ers came into the
fame with a 13 3 mark
Ol D DOMINION got its first
league win ol the yeai last week,
defeating George Mason 71-63 lo
break a three-game losing streak
Senioi forward Ronnie McAdoo
scored 22 points and pulled down 13
rebounds to pace the Monarch win.
Centei Mark West and guard Billy
Mann both added 17 points.
I he Monarchs also defeated
Virginia Commonwealth during the
week. ODU's 61-58 win ended
VCl 's four-game winning streak
over the Monarchs.
IH1 COMING WEEK has three
conference games on tap. On
Wednesday, Richmond travels lo
Old Dominion. William and Mary is
ai George Mason on Ihursdav and
at Richmond on Satuidav.
I he Indians also hav i
conference fame dun:nei
seven days, hosting Mi
teience powei ii ginia
Monday night.
(ld Dominion a�
outside opponent, travi
thward on Saturdav to lacSi
Joseph's, an Ni tout nevSUl -
pi ise las! veai and ow nei16 )
record tins season
Easi C arolina's only fame it the
week is on Ihutsdav, when H.
College will invade Mil(
iseum
chall

Hi

e A . �
I v
��
i
i . �
I
H
i
pi kiri�
Football Schedule
Features Pair Of
1981 Bowl Champs
i w
. I
K ka i
i
I I

Ml( lib
:
l-A (ID1

lEDl �-
i
ep foi ai d femplt
The I ad Pirates Have Come fopether Of I ate
Red-Hot Lady Bucs Now Face E. Tennessee St.
By JIMMY DuPKKK
Managing f dtior
After trouncing Appalachian
State 76-45 Friday and riding a
seven game winning streak, last
Carolina's 1 adv Pirates must now
prepare to host highly touted Easi
Tennessee State University Wednes-
day.
Sam Jones provided 24 points and
seven rebounds against Sl with
foul teammates also hitting in dou
ble digi'ts. Darlene Chaney added
13, 1 illion Barnes 11 and Mary
Denkler and 1 oletha Harrison 10
each as the Pirates notched then
11th win against seven losses.
"That was our third away win in
a row said ECU coach Cathy An
druzzi. "We kept them to just 4s
points - our defense was a real
"Might spot
"We preach and prcav h am
preach and when (the defense
works, u creates foi othei areas ol
out game
�ndi ui praised loiH s and
Barnes foi earning "Rai ol the
Game" honors foi theii defensive
efforts. Each, she noted, held theii
opposing plavei to iiist two points.
Easi fennessee will be looking to
avenge an 83 "4 the I ady Pirates
handed them a yeai ago I he I ady
Bucs ol 1 I SI will have the advan
tage of experience this nine, as
senioi Marsha Cowan combines
w ith freshman Lori I lines in i he
backcouri for a combined J5
points an outing
At h 3. sophomore centei I eigh
Jaffke is strong inside with 8 5
pomis and 6.1 i ebounds pv i can
"i Maisha c owart) had H) againsi
us lasi yeai At. she avi .� 24
this ear iivli u. � � : I � �
this fame we can't It I 24
points.
"W e're coming a, i oss a b
Wednesday Ihev'ie big inside, so
we're goillj I � e lo b ' out bet
ici than we have W can' afl rd a
sloppy fame we can'i afford
stupid mistakes
"We're pleased with oui girls not
because ol the wins, bin because ol
I he vv av w e v o)
"We are not doing anything spec
taculai We an playing fundamen-
tal basketball We'vt averaged only
n turnovers a fame in the last three
fames while forcing out opponents
into 2S tin trovers a game We don't
gamble much on steals, bui we are

Denkler's I9.�
bounds �
16 4
6 rebounds.
"Ofl
looking foi
burden off Sa
ndin. "Denk
blem vv
king to b
"Overall, I'm please �
mce between inside
gettinj
players complimen
"In each of our as
e ve had rive pla
figures - thai says some
om k"am P�ay and
gotten ofl the bench "





?
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
M-BRUARY 2. 1VK2
: k !

re-
s are
g ihe
-end
a Ik Me
i she's
ihe
side
v Our
lher.
games
uible
about
we've
Pirate Swimmers
Sweep Appalachian
- �a -�tftr -Ji 71
By THOMAS BRAME
Awl Sports r diiir
The ECU swimming learns weni
to Boone last weekend and came
home with two impressive wins over
Appalachian State.
The ECU men won 56-14 while
the women prevailed 76-52.
The Lady Pirates took 11 first
place finishes in their quest to vic-
tory. The 200 medley relay team
continued its success by eclipsing its
own varsitv record with a time of
1:53.9.
Sally Collins took individual fusts
in the 400 individual medley and the
500 freestyle. Nan George was a
double winner in the 50 and 100
freestyle events.
Solo winners included Jennifer
Jayse in the 100 backstroke. Dordi
Henrikson in the 200 butterfly,
ancy James in the 2(X freestyle,
and Lori McQueston in the 100 but-
terfiy event.
Kim Lowe took firsts in both the
one and three meter diing events.
"This was a low-key meet fot
us said Assistant Moll) Delozier.
"We did not swim our best times to
win this meet
The ECU men had an easy time of
it also as they took eight firsts en
route to victory.
Double winners were Stan
Williams in the 50 and 100 free style
events and Scott Eagle in the one
and three meter diving events.
Ciregor Wray continued his suc-
cess by winning the 1650 freestyle
with a time of 17:19.75.
Joe Nelson won the 200 freestyle
and Doug MacMillan took the 100
butterfly to round out the Pirate
firsts in indiidual events.
The 400 medley relay team came
away with a win with a time of
3:38.55.
1 he Pirates must continue to
swim good because Duke is next on
the agenda, last year, Duke swept
both the ECU men and women. The
1 ady Pirates have never beaten the
Blue Devils.
The Pirates end their regular
season this Saturday at Duke. The
swimming gets underway at 1 p.m.
Ihe men then go to the Eastern
Regionats in Pittsburgh on March
3-6. Ihe women will travel to Idaho
for the Nationals March 10-13.
SCOREBOARD
M M -MM IHSUMHM.S
( .ml Kri'ifil
i.HUCN Mddl'll
WiUiaai arnJ Mjh
tatl anilma
Ku tun -ltd
OIJ I).�num.n
KlL'l MUM'II
hi
i :
i
14
Or.ll
15-3
I-
-� IQ
12-

I Y
Hjpn- .i I .i- ai iiiu
���l . Jrh ft
I K"tt Mi a I
)ld IJ'lun Ji Si I
l.iin S.i. ji Na )
irjiitiu t uiiitwitiwtalil t '
U llllHltl Mr . H
Photo By DAVE WILLIAMS
ECU Swimmers Compete In Earlier Meet Against UNC
Frosh Pace Lady Bucs
Classifieds
ATTENTION
Classified ads mull be taken ONLY
during the following hours
�Monday - I IS J 00
I .sdav - 3 00 3 00
Wcdnesdav � I IS 3 00
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Rates are Ji for the first IS words
and i OS pir words alter the lirst
fifteen
FOR SALE
WATERBEDS DOS T pay retail
tor you' heated w.aterbed ouy
direct from mql ana save Buy a
complete 1st quality P'n wood
heated waterbed with is yi war
ranty tor as low as S18s (Queen)
S!?' iKmq Lavaway av.nl Call
David tor appointment 7Sb 2406
KEROSENE AND quarti maters
lor sale can and pump included
Call 7S7 1920
ZENITH PHOTO Enlarqer lenv
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OFFICIAL JOVAN pos'ers of the
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Tour. Limited Quantity Call Bill
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FOR RENT
ISO PER MONTH, : blocks Irom
campus Room ate Needed iSO
deposit and one third utilities
t$1 3038
WAN'ED FEMALE
�oomateiiSO S160 uncl rent �
jtihtiesi 2 blocks Irom campus
Need Bedroom Furniture 7SB S36I
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE
wanted to share 2 bedroom
townhouse rent is 1112.SO plus �
utilities Non smoker pielered
C�N 7S2 4494
FEMALE ROOMATE Private
bedroom S83 monthly plus � e�
penses, 7 lOths of a mile Irom
campus 7S8 S24S Pets allowed
TWO PEOPLE wanted to share
larqe house with younq couple in
Lake Ellsworth. Greenville Con
venient to hospital and university
S120 per month plus I 4 utilities
Deposit required Can 7S6 630e
after s p m
HELP
WANTED
COUNSELORS FOR western
North CArolina co ed summer
camp Room, meals, laundry,
salary and travel allowance E�
pertence not necesaty but must
enjoy livinq and workmq with
children Only clean cut non
smokmq college students need ap
pi, Foi application brochure
write Camp Pmewood 180'
Cleveland Rd . Miami Beach Fla
33141
SERVICES
CARICATURES BY WEYLER
Greenville s onqinal personalued
art service Have a cartoon donw
os yoursel1 or a loved one a uni
que qitt icea' $10 for 8I0, b'w or
color Call 7S2 577S
TYPING TERM thesis.
resumes dissertation etc Pro
tessional quality at Lowest rates
Call Kerrpie Dunn anytime
7S2 6733
NOTARY PUBLIC Call Amy at
757 3734
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST lor
term research, thesis papers, ar
ticles tor publication, dissrlations,
etc Reasonable Rates. Call
7S7 1378 atler 4
WANT TO learn about drawing
without going to Art school
MendenhaU Crafts Center otters
drawing, starting Feb. 2 Contact
Linda Barkand at CraM Cenler or
Greq Moll 752 26�7
Want to know HOW TO MAKE
BETTER USE OF YOUR TIME
Booklet at ECU Bookstore
PERSONALS
ATTENTION Do you have an in
teresting or unique dorm room?
The Buccaneer is searching for
those special rooms on campus for
a lew photographs All interested
persons contact The Buccaneer at
7S7 650!
PATSY Dallas" and 'Falcons
Crest' never were so interesting
Maybe we can try agam - soon, I
hope See you around the ofticels)
JD
WANTED SAN FRANCISCO
4�'ers Pepsi Cap Neqotiabie
7S7 6IS3 work and 355 2362 home.
CHRIS MERCI tor those "well
done steaks Frenchly Yours
7 11 l�59
TO THE quy on the caboose I
remember another episode on the
M Tram Little Washington will
never be the same I must admil.
it was another typical "Joe Job"?
But don t worry my triend lor this
isn 1 the end, there's always
Driver's Ed m the tall Signed,
another innocent rider on the
M Train
BY CYNTHIA
PLEASANTS
ford. Np�rl� Irtiler
The Lady Pirates
Track team placed in
several events this past
Saturday at the Moving
Comfort Invitational in
Blacksburg,Virginia.
The invitational,
which is fast becoming
one of the major in-
door meets for women
in the United States, in-
cluded such top schools
as Tennessee, North
Carolina State, Penn
Slate, Virginia and
Maryland.
Arnette Kelly and Li
Fraham, both freshmen
here at ECU, placed
third in the 300-meter
RIDERS
RIDE TO CHARLOTTESVILLE
Virginia Weekend ol February 12,
Leave anytime Will Pay for Gas
Call Debbie 752 7247
ATTIC
South's
No. 6
Tues Feb. 2
Video Rock
on 7 Ft. TV
?�? �
Rock ;
ightclub �
j Wed Feb. 3
CHRTSftUS fttCOROtftG IRTISH
ili!jlli7jJiJLjIi4i:JJiii
L
9 9
with Fabulous Knobs
'Wsufis pizza � Hem's- run? pis -hippv sn
events. Kelly, a top
recruit, had a time of
:45.4, while Graham
had a slightly slower
time of 46.5.
Kelly placed fourth
in the 60-yard , dash
with a lime of 7.3.
Freshman Davene
Cherry, who specializes
in sprinting, also placed
sixth in the 60-yard
dash with a time of
7.64.
Eva Brennan, who
holds the ECU record
in the 1500-meter
event, placed sixth in
the same event with at
time of 5:08.65.
Freshman Lisa
Whitley placed sixth in
the 1000-meter race
with a time of 3:16.1.
Carolyn Moore, did
not qualify in the
400-meter event, but
still had a good time of
:62.
The foursome of Kel-
ly, Cherry, Graham,
and Moore placed
fourth in the 450-relay
race combining for a
lime of 1:23.4.
Head coach Pat
McGuigan said she was
pleased with the team's
performance. "We're
gaining more indoor
meet e x pe r i e n c c -
something these girls
have never hadshe
said, "We look more
experienced and that's
important
I HIS WH.K SN HUM I I
l.rv trb 2
AiiKiu.ui .i) V.ilh.111! and Mjt
i.i.Ht! tkoxhinylH Viv
,ntMiii Siju .ii lui'ii Mjsn
Maivtumj al W ilium anil M.m
Viid Irh 1
KulnlWitil .11 OIJ l)"HMhl.
I.ink- Madtvm at t .m'rKli
Ihun. trh 4
William and Man .n ticxpt Mas
Mi.� I Hi �
Viiyiiiu Uvl a 'tl
- lhlr iinhrrnn l.nmr
I M WIlksHIMIlN
l i l . .
I.U1H M.l.l: �'( N �
M . ,1 liul 'ii Will J M.
I I .11 i l l i i i
� ill !)� ii mi hi 61. Va
I.hi M.i.i.
X H - i I , i ,�
W iRu ' ! 17. J ii 11 ,
Sigma Nu
Little Sister Rush
i i i i x i i i i r i i r i i i t r
Every Day
11:00-11:00
300 E. 10th St.
758-6121
The Best Pizza in Town � Honest
Wednesday, February 3
Thursday, February 4
Parties start at 9:00
1301 Cotanche Street
for Rides Call 758-7640
Game
Machines
Big Screen
TV
Drive-Up
Window for
To Go Orders
Every Day - Buffet 11:00-2:00$2.79
Mon. & Tues. - Buffet 500-8:002.89
Wed. - -Ail You Con tot Sfjuyhelti so-8:002.25
Thurs. � Lasagna 5:00-8:00Two for 3.60
k
smmmmmmiiiini
ima
SP0RTSW0RU)
WS
756-6000;
BUFFET
PIZZA, SALAD, SPAGHETTI, SOUP
ALL YOU CAN EAT
Mon-Sun. 11:30-2:00 $2.69
Mon. & Tues. 6:00-8:30 $2.89

104 Red Banks R4. (Behind Shoney's)
Tuesday Night �
ECU NIGHT
JUST $1.00 with ID includes Skate Rental
7:00-10:00
Every Friday & Saturday Night
ECU Students are admitted for
JUST $2.00 including Skate Rental
jfe��:
.
WEDNESDAY
SPAGHETTI DAY
ARGE PORTION
OF SPAGHETTI,
GARLIC BREAD $1.88
BONUS TRIP TO SALAD BAR $.49
Hwy. 264 Bypass, Greenville
Selection of Ladies1 Tennis
Clothing. Excellent for
Racquetball & Tennis
75 OFF
All Ski Clothing
By Aspen, Pacific Trail
12 PRICE
MIRiPSfiiE
Thursday, Friday, Saturday
Selection of Men's
and Ladies' Warm-l ps
12 PRICE
Robert Bruce Sweaters
b Arnold Palmer
Reg. S35.00
NOW! 1995
Available in -Neck
&( tew Neck
Tennis Ball by Wilson & Penn
Yes. Buy 2 cans for $5.00 and SAVE
Regularly $2.98 per can
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i
10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 2. 1982
West Is Double Leader
Though Old Domi-
nion is off to a slow 9-8
start, the Monarchs
have the ECAC-
South's scoring, re-
bounding and assist
leaders.
ODU center Mark
West leads the con-
ference in both scoring
and rebounding. The
6-10 junior is averaging
17.2 points per game
and 10.2 rebounds.
West also is the
league leader in block-
ed shots with 77
tlirough 17 games. He
leads the entire nation
in that category.
Richmond forward
John Scweitz follows
West in the scoring
race, tallying 16.9
points per contest.
Freshman guard Carlos
Yates of George Mason
is next with a 16.7
average.
James Madison for-
ward Linton Townes,
at 16.2, and George
Mason guard Andy
Bolden, at 151, round
out the top five.
Ronnie McAdoo,
like West an ODU
Monarch, is second on
the rebounding stat list
with an average of 8.6
pulls.
Another ODU
player, guard Grant
Robinson, is the
league's assist leader.
He is averaging 4.9 per
game.
East Carolina's
representatives among
the league lists are
Charles Green and
Morris Hargrove.
Green is 13th in the
league with a 11.1 scor-
ing average, while
Hargrove is 15th at
10.8.
Hargrove stands
ninth in rebounding,
pulling down 5.6
boards a game.
m
ADVERTISED
iTf M POLICY
Each ot these advertised items is required lo be readily available lor
I below the advertised price in each AP Store, except � specifically
in this ad
sale at or
noted )
Peartree Popular Back Home
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT FEB. 4, AT AAP IN GREENVILLE N. C.
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
703 Greenville Blvd.
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville, N. C.
EC AC-SOUTH LEADERS
SCORING
�Muter, learn
Mark West, ODU
John Scweitz, Richmond
(. ,iiIon Yates, Li.Mason
1 inton rowncs, J.Madison
nd Bolden, G.Mason
Andre Gaddy, G.Mason
Ronnie McAdoo, ODU
Ron Romaine. Navy
)jn Ruland, J.Madison
Keith Ciepiicki. W&M
Bill Mann. ODU
Bill live. Richmond
Charles Green. ECt1
Mike Sirayhorn. W&M
Morris Hargrove, ECU
G - Pts.
17-292
18-304
17-214
18-291
17-274
17-249
17-246
16-224
18-225
16-195
17-205
18-215
17-188
12-133
17-183
REBOUNDING
IMuter. learn
Mark Wesl, OIl
Ronnie McAdoo, ODU
Andre Gadd. G.Mason
Dan Ruland. J.Madison
Mike Shannon. Ci.Mason
1 inion rowncs, J.Madison
Jefl Pehl, Richmond
Bill Rye, Richmond
MnrrK Hargrove. ECU
Garv Price. Naw
ASSISTS
Plater, I earn
(iranl Robinson, ODU
Rob Romaine. Naw
H.lly Barnes, W&M
lorn Bethea, Richmond
BilK Mann, ODU
G � -
11-84
16-71
18-57
17-M
Avr.
17.2
16.9
16.7
16.2
15.1
14.6
14.5
14.0
12.5
12.2
12.1
11.9
11.1
111
10.8
Avg.
10.2
8.6
7.5
7.0
6.8
6.1
6.0
5.7
5.6
5.4
Avg.
49
4.4
4.3
3.2
i.i
Continued From Page 8
man rather than take the shot
himself
Peartree was and is a very
popular figure in Beaufort Coun-
ty. In fact, Baker says the
18-year-old is almost a local
celebrity.
"1 guess you could say he is the
hero in this area Baker said.
"He is a very exciting player to
watch and the fans here just lov-
ed him
Peartree was so well thought of
that Pantego fans named him
after Los Angeles Laker great
Earvin "Magic" Johnson.
"Everybody used to call me
'Magic Two Peartree said.
"Thai was neat because he was
my idol and I'd already decided I
wanted to pattern myself after
him
Ali ihe playing time, com-
pliments and winning lessened a
great deal for Peartree once he
began his collegiate career. The
Pirates have struggled to a 7-10
start and he only began playing a
great deal after Byles was in-
jured.
"For a while ii was really
tough Peartree admitted. "To
be honest, I wondered for a while
why 1 came here. 1 was sitting on
the bench and could see places
where I thought 1 could help. 1
think Coach Odom realized that
because he'd talk to me and make
me feel better
Peariree's dislike of bench-
warming, which coaches slay
stems from his love of the game
and will to win, almost cost the
Pirates a chance at signing the all-
state recruit.
The ECU staff suggested that
Peartree attend a prep school for
a year before enrolling at ECU.
They suggested this because of
the return of Byles and
sophomore point man Herbert
Gilchrist. Peartree and his high
school coach both disliked the
idea, so Odom and Co. offered
the scholarship anyway.
"We wanted him very badly
Pendergraft said. "He said he
was willing to go to a junior col-
lege for a year, but not to a prep
school. We weren't about to take
a chance on him going to junior
college and then change his mind.
It's worked out for the best
anyway
Indeed it has. Over the last two
weeks the accolades have come
pouring in. Minges Coliseum
fans have been very vocal in com-
plimenting his aggressive defense
and fast-paced offense, while
both his current and former
coaches have looked to the future
with optimism.
"I think Bruce is going to be an
exceptional guard for us some-
day Odom told a press gather-
ing following ECU's win over
UNC Charlotte last week. "The
thing 1 like about him most is that
he is so very coachable. 1 can say
whatever I want to him and not
worry about his pouting. Wilh
that attitude he can only im-
prove
Baker did not see the Charlotte
game but was on hand for Pear-
tree's 20-point performance
Saturday against Richmond.
"1 think we all got a sample of
what he's going to be like
Baker said. "Before he's finish-
ed, he will fill a lot of seats in that
coliseum
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Pre-Registration Issue �
Wednesday, February 17
An advertising bargain
WHAT'S IT LIKE TO BE
A SINGLE PARENT?
Lots of teenagers tell us it's tough. If
you're a pregnant teen, we'd like to
heip.
An experienced counselor can help
you think about your options and make
a plan for yourself and your baby.
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The Chidren's Home 52 5847
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A TTENTION:
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You are cordially invited to attend the RUSH
meeting of the Lambda Chapter of Gamma Beta
Phi, East Carolina University.
At: 7:00 p.m.
In: 244Mendenhall
On: Feb. 2 or Feb. 3, 1982
We hope to see you there!
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 2, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 02, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.175
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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