The East Carolinian, January 28, 1982






I
2toe
Carolinian
A Li
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 58 No. 35
Thursday, January 28,1982
Greenville,N.C,
8 Pages
Outlook Good For Proposed
ECU Communications Major
By CHARLES CHANDLER
The proposed East Carolina com-
munications major got a shot in the
arm yesterday following a meeting
Sn Chapel Hill between a university
representative and a high-ranking
official in the UNC system.
"I'm very optimistic ECU Vice
Chancellor for Academic Affairs
Robert Maier said following a
Wednesday afternoon meeting with
UNC Associate Vice President for
Academic Affairs Donald Sted-
manThings are going through a
normal kind of procedure. We have
every reason to believe we are better
off today than yesterday
Stedman, who works on the staff
of UNC President William Friday,
said he left Wednesday's meeting
with high hopes as well. He added
that any questions he had about
funding for the major � which has
presented the program with its
largest roadblocks � had been
answered by Maier.
"He clarified the part of the pro-
posal that most concerned me
Stedman said. "The problem we
have is there is very little money in
the university system for a program
like this. Dr. Maier gave me reason
today to be optimistic that the
money can be found somewhere
It is estimated that $100,000 is
needed to get ,the program off the
ground. In addition to equipment,
two new faculty members will have
to be hired before the major is
established. Maier said there are
several sources he believes to be in-
terested in donating to the cause.
"As I told Dr. Stedman, I think
there are sources outside the univer-
sity that are extremely interested in
helping with the communications
major Maier said. "I feel
reasonably confident they will help
with finances and perhaps with
some equipment
Gerald Haskins, an ECU faculty
member and head of a special ad
hoc committee for the formation of
a communications major, said he
too was pleased with the results of
Wednesday's meeting between the
two officials.
"Some of us here at the university
have been kind of on pins and
needles Haskins said. "We did
not know exactly how critical to-
day's meeting was, but we knew it
meant a great deal. I'm thrilled to
death the way it turned out
The drive for a communications
major began in earnest some two
years ago. Shortly thereafter, the ad
hoc committee was formed. last
May that committee submitted a
proposal to establish such a major.
Since that time Maier has been
working closely with both Haskins'
committee and officials of the UNC
system.
Now that Stedman and his
cohorts have reviewed the proposed
major and are reasonably satisfied
with its format, it will now go
before a Board of Governor's plan-
ning committee.
The planning committee will con-
duct an investigation and, if
satisfied with the proposal, will
make a recommendation to Board
of Governors. The board will then
vote to decide if the communica-
tions major is to be established.
Haskins said if things move along
smoothly the major could be
established as early as next fall.
"Realistically, though he said,
"we would hope to have it ready to
go by the spring of next year. I think
that is a very real possibility
"We're trying to move it along as
fast and as smoothly as possible
Maier said. "This program, in my
judgment, would fill a very signifi-
cant regional need. "
Photo
H hen It "s Not Snowing
.it's raining, as a lonelv visitor learns after leaving Me
By CHRIS BENNETT
ndenhall.
On The Inside
He once rubbed elbows with
James Kilpatrick, but at the request
of former chancellor Leo Jenkins,
William A. Shires came to ECU
as director of the News Bureau and
Public Relations. Read about his
colorful life on page 5 of The East
Carolinian.
Untraditional Sentence Given
Women '$ Rights Leader
Praises Positive A ction
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Sl�ff NVriirr
Last Of Two Parts
The president of the Pitt County
Women's Political Caucus says
Ronald Reagan is only giving lip ser-
vice to the efforts of the women's
movement.
"Reagan is supporting the
destruction of the affirmative action
program said Freddy Jacobson,
who praises affirmative action as
strong support for both minorities
and women. "It's not just a
black-white issue she said. "Many
people only see discrimination in
terms of racism
Affirmative action has been
receiving negative criticism since
Reagan's election and the
Republicans took the majority of
the Senate, according to Jacobson.
"I think the young women
graduating from college today will
find that without affirmative action
programs, the doors to equal oppor-
tunity will start closing agaih she
added.
Jacobson feels that support for
candidates who are insensitive to
women's issues is diminishing rapid-
ly. Almost 75 percent of the can-
didates endorsed by the National
Women's Political Caucus were
received a majority of votes in the
last election, according to Jacobson.
"Few women supported Reagan
by a good margin than men and the
gap is widening she added.
Jacobson said her main challenge
is getting people involved.
"Complacency is the biggest enemy
of the whole movement she said.
"People assume that everybody else
is going to solve their problems.
This is not just a women's problem;
I think this is a people's problem
Lack of political involvement is
the generally accepted factor in the
inequality of women and minorities,
according to Jacobson.
"I strongly believe that people in
eastern North Carolina support
equal rights for women just as
strongly as the people in the rest of
the country, but our legislators
don't hear from them Jacobson
said. "The opportunity to get in-
volved is here
The National Organization of
Women (NOW) and the Women's
Political Caucus are pushing hard
for the ratification of the Equal
Rights Amendment before the June
30 deadline. The Supreme Court
stayed the recent decision of U.S.
District Court judge Marion
Callister to nullify the Congres-
sional extension of the deadline and
declare the recension of five states
to be valid.
"If they don't hear it befo�e the
deadline, the whole thing will be
killed Jacobson said. "The timing
is what makes the difference
Controversy has surrounded
Callister's decision not to remove
See LOCAL, Page 3
By GREG RIDEOl T
Miff Wnlcr
Punishment, an important part of
any judicial system, is levied in
many ways. The most common are
fines and imprisonment. However,
occasionally a judge will break
tradition and hand down some other
type of sentence. This was
discovered recently by Jimmy Dale
Stone Jr an ECU student.
S'one, of 129 Aycock, was recent-
ly Convicted in Greenville District
Curt of iamperinc with an
aufomobile. He was found, by a
campus security officer, rummaging
through a car parked in the lot on
14th and Berkely streets.
Judge Horton Roundtree told
Stone that in addition to paying
fines and court costs, he would have
to work for the university police sta-
tion each Friday night from 6 p.m.
to midnight for the next two mon-
ths.
ECU Director of Security Joe
("aider and Francis Eddings, Assis-
tant Director of Security, decided
that Stone's job would be picking
up trash around the campus. Ed-
dings says he believes that this type
of punishment will help offenders
"gain insight into the work of the
police department and, at the same
time, render a service to the cam-
pus "
Eddings added that Horton is the
onlv judge in Greenville who uses
this method of punishment. "He
will probably continue to do it he
said.
The following is the ECU Cam-
pus Security blotter for the week of
Jan. 20-26. Dorm-related incidents
reported for the week were relatively
light.
Jan. 20. 1 p.m. � Benjamin
Trent Hunt lev of 203-A Scott was
arrested east of White dorm for
driving under the influence of
alcohol. 1:26 p.m. � Cpl. Watson
reported that the west door of Belk
Hall's canteen had been vandalized.
Jan. 21. 1:30 a.m. � Bruce
Devincenzo of 180 Jones was ar-
rested south of the Jenkins Art
Building for driving under the in-
fluence of alcohol. 8 p.m. � Detec-
tive Sgt. McAbee reported finding
drug paraphenalia in the possession
of Jack N. Smith of 151 Umstead
dorm.
Jan. 22. 6:45 a.m. � Helen L.
Saulman of 706 Greene and Ricky
Allan Teel were found in violation
of the visitation policv.
Jan. 23. 2:45 p.m. � Lana
Loreene Helms of 511 White
reported the breaking and entering
and larceny of her vehicle while it
was parked in the Ninth and James
streets lot.
Jan. 24. 12:30 a.m. � Mark
Wendell Carnes of 223 Jones was
arrested for driving under the in-
fluence on College Hill Drive. 11
p.m. � Dennis Daniel Carrigan of
363 Aycock was arrested for assault
on a female.
Jan. 25. 12:30 p.m. � Mark
Davis of 106-D Scott and a minor
were found in violation of the visita-
tion policy.
Jan. 26. 6:30 p.m. � Malcolm
Tully and Kenny Crew of 404-B
Belk were found in possession of a
controlled substance by Detective
McAbee. 10:22 p.m. �'Richard K.
Rowland of 362 Umstead reported
the breaking and entering and
larceny from his vehicle while it was
parked at Mendenhall Student
Center.
Newborn Formula Sales Controversial
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
"Nestle Kills Babies claims the
literature distributed by INFACT
(Infant Formula Action Coalition),
a Minneapolis-based lobbying
organization.
Yes. that's the same Nestle that
makes everyday favorites such as
Nestle Quik, Nestle Crunch,
Nescafe and other products like
Swiss Knight cheese, Libby's canned
foods � and an infant formula pro
duct used in developing countries.
Sally Fronsman-Cecil of the
North Carolina INFACT says she
agrees with the strong statement.
"Nestle, by their practices, kills
babies she said. "They take a very
immoral and unethical stand on this
issue
At the crux of the controversy is
Nesile's promotion, marketing and
sale of infant-formula products in
poor countries. INFACT claims
that Nestle uses various tactics to
discourage breast-feeding among
mothers in those areas even though
breast-feeding would be a better
choice.
Susan Scanlan, a spokesman for
the Nestle Corporation, said, "
'Nestle kills babies' is ridiculous.
Nestle saves babies' lives is a more
accurate statement Scanlan claim-
ed that Nestle no longer advertises
to mothers.
Despite this claim from Nestle,
INFACT was recently endorsed by
various national organizations in-
cluding the American Public Health
Association, the National Educa-
tion Association, the American
Federation of Teachers and the
American Baptist Churches. Many
professionals in nutrition at U.S.
universities have also endorsed IN-
FACT.
Hunt's Committee Studies Drinking Age
By MIKE HUGHES
AuisUiil News r dnor
Last October, Governor Jim
Hunt's Crime Commission staff
recommended that the state's legal
drinking age be raised from 18 to
21. A committee was then appointed
to study the pros and cons of the
proposed increase.
When that study is completed, the
Crime Commission will then make
its final recommendation to the
governor.
Hunt's feelings on the issue have
not yet been released. However, the
governor's assistant press secretary.
Brent Hackney, quoted Hunt as af-
firming that the plan was
"something to look at
When a similar proposal to raise
the drinking age arose in Georgia in
1980, a group of universities in the
state conducted its own study titled
Arguments Against Raising the
Legal Drinking Age (AARLDA).
Contrary to the findings of the
state's study, this study cited facts in
support of keeping the drinking age
at 18.
"The whole idea is to try to keep
alcohol out of the high schools
says Steve Koval, who took part in
the Georgia study. "Raising the
legal drinking age to 19 would ac-
complish this. So why penalize the
19 and ?0 vear olds hv raising it to
21?"
However, Hackney cited the main
reason for deliberating the increased
drinking age as an effort to curb the
rising number of drunk driving in-
cidents.
The director of analysis for the
Crime Commission, David Jones,
stated recently that traffic fatalities
have already caused most states to
raise their legal drinking ages.
Illinois, for example, has record-
ed 30 percent fewer fatal automobile
accidents among 19 and 20 year olds
since January 1980, when the state's
drinking age was raised to-21.
Likewise, the drinking age in
Florida was raised in October of
1980 from 18 to 19. According to
reports, the mam reason for that in-
crease was, indeed, to keep alcohol
out of the high schools.
A study conducted by the Univer-
sity of Michigan showed that 20 per-
cent fewer fatal accidents have oc-
curred in that state since the drink-
ing age was raised.
Jones believes that raising North
Carolina's drinking age to 21 would
save between 20 and 25 lives per
year.
Even if the Crime Commission
passes the study on to the governor,
and he accepts it, the proposal will
not be up for adoption until the next
full session of the General Assembly
in 1983.
Governor James Hunt will soon hear his Crime Commission's
recommendation on a proposal to raise the legal drinking age in the state
to 21.
"We're a fairly extensive network
of health professionals, government
officials and people in religious
orders Fronsman-Cecil claimed.
"They (Nestle) have used
billboard propaganda to encourage
bottle-feeding added North
Carolina INFACT secretary Helen
Zunes. "They're trying to make
these women feel that breast-feeding
is old-fashioned and that bottle-
feeding is modern. It's a status sym-
bol for the poor women
INFACT claims Nestle will often
distribute free samples of their for-
mula products to mothers with
newborn infants. "It encourages
mothers to begin bottle-feeding �
with no initial expense to them �
and the mothers wil then dry up
Fronsman-Cecil said.
According to Fronsman-Cecil,
lactation will stop after a few weeks
if it is not stimulated, and by that
time the mother will run out of free
samples and be forced to buy the
often high-priced formula product.
Nestle says they distribute free
samples, but only "upon writtc i re-
quests by health professionals
Scanlan stated. INFACT counters
with allegations of kickbacks and
bribery by Nestle to health officials
who help promote its product.
"There is evidence of . . . other
unethical practices Fronsman-
Cecil added. People will get a cer-
tain percentage (of the profit) for
promoting the stuff
According to Fronsman-Cecil,
Nestle will often pay the highest
salaries to medical people who are
then asked to do sales work. "The
nurses are sort of lured away from
the public health professions in
many countries she explained.
"Considering the shortage of health
professionals in the third world, it's
obvious how unethical this practice
is
More complications can result if
the powdered milk formula is misus-
ed, Cecil-Fronsman said. Improper
See NESTLE, Page 3
t-





I
f
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 28. 1982
Announcements
WALK FOR HUMANITY
The 11th annual Greenville
� Walk lor Humanity" conducted
bv me ECU Hunger Coalition, is
our biqqest event ol the year The
� Walk" will wind through the
streets ot Greenville and everyone
is invited
Each year the money that is
i rtised has been divided between a
local hunger need and tor a na
'ional or international relief pro
i�-c tn the past ECU students
nave been the maior contrivuters
'o the success ol the "Walk"
We have 1? weeks left until the
Walk" and many things to be
done We need help from
t-veryone You can walk, donate,
.irqanne, speak to groups, invite
us 'o speak 'o your group, dome to
�ir mee'cngs do art work, help us
plan the rou'e. put us in contact
with other enthusiastic people,
make suggestions, prepare the
ilier the "Walk" lunch, ect
Peole don ' have to suffer from a
lack of food. We can make a dif
terence! Make the "Walk" your
jnmps social protect for the spr
Miq si-mes'er Come on - "Put a
i,tn hear' in your Soul
sVt invite vou to come to our
meeiwtm on Thursday's at 7 30
p m a' "r Newman House (953 E
10" V I or ca" us 'o find out
m ire 7S2 �U
GAMMA BETA PHI
O T-u, sciav Jan ?8 we will
� I meeting at 6 p rn in
,� hi. ail 221 M is important for
III members 'o he there to vote on
�sma u' reviseo constitution
KAPPA SIGMA
The Theita Pi chapter of Kappa
Sigma would like to congratulate
the ten pledges The new pledge
class is Alpha Sigma pledge class
On Monday February 1. 1982. Kap
pa Sigma will hold their Spring
Little Sister Rush. For more infor
mation call 757 5543
PHI KAPPATAU
LITTLE SISTERS
There will be a Little Sster
meeting, Sunday. Jan 31, at 9 30
This is a mandatory meeting and
ALL little sisters neet to attend
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Phi Beta Lambda will hold its
next meeting Wed . Feb 3 in Raw!
130 at 400 Anyone interested in
lOimng Phi Beta Lambda is urged
to attend this meeting.
ACTING CLASS
Se0nen B Finnon. artistic
� r'C' r 'in. newly formed
� pi i lie Little Theatre
tsori c o 'Me Wesley Founda
t Greenville s inviting par
i 's v i i beginning acting
class The class will begin on
Sa'urday Feb � and meet from
11 00 a m 'c I 00pm for eight
successive Sa'uroavs The cost
tt : oe S8 00 DC participant Fin
n, n formerly ot ECU s Drama '
� Deear'r-en- s'resses tha'
nas' is an i-vroduction tc
5 basK � ctwiQues concen
r i sense megwory. reiaxa
� c v sa'i n F ir additional
n. call Niiiiv Owens at
V. hi r. SI Student Center
?030 r Stephen Finnon
'57 ij
NASW
The Coastal District of the Na
tionai Association of Social
Workers Association will hold a
meeting in Greenville on Jan 28 at
7 30pm in the front section of the
Aided Health Auditorium. Or
John R Ban will be the featured
speaker Students, faculty,
members, and interested in
-�ividuals are invited to attend
SECOND UNITED
NATION
The Campaign for the Second
United Nations Special Session on
Disarmament is encouraging par
ticipation in its activities schedul
ed tor June 12th in New York City
A local group is planning to travel
to the UN at that time to add their
voices to trie already great
number of peole calling for Global
disarmament Enough nuclear
weapons now exist to destroy the
world many times over. Our
response to this escalation is
critical A local task force for the
UN Campaign is now forming to
discuss various ideas and plans of
action Anyone interested par
ticipate by calling 758 4906 or at
tendmg our local task force
meetinq on Friday evenings a'
6 30 p m at 610 S Elm Street
FEELING A DRAFT
LATELY?
How should a Christian respond
to military service in a nuclear
age7 Would Jesus led a division of
soldiers into battle' H these ques
tions are difficult for you to
answer or you would iust like
more information we welcome you
to view "Every Heart Beats
True a film strip about registra
tion and the draft
Come to Room 221 of the Library
Science Building on Thursday
evening Jan 28 at 9 p m A brief
discussion will follow and mforma
'ion about registration the draft
and counseling for conscientious
obiectors will be available
Everyone is welcome and all Per
sonai Information will be con
fioentiai Women are encouraged
to participate
SWCS APPLICATIONS
The Department of Social Work �
Correctional Services will accept
applications from students inten
ding to maior in social work or
corrections through Feb 2
S'udents should contact the
Pepartment Offices (312 Allied
Health Building) immediately to
obtain an application and make an
appointment for nterviews
Deadline for the first interview is
February 1 To be eligible to app
ly the student must have com
pieted at least one social work or
correctionscourse. and is expected
to have a minimum grade point
average of 2 5 Call 757 6961 (Mrs
Joyner) for additional mforma
tion
HANDICAPPED
STUDENT SERVICES
The Office of Handicapped Stu
dent Services needs reserve
drivers tor the handicapped van
Anyone interested who has the
afternoons free from 12 00 noon
until 6 00 p m should contact the
Office of Handicapped Student
Services at 757 6799 or come by
Whichard 212
The East Carolinian
V'MH'J "It- l liUIN I lllli'tltt'll I
imir 19!
Publ'Shed every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
mq me summer
The East Carolinian is the of
ticiai newspaper ol East
Carolina University, owned.
Derated, and published tor and
by the students Ol East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate. S20 yearly
East Carolinian offices
located in the Old South
mg on the campus of ECU.
Greenville. NC
I The
are loi
Buildir
POSTMASTER Send address
i nanges to The East Carolinian.
Old Sou" Building, ECU Green
vii'c. NC 27834
Telephone 757 636. �37, 6309
Application to mail at second
class postage rales is pending at
Gieenville, North Carolina.
PPHA
The Preprotessional Health
Alliance (PPHA) will have a
meeting this Thursday. Jan 28
This meeting will be held at 5 30
p m at The Afro American
Cultural Center All members and
inductees are urged to attend
The Preprofessional Health
Alliance also announces its Annual
Induction Ceremony Friday. Jan
29 at Mendenhall Student Center,
7 30p.m
PHI ETA SIGMA
Freshman Honor Society will
hold a general meeting in room 212
Mendenhall Student Center on
Tuesday, Feb. 2 at 5 p.m Fund
raising and social activities will be
discussed AH members are urged
to attend
CO-OP EDUCATION
The Cooperative Education Of
fice. located in 313 Rawl Building,
currently has tob openings tor
Summer and Fall 1982 with the
tolling agencies Social Security
Administration Baltimore. MD.
Morth Carolina internship Office
Raleigh, NC, Camp Day, NC In
stitute of Government Raleigh
NC
For more information, contact
the Coop office in 313 Rawl
Building
PHYE MAJORS
All students who plan to declare
physical education as a maior dur
mg change of maior week for the
tall Semester, should report to
Mmges Coliseum from 1 00 3 00
p m on Wednesday, Feb 10 for a
motor and physical fitness test
Satisfactory performance on this
test is required as a prerequisite
for official admittance to the
physical education maior pro
gram More detailed information
concerning the testis available by
calling 757 6441 or 6442
NUTRITION AND
WEIGHT
There will be general nutrition
and weight reduction classes of
tered at the Student Health Center
lor next five weeks I Jan 26 Feb
2.9.16.23) Call 757 6841 to enroll
tree of charge m the 9 10 a m or
10 Mam classclasses individual
counselling for special diet pro
blems are available on these dates
trom 89 am by referral of a
physician For more information,
contact the Student Health Center
SWCS APPLICATIONS
The Department of Social Work
8, Correctional Services will ac
cept applications from students in-
tending to maior in social work or
corrections through Febrvcv 2
Students should contact the
Department Offices (312 Allied
Health Buildmg) immediately to
obtain an application and make an
appointment for interviews
Deadline for the first interview is
February 1 To be eligible to app
ly. the student must have com
pieted at least one social work or
corrections course, and is ex
pected to have a minimum grade
point average of 2 5 Call 757 6961
(Mrs Joyner) for additional infor
mation
KAPPA ALPHA PSI
Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity will
hold its 1982 Spring Formal
Smoker Thursday. 28 at 8 p m in
the Mendenhall Multi Purpose
Room at the Student .Center All
young men interested are invd
to attend
SIGMA GAMMA RHO
The sorors of the Eta Mu
Chapter will be having rush on
January 28 at 7 30 p m in
Mendenhall Student Center We
are inviting all interested young
ladies to attend The elegance of
simplicity with the epitome ot
class, that's Sigma
PHI EPSILON KAPPA
A meeting will be held tor pro
spective new members on Mon
day, Feb 1 at 7 m M.nges Col
iseum, room 145 New members
must be at least sophomores with
an intended maior of PHYE
ART SHOW
The Seventh Annual Art Show
will be trom Jan 26 to Feb 5. 1982
m the Greenville Museum of Art
All ECU artists are encouraged to
prepare their best work to submit
Friday. Jan 22 1982 to the con
ference room m the office ol
Jenkins Fine Arts Center. ECU
Cash priies. provided by me Att.c
and Jettnes Beer and Wine. Co
will fange from $10 for Honorable
Mentions to S100 lor Best m Show
QUESTION?
Can you speak m tongues? What
good is it? Ar y person who is born
again can speak m tongues anv
time they want, it they understand
the B'ble. and believe it (I Conn
thians 12 14) Come to our
fellowship and learn more about
this truth and other truths from
the Bible that are rarely taught to
day Thursday. Jan 28 at 8 p m
Mendenhall S'udent Center, room
242
COLLEGIATE 4 H
On February 4. Thursday, the
ECU Collegiate 4 H Club will meet
at 7 p m at the dob advisor's ad
dress For more information and
location can Carrol Anne at
756 4287 or Ivey at 759535 All
members and interested persons
are urged to attend
SCEC
The Student Council tor Excep
tionai Children, will nave their se
cond meeting on Monday. Feb la1
4inSp 129 This win be aprogram
meeting refreshments will be
seryed Please 10m us
FITNESS CLASSES
Get nd of tnose winter bulges
and get reaor to hit the beach
join the Fitness Classes offered
for students faculty staff ar
� families sponsored by trie
Dept ot IM REC Services These
classes are designed to increase
flexibility, improve muscle tone
increase cardiovascular fitness
and to nave a good time The cos1
for the eight week session s 5 00
for the 1 time per week class
JI0 00 for the twee weexir classes
, ii Oegin the week ot Feb i
For times ana places, can Sue
Stanley a1 757 6064
USED
TIRES
40.00
inquire at
Evons Seafood
Help When You Need It Most.
The Fleming Center has been here for women of
all ages since 1974, offering understanding and
help to anyone faced with an unplanned pregnancy
. . . day or night. Services include:
Free Pregnancy Testing
Weekday & Saturday Abortion Appts.
Evening Birth Control Hours
CALL 781-5550 DAY OR NIGHT
THE FLEMING CENTER
We 're here when vou need us.
Cunt mUwyolinti pr�
madkot ttu4��H moy �� com-
pete tor tevarol hyndrnd Air
Fore ickolonkipt Thai
� ckoionhip ontoba awarded
to �tuf��tt accepted into
i�a"ic�t Kkoob o� fwtkmoB o.
of Iho beginning ol their
lopkomor yoar. TW Kkoior-
ikip provide tor tuition bookt,
lob Ion and egwipment. phis a
SS30 monthly olio.once hv
vntigcrto Hin financial otter
nativo to ttw High cett ol
modicol eeucotioa.
Contact
l.SU.HHI III
PROH-SMONN
KM Kl I list.
SottoGL-1. llOONarohoDr
Kalaiab. NC 27689
Phon. CoHact I919I7SS-4134
THE SHOE OUTLET
(Located beside Evans Seafood)
Featuring name brand shoes at bargain prices.
Up To 75 OFF regular prices
Bass Steward-McGuire Brouse Abouts
201 W. Washington St. Within walking distance of campus.
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
AMBTIONS FKOM 1S-H
WEEKS
AT FURTHER E XPSMSI
ilUN PSfJg�1 Test, SirHl
Control and Prafclaai
rVopilncv C� lll��- f or mr
IMr informal ctt W-OUJ
(Toll Frtt Nwiafcar
MftlMW) fctftM� AM
andP M W�kdayt
� ALKlON WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
�it wttt MarjM st.
Salno. N.C.
�tfO
ltt J
JOLLY'S
PAWN SHOP
Large inventory of new and
used merchandise
We Have
Lay away
�Accepting any items of value for collateral
� All transactions confidential
WE BUY GOLD & SILVER
ACROSS THE RIVER � Comer of N. Green & Hwy. 33
(Pactolus Hwy.) 752-S759 Mon. Fri. 9 to 5 � Sat. I to 4
BICYCLES
GUNS
JEWELRY
STEREOS
MUSIC INSTRUMENTS
TOOLS
Kings Productions Auditions
East Carolina University
A J Fletcher Recital Hail
Tues . Feb 2: 4-7 p m
Carowlnds
Midway Music HaU
Sun . Jan 31. 12-4 p m
Pri-Kjuctions feature professionally
designed scenery, costumes, staging
inti choreography in fully equipped theatres and outdoor stages
Singers � Dancers � Instrumentalists a Technicians
Variety Performers � SieO-250week
ixt' rp mi !�e Ail: be paid 10 rurec performers traveling ovet
250 -rules to the park
Contact L-ve Shews Carowincls Bc Wb Cnarlone NC 2822
or Kinqs PfOduCtionv
Fnceiammeni Depl 1932 Highland Ave Cincinnati OH 4S? 19
beginning February 1st
The Galley
Snack Bar
(Located Ground Floor Jones Dorm)
will be open until
11:00 p.m.
Come Watch Prime Time TV
On the New 6' Wide Screen
�??????��??????
rd�lC
lies
i Beef
Hot Soi
RoaSl areas
Turkey
Chicken Filet
Steak Sandwiches
Fishwich
J�o
5Rr
Meal plans accepted.
come join us
every sunday
11:30-230
Spend Spring Break in the Big Apple
The 1982 Student Union Travel Committee is offering a fantastic six day trip to
New York City during the Spring Break vacation. The trip will depart from J
Mendenhall Student Center at 8:00 p.m. on Friday, March 5, and return Friday,
March 12. Travel will be via 46 passenger buses.
The full price of the Student Union Travel Committee's sponsored trip to New
t York City is as follows:
$289.00 per person in single occupancy room.
$185.00 per person in double c. twin occupancy room.
$159.00 per person in triple occupancy room. �
$145.00 per person in quad occupancy room.
The price includes charges for transportation from Greenville to New York Ci-
ty, and from New York City to Greenville and hotel accommodations at the Hotel
t Edison located at Times Square. Each trip participant is responsible for hisher X
meals, admissions, transportation within New York City, and incidental ex-
penses. All payments must be made by cash, check, or money order, payable to
the Central Ticket Office. The balance is payable on or before February 22,1982.
Registration applications may be picked up at the Central Ticket Office, located �
X in Mendenhall Student Center. j
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ttiEEASIAROl INIAN
JANUARY 28, 1SJK2
� � � 4
































































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,i-
to
12.
Nestle Corporation Subject Of Formula Dispute
Continued From Page I
dilution of the mixture
can cause medical and
developmental
disorders in a newborn
child. Lack of clean
water, poor sanitation-
sterilization conditions,
and label instructions
that cannot be read by
illiterate mothers add
to the already difficult
problem of formula use
in poor countries.
According to ECU
nutrition instructor
Marilyn Steele, danger
of infection and
digestive orders can
result when formula is
ocal Leader Praises Affirmative Action
Continued From Page 1
himself from the case
because he was an of-
ficer in the Mormon
church, one of the
stronger opponents of
FRA
"He was asked by
women's organizations
and the U.S. Justice
Department not to hear
this case Jacobson
said. "I don't want
Judge Callister's ruling
to deter even one com-
mitted supporter of the
HRA from working
toward our goal � 1
want them out there
working
If time runs out for
the amendment, the
whole process of more
than 10 years work will
have to "start from
scratch according to
Jacobson. "No matter
what, our goals are still
the same she said.
"We have to work for
women's issues and we
continue to
the public
women's
issues of concein
Jacobsen noted were
'equal pay and equal
opportunity, job train-
ing, day care centers,
shelters for battered
women, shelters for
displaced homemakers,
social security for
homemakers, and
shared pension plans
for military wives � to
name a few
Jacobson extended a
challenge to the
students of East
Carolina to get involv-
ed.
1 think ECU
students have a great
potential for getting in-
volved she said.
"Once women realize
the power of unity,
there's no end to what
can be achieved for
both women and
men
Jacobson suggested
that any interested per-
sons should contact the
Women's Political
Caucus at 756-4124 or
Lil Simmons of the Na-
tional Organization of
Women at 752-4440.
diluted with con-
taminated water.
"Over-dilution could
lead to starvation
because they (infants)
wouldn't be getting the
amount of nutrients re-
quired for growth and
development Renal
problems may also
result if the formula is
under-diluted, Steele
stated.
Even when over-
diluted, the formula
has a white, milk-like
appearance. Often a
mother in a developing
country will not be able
to comprehend the
need for a proper mix-
ture.
Steele pointed out
that breast-feeding is
not alwavs the best op-
tion. In many situa-
tions a mother may not
be able to breast feed
normally. She said
most nutritionist agree
that "for most
mothers, breast-feeding
is best, especially in
developing countries
where water supplies
may be contaminated,
making dilution of for-
mula products
dangerous to the in-
fant
Because educational
levels are not very high,
label instructions may
not be properly read,
according to Steele.
Breast-feeding is be-
ing encouraged for
many other reasons.
Even among women in
developed countries,
there has been a large
increase of the number
of mothers opting for
it. It has been noted
that breast-feeding is a
natural method of birth
control because it in-
hibits ovulation.
Others claim it helps
control other disease
by transferring natural
immunities from the
mother's body. The
significance of the
special bonding ex-
perience between
mother and child has
been a factor that some
specialists believe in-
hibits child abuse.
According to Polly
Mann of the national
1NFACT office, "the
passage of the World
Health Organization
have to
educate
about
issues
Some
of the kev
Summer Job
Opportunities
In Camping at
Camp Don-Lee
Camp Chestnut Ridge
Camp Rock fish
FOR:
Counselors
Lifeguards
Crafts
Sailing & Canoeing
Nurses
Salary
Room & Board
Benefits
N.C. United Methodist Camps
Interviews and Information February 8, 1V82
at ANNUAL CAMP DAY
ATTENTION
BUSINESS MAJORS
ctiool of
USINCSS
east Carolina
Business shirts are now available in blue and
black in all sizes. If interested, please contact
Jeff Hales at 757-3484 or Tim Allen at
758-5473.
code was the greatest
success that we had
Mann was referring to
a marketing code that
was adopted by the
organization in which
INFACT played a large
part in its passage. The
marketing code was a
non-binding set of
guidelines on
marketing procedures
for infant formula.
Controversy arose
when the United States,
in a 119-1 vote, opted
against the voluntary
code. The reason for
the US vote was
primarily a question of
free enterprise, since
representatives felt the
code would hamper a
business' right to
operate unrestricted.

ATiTIC
Souths No. 6
Rock Night Club
Thursday CHOICE
4MMMMMMMM???����??�
Friday & Saturday
WOKTHH4-7Krida
MMMNNMMMMMM�4MMF4MMF��
Sunday DRIVER


���
756-6000
104 Red Banks Rd. (Behind Shoney's)
Tuesday Night �
ECU NIGHT
JUST1.00 with ID includes Skate Rental
7:00-10:00
Every Friday & Saturday Night
ECU Students ore admitted for
JUST $2.00 including Skate Rental
OE� � � � � � � � �
.
friday-saturday nite
in concert
Legendary Blues Band
Guest artists who have appeared on stage with members
of THE LEGENDARY BLUES BAND include such
diverse performers as Dan Akroyd, John Belushi, Greg
Allman, George Benson, Gatemouth Brown, Larry Cor-
yell, Dizzy Gillespie, B. B. King, Albert King, Bonnie
Raitt, Stevie Wonder and, of course, Johnny Winter, Bob
Dylan, and all of the Rolling Stones.
�tj� iEaat (Earnltmatt
accepts CLASSIFIED ADS
on the following days at these
designated times:
Mon. 1:30-3:00
Tues. 2:00-3:00
Wed. 1:30-3:00
Thurs. 2:00-3:00
Fri. 1:00-2:00
Items and Prices
Effective Wed . Jan 27
thru Sat . Jan 30. 1982
in Greenville
Copyright 1982
Kroger Sav on
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold to Dealers
600 Greenville Blvd Greenville
Open 8 a.m. to Midnight
Open Sunday 9am to 9 p m
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re-
quired to be readily available for sale m
each Kroger Savon except as specifical-
ly noted m this ad if we do run out of an
item we will offer you your choice of a
comparable item when available, reflec
t:ng the same savings or a ramcheck
which will entitle you to purchase the
advertised item at the advertised price
within 30 days
v.
e .

Classifieds must be brought into the
EAST CAROLINIAN office and paid for
in advance. The deadline for classified
ads is 3:00 on Monday and Wednesday.
The rate per classified ads is $1.00 for
the first 15 words and $.05 per each addi-
tional word thereafter.
KROGER
FLORIDA FRESH
Orange Juice
-Mjfr F"?-Gal
Ctn.
MADE FRESH DAILY
CHEESE OR PEPPERONI
Chips & Snacks
iBRBBBslO
COSMITICft A
FRA6RANCII
orr
suoo
WfTAIl
5sf
S3i2j
jtfci6
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I
(Mr Eaat (Earnlfotfan
Serving the East Carotin cmmpm community since 1925
Paul Collins. aMhM
Jimmy Dupree, ��,��,����
Ric Browning, oh �, j w tlmm Charles Chandler, w� E�r
Fielding Miller, -����n �rrinm Tom Hall, ������
Alison Bartel, mm�mm� Steve Bachner, rnnimjmw.jnf cuuw
Sieve Moore, amthw William Yelverton, &
January 28, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Journalism
Communications Vital To ECU
For once good news comes to the
campus of East Carolina University
from the mother institution in
Chapel Hill. After several years of
planning and waiting, it now seems
there is reason to believe there will
be a communications major here by
spring semester 1983.
The news from Wednesday's
meeting of ECU Vice Chancellor
for Academic Affairs Robert Maier
and Donald Stedman, UNC
associate vice president for
academic affairs, has given rise to
optimism the program could be
operational by the fall.
It appears the only roadblock
which remains is the Board of
Governors of the UNC system and
their planning committee. This
could present problems for the ECU
program, but Stedman's favorable
recommendation which appears im-
minent is expected to calm the
rough waters.
Following the creation of the
ECU Medical School there was an
informal decision to delay expan-
sion of curricula here, but sufficient
DOONESBURY
time has now passed.
The various campus media have
progressed remarkably well con-
sidering there has not been a con-
centration of study available in
these fields.
In all modesty, this campus
newspaper is as good as any in the
state. The East Carolinian was
recognized with the Associated Col-
legiate Press' "First Class" award
for spring 1981, falling just one
mark of distiction short of the top
award � "All America
The 1980 Buccaneer was rated
"All America" by the ACP � one
of only five in the nation.
With WZMB soon to begin FM
broadcasts, it seems a shame the in-
dividuals operating these media are
forced to major in fields which are
not necessarily related to their
"labor of love" � journalism.
The fate of the ECU communica-
tions major rests in Chapel Hill; we
can only hope the need for another
institution offering a concentration
in this vital field is recognized.
by Garry Trudaau
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THE EAST CAKCUH1AN
A Iternatives For ECU Wastes
By KIM AI BIN
1 am so proud of the Media Board.
After ail the fuss about those 5,000 year-
book covers which were comprised in a
remarkable affort to maintain the Buc-
caneer's � um, let's see, dignity(?) . . .
yeah, dignity � those clever souls on the
Media Board have invented an ingenious
method of putting idle Buc covers out of
their misery and to good use. The Media
Board is going to sell the old covers as
notebook binders.
It is in this same spirit of conservation
and laborious planning that I present to
you a list of other potential recyclables on
this campus. These are elements of life at
ECU which, I feel, are not being utilized
fully or adequately and so must be redefin-
ed or converted. With a little imagination,
the students of East Carolina could think
of new uses for:
THE FOOD AT MENDENHALL
SNACK BAR � I do not think that any
one means for us to take that stuff inter-
nally. This point was driven home to me
when the coffee I bought there dissolved a
hole through the styrofoam cup.
WZMB � 1 think the reasom they are
not on the air yet is because those in charge
over there have not yet decided whether
they �vant a radio station or a cause for
which students can become acquainted
with the local and federal bureaucracy.
PHYE 1000 � This course could easily
be used as punishment. As a disciplinary
measure. Dean Mallory could require
students to retake the course.
The SIG-EPS � Sorry boys, I can't
think of a single use for you. Give me a few
years, okay?
THE INFIRMARY - This is a nice
place to spend the entire afternoon wat-
ching television while waiting to be seen by
the doctor. Do you think we could get
some more chancy machines in there, or a
cafeteria? We might as well make ourselves
at home.
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
� Aahhh, now there is a white elephant. It
is the most beautiful structure on our cam-
pus, yet it suffers the most from
underutilization. This stems, I beleive,
from an inability on the part of most EC
students to refrain from participating in
other activities which are enjoyable. Is it
possible that Mr. Alexander, the patron
saint of MSC, so restrict relaxation with all
of those rules about or eating or drinking
on the carpet and in the theater that any
people do not feel comfortale in
Mendenhall? I mean, I can understand
why the snack bar is closed most of the
time, that makes good sense � who is go-
ing to get hungry after 7:30 p.m.?
At any rate, the students of ECU would
doubtlessly benefit more from the struc-
ture if it were to take on a more utilitarian
nature, Mendenhall could be used, for ex-
ample, as a traffic office, since
Mendenhall has parking facilities and the
traffic office does not. It could be used as a
stand-in for the buildings on campus which
are being renovated. It would really serve
will as housing for the elderly. We could
build a real cafeteria in there.
Or should we leave it as a museum and
erect statues of our administrators inside?
No, I've got it. The Media Board could
sell yearbooks covers there.
There's A 'Rooney' Born Every Day
By ART BUCHWALD
Andy Rooney started it on CBS's "60
Minutes" by discussing one of Americans'
greatest phobias, "Fear of Tipping
Rooney came out against tipping, but he
admitted he didn't have the nerve to lead
an anti-tipping movement.
Coleman McCarthy, the columnist for
The Washington Post, then wrote that
Rooney didn't have to lead the anti-tipping
movement in the US because it aleady had
leaders, including McCarthy, who not only
"stiffs" waiters and cab drivers, but golf
caddies as well.
First of all, for every defiant McCarthy
willing to ignore the practice of tipping,
there are 10 Rooneys quaking in their
boots because no matter what they've
given as a gratuity, they're never sure if it
was enough.
In my day, those of us who always had
our hands out, could spot a deadbeat like
McCarthy before he even got out of a taxi.
He was wasy to identify because you could
hear the cab driver cursing him as he drove
away. Another clue was that a McCarthy-
type always tried to carry his own bag into
the lobby, and after checking in, attempted
to lug it by himself up to the room.
In the well-run bellhop corps to which I
Campus Forum
Tips For A 'Private Conversation
After reading your article in The East
Carolinian the thought comes to mind
that private conversations should be
held in private places. The situation that
you describe is analogous to someone
entering the Croatan nude and then get-
ting teed-off because someone looks.
Perhaps we should reverse the situation
and invite all those who have been study-
ing in the Croatan, or soda shop, to
write in about how they were interrupted
by private conservations in public
places.
I find it amusing that you emphasize
one of the basic human qualities when
you said, "I happen to know how ir-
ritating this is because it happens to me
all the time, too, when I notice someone
listening to a private conversation of
mine You see people are naturally
aware of their surroundings. So when
they hear something out of the ordinary
they naturally take notice. I myself am a
stickler for a good joke!
However, if you choose to believe that
people go around with books and
newspapers, placing themselves in
strategic locations, in order to eaves
drop, then so be it. But if in the future
you really get miffed about someone
listening in on your conversation, heres
a few suggestions: 1) Move to a more
private location or 2) carry a sign saying
private conversation, please do not listen
or 3) turn very slowly and stick your
tongue out at him or 4) Just Keep Your
Mouth Shut.
RON PATE
Junior, Accounting
Abortion
It is interesting to note the views of
abortion that have been stated in your
paper; the issue seems fortuitously perti-
nant to East Carolina in view of Sen.
John East's involvement in the Congres-
sional committee deciding the matter.
What seems truly amazing is that few
have taken on the problem as a social
matter, but have, rather, tried to
eradicate this matter by focusing upon
the medical issues. Despite the problem
of possible damage to the uterus, the
major crux of the argument has fallen
on the point at which life begins, or ,
rather, at what point the zygote becomes
human and is subject to and part of a
legal system, determining whether the
abortion is legal or not.
Apart from the obvious entanglement
with legal and medical debate, the issues
boil down to the major issue of our
morality: is it just to abort a potential
human life? The issue is, then, a moral
and social one, and is open to, most like-
ly, even more heated debate as a bare
issue of humanity.
It seems amazing that an issue that is
basically moral and social in nature, has
been confined to the fate of, as yet,
undetermined identities. It would seem
that to truly encounter the problem, one
would have to examine the entire history
of conception. That is, the
mythological, religious, and in any other
way social views of not only
motherhood, but ideas surrounding
feminity and masculinity, and paren-
thood in general. It would seem that
there is a strong enough aura surroun-
ding the dichomoties of birth and death
that are inherent in such a question as
abortion would have solicited responses
on a more human level that could help
those in emotional positions on both
sides of the issue.
GREGSHELNUTT
Soph Art
Cordial Welcome
I recently had the pleasure of serving
as a consultant to the department of oc-
cupational therapy at ECU. Though 1
was on the campus for only a brief
period, I could not help but be impress-
ed by the cordial welcome I received
from everyone: administrators, faculty
and students.
The spirit and enthusiasm of the
members of the occupational therapy
department are outstanding. Besides
meeting with faculty, I also met with
representatives of the junior and the
senior class and was particularly im-
pressed with their dedication to a very
demanding course of study.
ECU is fortunate to have such a
strong professional program for its
students.
My thanks to all who made my visit
with you so pleasant.
RUTH M.GRIFFIE, PhD
Prison Letter
I'm writing you in the hopes you'll
run an article in your newspaper for me.
"Inmate wishing for sincere female to
build a solid, lasting friendship relation-
ship with
All letters will be answered if they
sound sincere.
Reggie L. Parker
McCain Prison Unit
P.O. Box 58
McCain, NC 28361
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes tetters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
belonged each man took his turn checking
people in or out. The last man on the list
was stuck with emptying the ashtrays in the
lobby and attending to the needs of a Mc-
Carthy. You did these menial tasks
because sooner or later you knew you
would get an Andy Rooney.
When an Andy Rooney appeared at our
resort hotel, and I was the lucky bellhop, I
would rush out and say, "Good day,
sirIntimidated, he would immediately
hand me a quarter. I would carry his bags
and escort him smartly to the desk. After
registering, the desk clerk would ring a
chime, give me a key and I would say,
"Please follow me, and don't worry, I
have change for a 10 dollar bill
An old bell captain, from whom 1 had
learned the proession, told me, "When
checking in a couple, there are two kinds
you will be dealing wjth. The first will be
married. Don't waste too much time on
them, because the size of the tip has
already been established in the husband's
mind, But every once in a while you will
luck out and get an unmarried couple. At
this moment, money is no object for them
to get into the room and to get you out.
Stall for time, checking the windows, the
closets and the water in the bathroom, The
longer you remain, the more nervous the
man will become and finally in despera-
tion, he'll shove a fistful of money in your
hack of you just agree to leave
"Howwill I know if the couple is mar-
ried or not?
"A married man usually flops on the
bed first, and his wife always checks the
closets to see if there are enough hangers
"And an unmarried couple?"
"The unmarried woman usually starts
combing her hair in front of the mirror,
and the unmarried man always makes sure
the bolt on the door is working
My tutor gave me one other piece of ad-
vice, "If the couple is unmarried, wait 20
minutes, and then bring them a bucket of
ice. You'll earn the fastest five bucks you
ever made in your life
No need to go into other secrets of the
trade, but suffice to say that the Andy
Rooneys of this world don't have a prayer
against people who are used to being tip-
ped for serving the public.
The next time you catch "60 Minutes"
on television, take a close look at Andy
Rooney, and you'll know why no one in
the hotel, restaurant or taxi business is
afraid of him. AH you have to do as a
waiter is pour soup on him, and he'll shove
a 10-spot in the palm of your hand.
1 ' lftJ. Lot Angeles Time Syndicate
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
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it as a
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at our
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� em
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: Andy
one in
liness is
k) as a
shove
William Shires
JANUARY 28, 1982
Page 5
Wililililllilis
News Bureau Director's Love For
ECU And Education Continues
B ANGELA ROACH
siatl Wntrr
It experience is the best teacher,
then East Carolina is endowed wiih
one o the best directors in the
Southeast. Director o' the News
Bureau and Public Relations is.
William Archer Shires.
This department, located in fcr-
win Hall, is responsible for gather-
ing and distributing all pertinent in-
formation concerning the campus to
regional, state and national media.
Shires' responsibility is to edit all
material and make sure the media is
provided with accurate and up-to-
date information.
Pieces oj Eijilu, a bi-weekly
newsletter, is published for the
faculty and staff. The News Bureau
and Public Relations does not cir-
culate it to students or the com-
munity. Shires edits such articles as
current university news, resolutions,
promotions and notices of births,
marriages and deaths of those
directly associated with TCI
There is aiso a list of those faculty
members who have apeared on
television or radio broadcasts as
well as those who have received
grants for research or have publish-
ed works or made presentations.
A columnist for the North
Carolina Association of Afternoon
Dailies in Raleigh before assuming
duties at Last Carolina, Shires is
equipped with the knowledge,
wisdom and understanding needed
to function well in his capacity. The
Afternon Dailies represented 35
afternoon newspapers with a com-
bined circulation of 6(K),(KX). There
appears io be no regrets in leaving
The Afternoon Dailies, a job he
held t'H eight years. He admits thai
Ins present position has placed his
life at the proper level.
ECU Hound
Shires was a political writer dur-
ing his newspaper years. His writing
interest began in high school and
continued at 1 ambuth College,
where he was the editor o Vision,
the school newspaper. The Jackson
Sun hired him in 1944 and his pro-
fessional career began.
Shires majored in chemistry and
minored in biology at 1.ambuth.
Grduate studies were undertaken at
this university. It was at this point
!ha: his love tor his native Tennessee
diminished as his love tor East
C arolina and the eastern region in-
creased.
I nited Press in Atlanta and Rich-
mond, the Commercial appeal of
Memphis and United Press Interna-
tional's Southern Division Night
News in Atlanta have all reaped the
rewards of his talents. At one time
or another, he has fulfilled such
duties as reporter, bureau manager,
newsman, wiredesk editor, cor-
respondent and columnist. He can-
didly recalls being a poor, beginn-
ingreporter in Richmnd but is happy
to have shared in so many ex-
periences.
James Kilpatrick, noted conser-
vative columnist, was a reporter for
the Richmond News Leader while
Shires was with the United Press in
Richmond. The same major news
stories were witnessed, investigated
and written bv these two men duing
the early 1950s.
Shires has crossed paths with
many successful writers: Tom
Wicker of The Mew York Times,
Bill Sexton, based in Peking and
Ah in Webb who is a foreign cor-
respondent for U.S. News and
U ord Report.
During his years at East Carolina
graduate school, he developed a
great love for the area and the
university. He also acquired many
friends. James Whitfield, a trustee
of the university, became one of his
best colleagues. It was he who first
made Shires aware of the vacancy at
the ECU News Bureau and Public
Relations office. Because his son
was finishing his last year of high
school, Shires declined the offer.
But when Chancellor Leo Jenkins
asked him to consider the office
when it was again open, Shires was
free to accept on April 1, 1970, and
did.
One visit with Shires at his office
reveals his personality. The
American eagle makes it evident
that he was a political columnist.
One realizes his multi-facet
background and after conversations
with him. that background has
given insight into his world. There
are books galore, magazines reveal-
ing his varied interests and
photographs of several North
Carolina leaders. There are plenty
of chairs as if there will be a news
conference held any second. There
are framed awards. There is also a
tvpewriter and a rack filled with
notes.
Sometimes he gives free advice to
young writers, stressing verb usage
instead of adjectives. And he also
has a genuine love for the language.
He does not neglect to stress the im-
portance ot learning the basic rules
of sentence construction, spelling
and punctuation.
He still collects articles on how to
improve writing techniques for his
own benefit. And he still receives
newsletters from UPT "Once you
work for them they never let go he
quips.
Now Shires focuses on education,
"We are faced with a problem in
the fact that we are able to score and
distribute vast amounts of informa-
tion with computers. We are seeing
a revolution in the way information
is stored and retrieved and then
given to the public. I would caution
that this is a mechanical process and
a great obligation remains for
researcher, reporter, writer
andeditor to master the language
he commented. Although education
is now his business, he is still attach-
ed to the business of reporting.
Graduate studies continue for
him at East Carolina in European
history. His Lutheran beliefs make
him particularly involved in the
study of how the printing press had
a positive affect on the Prostestant
Reformation. The attractiveness of
this concept is evident since Martin
Luther, the leder of the Reforma-
tion, had translated the Bible into
his native German just before
Gutenberg printed it on moveable
type.
Shires also has an affiliation with
various organizations. The North
Carolina Travel Council awarded
him a citation for travel writing in
1965. He is a member of the
American Historical Association,
Sigma Delta and the Greenville
Writers Club. From 1969 until 1974
he was the director of the American
Cancer Society of North Carolina.
He was the publicity chairman for
(he North Carolina American
Cancer Society from 1964-1967 and
1972-1973. Gov. Dan K. Moore ap-
pointed him chairman of the North
Carolina Commercial and Sports
Fisheries Advisory Board of which
he served from 1966-1969. He was a
judge for the Mayflowwer Cup
Award in 1973. Also, from
1978-1980 he was the director of the
College News Association of the
Carolinas.
William Shires has brought his
journalistic assets to this campus
and community, producing educa-
tional rewards. His memories reflect
a diversified personality makeup
but he confesses that he can speak
better of his encoun'ers with a
typewriter than with his
mouthpiece.
East Carolina should appreciate
both.
Greenville Sure Ain't Texas,
But Don't Let That Fool You
B LINDA HALL
siat I Ytriirr
Since Dec. 1980. Ed and Carolyn Weeks have owned
and operated Weeks Seed and Feed and Western Wear
on Dickinson Ave Greenville. The store features
Western wear for men, women and children, including
boots, hats, shirts, jeans and bells for the most discern-
ing customer.
The Weeks have attended Western shows around the
country, and they say the demand is great for popular
brands. Many of their customers state that they have
worn Western products for several years, citing comfort
and style as attractive qualities. Others see the clothing
as a tad or fashion interest � part of a current trend.
According to Ed Weeks, "1 was surprised at the
number of people who were buying Western wear
before Urban Cowboy And although he readily ad-
mits that the movie industry has created more of an in-
terest in the clothing, Weeks does not feel it is a fad.
"People see the quality he states. "It's like jeans �
they wear so well and are popular
The best sellers are the boots. Beautiful and exotic
varieties in fashionable new styles by Laredo, Justin,
Tony Lama, Abilene, Acme, Nocoma and Wrangler
range in price from $50 to $230. Customers can choose
from a number of skins, including alligator, antelope,
elephant, lizard, ostrich and snake. Eel boots are the
most expensive at $330. All boots come in a variety of
toe and heel styles and may be custom ordered through
the store.
While passing through Texas on a recent trip to Mex-
ico, the Weeks puchased a rattlesnake skin hat which
can be specially ordered in about three weeks for anyone
desiring such a novelty.
Ranging from $20-80, with most displaying price tags
of $30-35, are the hats, the second most popular item.
Straws are featured for the spring while felts and
leathers sell in the winter months. However, it is not

William Shires
Ftwto �� OAVK WILLIAMS
Magazine Tackles Vital Issues
unusual to find some people in straws all year around.
The store features hats by Stetson, Laredo, American
and Rockmount. Resistol hats will soon become part of
the inventory.
Shirts help complete the Western apparel. From basic
plaids to fancies, the selection of shirts is varied. Fring-
ed shirts for men are popular, as are denim and leather
vests. Engraved belts are available in a price range o'
$7-18. Accessories include hat feather clips, hat pins,
neck scarves, spurs, hat bands, bola ties, buckles, knife
cases, collar tips and watch bands.
Seed A nd Feed
The store also sells seed and feed.
Weeks is a former farmer from Tarboro and holds the
world's record for the longest watermelon, 4 feel long;
the world's largest watermelon at 197 pounds; and the
world's longest peanut at 3.5 inches. He held the former
record for the world's largest cantelope at 39 pounds,
but that mark was broken in Rocky Mount last year
with a giant weighing 51.5 pounds.
These facts may be of interest to any avid gardner
since Weeks is the only source for the seeds out of this
record-breaking cantelope. Price: $4 each. Why are they
so special? "It's in the seed � the way it is crossed
says Weeks.
What started out as a hobby has blossomed into a
thriving business. Since 1964 the Weeks have operated a
mail order business in seeds. And having traveled to
numerous seed stores in North Carolina, South
Carolina and Virginia, the couple decided to open their
own.
The best selling seeds are the giant varities, including
tomatoes, cucumbers, pumpkins, corn and peanuts.
Especially watermelon and cantelopes.
Whether you would like to gorge yourself on your
own homegrown varities of fruit and vegetables or dress
yourself in Western delights, the Weeks can do both.
By JOHN WEYLER
stall Writer
Never before in this century have
Americans been faced with(such a
variety and number of moral ques-
tions and controversial issues. As
our homes and institution have
become battlegrounds of debate, it
was inevitable that a special
magazine be published to deal with
these topics: Morality '82.
"In the past few years, the moral
climate of America has become a
significant issue, both socially and
politicallyToday, politicians,
businessmen, church leaders and or-
dinary citizens, all trying to cope
with our increasingly complex
world, have discovered that moral
questions stand at the very center of
our daily existence say the
magazine's editors. "Morality 482
presents the stories behind the news
and a piercing look at the people
who made these stories happen.
Here are the facts and perspectives
with which you may draw your own
conclusions
The slick, attractively-designed,
84-page enterprise from Carnegie
Publications, now selling for $2.25
in the Greenville area, describes the
issues from abortion to zealous
reformers in articles, photos and
special features. One section takes
each topic individually and gives the
pro and con view points. A brief ex-
ample from the discussion of school
prayer:
PRO-Prayer in public schools
gives students an appreciation of
traditional American values and
morality.
CON- Religion is a private, in-
dividual and family concern.
Government institutions, including
schools, should play no role in fur-
thering particular religious beliefs.
Another section gives a more in-
depth look at separate issues, in-
cluding a short history of the sub-
ject, the situation as it stands in
America today, case studies of
citizens whose lives have been
touched by the topic, and all the
myriad questions surrounding the
issue. From the article "Abortion:
Right to Life or Right to Choose?
"As abortion activists, pro and
con, step up their lobbying ac-
tivities, legislators will soon have to
quit hemming and hawing and make
some tough decisions: Does the
government have the right to tell a
woman what she can or cannot do
with her body? When poor women
and teenagers need abortions,
should taxpayers foot the bill? Does
a fetus have legal rights? And can a
husband step in to prevent his wife's
abortion?"
Other articles include "Kids On
Pot: Soft Drug or Hard Habit?
"Sex on Television: Pure Filth or
Fact of Life? "Book Banning:
Censorship or Good Sense?" and
"Creationism: Biblical Fact or
Evolutionary Theory?"
People within the pages include
both powerful public figures and or-
dinary people whose lives have
become controversial. We meet
Roman Welzant, an elderly
Baltimorian who fatally shot a
teenager who had been throwing
snowballs at his house and other-
wise harassing him, considered a
killer by some and a hero by others;
Aaron Fricke and Paul Guilbert, a
gay couple who attended their high
school prom together ("Though
some seniors were outraged, others
at the prom saw it as a lesson in
tolerance"); Mike Johnson, a
teenager who won legal custody of
the illegitimate daughter he fathered
with a 15-year old schoolmate; and
many others.
Among the mighty we meet
Reverend Jerry Falwell of the Moral
Majority and Bob Guccione,
publisher of Penthouse magazine.
In an article detailing their on-going
battle it is shown that their disagree-
ment runs far deeper than Falwell's
claim that Penthouse illegally
published an unauthorized interview
with him their feud is based on a
fundamental conflict of ideas. Says
the preacher, "You seldom pick up
a newspaper without reading of
some assault on our efforts to return
America to moral sanity Says the
publisher, "The Moral Majority
represents a philosophy that is both
loathesome and antithetical to the
American way of life
Morality '82 has its faults as a
magazine � it completely ignores
some important issues such as civil
rights, is guilty of some sensa-
tionalism instyle � but should be
commended for it's balanced, fair
treatment of highly controversial
topics. The information presented
in Morality '82 is helpful to one try-
ing to make up his own mind in the
midst of so many confusing, hotly
contested concepts, subjects and
beliefs. Or, as Thomas Jefferson, in
an article that opens the magazine,
said in an essay that was written in
1814 but still speaks to us today:
.Some have argued apainst the ex-
istence of a moral sense, by saying
that if nature had given us such a
sense, impelling us to virtuous ac-
tions, and warning us against those
which are vicious, then nature
would also have designated, by-
some particular earmarks, the two
sets of actions which are, in
themselves, the one virtuous and the
other vicious. "
,v
� p in OMMMMgl mHH WtM
t
f





I HE LAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 28. 1982
Shirley Chisholm To Speak
B ECU Ne�s Bureau
Several music and
theatrical perfor-
mances, a lecture b
Rep. Shirle Chisholm.
a film and a soul food
dinner are scheduled
for ihe annual Black
Ans Festival at East
Carolina from Jan. 31
to Feb. 6.
I he festival, spon-
sored by the ECU Stu-
dem Union Minorit
Aris Committee, will
begin with a tree con-
cert b the N.C. Stale
I ni ersity Gospel
i hoir Sunday, Jan. 31.
ai 5 p.m. in ECl 's
Hendnv I heatre.
dinner featuring
soul food is planned for
Monday. Feb. I, ai
6:30 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student
c entei. dmission to
the dinnei is available
by advance ticket.
talent competition
will be held Tuesday.
I eb. 2. ai s p.m. in the
Hendriv Theatre, wnh
tickets ai the door
availabie for SI each.
I he film, .� -
wanIs Thai You?,
will he shown Wednes-
day . 1 eh 3 in Hendrix
i heatre. Persons will
1(1 activity cards or
Mendenhall member-
- ip cards will be ad-
mitted.
Shirley Chisholm s
lecture is scheduled for
8 p.m. Thursday. Feb.
5. Public tickets are
available in advance
from the ECU Central
Ticket Office or at the
door for S5.
On Friday, a drama
production, "An
Ebony Revue will be
presented by the UNC-
Greensboro Neo-Black
Society in the
Mendenhall
Auditorium. Admis-
sion is SI at the door.
The festival will con-
clude with a dance
Saturday at 10 p.m. in
Mendenhall
Auditorium. Music will
be provided bv the
Mellow Madness hand.
rickets are S2 each.
ABORTIONS
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I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JANUARY 28, 1982
Page 7
Hargrove, Pirates Surprise Charlotte
By CHARLES CHANDLER
sports r dilttr
Easi Carolina forward Morris
Hargrove scored 17 points and
yanked down 15 rebounds to lead
the Pirates to a 71-68 upset win ovei
UNC Charlotte in Minges Coliseum
W ednesday night
I he victory snapped a three-game
ECU losing streak and upped the
Pirate mark to 7-9.
I he favored 49ers, who tell to
13-4, scored the game's first bucket
to take a 2-0 lead. I hat lead uh
soon ui evaporate and UNCC nevei
led again.
The Pirate lead reached nine on
tour occasions, though the game
�is nip-and-tuck most of the way
'This was a very big win for us
ECL) head coach Dave Odoni said
following the contest, "li was a
much-needed win both for the team
and for our program. 1 must say we
beat one line basketball team
tonight
Odom said he felt the key to the
game was his team's intensity and its
success in the first half on the fast
break.
"That was something we wanted
to do Odom said of his team's
transition play. "We fell like we had
a good chance o wearing (I NCC
guard Phil) Ward down. He's so in-
volved in their offense. There's no
wav he could get back mi the break,
play tough defense and still play of-
fense the way he does
Ward did, indeed. pla well on
I S( H4KI oil! tXi
i � 444i I
M 22. H : -
Vkillia IIIMIO MtO
n�f M S 25 IK-25 6
? t I 7U
Circcn 'O-J 14 H
7. Pcai
i
ottense, especially in the first half
when he tallied 16 points. He finish-
ed with 21, tied with teammate Bob-
bs Polls foi game-high scoring
honoi s.
While Ward had a big first half.
Potis stole ihe spotlight in the se-
cond, scoring i 5 oi his 21. Odom
felt keeping the 49ers' star twosome
from gelling it going simultaneously
was a big ke
"l! was aid's show (he first half
and Potts' the second the ihird-
yeai Pirate mentor said. "They need
them both lo heal a good team.
rhey seemed to have each ot them
for just 20 minutes tonight
I'NCI coach Mike Pratt said the
night was one that did not favoi Ins
club.
"We jusl couldn't seem to do
anything right Pratt said. "It was
a long night. I his loss really hurls.
You've got to give credit to ECU,
though llu came at us hard all
night
I he three previous Charlotte
losses came against Florida Stale,
St. Joseph's and Alabama-
Birmingham, the latter two clubs
having participated in the NCAA
I out nameni last season
I he strong play oi center Al
Mack paced the Pirates in the early
going. The transfei from Hilbert.
NY. Junioi C ollege scored 12 first-
half points to lead the team lo a
37 32 lead at inteimission.
The 49ers posed a neat constant
threat to the ECl lead in the second
hail. i uning n to nisi two on nine
different occasions.
I he last time the lead was thai
low was with 2:35 remaining when
two free throws h 4Mei forward
Melvin Johnson cut the Pirate ad-
antagc ;o 62-60.
1 C I then reeled ofl seven
straight points, toe ot them from
ihe free throw line, during the next
An Excited Crowd
ECU students were extra enthusiastic during the Pirates' upset win over L'SC
Charlotte Wednesday night. The crowd was able to cheer loudly, like when for-
ward Charles Green slammed one home (at left), as the Bucs ended a three-game
losing streak against the 49ers. (Photos By Dave Williams)
minute lo go up by nine, 69-60, and
secure the victory.
Mistakes by the Pirates late in the
game did not prove as costly as they
could have. Two slam dunks, one by
Charles Green and the other by
Charles Watkins, failed to go down
and were the most obvious of the
late mishaps.
Still, Green was one ot
Pirates (including Hargrove) to"
finish in double figures, scoring 14
points. Center Al Mack added 15
and freshman guard Bruce Peart ree
10.
The Bucs shot 46.9 percent from
the floor for the night, compared to
9 for the visitors.
ECU gets back into action on
Saturday night, hosting Richmond
in a key ECAC-South tilt. The
Spiders are 11-7 and have posted
upsets over naiionaliy-rankeJ Wake-
Forest and highly-regarded South
Carolina.
The Piraies are 2-1 in league plav
heading into thai game, which car-
ries a 7:30 p.m. start.
Swimmers
Swept By
State, Tech
By THOMAS BRAME
'al! Write)
The swimming teams ol the E I
men and women were swept in a
double meet against N.C Stale and
Virginia rech this p Monday.
The power ol the Slate women
was overwhelming as the score
111-28 indicates ECl women did
not have a first-place finisher
against the Wolfpack,
Setting a new arsitv record of
1:394 by ECU's nationally ranked
200 frees!vie relay learn was not
enough io topple the Wolfpack.
NCSl took the event with a tune oi
1:38.77.
Against Va. lech. I Cl 2(H)
freest vie relav team redeemed
themselves with a win.
Ken wiih that win the 1 adv
Pirates fared htile better, losing o
i'l 95-40
1 here were a few bright spois in
the loss. Hannelore Koehler won the
100 breastroke with a time oi
1:15.02. In the 50 freest vie event,
Nancv James and Moria McHugh
swam national qualifying umes.
The two losses brings the 1 adv
Pirates record to 3-4.
The ECU men also same away
with two losses which bungs then
record to 3-6.
Lady Pirates Have Bounced
Back With Six Wins In Row
0'


� '
ECU Swimming Action
I he Wolfpack men denied the
Pirates any firsi place finishes in
the meet. 1 he Pirates came back to
tackle three first place finishes in
then loss to Va. lech. 79-32.
Joakin Swensson was the only
double winner tor the Pirates. He
won the 2(H) backstroke with a time
ot 1:5794 and the 2(H) individual
medley with a 1:5K.51 clocking.
"We were outmanned by both
teamssaid ECU assistant Rick
Kobe "Bui we were pleased with
our limes
Still, Kobe compares this year's
ECU team with last year's and said,
"We're twice as good as we were
last year. We play a difficult
schedule and that's why the wins
and the losses don't reflect how
good we are
The ECU swimming teams hope
to break a three-meet losing streak
against Appalaehain State on Satur-
day The action in Boone gets
underway at 12:30 p.m.
By JIMMY DuPREE
Man icing Mitof
It wasn't long ago that the Lady
Pirates looked as though they would
suffer through the worst season
since Cathy Andruzzi took over as
head coach. But the season � and
players � were much "younger"
then.
After back-to-back losses to Ken-
tucky and Louisiana State which set
their' 1981-82 record at 4-7, the Lady
Pirates have posted a flawless 6-0
mark. Many factors have con-
tributed to their recent success, and
Andruzzi insists her youthful squad
has yet to reach their potential.
"The girls have done a tremen-
dous job coming back from 4-7
said Andruzzi. "The games have
been exciting because the girls are
starting to make things happen. I
can't say enough for their discipline
on the court
The fiesty fourth-year coach
credits increased assists and steals,
as well as decreased turnovers for
East Carolina's rejuvenation.
"I think what we're really pleased
with is our defensive game she
said. "Our defense has created for
our offense � that's part of my
philosophy, though.
"We've had several games recent-
ly when we held our turnovers to 12
or 13. When you're under 15 tur-
novers in a game that means your
offense is under control � the game
is at the tempo you want.
"Our kids have really improved
their concentration on the floor
A record of 10-7 is better than
many speculated ECU would have
at this point, but it's still not
satisfactory for Andruzzi. With the
Lady Piraies set to play against Ap-
palachian State, East Tennessee
State (Feb. 3) and N.C. State (Feb.
7) in a 10-day period, there's no
time to relax for those in the purple
and gold.
"We play in Boone (ASU) Friday
and we'll have to be ready said
Andruzzi. "We beat them here by
only three early in the season, and
they've gotten continually better
since then. They're tough inside and
can take control if you let 'em.
"East Tennessee lost to
(nationally ranked) South Carolina
by one in Columbia. They're always
tough, and I know they'll be ready.
"I think we'll be ready for them,
too. This (ECU) team takes one
game at a time and looks at the im-
portance of it. They respect each op-
ponant not to underestimate
anyone.
Following weekend victories over
Georgia Tech and Wake Forest,
center-forward Mary Denkler leads
the Pirates with 20.5 points and 8.3
rebounds per game. The junior not-
ched her 1,000th point Monday in
the Lady Pirates' 87-52 romp of
Wake Forest.As of January 18
Denkler led the NCAIAW"s scoring
leaders and continues to challenge in
rebounding.
Senior Sam Jones contributes 16
points and 6.6 rebounds an outing
leads the team with 100 assists with
nine games remaining. Senior guard
Lillion Barnes, never a starter
before this season, adds 9.1 points
and speed on defense to the attack.
"In terms of scoring, Mary and
Sam usually carry the load An-
druzzi said. "Bui they have a very
good supporting cast; they have
some very unselfish teammates
For a variety o reasons the Lady
Pirate roster is down to eight from
its original 11.
"I enjoy the closeness of having
eight players she said. "The only
part it's bad is when you get in foul
trouble. If injuries come into the
picture, it would be trouble � I
can't lose sleep over it, though
Jones Creates Action On Court
ECU's Sam Jones makes her move against an opponent in an
earv-season game.
By JIMMY DuPREE
Managing hdilm
ACTION
That's what they call her and
that's what she creates.
Weaving through defenses to fire
in two points or set up one of her
Lady Pirate teammates, Sam Jones
has developed a reputation for get-
ting the job done creatively.
"Sam creates action when she's
out there said ECU coach Cathy
Andruzzi. "She turns on the crowd.
She's really become a leader at both
ends of the floor.
"Defensively, she causes our op-
ponants a great deal of turnovers.
Offensively, she can maneuver their
defense out of position to free so-
meone else
Indeed, through games of Jan.
18, Jones led the NCAIAW with 2.5
steals per contest and her 15.7 point
average was third behind fellow
Pirate Mary Denkler and Ap-
palachian State's Muriel Higgen-
botham. She was second in the assist
category with 5.7 a game, and hand-
ed out her 100th of the season
against Wake Forest.
Early in the season, though,
Jones offensive stats were not so im-
pressive, as she averaged around 12
points in the first six games.
"I think Sam has really come
around a lot lately Andruzzi
praised, "especially aftr the
(Christmas) holidays. She wasn't
playing the type of defense and of-
fense she's capable of.
"Our game has really changed
since we're getting it from her. I
think it's lifted other people as
well
Jones came to East Carolina after
a record-setting career at Louisburg
College. But the transition was not
quite what could be expected.
"On the court, my junior college
coach's philosophy was not that
much different than Coach Andruz-
zi's said Jones. "But off the court
the routine here is something else
altogether. We live basketball ex-
cept for classes and study hall
Both Andruzzi and Jones agree
the 1981-82 Lady Pirates have im-
proved since early in the season and
that they have not yet peaked.
"We still have a long way to go
said Jones. "We haven't been talk-
ing (to each other) enough in the last
couple of games. We're sort of slip-
ping back into old habits
The next three games will not be
easy for the Lady Pirates, as they
travel to Appalachian State Friday
and then host East Tennessee State
Feb. 3 and North Carolina State
Feb. 7. Jones hopes to close out her
ECU career with solid perfor-
mances.
"I haven't played consistantly
she said. "My last nine ball games I
want to play the best 1 can
Academically Jones is still a year
from commencement, but she in-
tends to complete work on a degree
in special education before moving
on to other athletic goals.
"I've had a couple of pro offers
in Belgium and France Jones ad-
mits. "I'd like to give that a try, but
I want to get my diploma first.
That's what's most important
Jones and teammate Fran
Hooks having a few laughs in
a preseason picture session.





8
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WATEHBEDS DON T pay retail
lot youi hea'ed waterbed buv
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heated wa'eibed with 15 yt war
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7S7 3038
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Call 'SB 469S
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Irom campus Need Bedroom Fur
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TYPING TERM. thesis
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PERSONALS
ATTf NTION Du yuu have an Ml
teresttnq or unique dui m 1 00m ?
The Butcamei is seaichmq lui
those special 100ms on campus foi
a lew photoqiaphs All interested
persons contact The Buccant-t 1 ,ii
757 6S0I
WANTED SAN FRANCISCO
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WIN A Pinbalt Machine Fust
Place Pne in tho Gonq Show
(JlVCfl by Siq Ep Little Sisteis It
will be at Papa K.iU Jan 29 at
8 30 Call 758 7912 lot more info
HAPPY BIRTHDAY HUNTER'
21 years old I hear ya man
Bun
LET FRIDAY br an Afternoon
Di'iioht wilh Skip Castro and the
Phi Tau s at the Attic
GTE As Rick would sav. 'I've
done qpeiy'hinq tor you you vc
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RIDERS
RIDE TO CHARLOTTESVILLE.
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Call Drbbii' 72 7747
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NEXT TO VILLA ROMA
sPECIAI H AIRC UTS RrX $5.00
NOW $4.00 WITHTHISAD y
y Call 758 3768 or come by � Hrs. 8 5:30 Wed. Sat. 1
hmec )bk mmmmmmmmmm mhmmhmmm
Blood Drive
Room 244
Mendenhall
Student Center
10-4 Wed. &Thurs.
Jan. 27 & 28
Sponsored by Circle K
WANT A
FAST FOOD
ALTERNATIVE?
Famous Foot Long Sandwiches
� 17 varieties of subs & salads
� Made to your order
� Subs served hot or cold
�"Regular or snak size
NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY
Hi
offers for
your enjoyment
ADVENTURES IN BRITISH THEATRE
July 4-17, 1982
Two Weeks In London
7 British
Theatre Performances
Tours Of Historic London
Covent Gardens Theatre Arla
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We've got more taste.
208 E.
Fifth St.
758-7979
660
Includes Room and
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at the Univ of London
Does not include trans-
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For more information contact
Charles Martin Thompson Theatre,
Box 5746, NCSU, Raleigh, N. C Zip
27650. Phone (919) 737 2405.
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Take Out Service tW3 t 10th S' 'S8 2172
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Present this coupon and show
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t





Title
The East Carolinian, January 28, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 28, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.174
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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