The East Carolinian, January 21, 1982






Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 5ft. No. 34
Thursday, January 21, 1982
Greenville,N.C.
10 Pages
License 'Apparently Misplaced'
WZMB Approaching Airtime
Photo Bv GARY PATTERSON
Harwich "o one knew we had the STI
By MIKE HUGHES
Autttam Htmt r.Uior
Believe it or not, the ECU radio
station, WZMB, may be ready to
begin broadcasting within two
weeks.
For all the skeptics who think
they've heard this one before, they
are undoubtedly correct.
However, following yet another
license mixup at WZMB, Sam Bar-
wick, the general manager,
estimates that � barring technical
problems � the station will go on
the air in the next 10 days to two
weeks.
In the Jan. 14 issue of The East
Carolinian, Barwick said that the
station lacked a studio-to
transmitter-link license (STL),
which is necessary for WZMB to
begin broadcasting. According to
Barwick, the STL license had been
applied for but was being delayed.
However, according to Van
Brown of the WZMB Petitioning
Committee, the STL license was
granted in July 1980. Brown claim-
ed, in a letter to the editor, that he
had spoken with representatives of
the Federal Communications Com-
mission who assured him the STL
had been granted.
"When 1 took this job in April
Barwick explained, "no one told me
we'd had the STL for nearly a
year
Barwick claimed he found out
about the error on Jan. 14, after
spending much of the day telephon-
ing the FCC.
"Everything Van Brown said in
his letter was true Barwick admit-
ted. "The problem arose because no
one knew we had the STL. We still
don't have any physical proof that it
was granted
According to Barwick, the sta-
tion's copy of the license was
"apparently misplaced causing
the misunderstanding.
Likewise, no copy of the license
could be found in the files of Dean
Rudolph Alexander, a member of
the Media Board.
"What we actually have Bar-
wick said, "is a construction per-
mit This permit enables the sta-
tion to place the transmitter atop
Tyler residence hall.
Replacing the transmitter should
not pose anv problem, according to
Barwick, as the process merely in-
volves "connecting two or three
wires
"Sometime this week he con-
tinued, "we'll turn on the transmit-
ter and iron out the bugs. Then we'll
resume program testing. As soon as
I can meet with the staff, and as
soon as they feel comfortable, we'll
go on the air
What remains to be done before
WZMB may begin broadcasting is
to obtain a Program Test
Authorization (PTA). This is done
simply by notifying the FCC that
the station is ready to commence
programming.
According to Barwick, if no fur-
ther problems surface, the station
will obtain the PTA and will be on
the air by the end of the month.
Nail: 'Representing All The Students9
By PURKkOMII I
"Do vou know the name of the
.lent Government Association
president?" was the question.
N . not for sure
"1 ha�c no idea
"Isn't it Marvin somebody?"
�rises.
"What arc the functions of his
the next question.
"1 reall) couldn't tell ou was a
typical reply. One student, biology
major Marv Kendrick, thought the
SGA president should "mainly
represent the rudents and their best
interests
Lester Nail, the 1981-82 SGA
- - . sees his i ole as
"representing the students, all
knts, a best 1 can' � one of his
campaign promises He is constant-
. - keeping appointments,
sitting on committees, being a
�on with the local community (as
epresentative on the Greenville
uncil) and even maintaining
id enough grades to warrant ac-
ceptance to Campbell University
school for the fall 1982
semester.
Nail is a basically quiet man.
He considers himseif a Christiam as
well as a conservative, yet at times
he admits to seeing "flaws" in a
-vstem that doesn't always work as
it should. When asked to comment
on the job performance of President
Reagan and his administration, Nail
nesitates a little and says "I feel like
he's doing what he believes in
Nail grew up in the rural setting
ol Cherryville (near Gastonia), but
after tour years at ECU he calls
Greenville home. "When I visit my
family and 1 say it's about time for
me to go home. 1 mean Greenville,
hut my mother doesn't always ap-
preciate it
Among the responsibilities of his
job are four major committees of
w hich Nail is a member � the
Board of Trustees, Media Board,
Student Union Board of Directors,
and the ECU Alumni Board of
Directors. "Some days I'll have
three meetings in a row . . . and they
always seem to fall on a night before
I have a test he says.
All this plus lots more, such as
making a tough moral decision of
whether to veto the medical
emergency loan fund because it ear-
marks funds to pay for student
abortions, are the functions of a
president. The president "still has to
be a student first � he still has to go
to classes and study continues
Nail.
The job doesn't go without con-
troversy. A veto decision on the
medical emergency loan is likely to
be overridden by the SGA
legislature, and he has been accused
of "playing God in this matter
Nail says the person who opts for
an abortion is "playing God" by
discontinuing the pregnancy.
"Morally I'm opposed to abor-
tion he says. "I could not give my
approval to anything that supports
abortion. 1 want people to stop and
really think about it
Nail says he believes life takes
piace at conception, and thai he
doesn't believe abortion constitutes
a medical emergency. "I can't see
students funds being used for this
purpose he concludes.
The Student Loan Fund was also
cancelled by Nail last year. "1 didn't
feel the collection process was ade
quate he says. At the time the
fund had $7,000 in outstanding un-
paid loans.
The program has since been
revamped and is once again
available. Any student can get a
emergency loan of up to $25 "in less
Room To Spare
A resident of Scott Dorm lets it all hang out.
Photo By DAVE WILLIAMS
ECU Hosting NCSL Council
By DIANE ANDERSON
Staff W filer
East Carolina University will host
the North Carolina Student
Legislature Interim Council on Jan.
23 and 24.
Gary Williams, speaker of the
ECU legislature and an active
member of the NCSL, urged all in-
terested students to attend, "those
who are interested in politics,
government, or just for those who
are interested as an average citizen
in the future
NCSl, tounded in 1937, is cur-
rently the oldest active student
legislature in the country. The issues
dealt with are timely and controver-
sial and offer students an oppor-
tunity to get involved in the
legislative process and express their
opinions.
The monthly Interim council is
organized like a model general
assembly. All legislation adopted at
the meetings is published in a yearly
Compendium, which is distributed
to the North Carolina General
Assembly, Council of State, and
other interested parties.
Williams stated that hosting this
months Interim Council will allow
ECU students the opportunity "to
see how other students feel about
timely issues facing the state, to see
how important it is to speak out,
and to see how important it is to
'rock the boat because you don't
make progress by sitting on your
hands and doing nothing. You make
progress by rocking the boat, by ex-
pressing your opinions, by express-
ing your ideas
Among the bills being presented
at this weekend's meetings is a
resolution concerning the consent
decree issued to settle the desegrega-
tion controversy between UNC and
the Department of Education.
Virginia Carlton, president of the
ECU chapter of the NAACP is
scheduled to speak on this issue.
The NCSL will also take a posi-
tion on the proposed amendment to
the N.C. Constitution to extend
legislators term of office to four
years. Representative Lancaster or
Senator Barnes from Wayne County
in Goldsboro, sponsors for the bill,
will be debating in favor of the bill.
Tom Gilmore, former deputy
secretary of the Department of
Human Resources, and currently
chairman of the "Keep the Two
Year Legislative Term Committee
is tentatively scheduled to attend.
Williams says the NCSL has
always had a "volatile history. A lot
of the things we discussed back in
the 50's and 60's were way ahead of
their time. We were kicked out of
the capital for a number of years
because we were accused of being
everything from communists
"We take this very seriously. This
is a chance to see that a group of
students are serious and concerned,
and really do care about what hap-
pens in the future in this country
and state he said.
The Interim Council convenes at
12 p.m. on Saturday, and adjourns
at 5:30 p.m. The meeting recovenes
at 9 a.m. Sunday, and adjourns at
12:45 p.m. The main meeting will be
held in room 244, Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. All interested students
are invited to attend.
than 20 minutes from my office
Nail says.
Students can fill out a simple ap-
plication, present their identifica-
tion and activity cards and receive a
no-questions-asked loan for a $1
surcharge. Ample time is given for
repayment, Nail says.
Being SGA president was
"something that I always wanted to
do said Nail. "1 felt I was
qualified to do it
Nail calls his four years in student
government service "a tremendous
learning experience He was
freshman class president, SGA
public defender in his sophomore
year, and the SGA attorney general
last year.
"I really love this university
Nail says. "There's no way I'd go to
any other school than East Carolina
if 1 had to do it over. 1 want the
studnts to get proud of East
Carolina. Quit comparing us to
Carolina or State, We've done a
good job in our 75 years. We're the
third school in the state
First of all he is a student, second
he is SGA President, and third he is
a trustee. Nail says. "I consider it an
See SGA, Page 3
Photo Bv K3N JORDAN
Nail (left) watches the proceedings of the student legislature with SGA vice
president Marvin Hraxton.
Campus Security Blotter Shows
Fewer Break-Ins During Holidays
By GREG RIDEOUT
Staff Writer
The University Police Depart-
ment had fewer than the normal
reports of break-ins during the
holidays, according to police
records.
Joe Calder, director of security,
commented that dorm larcenies
were "way, way down" due to the
tighter security put on the most
vulnerable dorms � Belk and Scott.
These reports and other dorm-
related incidents are included in the
following police blotter for the
period of Jan. 6 until Jan. 19.
Jan. 6. 12:05 p.m. � Sandra
Gayle Wentzof 312-A Belk reported
the breaking and entering of her
room and larceny of property
belonging to her and her roommate.
Jan. 7. 7:30 p.m. � Alan Keith
Oliphant of 211-A Scott reported
the breaking and entering of his
residence as well as larceny of per-
sonal property. 10:30 p.m. �
Maureen J. Obayl of 347 Cotten
reported the loss of her room key
and that someone had entered her
room during the holidays.
Jan. 8. 12:30 p.m. � Phillip Ray
Taylor of 335 Jones reported the
breaking and entering of his
residence and larceny of personal
property.
Jan. 9. 1:58 a.m. � Lonnie C.
Stafford of 132 Slay reported the
larceny of a Realistic radio scanner
from his room.
Jan. 10. 12:21 p.m. Keith Richard
Marsil of 161 Jones reported the
vandalism of his vehicle parked in
the 14th and Berkeley freshman
parking lot. 6:30 p.m. � Wanda
Kay Bowman of 314 White reported
the vandalism of her vehicle while it
was parked in front of Clement
Dorm.
Jan. 11. 7:30 a.m. � Hugh
McGowan Jr. reported the theft of a
News and Observer paper box from
the main entrance of Brewster. 1:15
p.m. � William M. Lincoln of 377
Aycock reported the breaking and
entering of his residence and larceny
from same. 10:15 p.m. � Mitchell
Alan Ivey and Mike Dwayne
Blackwell, both of 137 Aycock,
were observed discharging bottle
rockets from their room window.
Jan. 12. 11 p.m. � Virgil Brian
Mason of 307 Aycock was served
with a warrant for assault inflicting
serious injury.
Jan. 13. 1:35 p.m. � Kim
Rackley of 203 Garrett reported the
larceny of a Craig FM converter
from her vehicle while it was parked
in the lot at Fifth and Reade streets.
4:30 p.m. � Sylvia Harrison of the
School of Medicine reported the
theft of a pager from the psychiatry
department. 11:30 p.m. � Virgil B.
Mason was arrested for alleged
forgery and uttering.
Jan. 14. 2:19 a.m. � Michael
Shaw Biggers of 132 Jarvis and
George Timmerman, a non-resident
of the dorm, were arrested for
See CAMPUS, Page 5
Tuition Costs Exceed Inflation
By MIKE HUGHES
Anulaal Nf�i Milur
What goes up must come down.
That may be what students learn
in physics on the first day of class,
but the statement might not apply so
well to inflation rates or, especially,
to tuition rates.
In fact, the increase in tuition
costs since the 1981-82 academic
year exceed the 10.9-percent infla-
tion rate reported in August 1981.
A survey of 229 state colleges
throughout the country showed that
out-of-state students are being
charged an average of $2,021 per
year for tuition, while in-state
students pay an average of $818 an-
nually.
Last year, out-of-state students
payed an average of $1,795 in tui-
tion costs, and the average price tag
for in-state tuition totalled $712
yearly.
The study was sponsored by the
National Association of State
Universities and Land-Grant Col-
leges and the American Association
of State Colleges and Universities.
In the last 10 years, tuition rates
for all students have at least doubl-
ed. Annual costs for state residents
have increased 101.9 percent, while
tuition for non-residents has gone
up 1312 percent.
Another figure noted by the study
showed that the total education
costs for students of state colleges
have also risen.
The average bill for one year of a
college education, including tuition
room and board, goods and ser
vices, is now $3,781 for out-of-state
students, an 11.2-percent increase
from last year.
In-state students now pay approx-
imately $2,578 in total costs annual-
ly, an increase of $261, or 11.3 per-
cent, from the 1980-81 year.
!
i
- ' �
I





I HI EAS1 CAROI INI AN
JANUARY 21, 1982
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
II you 01 your organization
lUld like 10 have an item printed
the announcements oiumn
,� the announcement uis
I is possible) typed and
' he Last Caroh
an i" i a'i ' vas editor
I narqe tor an
' sai e is often
,i. . men)
�y "� Tuesday
esdav tot the
: . all
s and depar 1
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
.
Hilly
i he serv � i
I m with thi
BUSINESSMAJORS
� Alien a' JS8 i
S St 7S7 3484
REBEL
The Rebel is now accepting sub
missions tor the 7th Annual Rebel
Art Show Work may be delivered
on jan 22 between 9 and 4 to the
Conference Room in Jenkins In
eluded with each piece must be a
$1 entry tee Any ECU student is
eligible toenter Prizes include $50
for 1st Place in each category and
SIOO tor Best In Show The contest
is sponsored by the Attic and Jef
treys Beer and Wine Co
LSAT
Ti Law School Admission Test
� bt red at t asl Carolina
University on Saturday, February
?0, 198? Application hianks are to
; � onip ' 1 and mailed to
It onal testing Service. Box
9�6 R I NJ 08S40
Registration deadline is January
21 1982 Registration postmarked
' " I �'� must be accom
� SIS non refundable
lati r �� �� n lee
GYMNASTICS ROOM
UTILIZATION
room located m
� mnasium is open to
studi nts la ulty and staff each
'�" from 6 30 p m to 8
Members of the university
unity are invited to utilize
-luipment and ex
nder the quidan e of
ed instructors ourmg these
. periods
AED
Alpha Epsilon Delta pre
medical honor society will meet on
Tuesday. Jan 26 at 7 30 p.m in
Flanagan 307 Etsil Mason, direc
tor ol volunteer services at Pitt
County Memorial Hospital, will be
the quest speaker All interested
persons are invited to attend
SNOWE SKI DEPOSITS
Deposits lor spring break skiing
at Snowshoe, W V are due Jan 26
at 4 00 p m in Memorial Gym
Room 108 For more formation
contact Mrs Jo Saunders at
757 6000 Memorial Gym 205
PHYE MAJORS
� lan
I ma week I
. �. . o report 1
I 00 3 00
lay. Feb 10 tor a
� . � . - . fitness test
pert
; Sill
imitta
nor
v �, � , .
���
:0 OP EDUCATION
�-1I
. Of 11 c i
Ml

IS h
and proofed annc
HANDBALLRACQUET
BALL
- � ourt system will be in
� lit ' ourt n 2 from 8 15pm
ThUTS and
Sal -in.1 �- A bta kl i ard has been
� n try bservation deck
.� ' estabtist i rtallenge posi
HANDICAPPED
STUDENT SERVICES
. ol Handicapped Stu
� � . . 'leeds reserve
ri-idicapped an
led aoo has the
� � � � � from I? 00 noon
r- ,v. ; m should contact the
� Handicapped Student
'fW
BEGINNING
BALLROOM DANC.NG
The basics and their variations,
and prac tice m leading and follow
mg These classes begin February
19 thru April 6. at 6 00PM
ASSOCIATION FOR
COMPUTING
MACHINERY
The ECU chapter of ACM will
meet this Thursday. Jan 21. at
3 30 p m m Room 221. Austin
Buildmq Mr Furney James, of
'he ECU Placement Center, will
speak on job Search Techniques
Anyone interested is invited to at
tend
ECGC
interested in sex and sex
therapy' On January 26. we will
be hosting a guest speaker on
these subiec ts Elections will also
be held during the first 15 minutes
of the rneetmo so be prompt! � The
meetmq will begin at 7 30 at the
Newman Center Bring a friend
and enioy some stimulating con
versation See you there1
BANJO
A basic introductory course m
banjo will be taught on Monday
evenings from 6 30 7 45PM The
classes begin February 22 and end
on April 19
INTERMEDIATE
BALLROOM DANCING
individuals with the vasic shills
warning to improve Foxtrot.
Rhumba, D scp Waltz and Bop
techniques Every Friday from
February 19 April 30 at
8 00 9 00PM the classes will be
taught
SCEC
The Student Council tor Excep
tional Children is having ts first
meeting Monday. Jan 25 in
Speight 129 at 4 p m Please come
and support exceptional children
Tnank you1
LIVE LIFE
Would you like to improve your
present way ol life? By getting
closer to God and knowing the
Word ail things are possible. You
can discover more about this as
well as about other truths that are
evealed m the simplicity of God's
Word You can do the works that
Jesus Christ did and more (John
14,12) Come ioin us for a
fellowship meeting this Thursday
evening at 8 p m at Mendenhall
Student Center m Room 242
FITNESSCLASSES
Get nd of those winter bulges
and get ready to hit the beach
Join the Fitness Classes ottered
for students, faculty, statt, and
their families, sponsored by the
Dept of IM REC Services These
classes are designed to increase
flexibility improve muscle tone,
increase cardiovascular fitness,
and to have a good time The cost
for the eight week session is $5 00
lor the 1 time per week class,
510 00 for the twice weekly classes
will begm the week ol Feb l
For times and places, call Sue
Stanley at 757 6064
NUTRITION AND
WEIGHT
There will be general nutrition
and weight reduction classes of
fered at the Student Health Center
lor next live weeks (Jan 26. Feb
2 9 16.231 Call 757 6841 to enroll
tree of charge in the 9 10 a m or
10 II a m dassctasses individual
counselling for special diet pro
blerns are available on these dates
Irom 89 am by referral of a
physician For more information,
contac' the Student Health Center
STUDENT STORE
CLOSED SATURDAYS
Beqinmng Saturday. February
6 1982. the Student Supply Store
and The Soda Shop will be closed
on Saturdays The Croatan will
begin opening on Saturdays
February 6. at 8 Mam and dose
at 12 30
NEW YORK
The East Carolina University
Student Union Travel Committee
is oiler mg a lantastic spring break
alternative at an unbeatable price
� Six days in New York City The
trip will run Irom March 5 thru
March 12 The cost of the trip is as
follows Single occupancy
J289 00, Double occupancy
S185 00. Triple occupancy
J159 00, Quad ocupanry S145 00
Included in the price are the
following roundtnp transporta
tion via forty six passenger buses
and hotel accommodations at the
Hotel Edison The registration
deadline is February i? and reser
vations can be made at the Central
Ticket Office located in
Mendenhall Student Center
ART SHOW
The Seventh Annual Art Show
will be from Jan 26 to Feb 5, 1982
in the Greenville Museum of Art
All ECU artists are encouraged to
prepare their best work to submit
Friday Jan 22, 1982 to the con
ference room in the office of
Jenkins Fine Arts Center, ECU
Cash prizes, provided by the Attic
and Jeffries Beer and Wine, Co
will lange from J10 for Honorable
Mentions to S100 for Best m Show
ARTISTS
Artists! The Seventh Annual
Rebel Art Show, sponsored by the
Attic and Jeffrey's Beer and Wine
Co , is coming up to give you an op
portunity for recognition as will as
prize money All registered ECU
students may enter a maximum of
two pieces in any of the following
categories Painting, Sculpture,
Ceramics. Drawing, Photography
Design (metal, fiber or wook
Graphic Art and Illustration Plan
to bring your best work on Friday
Jan 22. 1982 to the conference
Koom m Jenkins Fine Art Center,
FCU
GAMMA BETA PHI
We will hold a meeting on Thurs
day. Jan 21 at 6 00 p m in
Mendenhall 221 Elections will be-
held, so please attend
RUGBY
Rugb. practice begms luesday.
Jan 26 for old and new players
Practices will be held from 4 to
6p m behind the Alhea Hen
Building Tuesdays Ihr- , :I
Thursdays
USED
TIRES
$10.00
inquire at
Evans Seafood
r Help When You Need It Most. A
The Fleming Center has been here for women of
all ages since 1974, offering understanding and
help to anyone faced with an unplanned pregnancy
. . . day or night. Services include:
Free Pregnancy Testing
Weekda & Saturday Abortion Appts.
F.vening Birth Control Hours
CA1 1 781-5550 DAY OR NIGHT
THE FLEMING CENTER

K 'e 're here when you need us.
JOLLY'S
PAWN SHOP
Large inventory of new and
used merchandise
We Have Layaway
� Accepting any items of value for collateral
� All transactions confidential
WE BUY GOLD AND SILVER
ACROSS THE RIVER � Corner ol N Green & Hwy 33
(Pactolus Hwy 752 5759 Mon Fri 9 lo 5 � Sat 8 to 4
&
o
Gre
-�
with
East Carolina Sororities
ami
KA Spring III
Rush
AKA
XQ
FEB. 2-15 SIGN UP
JAN. 25-29 � Student Supply Store or Croatan
10-3 or call 757-6180 � 8-5
AZ
AIA
AD
Aon
"�
Meet the Brothers who make
News Weekly.
RUSH

January 25,26,1982 9:00 p.muntil
The House at the bottom of the hill
Phone: 758-7699
ii
DEFENSE
Don't be a V8 pound weakling.
and let that beach bully push you
around this spring Sign up tor a
Personal Defense Course ottered
by the Dept ot IM Rec Services
The classes are being ottered on
Monday nights from 6 30 7 30 pm
in Memorial Gym. and trom
7 30 6 30 p m in Sla Dorm The
super low cost of these classes is J5
for the entire eight week session
You can sign up in Room ?04
Memorial Gym
You need no previous i�
perienre to participate in these
� i.isses You will learn to defend
yourself against an altai kir learn
to throw ano take a punch, and
protect yourself against rpe This
� ourse is a fun way to increase
flexibility, tno. ,i .trength, and
� am a very practical skill at the
same- time For additional "for
mation. call Sue St a n I e at
757 6064
SGA SCREENINGS
There are several position
" � SGA L i gislature The
reenmgs committee win
i i-pting applications I �
n the Legislature pi .
rome r the SGA Ottn e lot
mation and application Apphca
lions accepted until Jai jar� 26
POETRY FORUM
The Poetry Forum will meet
Thurs . January 21 ill Mendenhall
Room 248 Please bring copies ol
your poems to be critiqued
Everyone is invited There are no
restrictions Anyone interested in
poetry is welcome
OMEGA PSI PHI
Announces all men interested in
pledging Spring Line 82. formal
Smoker, Jan 24 at 8 Mendenhall
PAGEANT
North Carolina Southern Beau
ty The search is on for contesiants
aq-s 4 2? years old, each age divi
sion limited, deadline March l.
l�82 Pageant will be held April 16
and 17 For information send a
stamped address envelope to N C
SOUTHERN BEAUTY
PAGEANT, P O Box 5432,
Greensboro. N C 27403
BELLY DANCING
The Department ol Intramural
Recreational Services is ottering a
brand new course this semester.
Belly Dancing! This ancient, e�
otic art form will be otfered rues
day evenings trom 6 30 7 30 p m
The class will be held in the Dance
Room m Memorial Gym starting
Feb 2, and will continue for 8
weeks The cost is $5 tor the ent.re
session This is a beginners class
No experience is necessary Don t
be shy1 Signup in room 204
V- monal Gym for a tun class that
win help you get ready lor bikini
season For additional mtorma
tion call Sue Stanley at 757 6064
NOTICE
Students who CIANGED
THEIR ADDRESSES dur.ng
regis'ration and drop add should
qo to Whichard Buildilng. Room
100, and complete another form
The original forms were in
advertently destroyed during the
cleaning ol the gym
KYF
K ir.g's YCXjth Fell" �
will nold it's firs' meeting
spring semester The Qa'
January II �l � Mendenr
dent Center Room 247 Visitors'
$n e ano refreshments .
at Itte conclusion
' rtg
LAW SOCIETY
I aw Sec '�
its regular monthly me.
Thursday evening. Jan
in room 271 Mendenhall
Robert P B'crwning m
"The Role Of A Super
Judge" For further
contact Dant- lone a- 'S6 65S
SOCIANTHCLUB
There will be a shor' mi �
the Sociology Anthropoi
Wednesday Jan 27 a' 4 s
i; r.e a si � �I ousmess i
Please make plans h itti
( oil
SIGN LANGUAGE
CLASS
Th. ec U Program d i k. , ing
Impaired Students ana FCU
Language Club announce rt non
credit l ntroou 'r.r , Sign
Lang ling (, 30
p m Wednesday Jan 20 in
�� s'i 1 B 203 nn the ECU cam
pus The class will �� . �
Greenville students and ac
Chere . .
ana no a �
an ?o 27.
ano Feb. 3. N � . au
milted to the 1 lass afti r 'ha'
lass win begin at 6 JO �
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'wo and one hail hours II will run
concurrrn' yvitl II �
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l





THfcFASTt AKOl INIAN
JANUARY 21, 1982
Universities Experiment With Differential Tuition Rates
(CPS) s traditional sources of
funding dr up, a numbei of col-
It ges are now toying with a nevs con-
cept m the ongoing quest for
generating more income � differen-
tial tuition rates.
he idea of charging different lui-
tion rates for different categories of
s idents is in itself not that new.
Some colleges have been making in-
tmi of-state students, graduates
� undergraduates, and profes-
; school students pa different
n rates fot years.
What is neu is that colleges are
inning to discriminate on bases
like class level, cost ot various
courses, and even popularity of cer-
tain courses.
Students, in othei words, would
pay more to major in popular sub-
jects � those theoretically most
likely to lead to good jobs after
graduation � than to major in
topics with lesser enrollments. In to-
day's market, for example, it would
cost an English major more to
transfer to a biology program, and
even more to switch to engineering.
A wide variety of administrators
at various campuses confess ihev are
flirting with the idea in response to
radical cuts in state and federal
education funding. But critics warn
of limiting low-income students' ac-
cess to high-payoff majors, and for-
cing all students to choose their ma-
jois according to cost factors rather
than to interest and aptitude.
1 he University of Minnesota,
reports Vice President tor Academic
Affairs Kenneth Keller, has already
unplemeniesd tuition rates "based
primarily upon the cost of the pro-
gram
"We've been using the system for
several years now, and there haven't
been any majot problems with it
that I am aware of Keller says.
"The concept behind it is to have
each student pay approximately the
same percentage of his or her educa-
tion costs
A Minnesota biology major, for
instance, will pay an average of $418
this quarter, compared to an
English major's $351. Keller says
the difference is found in material
costs, lab expenses and departmen-
tal costs of providing the courses.
Keller carefully adds that such
differential rates must "of course,
be balanced by accessabihty. We
make sure ther is sufficient financial
aid available to students so that no
one is locked out of a program and
forced to major in something that
has a lower tuition
Keller is opposed to charging ac-
cording to a course's popularity,
which is exactly what Indiana
University is considering.
1U administrators are now
weighing a proposal to require
students to pay more for courses
that are in high demand.
"It's just a question that's been
raised, but is definitely a possibili-
ty that we'll go to some kind of dif-
ferential type of tuition says IU
Vice President Kenneth Ciros Louis.
Gros lewis says IU is studying a
number of alternative fee plans that
would base enrollment costs on fac-
tors like popularity, extra costs like
lab and service fees, and "quality of
programs that the university is par-
ticularlv noted for
He adds that while differential
tuition could "make it difficult tor
students with limited funds" to get
into high-payoff majors, IU would
try to supply enough financial aid to
remove cost as a factor in choosing
a field of study.
"I'm not convinced that financial
aid is as effective a vehicle in in-
creasing access (to all majors) as is
low tuition argues R. Michael
Berrier of the American Association
ot State ("olleues and Universities.
SGA President Speaks Candidly
L163870700
t ontinued From Page 1
awesome responsibili
iv he savs of his posi-
n on the board of
trustees. "The trustees
are dedicated men and
w omen and have the iu-
est of the universit)
ai heart
Recently Nail put
ncipated m the Martin
1 uthei King birthday
activities. Nail savs he
has tried to be sensitive
to minority issues on
v a m pus.
"Discrimination is just
something that is terri-
siaies Nail. "1
lust feel like we've got
to improve relation
ships between all
races
�� I he outright ob-
vious discrimination �
how did people put up
with it?"Nail asks. "A
triend told me. 'you
grow up with it, love
with it. and you had to
accept it
He praises his family
fot his Christian
values. "I've never
heard my father
swear Nail says. "I
was able to learn bv
observing, not be what
someone told me to
do
For his work. Nail
receives a salary ot
$200 per month. The
only requirement for
SCiA president is a 2.0
CiPA as well as being a
full time student.
"There are a lot of peo-
ple who can't get in-
volved because thev
must work. You could
not work at an outside
job and be (SCiA) presi-
dent Nail says flatly.
"Student involve-
ment is one area I'm
really disappointed
in he adds. Nail said
he believes that student
involvement is the only
way change can take
place. "Many commit-
tees need students to sit
on them, but there
aren't enough
xutilus

1002 EVANS STREET
GREENVILLE, N.C
THE
FITNESS
CLUB
fi
HARBIN HIGHLANDER CENTER, INC.
Coin-Operated
Laundry
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C leanest laundry in town!
Color T.V. and Video Games
Across from Highway Patrol
Station on 10th St.
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for men and women
OLYMPIC SARBELLS
�COED HOURS -FEMALE HOURS
AND DUMBELLS �SAUNA
SHOWERS, AND LOCKERS
WHIRLPOOL �WET PLANS
Special Student Rates
Group rates for 5
or more students.
$67.50 per student
Come bv or call TODAY and set
up an appointment tor a tree wO'feoul
at Al IIIs ss
isOl A" s� 1 )
volunteers Nail in- wants the students to available people when
cites all interested know he is here to serve they have a problem,
students to see him or their interests. Usually students will
Dr. Elmer Meyer, the "Everybody's here to only need some infor-
vice chancellor of Stu- help them Nail mation or "they don't
dent life, if interested, states. He asks students know where to
Nail says he also to go to him or other gosays Nail.
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Also, large selection of
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BOND'S
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ARLINGTON BLVD.
come ioin us
every sunday
StfRDHY
BUFFET
"Home of Greenville's Best Meats1
PIRATE COUPON - 5 DISCOUNT ON
Any Food Order Regardless of Size
Present this coupon and show
your ECU ID to cashier.
Coupon expires Feb. 6, 1982
Name,
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Amt. Purchased
PRICES EFFECTIVE THURSDAY THROUGH SATURDAY
HEAVY WESTERN
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$158
1
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Without coupon � t�c. Limit one per customer. Expires 1-23-S2.
ftor i inijMiMtH





r
Stye East Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins, ammcm
Jimmy DuPREE, sm,bh,m
Ric Browning. 0im,�, � �v,r,�m� Charles Chandler, ��� &�,
CHRIS LICHOK, Business Manager TOM HALL, Newst.diior
Alison Bartel, mmmMmw Steve Bachner, gmmmmm mm
Steve Moore, qim m William Yelverton, SlyiEt,o,
January 21, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Medical Loans
Legislature Broadens Narrow Issue
Government funding of abortion
is one of the most volatile issues that
politicians face today. People's at-
titudes about abortion range from
religious and moral objection to
scientific support. Then there are
the pro-choice people who do not
necessarily approve of abortion for
themselves but accept an in-
dividual's right to decide for
herself.
Therfore, when decisions are
made about the funding of abortion
they are sometimes based more on
personal values and emotion than
fact.
Such is the case with the SGA's
debate over its $150 medical
emergency loan fund.
The student legislature voted
Monday to reinstate the fund but
only after heated, devisive debate,
and an amendment to prevent use of
the fund for abortions was given
serious and lengthy consideration.
Now SGA President President
Lester Nail has indicated that he
plans to veto the bill. When asked
about the fund, Nail said, "I
wanted the medical fund
(suspended) strictly because I am
against abortion
Those who oppose the fund for
abortions strike out on all counts.
First, there is no proof that the
fund has been used primarily � or
even widely � to pay for abortions.
Since the use of the money is a con-
fidential matter between doctor and
patient, there are no statistics
available to the SGA concerning
what the loans have been used for.
Of course rumors persist, but they
are no substitute for fact.
Further, no polls have been taken
to indicate how students feel about
their money being used to support
such a program. And yet the
legislature spent a great deal of time
debating the morality of abortion
while trying to decide whether or
not to reinstate the loan which sup-
posedly had been suspended so that
an investigation into its usefulness
could be conducted.
Finally, the question remains of
whether or not the SGA should base
its decision on members' personal
feelings about abortion.
The answer is a simple yet em-
phatic no. The Supreme Court has
ruled that abortion is a matter to be
decided by a woman and her doctor
� not by politicians.
If, despite all this, the SGA
decides that abortion is evil and that
students cannot use the fund for
such purposes, why shouldn't they
go one step further and say that
snorting cocaine is wrong and
therefore no one can use a medical
loan to have his nose cauterized?
Where do you draw the line, where
do you end the limitatons?
At the risk of repeating ourselves,
let us emphasize that abortion is a
medical decision that must be made
by a woman with the help of her
doctor. The decision to have an
abortion is never easily reached; it is
bound to be traumatic. The
availability of an emergency
medical loan fund can help ease the
trauma.
Consider This
We have a wonderful new traffic
office. You can go in and pay $25
for a parking sticker and then miss
half your class while waiting for a
parking space.
Hold on a minute. Buying that
coveted parking sticker isn't so
easy. Might take a while. You might
even miss your class.
Since there isn't anywhere to park
at our new traffic office.
D00NESBURY
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THE
PR6ZZES OF 00 S
-Campus Forum
Loans 'Viable And Necessary9
Medical emergency loans to students
in need is a viable and necessary pro-
gram at ECU, and personal preferences
should not influence such a program. I
do not understand how Mr. Nail or Mr.
Rogers, or men in general, feel they have
any "right" to determine whether an
abortion is proper or not. Both Nail and
Rogers are out of line in attempting to
force their attitudes and preferences in
an area where they do not belong.
Abortion is strictly a women's issue,
and we as men should not legislate nor
try to control the use of this medical
operation. If a man has strong feelings
about the issue personally then it should
be handled on that level in the day-to-
day practice of his life by not helping a
woman become pregnant. Let women
make the decisions on this issue and
keep "the exact manner in which the
money is used confidential between doc-
tor and patient as is set aside in the
original bill.
RANDYSCHERR
Graduate Student, Art
Get Off
A judge in Arkansas has recently rul-
ed that teaching creationism is a viola-
tion of the Constitutional principle of
seperation of church and state.
However, Mitch Daub quotes scripture
as a basis for his decisions on student
welfare committee at a state owned and
operated university. Lester Nail decides
to veto the bill because he is personally
opposed to abortion.
Where do these two men get off? A lot
more can happen to your health at
school than getting pregnant. I had three
wisdom teeth removed in the first
semester of my freshman year; a benign
tumor just under my right breast waj
surgically removed in the second
semester of my freshman year; and
another lump was taken out in the fall of
my junior year.
Fortunately my parents could afford
these emergencies when they cropped
up. However, if I had not had my folks
to fall back on financially, 1 might have
been forced to skip the treatment of all
three problems, especially if Lester
Nail's thinking had dominated school
politics.
And where does Mike Rogers get the
right to splash gory pictures of abortions
all over an SGA meeting? In the United
States, abortions are still legal, in the
world of Daub, Nail and Rogers it is an
ill that must ob obliterated. And none of
them have proof that the SGA medical
loan is used exclusively for abortions.
How many male students have applied
for the medical loan in the past? That
would be a first, a pregnant man.
I hope Lester Nail, Mitch Daub and
Mike Rogers have to pay for every child
they ever conceive, from diapers to
diploma.
SUSAN RIES
Senior, English
Jazz Bones
Thank you for publishing Mrs.
Greene's letter (Campus Forum, Jan.
14). First, the Jazz Bones wish to ex-
press our appreciation to Mrs. Greene
and everyone who has attended any of
our performances. Feedback of this type
is deeply gratifying!
Secondly, the ensemble is "alive and
well Since that evening (Mendenhali
Student Center's Coffee House) we have
been busy. The group has performed for
the N.C. Association of School Music
Dealers, the N.C. Music Lducators Con-
vention in Winston-Salem, the Dir
Arts Council, the Greenville Arts Coun-
cil, the Phi Mu Alpha Jazz festival ai
ECU and the Eastern Trombone
Workshop at Honda State University
(Feb 1981). We will be performing a
part of the Raleigh Ja Festival (Jan. 28
at the Deja Vu, Cameron Village) and
the Roberson County Friends of the
Library Concert Series (Lumberton,
Feb. 7).
Again, thanks to Mrs. Greene and to
those who have supported us through
the years.
GEORGE L. BROUSSARD
Director, ECU Ja Bones and
Jazz Ensemble
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted.
'Private9 Conversations: Not Always
By KIM ALBIN
It has come to my attention that, for the
record, a distinction needs to be drawn bet-
ween the two types of individuals on this
campus: those who hold conversations in
public and those who listen in on those
conversations.
I realize that those of you who happen to
fall into the latter category may suffer
great embarrassment over the publicity
about to be given to your pastime: that is
my intention. I wish to break you of the
habit since it is, in my opinion not just an-
noying but also uncouth.
It happens all the time: while standing in
the Croatan or the soda shop or
Mendenhali you notice a person inching
ever closer, straining to hear your conver-
sation while pretending to read the
newspaper, study his notes or examine the
wallpaper.
I happen to know how irritating this is
because it happens to me all the time, too.
When I notice someone listening to a
private conversation of mine, I, like most
people, usually turn my back and begin to
whisper. But this solution to the problem is
temporary at best and does nothing to
teach the eavesdropper a lesson.
By the way, a friend of mine who gets
particularly annoyed by eavesdropping
handles the situation in this manner: as
soon as he begins to suspect that someone
is eavesdropping he tells a few filthy jokes.
This will always evoke either laughter or a
withering glance � both of which give
away the listener. He even encountered one
eavesdropper who had the nerve to ask him
to watch his language, though my friend
was talking at a very low volume.
What could be the matter with these
people? How could a lively, intelligent stu-
dent be so bored and idle that he needs to
eavesdrop on strangers? It is one thing to
be within "earshot" of a conversation; it is
another thing entirely to strain one's ears
just to be nosey.
Lest I sound harsh, let me assure you
that I do not mind at all when someone ap-
proaches me and begins a conversation �
that is my favorite way to meet people. But
my interlocution is usually directed ex-
clusively to the new person whom 1 know is
listening, and it is distracting to discover
an extra listener who is unaccounted for
and strange, no less.
I hope that these few words will take
care of the problem without a great deal oi
hoopla. Any further mention could and
should cause more embarrassment for the
eavesdroppers, and I do not want to spoil
anyone's day. It just stands to reason,
though, that those people who have
nothing to say can be very annoying to
those of us who have something to
sayprivately. A little mutual respcci
would be nice.

i





1
FHEEASTCAROl INIAN
JANUARY 2l. WR2
HEAK.T
I
ry
Feedback of this type
"alive and
- iMendenhall
louse) e have
nip has performed for
S hool Music
ducat ors Con-
S i u Dinston
v - Coun-
1 estiva! at
i as I lombone
University
performing as
aliJan. 28
illage) and
nds of the
(I umherton.
Mi - Greene and to
�rted us through
I BROLSSARD
izz Bones and
Jazz 1-nsemble
m Rules
'homes letters
tnts ' view. Mail or
e in the Old South
-om Joyner Library.
. erification, all letters
ime, major and
uJress, phone number
the author(s). Letters
Mf typewritten pages,
r neatly printed. All let-
for brevity,
. no personal at-
Iways
!ese :�- a �rds will take
;m without a great deal of
ther mention could and
iiharrassment for the
nd I do not want to spoil
lands to reason,
people who have
an he very annoying to
ave so me thing to
nle mutual respect
Skin Calendars New Fad
(CPS) � A number
of campuses are mark-
ing the new year on a
new, somewhat
libidinous form of en-
trepreneurial spirit:
pin-up style calendars
featuring full color
photos of scantily-clad
campus beauties,
available in both male
and female versions.
Ambitious students
at various campuses are
making a nifty profit
from the new calendar
craze, with sales runn-
ing into the thousands
of dollars for several of
the publications. But
not everyone is rushing
out to buy the timely
novelties, and one col-
lege has even issued a
resolution condemning
the calendars as
"sexist
Todd Headlee, a
business major at
Arizona State, takes
credit for starting the
fad when he debuted
his "1981 Men of
ASU" calendar last
January. Headlee says
he sold over 3000 calen-
dars the first week they
were released.
"For 21 years at
ASU there was a girls'
calendar put out by one
of the fraternities
Headlee recalls. "But it
was never really
marketed until last
Christmas when they
came out with the
slogan 'Girls of ASU
make great Christmas
gifts That's when 1
came up with the idea
of coming out with a
men's calendar
Headlee's 1981
calendar used pictures
of "really attractive"
male students at ASU,
featuring a different
model for each month
of the year. "But they
were all fully clothed
Headlee quickly adds,
noting the photos were
"Done tastefully and
professionally, in no
way pornographic
Since the ASU calen-
dar hit the bookstores,
dozens of other cam-
puses have picked up
the idea.
At Michigan State,
students can choose
"The "Men of MSU
Calendar which
features bare-chested,
"clean-cut" male
students in a variety of
poses, or the newly-
released "Women of
MSU which shows a
"cross section" of at-
tractive women clad in
swimsuits and low-cut
dresses.
Marty Karabees, an
MSU senior in in-
dustrial design, con-
cocted the "Men of
MSU Calendar" after
seeing Headlee's ASU
calendar.
"The calendar is a
product of the
eighties Karabees
says, "not something
that could have hap-
pened five years ago
The 13 students pic-
tured are "a great
group of guys, not just
good-looking, but peo-
ple too
Soon after Karabees
published his calendar,
another student
brought out a female
version.
Both MSU calendars
are reported to have
sales in the thousands.
University officials say
there have been few
complaints about them.
But the idea caused
complaint at Iowa
State. "The Women of
Iowa State 1982 Calen-
dar released this fall
by Des Moines
businessman Barney
Tabach, has been a
center of controversy.
Members of the ISU
faculty and the Govern-
ment of the Student
Body (GSB) have de-
nounced the calendar
as stereotypical and
unrepresentative.
The GBS recently
passed a resolution
asserting "the calendar
reinforces the fallacy
that women are objects
of entertainment" and
contributes to "the
perpetuation of this
stereotype
"Some of the
women's groups on
campus were disgusted
by the calendar says
GSB Vice President
T.J. Hentges, who co-
sponsored the resolu-
tion. "I would hope
that in a college campus
situation, people could
find a variety of in-
teresting things to view
besides the beautiful
people
Faculty members are
similarly critical. "The
women are seen as sex
objects contends Dr.
Jean Adams,
economics professor
and head of the Univer-
sity Committee on
Women. She says the
calendar doesn't repre-
sent ISU women, call-
ing it "sexist
"Sexism is a relative
term responds calen-
dar publisher Tabach.
"I don't think we
misrepresented women
at ISU. We were look-
ing for women that
would photograph
well, and one of the
criteria for calendar
subjects is physical at-
tractiveness
Tabach claims he
tried to get a "cross
section" of women to
feature, but admits
"the calendar is pro-
moting women and
their beauty He's
now thinking of
publishing a male ver-
sion. "I don't create
the demand. I just react
to it
Calendar magnate
Headlee, for one, is
reacting with two new
calendars for 1982, one
male and one female.
Retailing at $4.95, the
calendars are being sold
nationally by B. Dalton
Bookstores and
Walden Bookstores, in
addition to local Tempe
stores.
Headlee has already
sold over 5000 1982
"Women" calendars,
but the "Men of ASU"
remains his bestseller.
He's already sold
20,000 of them.
"I think the men's
calendar is selling
because women haven't
really been exposed to
these type of things
before Hedlee
speculates. "All the
pictures are tasteful
and professional
But the calendars
may not lead to finan-
cial success on all cam-
puses.
"I'd be surprised if
one showed up here
says Dean Vettrus,
general manager of the
student union at the
University of Idaho.
There was an uproar in
Moscow last year when
the student yearbook
came out featuring
three photos of nude
students. "It took a
year to blow over
Vettrus says. "This is a
very straight, conser-
vative campus
Campus Crimes Reported
Continued From Page 1
allegedly stealing cigarettes from the
residence hall canteen area.
Jan. 15. 2:12 a.m. � Andre
Bentley of 405-C Belk and Gregory
Carter of 405-A were arrested for
delaying an officer in the perfor-
mance of his duty. 11:55 p.m. �
Thomas H. Glasgow III reported
the larceny of items totaling $125
from 310 Aycock.
There were no dormitory in-
cidents reported on Jan. 16.
Jan. 17. 9 p.m. � Cynthia
Patricia Randall of 227 Umstead
reported the theft of her car battery
while it was parked at Mendenhall
Student Center.
Jan. 18. 4:10 p.m. � Kenneth
Ray Phillips of Winterville was ar-
rested for alleged indecent exposure
at Memorial Gymnasium. 5:39 p.m.
� Reid Saleeby of 312-C Scott
reported the larceny of a ski vest
from the dormitory canteen. 4 p.m.
� Kathleen Braswell, residence
director of Fletcher, reported the
larceny of lamps from the dor-
mitorv lobby.
Jan. 19. 6:13 p.m. � Charles G.
McDowall III of 409-C Belk
reported the breaking and entering
of his vehicle and larceny from
same.
Event Raises Funds
More than $2000 was
raised in the Greenville
area last weekend for
the Cerebral Palsy
Foundation.
Volunteers from East
Carolina's Phi Sigma
Pi National Honor
Fraternity manned the
phones for the founda-
tion's annual telethon,
which began at 10:30
p.m. Jan. 16 and lasted
until 7:30 p.m. the
following night.
According to
Margaret Milliken,
chairman of the local
telethon operation, the
$2100 raised was a
marked increase from
last vear's total of
$743.
Milliken thanked
Larry Land for the use
of the Coastal
Chemical Corporation
on Evans Street for the
local telethon head-
quarters, and
Domino's for the dona-
tion of three large piz-
zas Sunday afternoon.
The East Carolinian
St-r i Mv ihr tui'lf'm i tn'i'iunil
umvl925
Pubi'Sied every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academ r
e�r and every Wednesday dur
ipq the surnmer
Las' Carolinian ,s 'he o
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Carolina Universi'y. owned
operated, and published tor and
i. yuce's ft Eas'Carolina
Universi'y
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The East Carolinian offices
�re located in the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU
Greenville NC
POSTMASTER Sena address
changes to The East Carolinian
Old South Building, ECU Green
ville. NC 27834
Telephone 7S7 6 36 �67. �3M
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informative stories about the news events of the day
at ECU and in Greenville the best sports coverage,
and interesting features about the people, places and
things surrounding youso can your parents. For $25
your parents can get a one year mail subscription to
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f






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
"We glanced about Joshua Logan
remembered, "and saw this boy standing
there. He was lean and lanky and had an ex-
traordinary chest. His chest was caved in and
his pelvis stuck out, and his lower thighs went
back and his knees stuck out. He was in a
black pullover sweater and the typical white
golf pants of the day, which were supposedly
plus fours, but his were minus two. He was
very skinny. Black stockings and black shoes.
Nobody had ever seen anybody dress that way
before. We couldn't figure it out. He was
either terribly chic or didn't know what the
hell he was doing But he did know what he
was doing. He, being
FONDA
Style
JANUARY 21 1982 Page
Conflicts Within
Gil Carter (Henry Fonda), left, and his sidekick Art Croft (Henry Morgan) have a shot of whiskey after the long spring
roundup in The Ox-Row Incident, a film about inner reasons that drive men to lawless killings. It is not a wild emotional
shocker that displays mobs storming a jail, whipped up to a frenzy, killing in anger. Instead, quietly, inexorably, it mo
by small stages to a triple hanging in the lonely Ox-Box alley.
( H-
I
reno
I
The Legend Still
Thrives Late In Life
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
Style tdilm
For the thousands and thousands
of unfortunate people who have
never had a grandfather to hue or
hug or converse with, Henry Jaynes
Fonda is the perfect choice. He is a
man who has endured the toughest
profession of all for 56 years, in-
cluding more than 80 films, doens
of plays, two television series and
five wives.
He is a man who is in the latter
stages oi life, weakening because oi
a dangerous heart condition. But he
continues to work and moves us
again in his latest film, On Golden
Pond, released in late December It
is in this film that he may deliver hi-
greatest performance in a career
that has spanned six decades. The
film will be successful not because
of Katharine Hepburn's stirring
portrayal as Fonda's wife, Ethel
Thayer, who has lovingly endured
46 years with a man who is now
preparing for death. It is successful
because Henry Fonda is Norman
Thayer, an honery old sonuvabitch
who tries his damndest to show his
love for lus children � reflections
oi his relationship with his real
children, Peter and Jane, who have
followed him into his profession.
1 here will never be another Norman
Thayer on the screen. Or another
Henry Fonda - ii it.
He is a man who is followed by a
full-time male nurse wherever he
goes. He moves with the aid of a
walker from room to room in Mis
Bel-Air home. A hospital bed has
been installed in a small room adja-
cent to his kitchen. Cylindrical ox-
ygen tank- are delivered weekly and
stored in a cornet of lus bedroom.
Yet he made and makes On Golden
I'tuid in the year his autobiography
has been published. "It could only
be done last summer Fonda said.
"If it weren't, who's to know it
Katharine Hepburn and I are still
alive next summer?" Death will
overcome Henry Fonda but sickness
will not.
Fonda was born in Grand Island,
Nebraska, in 1905 to a pleasant
family. As a boy. he admitted
"walking across the street to avoid
meeting a girl He is a young man
Fonda's legendary lorn Joad.
who was taken by his father to see a
black man being lynched in the
center oi town. He is the young man
whose most cherished childhood
memory is the time he was awaken-
ed by his mother to see Haley's
Comey because "it only comes
around only once every 76 years
He began acting 21 years later
when Dorothy Brando (Marlon
Brando's mother) suggested he take
a small part in a town production.
The play sold him on the acting pro-
fession.
He is the young actor who travell-
ed to New Yorkand adutioned for
every play he could, unsuccessfully.
But he ventured to Cape Cod where
he joined some Ivy Leaguers and
became a member of the University
Players, befriended James Stewart
Myron McCormick, Joshua Logan
and Margaret Sullavan � making
her his first wife in 1931. He is the
young man who, at age 26, stood
painfully outside as his wife made
love to producer Jed Harris.
They were divorced a few months
later. She married Fonda's close
friend, agent Feland Hayward �
something that Fonda never spoke
with him about.
During the Depression, Fonda,
Stewart, Logan and McCormick
shared an apartment in New York,
depending mostly on rice, but they
eventually found work. In 1934,
Fonda appeared in New Faces, a
comedy review with Imogene Coca.
Hayward saw him and became his
agent, flying him to Hollywood to
meet with producer Walter Wanger,
who offered him $1000 a week for
two pictures a year. It was a very big
step for a Nebraska farm boy.
His first film was Farmer Takes A
Wife, based on the play he starred in
while in New York. Five pictures
later, he met Frances Seymour
Brokaw while on location in France.
In 1936, she became his second wife
and mother of Jane and Peter.
From the time he enlisted in the
Navy in 1942 � he was a quarter-
master in the Pacific, later becom-
ing a lieutenant and receiving the
Bronze Star and a Presidential cita-
tion � he made 28 films. In 1945,
he returned to Hollywood and madi
six more films in a three-year span.
The best of these include My Darl-
ing Clementine, The Fugitive and
Fort Apache.
He decided to take a leave from
the movies for seven years and
returned to the East where he por-
trayed Mister Roberts, his longest-
running and most memorable stage
role. The plav ran foi four years,
and he never missed a performance.
As Mister Roberts, (on stage 1948.
screen 1955), he was a patriot oi
America playing an American
patriot.
He is the actor who performed
Mister Roberts after his wife com-
mitted suicide after a mental
breakdown in 1950. "1 don't like to
be reminded of what happened
Fonda said. "It was a tragedy The
two had agreed to divorce before the
suicide.
Fonda had befriended 21 -year-old
Susan Blanchard and married her in
1950. They adopted a baby girl.
Amy, but were divorced five years
afterward.
After the film version oi Mister
Roberts. Fonda went to Rome to
work on Uar and Peace. He met
Afdera Franchetti during the film-
ing, and they were married in March
of 1957.That was the year of 12
Angry Men, the only film Fonda
ever produced, and The Wrong
Man, an Alfred Hitchcock picture.
He divorced Afdera in 1962 and
met Shirlee Adams, a stewardess,
making her his last wife in 1965 �
despite saying he would never marry
gain.
Fonda's Tom Joad, Wyatt Earp,
Young Mr. Lincoln and Mister
Roberts are popular, but some of
his most wonderful moments have
come on the stage in The Caine
Mutiny Court Martial, Two for the
Seesaw, A Gift of Time (Paul
Newman said this was "just the
goddamnest, greatest performance
I've ever seen), Clarence Darrow,
First Monday in October and the
most recent. Showdown at the
Adobe Motel.
Fonda is a rare breed of actor
who has never had bad reviews.
Critic Manny Farber wrote in 1966
that Fonda "seems to be vouchsaf-
ing his emotion and talent to the au-
dience in tiny blipsFonda's entry
into a scene is that of a man walking
backwrd, slanting himself away
from the public eye He played
many types of characters early in his
career, which he seemed to do with
ease; he was, in fact, one of us � a
part of his audience. In Young Mr.
Lincoln he won debates because he
made fun of his opponent's laissez-
faire. In The Grapes of Rath and
Jesse James, he is forced to be a
political activist � a corrupt legal
system has slaps him but he comes
out a hero.
He was a brilliant comic in The
Lady Eve, where he falls for con
woman Barbara Stanwyck and she,
in turn, tails for him � hea
heels in love
He is an avid deep - a
beekeeper, kiteflier and organic
gardener. He was rumored to be the
inspiration for Al Capp's
Abner. Eugene O'Neil is his :
play right, and he likes Woody Allen
comedy.
He has never been the recipient of
an Academy Award, even though he
received an honorary Oscar last year
for his contribution to the world of
films. He says if he is nominated for
an award this year lie will not at-
tend. "I never think about
Oscar he says. Why? "I will
be there and put up with thai shit
he told Playboy contributing editor
I awrenceGrobel. "1 watch it on 1
and five contenders for Besi ctoi
are all out there and at various tunes
the camera will go to them for close-
upsThe idea oi the camera com-
ing to me while they're naming the
other actors, then whoever wins
ksc I he '
and run il
mak
es a spe
No
But h
Hue
awards, preset I a the Kennedy
Center, dnJt we did see the emo-
tional side oi Henry Jaynes Fonda.
"The Kennedy Center was he
says, "particular at the end when
they had a Navy choral group
onstage and they, started singing
"Anchors Away" and then sang
"The Red River Valley" which is
Grapes oj Wrath. I cried like a
baby, tears just streaming out of mv
eves. I just couldn't stopcrying. The
Navy group came up both aisles
line and they saluted. 'Good night.
Mi Fonda It just broke me up
Fonda is sick
heart, but he
pacemakei put
recovering today
be!ore Halley's
next pa-v
now with a I
has had a new
in and is home
� only five years
Cornel makes its
�M �
f7
��:�
Henry Fonda as 1ister Roberts.

4b





�'�i
$
Festival A Cultural
Blessing For City
CHARLESTON, S.C
(UPl) The sixth an-
nual Spoleto Festival
USA a world
renowned potpourri of
the performing and
usual arts, has turned
into a financial and
cultural blessing for the
city, Mayor Joseph P.
Riiey said Wednesday.
"Spoleto has become
an economic and
cultural treasure for the
Charleston community
that has far exceeded
our fondest hopes
said Riley, who has
supported the festival
since its inception.
The festival has
drawn the world's best
performers and whet-
ted the appetite of local
citizens for more
cultural events in the ci-
ty. Riley told reporters
at a news conference
called to announce part
of the 1982 Spoleto
program.
It attracts thousands
of visitors to the
historic city and is
directly responsible for
more than $40 million
being spent in South
C arolina, he said.
John W. Kcssler,
president of the Spoleto
board, who described
this year's diversified
program as 'well
balanced said ticket
sales, which will ac-
count for almost half
of the $2.1 million
budget, are ahead of
schedule.
Actual monies raised
or pledges received
from the recently con-
cluded subscription
series mailing
amounted to $650,000,
a $250,000 increase
over the same period a
year ago, he said.
"The quality of this
year's program should
help assure us of strong
ticket sales and the
most successful Spolet
ever said General
Manager James T.
Kearney.
Spoleto has made a
slight profit for three
years after going over
its budget the first two
seasons. While $60,000
is still owed from
previous years, this
year's budget is cur-
rently in the black,
Kessler said.
Some of the program
s which includes Erich
Leinsdorf conducting
three performances of
the New York Philhar-
monic; founder and ar-
tistic director Gian
Carlo Menotti directing
his only play, "The
Leper and a major
production of
Shostakovich's opera
"Lady Macbeth of the
Mtsensk District" ' was
announced earlier. The
festival begins May 21
and concludes June 6.
The Oakland Ballet
Company; the Jose
Limon Dance Com-
pany; the Laura Dean
Dancers and Musi-
cians, who will perform
a new work commis-
sioned by festival of-
ficials; and Senta
Driver's group Harry
are the featured dance
programs.
The fireworks-laced
finale at Middleton
Place plantation near
Charleston will feature
an all-Ravel program
by the festival or-
chestra.
THE EAST CAROLlNlAN JAWARY2M9M7
ABORTIONS
1 24�eek terminations
App't's Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1 800-321 0575
Currant onAervnduO p��-
m��i.tQl tt�de"t� M, now torn
p�� to. .e��ol hundred A"
Fore �cKolonh,p�
,cho�or.K.p� om to be o-oroeo
to ��ud�nt� oc�p�ed o
��J�ol Khoo. o� hnmn o.
ot the beginn.no ol tne�
.ophomore yeo. The �holo.
,h.p pro�.de� to. turt.on booki
lob tees and equ-pment phu a
1530 monrtil ollo-once tn
.�t.aato t.� rinanool olte.
��,�. to tke h.gh cost ot
T�edicoi edi�coon
Contact
( s Vr Hr M IH
PROtrSSION
KM Kt HIM'
S.teGLl H00No�ohoOi
RoU,gh NC 27689
PSon. Collect �19H'�
Kings Productions Auditions
East Carolina University
A J Fletcher Recital Hal
Tues. Feb 2. 4-7 pm
Carowlnds
Midway Musk: Hall
Sun Jan 31. 12-4 p m
Productions feature professionally
designed scenery costumes, staging
and choreography m fully equipped theatres and outdoor stages
Singers � Dancers � Instrumentalists � Technicians
Variety Performers �180-250week
O � itM . NJ tc fwed performed travpung .tvp
t � ti ine �k
Contaci CarowrtK. 9o� 240516 Owrtone NC 28224
� King; Product
� ����� Dep, i932rtgfttn�JAe Gwwm. OH 452.9
TAR LANDING
SEAFOOD
RESTAURANT
Popcorn
Shrimp
All you can eat
Special Good Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday
This Week
Cross Green Street Bridge
TakeleHat 1st Light
Located one block down on lett
Phone
758-0327
Bob Hearing -
Manager
THISWEEKEND
AT
This Thursday � 7 P.M.
Friday & Saturday � 5, 7 & 9 P.M
Hendrix Theatre, MSC
Admission -
Greenville ,N.C
Two of Atlanta's Newest & Hottest
ROCK BANDS
THURS. � REM
FRI. & SAT. IN CONCERT
BABY & THE PACIFIERS
i i i i i i i
Hfl
Every Day
11:00 11:00
300 E. 10th St
758-6121
The Best Pizza in Town � Honest
Big Screen
TV
2 79
Every Day - Buttet n.00-2.00 x y
Mon. & Tues. - Buffet 5:00-8:00 �7
Wed. - "All You Can Eat" Spaghetti 5:00-8:00 2.25
Thurs. - Lasagna 5.00-8:00 Two for 3.60
rTtttU��MttlliiiitfH3
IIIIIIII
Drive-Up
Window for
To Go Orders
The Medical Store
2205 W. 5th St. I P.O. Box 59
Greenville, N.C. 27834
Phone 756-8371
�Diagnostic Sets �Gloves
� Liftman Drs. Bags � Dissecting Kits
Stethoscopes � Blood Pressure
�Tuning Forks Equipment
Any Type of Product for
The Health Care Professional
WHY BUY RETAIL - WHEN YOU
CAN BUY FROM THE DISTRIBUTER
East Carolina Medical Supply Co.
M�
Copyright 1982
Kroger Savon
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold to Dealers
on
V.
OPEN Mori, thru Sat. 8 AM TO MIDNIGHT
Sun. 9 AM TO 9 PM
600 Greenville Blvd.
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertleed itema is required to be read'iv
available foTaaleln each Kroger Sav-on, except as spec ti
caJlyroted In this ad If we do run out of an item we willoffer
vou vour choice of a comparable Item when available, reflec
C t� aamesavings or . relncheck which will entitle you to
purchase the advertised Item at the advertised price within 30
days.
lO
ASSORTED VARIETY
Fox Pizzas
KROGER
FLORIDA FRESH
Orange Juice
VASELINE
INTENSIVE CARE
Lotion
COLGATE INSTANT
Shave
Cream
COSMITICft A
16





I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JANLARY2I, 1982
FageK
Pirates
Lose To
Campbell
RALEIGH � Campbell Univer-
sity jumped to an 11-point halftime
lead and built it to 18 early in the se-
cond half, then held on for a narrow
62-60 win over East Carolina
Wednesday night.
The Pirates, playing without in-
jured guard Tony Byles, shot just 34
percent from the field in the first
half and 36 percent for the game.
The Camels wasted little time
jumping ahead, owning a 17-4 lead
with 9:33 remaining in the first
period. The club went into the
lockeroom ahead at halftime 37-26.
Campbell's first-half advantage
runs parallel with its action on the
free throw line. The Camels made
l7 of 21 from the charity stripe,
while the Pirates had just five free
throws and made four.
Campbell built the advantage to
48-30 with 15:38 remaining in the
game before the Pirates made an
amazing comeback that fell just
short of fulfillment.
ECU outscored Campbell 25-6
over a nine-minute span and took a
55-54 lead with 6:11 remaining on a
jumper by Charles Wat kins.
After relinquishing the lead, ECU
regained the advantage with 47
seconds remaining when Thorn
Brown connected from ten, putting
the Bucs ahead 60-59.
Harvey Smith fired a jumper in
with ten seconds remaining to give
Campbell a one-point advantage,
61-60. The Pirates were unable to
score on their next possession and
were forced to foul. Ron Curtis
made one of two free throws to br-
ing the final score to 62-60.
Curtis, a senior playing in his last
collegiate game against the Pirates,
led the Camels with 21 points.
Center Tony Brit to was close behind
with 15.
Forwards Al Mack and Charles
Green each pumped in 12 points to
pace the Pirates. Guard Mike Fox
was ECU's only other player scoring
in double figures, tallying ten.
The Pirates fell to 6-8 with the
loss and now face the unenviable
task of traveling to again on Satur-
day he opponent then will be
I5th-ranked N.C. State.
Nevitt, Zone Defense
Have Keyed State Start
i MPBH I i�2'
B
t
hk i span
K I iMIi
Hargrove I : i. Green 2-2 12, Gibson 0 0-0 0.
Mel lurir 0 1-2 1.1 1-00,1 i 2 2 10, S1a,k 5 :
12. McNai : : : ' H �n I 0-1 2. Be� 00-00, Waikim 2
0-0 4
kialfnmc j:i U Ml V Fouled out Green,
Hargrove
Trying For A Tap
ECU forwards C 'harles Green (34) and Thorn Brown (42) try
for a lap in during an early -season game. The (wo and their
teammates tried to no avail last night :o defeat a fired-up
Campbell scjuad in Raleigh. Now the Pirates must try to
bounce back from its two-name losing streak (the first being
to UNC-Wilmington) against I5th-ranked N.C. State on
Saturday night. (Photo By Gary Patterson)
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sporti Mum
Assistant coach Ray Martin says
there is one big reason why the N.C.
State basketball team has come
from last year's 14-13 record to its
current standing of 15th-ranked in
the nation.
That reason will certainly play a
big factor when East Carolina in-
vades Reynolds Coliseum Saturday
night to play its second ranked team
of the year, the other being now-
second-ranked Missouri.
No, the reason Martin mentioned
is not the superb guard play the
Wolfpack has been getting from
Sidney Lowe and Thurl Bailey.
"There have been a lot of things
that have helped us improve Mar-
tin said Wednesday via telephone
from Raleigh. "But if you have to
single out one person, it's got to be
Chuck Nevitt
The 7-5 senior center has, indeed,
come a long way. Four years ago he
stumbled his way into games, but
only if they were decided. Never did
Nevitt play when the game was at
stake.
That changed somewhat last
season, the big guy maturing
somewhat and coming into his own
in last year's ACC Tournament.
This year, though, Nevitt is a
starter and a real force in the State
attack. He has neither great scoring
or rebounding statistics. It is the
things that don't make the stat
sheets that Nevitt does best, Martin
said.
"Chuck makes it very hard for
people to score' on us inside said
the Wolfpack assistant coach.
"We've had a lot of success with the
zone defense and Chuck is the main
reason. When Chuck is in the game,
and not in foul trouble, it is very
hard for people to get the ball inside
on us
Alongside Nevitt on the State
starting frontline is 6-7 Scott Par-
zych and 6-11 Thurl Bailey. The
tallest ECU starter is 6-8 center
Michael Gibson.
Could the big size differential
plus ECU's 6-7 record (prior to
Wednesday night's game with
Campbell) mean the Wolfpack
might be emotionally down follow-
ing consecutive games against Big
Four opponents UNC, Wake Forest
and Duke?
"This time of year you never
want a let-down Martin said.
"Our kids realize the importance of
conference games and the impor-
tance of non-conference games. We
need to play just as well against East
Carolina Saturday as we have
against the ACC teams We know
that Dave Odom (ECU coach) does
a great job, so 1 think we'll be just
as up for the ECU game as any
other
Something the Pirates will no
doubt have to deal with is the State
zone defense that has held op-
ponents to but 49.3 points per game
and 40.4 percent field goal shooting.
The big front line is the core of
that defense. The one game the
Wolfpack lost badly, by 20 points to
top-ranked North Carolina, they
were forced out of the zone. Martin
says, though, that the State
coaching staff has confidence in its
man-to-man defense as well.
"Certainly the zone has become
our forte this year he said. "You
stay with what has been successful.
But we don't think we're at a big
disadvantage when we're in the
man. We just make iome ad-
justments
When the Wolfpack switches to
the man-to-man coverage, head
coach Valvano usuallv sends for-
ward Harold Thompson and
freshman Center Cozell McQueen
into the game for Nevitt and Par-
zych.
"That adds another dimension to
out defense Martin said. "But
Cozeil and Harold arc very quick
and agile on defense. I hey are bet
ter suited for the man-io-man and
have done a great job tor us
Most of the season the Wolfpack
has tried to play a slower-than-
average half-court game, choosing
not to run against quicker teams.
Martin says, though, that State
allowed � can run.
"Our team more or les
punches said Martin "We n
to what other teams give us and
what happens
The Slate attack is led by sharp-
shooting Derrick Whittenburg, u
is the owner of a 15.4 aver
Bailey is next at 14.0. while Parzych
averages 9.7 points per game and
I owe 9.0.
The ECU-State matchup g
underway Saturday night at 7:30
p.m. Tickets ar� available in the
Minges ticket office, selling for $6
to students. The game will be broad-
cast on the radio by WOOW-AM
(1460) and WITN-FM (9? 0).
Tony Byles
To Sit Out
2-3 Weeks
A stress fracture in Tony Byles"
left hand will keep the Fast
C arolina basketball player out of
action for at least two weeks, of-
ficials said Wednesday.
Byles, the team's starling point
guard and floor leader, will have
his hand in a cast for two to three
weeks. The university's Sports
Medicine Division predicts he will
need a gradual recuperation
period after the cast is removed.
Byles apparently broke his
hand during a Sunday practice,
but did hot have it examined for a
fracture until Tuesday when it
continued to bother him.
The f-4 senior is the team's
leading scorer with an average of
10.8 points per game.
Sophomore Herbert Gilchrist
got the starting call last night
against Campbell as Byies
replacements. Also expected to
see time at the point postion are
freshman Bruce Peartree and
junior Charles Watkins.
Super Bowl Features Two Cinderella Stories
Everyone knows all about
Cinderella in the fairy tales who
wore the glass slipper. W;hat
everyone wants to know now is who
will wear that slipper Sunday night.
That's right � Sunday night. You
know, after the big game. The BIG
game. THE big game.
The two participants in Super
Bowl XVI, to be played Sunday in
Pontiac, Michigan, are boUi long-
time also-rans.
Just imagine; the time is one year
ago. Your best friend walks up to
you and tells you that the Cincinnati
Bengals and San Francisco 49ers
will be playing in the Super Bowl
one year. You'd probably have sent
for a doctor.
But that is exactly what has hap-
pened. The two clubs won but a
total of 11 games between them in
1980. Both made remarkable turn-
arounds in combining for 25 regular
season wins in 1981.
Both, despite leading their respec-
tive conferences in regular season
wins, were not really the favorites to
go to Pontiac heading into the
playoffs.
In Cincinnati's AFC, the betting
man put his money on Miami and
San Diego. In San Francisco's NFC,
nearly everyone looked for Dallas to
steal the show.
Both the Bengals and 49ers could
have said, like Rodney Dangerfield,
"We get no respect The solution
to that problem, they found, was
simple � go out and earn that
much-wanted respect.
And that they did. The Bengals
beat a very good Buffalo team and
then annhialated the explosive San
Diego Chargers. San Francisco got
by the New York Giants easily
enough, then surprised everyone
with a remarkable comeback win
over the Cowboys.
Why the sudden resergence in the
two teams? The answer to that
coaching lies somewhat in the
coaching. Both Cincinnati's Forrest
Gregg and San Francisco's Bill
Walsh have the utmost respect of
their players.
Gregg, the tough disciplinarian,
and Walsh, with the innovative
mind, have turned in two of the best
single-season coaching jobs in NIT
history.
But both have had a good amount
of talent to work with, and both
have used that talent to the utmost.
The pre-game attention Cincin-
nati has received has centered in
great part around All-Pro quarter-
back Ken Anderson, who was
recently named the league's Most
Valuable Plaver. There is much
Charles
Chandler
more to the Bengals, though.
Cincinnati is loaded with former
number one draft picks. Among
them are three big weapons that
Anderson has at his disposal on of-
fense � receivers Chris Col-
linsworth and Isaac Hayes, as well
as fullback Pete Johnson.
The Bengal defense is hefty up-
front with three youngsters that are
just coming into their own.
The 49er defense, on the other
hand, is made up of a blend of
youth and experience. Veterans like
Fred Dean and Jack Reynolds have
combined with rookies the likes of
Ronnie Lott to make the SF defense
quite formidable.
Offensively, the key for San Fran-
cisco is quarterback Joe Montana.
"The Comeback Kid as he has
come to be known, has had a
remarkable season.
Montana can throw to a pair of
crafty receivers in Freddie Soloman
and Dwight Clark.
Clark is one of three former
Clemson players that start for the
49ers, the other two being defensive
linemen Archie Reese and Jim
Stuckey.
So, know we have the two
Cinderella teams, and have noted
their strengths. The question is �
who will win Sunday?
The two squads played a couple
of months ago and the 49ers got the
best of it. 21-3. You can bet things
will be different on Super Sunday.
Neither club will be lacking in
desire. Both are new to the Super
Sunday aura and will be pumped up
higher than Dean Martin on a Satur-
day night.
The edge here goe to San Fra
cisco. As 49er Coach Walsh said
before the Dallas game, "I don't
know why we're so successful.
There's just a bunch of young guys
on this team who don't know how
to lose
The pick is San Francisco, 31-28
Swimming Has Become Her Forte
Dropping Of Gymnastics Hasn't Stopped George
By CYNTHIA PI FAS A NTS
Muff Wnler
How many athletes do you know
who can switch from one sport to
another and end up breaking varsity
records? Nan George, a member of
the East Carolina swim team, has
done just that.
George, a sophomore from
Manassas, Virginia, participated on
the Pirate gymnastics team until the
program was dropped last year.
Having been a competitive swimmer
in high school, George decided to
talk with ECU's swim coach, Ray
Scharf, about the prospect of taking
to the waters again.
Scharf said he knew early that the
versatile George had potential
because her try-out times were so
good.
"She a gifted individual Scharf
said. "She has a lot of natural abili-
ty.
The swimming season just
halfway over, George has alrody
broken individual varsity records in
the 50- and 100-yard freestyle com-
petition. In addition, she has been a
member of the 200- and 400-yard
relay teams, which have both
established new school marks.
"Nan is a super kid and a hard
worker Scharf said. "She is a
tremendous asset to our team. I
wish we had ten more like her
Scharf cited George's positive at-
titude and determination as reasons
for her recent success.
Mollie DeLozier, an assistant
swim coach, agrees wholeheartedly
with Scharf.
"She is one of the most dedicated
swimmers on the team � a very
responsible individual and a tough
competitor
Her coaches say she has handled
the transition from gymnasitics to
swimming well, but George
disagrees.
"It takes longer to get into condi-
tion for competitive swimming and
I've been out of practice for two
years She added, however, that
being a gymnast helped her to stay
flexible, making the conditioning
for swimming easier.
George also had to adjust to her
new teammates, which she described
as rowdier than her former cohorts.
"Gymnasts she said, "are quiet
because they have to concentrate
"1 wouldn't want to
feel that I had ever let
my teammates down I
want to finish as one of
the top three in the na-
tion.
� Nan George
more
Dealing with judges, as was the
case in gymnastics, is something
that George says she does not miss.
"In swimming, you keep your face
in the water, and the only thing to
worry about is your time
George described herself as a true
competitor, but not against others.
"I don't worry about the person
swimming next to me she said.
"They're only pushing me to do bet-
ter
Though she holds records in both
individual and relay events, George
said she enjoys going solo better.
She said relay competition carries
too much pressure.
"5 wouldn't want to feel that I
had ever let my teammates down
she said.
George admitted, despite her
struggles to adjust, that she has been
pleased with her accomplishments.
"I'm right on schedule. I have set
goals and, so far. I have achieved
them
George believes her strong
religious faith has contributed to her
success.
She and her teammates are look-
ing forward to their meet tonight
(Thursday) with UNC-Chapei Hill.
George feels the meet wi'l be a tough
one, one that will give her a chance
to improve her time.
Coach Scharf said he is looking
tor big things fron, George come the
national finals, which will be held at
the end of the season in Moscow,
Idaho. George has already decided
on her goal for the nationals.
"I want to finish as one of the top
three in the nation
?
.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 21. IW:
Page 8
fense
e Start
j Harold Thompson and
mum Ccntei Cozril McQueen
the eame for Nevitt and Par-
bito
,ch.
�� That adds another dimension to
hi defense Martin said. "But
veil and Harold are very quick
e on defense. They are bet-
suited foi the man-to-man and
done a great iob for us
Mosl of the season the Wolfpack
ed io play a slower-than-
�e half-court game, choosing
i run agamt quicker teams.
lartin saw. though, that State �if
an run.
ir team more or less counter
inches1 said Martin. "We react
�her teams give us and see
happens
� ite attack is led b sharp-
fOerrick Whittenburg, who
vnei of a 15.4 average.
14.0, while Parzych
points per game atid
EC I Male matchup gets
nderway Saturday night at 7:30
m Tickets are available in the
. kef office, selling for $6
lents 1 he game will be broad-
on the radio by WOOW-AM
I, 460) and WITN-FM (93.0).
I he 6-4 senior is the team's
scorer with an average of
:nts per game.
phomore Herbert Gilchnst
t :arting call last night
rtst Campbell as Byles'
replacements. Also expected to
see time at the point postion are
iman Bruce Peartree and
ior Charles Watkins.
tories
it, 21-3. You can bet things
will be different on Super Sunday.
Neither club will be lacking in
desire. Both are new to the Super
Sunday aura and will be pumped up
higher than Dean Martin on a Satur-
day nighr.
The edge here goes to San Fran-
cisco. As 49er Coach Walsh said
before the Dallas game, "1 don't
know why we're so successful.
There's just a bunch of young guys
on this team who don't know how
to lose
The pick is San Francisco, 31-28.
d George
Though she holds records in both
individual and relay events, George
said she enjoys going solo better.
She said relay competition carries
too much pressure.
"I wouldn't want to feel that I
had ever let my teammates down
she said.
George admitted, despite her
struggles to adjust, that she has been
pleased with her accomplishments.
"I'm right on schedule. I have set
goals and, so far, I have achieved
them
George believes her strong
religious faith has contributed to her
success.
She and her teammates are look-
ing forward to their meet tonight
(Thursday) with UNC-Chapel Hill.
George feels the meet will be a tough
one, one that will give her a chance
to improve her time.
Coach Scharf said he is looking
for big things from George come the
national finals, which will be held at
the end of the season in Moscow,
Idaho. George has already decided
on her goal for the nationals.
"1 want to finish as one of the top
three in the nation
Classifieds
Indoor Soccer Event
Saturday At Minges
By THOMAS BRAME
ECU will host the
first annual Pirate In-
door Soccer Tourna-
ment Saturday in
Minges Coliveum
The tournament will
consist oi twelve teams
divided into 'luce dii-
sions.
East Carolina will be
represented by three
teams named ECl
W lute. Purple and
Alumni.
Other North
Carolina teams include
Eton. Catawaba and
Guilford all from the
L arolinas Conference.
The action begins at
S a.m. and continues
non-stop until 5:30.
The tourney champion-
ship will be decided at
5:30.
1 he standings will be
determined by the
N AS1 point system.
Gl CdnnjuiUqi-o Fa'iquis and
T Shirts. Sleeptnq B a q s
Backpacks Campinq Equip
mini Sli'Vl Toed Shoes
Dishis and O.i-i 700 Dittt-rvnt
Ni-� and Used Minis Cowboy
Boois SJ� 95
ARMY-NAVY
There are some changes
in the rules due to being
indoors, but am pro-
blems or discrepancies
will be resolved b
coaches and officials.
he Pirate booters
hope to get off on the
right fool in this tour-
nament, looking ahead
to the upcoming spnng
season.
Swimming
Showdown
Set Tonight FOr sale
Powerful North
Carolina invades the
Minges Natatorium this
evening to take on the
East Carolina men's
and women's swimm-
ing teams.
Highlighting the two
meets is the matchup of
two very strong
200-yard relay among
the women. The Tar
Heel relay squad is
ranked number one in
the nation, while the
Lady Pirates are rank-
ed fourth.
The double dual
meet is scheduled to
begin at 7 p.m.
The East Carolinian
P ibl � I every Tu. s.i, and
� m, au'n'ii 'fte academic
� a� .via ever vV. cmesaay nur
� so n mer
WALKMAN MINI UHctti player
Excellent stereo sound. Excellent
price. Call ?57H�.
WATERBEOS! DON'T pay retail
lor your heated waterbed, buy
direct Irom mlq and save. Buy a
complete 1st quality pine wood
heated waterbed with IS ft. war-
ranty tor as low as 111 (Queen)
s199 (King) Lawaway available.
Call David for appointment.
7ST24M.
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS shirts art
now available It interested pleas
call Tim at 7S� M7J or Jeff at
757 3484
68 OLDS 7(S, vood condition.
95 ooo miles, S2S0 call Kim
7S7 1460
��73 VW SUPERBEETLE-tIKO
or best otter. Call Lee. 7sa-7U4 or
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ONE MR. Cool dorm sue
refrigerator (used)� SS0 Call
7S� 4903. Tim Tobey.
USED YAMAHA guitar for sale.
owned years, in good condition.
$uo negotiable. Call 757 3107 ask
lor John, 110 E Tenth St.
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom trailer. $?0 per
month plus one half utilities.
Prefer working student. Call
7M-4M1 after p m
ROOMMATE WANTED: J
bedroom, part turn. apt. 'rent JUS
plus ' utilities. Walking distance
from campus. Call Sue 7S2 SM.
ROOMMATE NEE DEO begmn
ing Feb. l SIM month plus utilities.
Male or female, no preference.
Call me. 7JJ 7337
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed.
Georgetown apt, across from
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caii rwms,
ROOMMATE NEEDED Tar
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TWO PEOPLE wanted to share
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beginning March l Three
bedrooms, $07 monlh. one third
utilities Call 7S0 � �� Eastbrook
HELP
WANTED
EARN EXTRA cash Commission
agents for ECU. dormitories.
Shiver Shoe Repair 0M Dickinson
Ave. 7S0 tOlt (day) 7S3 �77
(night)
PERSONAL
TYPING TERM, thesis,
resumes, dessertations, etc Pro
fessional quality at lowest rates
Call Kempie Dunn anytime,
7S2 4733.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST wants
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term, research, thesis papers, ar
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7S7 1370
WILSON AREA commuters I am
looking lor someone to shart ride
Monday. Wednesday and Friday
Call 214 3912
LOST MALE dog While with
brown ears and black and white
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75804
NOTARY PUBLIC Call Amy at
757 3734
ASHEVILLE RIDE needed to
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750 3t2�
WIN A PINBALL MACHINE
First place pole in the Gong
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Jan 2� at 8 30 CaaM 758 7912 for
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CARICATURES BY WEYLER
Greenville s original personalued
art service Have a cartoon done
of yoursell or a loved one a oni
que gift idea! $10 00 for 8 X 10, b'w
or color tall 752 5775
HEY ROADRUNNER, cheer up'
The first month should be i
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OOPS' Should have hitched on to a
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No 13
CAN YOU kiss all night Can vou
eat em all night Ho tar can you
go Can you do it all night
LOST SILVER Cross pen with
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value 758 2557
HAIRCUTS $S 00 by profess.oi
licensed cosmetologist Appoint
ments available Tuesdd, and
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Marlend at the Clip Jomi 7t 8032
FOUND LADIES gold lr
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STORE
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ABORTIONS FROM 13-10
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$105.00 Pregnancy Test. Birth
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Pregnancy Counseling For tur
ther information call 032-OS3S
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800 221 250) between � A.M.
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RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
I7 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N.C
THE SHOE OUTLET
(Located beside Evans Seafood)
Featuring name brand shoes at bargain prices.
Up To 75 OFF regular prices
Bass Sleward-McCiuire Brouse Abouts
201 W. Washington St. Within walking distance of campus.
Career Opportunities
in Engineering &
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Local Interviews
on
February 4. 1982
GREAT FOOD
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Attention
Nursing &
Allied Health Students
The SGA transit has ex-
panded its routes to include
the ECU medical school &
health affairs library.
CAPTURE
MonFri.
Departures
Mendenhall 1:10
3:10
5:10
7:10
9:10
Arrivals
ECU Medical
Complex 1:20
3:20
5:20
7:20
9:20
The Preliminaries are over � now comes
The Main Event
RUSH
January 25,26,1982 9:00 p.muntil
"The House at the bottom of the hill
ELIGIBILITY: Works can be submit
ted by registered ECU students only.
CATEGORIES: Artist may enter a
maximum of two pieces in any of the
following catergories: (1) PAINTING,
(2) SCULTPURE. (3) CERAMICS, (4)
DRAWING. (5) PHOTOGRAPHY, (6)
DESIGN (METALS. FIBERS, 8.
WOOD). (7) GRAPHIC ART AND
ILLUSTRATION.
DELIVERY: Artist may deliver his or
her work on Friday, Jan. 22. 1982
between the hours of 9:00 AM. and
4:00 P.M. to the Conference Room in
the office of JENKINS FINE ARTS
CENTER, E.C.U. Each piece must be
completed and ready for exhibition.
Paintings must be wired if necessary
and sculpture should be self-
supporting. Artists are to avoid special
wiring or hanging installations All 2 D
work must be matted and acetated or
preferably framed
ENTRY FEE: :There will be an entry
fee of1 00 for each piece submit
ted. due on delivery
JUDGES: KELLY ADAMS
Photographer and Head of the Art
Department at Pitt Community
College.
RAY ELMORE. Instructor at ECU
School of Art.
TERRY ERICKSON, Associate Art
Director of McKinney, Silver & Rocket
AWARDS: First place winners in each
catergory will receive $50.00 BEST
IN SHOW will be awarded $100 00
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Phone: 758-7699
CAPTURE A PRIZE in the
7th ANNUAL REBEL ART SHOW
JANUARY 26 FEBRUARY 5,1982
Greenville Museum of Art
I Sponsored by the Attic and Jeff rays Boar and Wine, Co.
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ECU DINING SERVICES presents
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See the Game in the
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Chicken Filet
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 21, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 21, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.172
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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