The East Carolinian, January 14, 1982






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(Earclinta
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 58 No. 32
Thursday, January 14,1982
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Transmitter License Delayed
By MIKE HUGHES
M�ff WrMrr
Just in case you've worked your
fingers to the bone spinning the
knob on your radio tuner from one
end to the other in search of
WZMB, you've been wasting your
time.
As has been the fortune of the sta-
tion for several months, further pro-
blems have hampered WZMB from
airing on schedule.
Transmitters, licenses, paperwork
so what is it this time?
According to Sam Barwick,
WZMB's general manager, the sta-
tion now lacks the studio-to-
transmitter-link license (STL)
necessary to air.
The STL license permits the sta-
tion to transmit a microwave signal
A ir Florida Plane Crashes
Into Frozen Potomac River
WASHINGTON (UPI) � An Air
Florida jet, carrying 73 people into a
snow-filled sky, slammed into a
bridge packed to rush-hour capacity
Wednesday and plunged into the icy
Potomac River. Police said at least
63 people were missing and presum-
ed dead.
Officials called off the search for
bodies in the frigid water five hours
after the crash with most of the
bodies trapped underwater in the
mangled wreckage of the blue and
white aircraft.
District of Columbia Police
Spokesman G.W. Hankins said
although a handful of passengers
survived, it was assumed most were
trapped in the submerged plane.
Hankins said at least three � and
perhaps as many as 10 � people
aboard Air Florida flight 90 oound
for Tampa and Fort Lauderdale liv-
ed through the crash.
Asked if the rest were presumed
dead, Hankins said, "I'm afraid so.
That's the assumption � that most
of the people were still in their seat
belts from take-off procedure and
are still in the plane
The U.S. Park Police said there
were at least 16 known survivors '
both passengers and those in cars on
the busy 14th Street Bridge. The
capital's first major snowstorm of
the year sent thousands of govern-
ment workers home early.
Federal safety officials had no im-
mediate idea of what caused the
crash � first fatal crash at National
Airport in 31 years and the first
commercial crash in the nation since
1979 � but said air traffic control
was not part of he problem. More
than 1,200 controllers went on strike
last summer and were fired.
Air Florida said the plane, a Boe-
ing 737, was carrying 68 passengers
and a crew of five on a flight
originating in Washington. The
airline said 13 passengers were going
to Fort Laudcrdale and the rest to
Tampa. It had not released a
passenger list.
Joe Stiley, who was a passenger
on the plane, said late Wednesday
night in an interview at a Virginia
hospital that he knew from the mo-
ment the plane lifted off it was not
going to clear the bridge.
Stiley, 42, of Alexandria, Va a
professional pilot, said, "I had a
pretty good indication that things
weren't going right when we started
down ihe runway
"I turned to (my seatmate) and
said 'We're not going to make it;
we're going in he said. "We were
See AT LEAST, Page 5
from the studio in Joyner Library to
the transmitter link atop Tyler
Residence Hall.
Though Barwick applied for the
license at least two months ago, he is
not certain when it will be granted.
"We hope to be on the air by the
end of this month or the beginning
of next month Barwick said, "but
that all depends on the STL
license
Last month, when a faulty
transmitter delayed the station from
airing, Barwick explained that the
equipment had been sent back to the
company for repairs.
The transmitter, which was pro-
ducing only about 100 watts, has
since been returned, and according
to Barwick, it looks "pretty good
All problems aside, Barwick
seems confident in WZMB's staff.
"We just took on six or seven new
people, and we're going to start
training them now he said.
"Everyone on the staff is ready to
go
Programs scheduled for the sta-
tion, when it finally gets on the air,
will include religious shows, jazz
and classical music shows and
"off-the-wall" news reports.
Barwick also feels that guest
speakers will probably become a
part of the show.
So, when will students be able to
tune in to WZMB for campus news,
blues and views?
"Well Barwick says, "the only
thing I can say for sure is that we
will be on this semester
SnOW Job Photo By GARY PATTERSON
A student braves the weather to make her early morning class. Greenville
police responded to "eight to 10" accidents caused by the snow and ice on
the roads. One student slipped and fell down ic steps on campus and was
treated by the Student Health C enter.
Protestors March On Base
By PATRICK O'NEILL
siaff Wrilrr
Concern over United States
militarv involvement in the Central
American nation of El Salvador
became a North Carolina issue this
week, as 200 people from all over
the East Coast converged on Fort
Bragg, the U.S. military base in
Fayetteville, to protest the U.S.
decision to train 1,000 El
Salvadoran soldiers there.
"We've been told to train those
people, and we will train them
said Captain Maddox, a spokesman
for the base. "They're being trained
here at their requestin basic com-
bat training
The U.S. also plans to train 600
officer candidates at Fort Benning,
Georgia, starting later this month.
The demonstrators shouting
"He. hey. Uncle Sam, we
remember Vietnam" marched in
orderly fashion onto the base to pre-
sent a letter to the base commander,
It. Gen. Jack Mackmull, protesting
the training of the troops. A
representative of base command.
Col. Eric Erickson Jr. was on hand
to receive the letter.
"We believe that if the present
government is engaged in such
violence and atrocities against its
own people that it's immoral to con-
tinue to support that kind of
regime stated the Rev. Henry At-
tkins, coordinator of Triad Citizens
Concerned for Central America, a
Greensboro-based organization.
"Bringing the Salvadoran troops
here to be trained is an escalation of
the violence on the part of this coun-
try and this administration against
the El Salvadoran people
Rev. Attkins spent a week living
with El Salvadoran refugees and
claimed he spoke with women "who
had seen their pregnant daughters'
stomachs torn open and their
fetuses fed to pigs These acts, At-
tkins claimed, were committed by
government troops.
According to Maryknoll Catholic
priest Roy Bourgeous, who has
spent time in El Salvador, there are
14 families representing two percent
of the population who control 60
percent of the land and resources.
This two percent, Bourgeous claims,
"live in luxury, while the rest of the
people struggle for survival
"The U.S. government is siding
with the rich two percent, who are
backed up by the military
Bourgeous continued.
"The military are killing anyone
they believe opposes them added
Attkins. "The violence is directed,
by and large, against church people,
because they are organized
Attkins . Is that U.S. fear of
communism has played a large role
in our support of the military in El
Salvador. He feels that our military
support was strengthening, as op-
posed to weakening, communist in-
fluence in El Salvador.
"If you want to drive people into
the Soviet Camp, you couldn't
develop a better practice than the
one that the U.S. has now in its pre-
sent foreign policy in El Salvador
he said.
Attkins also claimed that this
position is "propping up an op-
pressive military regime
Perhaps moss notable of ihe kill
ings in El Salvador took place in
1980, when Archbishop Oscar
Romero was assassinated, while
celebrating Mass, for speaking out
against violence and government
tactics.
Later in 1980, four Catholic mis-
sionaries were also killed. Two of
the slain women were Maryknoll
Catholic nuns.
According to Maryknoll
spokesperson Sisier Helene
O'Sullivan, there are no longer any
Maryknoll missionaries in El
Salvador.
"We had to pull them out"
because of the situation there, she
said. "Our giving of arms to the
military government just prolongs
the fighting and prolongs the death.
The U.S. should be pushing for a
negotiated settlement as called for
by the bishops
According to Defense Depart-
ment officials, the cost to the U.S.
taxpayers will be $15 million for the
training of the El Salvadoran
troops.
Back in Fayetteville, close con-
nections were drawn by the
demonstrators between U.S. in-
volvement in El Salvador and this
country's past experiences in Viet-
nam.
"We're treading this path again
noted Dave Dellinger, a peace ac-
tivist with the War Resisters' League
and former defendant in the
Chicago Seen trial.
Dellinger made his statements
during a press conference
See PROTESTORS, Page 2
Inside
A star is born? Well, not quite,
but a hefty number of starry-eyed
students gathered at Fletcher
Music Center for the annual
Busch Gardens auditions See
William Yelverton's story on
poge 6
Engineers To Be In Demand
(CPS) � The employment
outlook for 1982 graduates, depen-
ding on field of study and
geographic location, will either be
"very good, or very, very bad ac-
cording to preliminary findings
from a Michigan State University
study on recruitment trends.
The annual study foresees that
chemical engineers will command
the highest salaries among graduates
this spring, while education majors
will probably draw the lowest
salaries and experience the hardest
time finding jobs.
"This will be a very unique year,
unlike we've ever had before
reports John D. Shingleton, director
of MSU's placement service, which
conducts the study. "There is a very
high demand for jobs in some
disciplines and locations. We're see-
ing vast extremes in hiring practices.
Everything either went up or went
down
On the up side are such disciplines
as computer science, engineering,
accounting, marketing, and
transportation-related majors. Job
seekers in those areas can expect to
find good jobs at competitive salary
levels, Shingleton says.
"The market will be high on
anything relating to high
technology, and low on disciplines
such as natural resources, fisheries
and wildlife, and arts and letters
Shingleton explains.
Chemical engineers with four-
year degrees will earn around
$26,000 their first year out of
school, Shingleton predicts, while
lowly education majors will scum
after jobs offering yearlv salaries of
around Si3.(XX).
Other studies, however, claim the
teaching job market will improve by
the mid-eighties.
Location will make a big dif-
fesrence in whether or not grads
find employment this spring,
Shingleton points out.
"The market in the midwest is
drying up according to
Shingleton, "while the southwest
and sunbelt areas look very good
Although the job prospects for
liberal arts majors in general will be
less than rosy, Shingleton believes
that good planning and preparation
will net most graduates a job this
summer.
"The market is tightening up a lit-
tle, but there are jobs out there
People are just going to have to
work a little harder to get work
It's Not Phoney: AH Rings Lead To Rolm
By TOM HALL
Ne� tdttor
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"East Carolinian. Mav I
help
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Beep. Boo p. Beep. Boo p.
Click.
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"East�"
We 're sorry. The number you
have dialed is not in service. If
you need assistance�
Click.
Scenes similar to the one above
have been taking place across
campus with the installation of
the new Rolm CBX telephone
system.
The new system, originally in-
tended to be installed on Dec. 28,
was "not actually cut over until
Jan. 8 according to Brenda
Herring of the Business Affairs
office.
"It's not even a week Herr-
ing said. "There are going to be
a few bugs in it
One of the features of the new
system is the "U-Touch"
pushbutton telephone. The
system will also facilitate the in-
stallation of telephones in faculty
members offices. In classroom
buildings such as Austin and
Rawl, some faculty members had
to go to department offices to
place a call or unlock a "black
box" telephone in some
hallways.
The East Carolina business
manager, Julian R. Vainwright,
is heading the system cutover, but
he was in a meeting Wednesday
afternoon and could not be
reached for comment. Herring
said the new system was still be-
ing wired.
In a "VERY IMPORTANT"
memorandum issued Dec. 11,
Vainwright explained that
although the Rolm system is
"modern" and "computerized
with many nice features, it must
be understood and used properly
for optimum results
"Each telephone user (faculty
and staff) is urged to attend one
two-hour training session
Vainwright's memo read. These
"hands-on" sessions, using
"live" phones, are required in
the contract with Carolina
Telephone and Telegraph, and
will be conducted through Feb. 5.
However, problems seem to be
persisting until the switchover is
complete.
One worker at Mendenhall
Student Center said several peo-
ple there had been "cut off" dur-
ing their telephone conversations.
Another employee in the
building, which houses the stu-
dent government and student
union offices, said a number of
people have had trouble calling
out of Mendenhall. This worker,
who asked not to be identified,
recalled that "the phone would
ring and we would get a recorded
message even when we hadn't
called out" at the information
desk at the student center.
At the Student Health Center,
"the phone is acting crazy said
Susan Reynolds of the infirmary
staff. "The phone'll ring and
there's no one there. We just
hang up
However, such problems seem
to have spared Joyner Library.
Director Eugene Brunelle sug-
gested that any difficulties with
campus telephones during the
switchover were due to a lack of
training in how to use the phones.
"Some of the numbers have
been changed from what's in the
book Brunelle noted. Callers
dialing one of these numbers are
likely to hear the phone ringing in
the receiver although it may not
be ringing at the other end of the
line, according to the library
director.
In the Department of English
office, "it's a little bit hairy
said secretary Kay Mills.
"There've been so many calls
coming in
Mills explained that to connect
a call to a faculty member's of-
fice, she has to "flash" � hit the
button on top of the phone, or
plunger in telephone company
lingo � then push the star button
and the seven button, and then
the extension number. This pro-
cess is repeated � except the one
button is pushed instead of the
seven � if there is no answer,
Mills said.
"Oh, it's lots of fun she add-
ed.
Those who still have rotary-
dial telephones must now dial 27
instead of pushing the seven but-
ton to transfer a call.
Until then�
Rrriiinnnggg.
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"Hello?"
Click.
- m �� MmuipiiUpQi
I
M





t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 14, 1982
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcements column
please send the announcement (as
brief as possible) typed and
double spaced to The East Caroli
man in care of the news editor.
There is no charge for an
nouncements, but space is often
limited
The deadline for announcement
are 5pm Friday for the Tuesday
paper and 5 p m Tuesday for the
Tnursday paper
The space is available to all
campus organizations and depart
m�nf�
SPORTS CLUB
The first meeting of 198? tor the
Sports Club Council will be held
Vied Jan Mat 4p m in Memorial
Gym. Room 105 Each sports club
recognized by the Department tor
intramural Recreational Services
Hi required to have a represen
tative in attendance This meeting
is ot utmost importance to each
club Agenda items include:
facility, fields usage allocation,
spring schedules approval disap
ptoval. budget problems for cer
tain clubs and club updates.
GYMNASTICS ROOM
UTILIZATION
The gymnastics room located in
Memorial Gymnasium is open to
s'udents, faculty and staff each
Mon �Thur from 6 30 p m. to 8
p m Members of the university
community are invited to utilize
the gymnastics equipment and ex
erase area under the guidance of
qualified instructors during these
time periods
HANDBALLRACQUET
BALL
A challenge court system will be in
effect on court no 2 from I 15 p m
to midnight on Tues , Thurs and
Sat. nights. A blackboard has been
provided on the observation deck
level to establish challenge posi
t i o n s .
SKI SNOWSHOE
Ski Snowshoe. W VA , Spring
Break- PHYE 1150- PHYE 1151
or go non credit Contact Ms Jo
Saunders, ?05 Memorial Gym
757 6000 for information Deposits
will be accepted on January 26 at 4
p.m. in Memorial Gym 108 Call
before this date to reserve your
room Limited space is available
SIGMA BIG BROTHERS
There will be a meeting of all
Sigma Big Brothers on Thursday
Jan U at 6 30 at the house All
brothers must attend
PIE THROW
The Tri Sigswill be having their
annual pie throw at Chapter Ten
on Friday, January 15 from 4 7
Reduced prices on brewski's.
chillys, and other alcoholic
beverages. So come on down ano
throw a pie at the Sigma of your
choice
REBEL
The Rebel will be a ceptinq sub
missions of Prose, Poetry and Art
work until the 22 of January Work
may be left m the Rebel or Media
Boaro offices.
SLC
The ECU Sign Language Club
will hold its regular bimonthly
covered dish supper and meeting
on Sunday. Jan. 17 at the
Mendenhall Student Center Multi
Purpose Room The supper will
begin at 6:00 p m. with a short
business meting and captioned
film to follow
The meal and meeting are open
to any interested student, faculty
member, or a member of the com
munity You do not need to know
Sign Language to attend, but
students who are taking sign
language classes or who have
taken them in the past are en
couraged to attend The purpose of
the SLC is to allow sign language
students and hearing impaired
students and community
members to socialize and develop
communication skills
We hope to see you there!
AHEA
The American Home Economics
Association will meet on Monday,
Jan. 18 at 500 p.m , in the Van
Landingham Room of the Home
Ec Building Mrs Tula Safterfield
will speak on Home Economists in
Human Service. All members and
others interested in Home
Economics in Human Service All
members and others interested In
Home Economics are encouraged
to attend
SCIENCE MAJORS
On Monday. Jan 18. American
Chemical Society Student Affiliate
will meet at 7 p.m. in Flanagan
202 All members and interested
persons are uroed tn attend
ADVERTISING
COMPETITION
Students from East Carolina
University. Greenville. North
Carolina, have been invited to take
part in a prestigious creative
advertising competition, in which
they will vie tor top prizes of Si ,000
cash and an eight week paid sum
mer internship at McCaffrey and
McCall. INC the New York adver
tising agency which sponsors the
program
the competition, called
Creative Advertising Challenge, is
being conducted by McCaffrey
and McCall for the second year
Students who participate must
create an advertising campaign to
promote a course or department
at tneir school They can compete
in either a creative writing or art
direction category They are re
quired to submit a concept state
ment of what they intend tocomm
municate in their campaign, as
well as the copy or art for two
elements of the campaign a
television commercial and
magazine advertisement Each
entry will be judged against all
others in its category
Deadline tor entry is Marcn i,
1982. with announcement of win
ners scheduled for April In addi
tion to the top prizes, awards of
$750 for Second Place. $500 for
Third Place, and up to fen $100
Honorable Mentions will be made
m each category A total of up to 26
orizes are available
Entry forms ano all intormanon
needed to enter Creative Advertis
mg Challenge are available a'
East Carolina University, from
Dorothy Safterfield, Communica
tion Arts Department
NTE
The National Teacher Examina
tions will be ottered at East
Carolina University on Saturday.
February JO, 1W2 Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to the Educational Testing
Service, Box 966 R. Princeton, NJ
08540, to arrive by January 18,
1982 Application blanks arc also
available at the Testing Center,
Speight Building. Room 105. East
Carolina University.
DR. MARTIN LUTHER
KING, JR.
The ECU Chapter of NAACr is
sponsoring a program saluting
this great individual's birthday
and recognition of this day as a na
tional holiday The program is to
be held January 15. 198? beginning
at 12 noon in front ot the Student
Supply Store Play a role in mak
ing this day a success) After all he
did it for the cause and paid the
price! For further details, call
757 6942
NAACP
fhe NAACP will have its
regular meeting, Wednesday. Oc
tober 20th at 6 00 in Room 221
Mendenhall All members please
attend
All excutive officers and com
mittee chairpersons will meet
Monday, October 18th at 600 in
Room 242 Mna�tnha.ll.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma Beta Phi will hold an
important meeting on Jan 14 at
6 00 p m m Mendenhall 221 elec
t.ons will be held, so please attend
this meeting.
INTERNSHIP
Sophomores, juniors and seniors
currently enrolled in a North
Carolina college or North Carolina
residents attending an out of state
college have until February 12 to
apply for the institute of Govern-
ment Summer internship Pro
gram in state government
Twenty four students w " be
selected by an advisory commit
tee to participate in a living
learning internship in North
Carolina state government
directed by the Institute of Govrn
ment The Institute of Govern
ment Interns will work from May
20 through July 30.
Students will work 40 hours each
week in a responsible position in a
state department, participate in
evening eductional seminars and
be paid approximately $150 per
week
Students interested in the pro
gram should secure a brochure an
nouncing the program and a State
of North Carolina application from
their college or university place
ment office or local Job Service of
fice A brief description of possible
internships are available in col
lege placement offices.
Students interested in the in
stitute of Government program
should mail an application to the
institute ot Government, Knapp
Building 059A, The University of
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North
Carolina, 27514 by February 12,
1982
Applicants will be accepted
without respect to race, sex, color,
national origin, religion, or han
Qicap
Dorothy Cherry, a student of
East Carolina University, served
as an Institute of Government in
tern m state government during
the summer of 1981
ARTISTS
Artists! The Seventh Annual
Rebel Art Show, sponsored by me
Attic and Jeffreys Beer and Win
Co is coming up to give you an op
portunity for recognition as will as
prize money. All registered ECU
students may enter a maximum ot
two pieces in any of the following
categories Painting. Sculpture.
Ceramics. Drawing, Photography,
Design (metal, fiber, or wook).
Graphic Art and Illustration Plan
to bring your best work on Friday,
Jan. 27, 1W2 to the conference
Room in Jenkins Fine Art Center.
ECU.
PARKING
The Greenville Parking Author �
ty will matt at the City Council
Chamber third floor at 9 15 a m at
City Hall on Wednesday. Jan 13
LIKE TO SING?
If you are a student and enjoy
singing, come join the fun this
Monday night All interested men
and women students can join the
Residence Hall Chorus without the
usual audition simply by attending
Monday's special open rehearsal
from 7 8 p m in Jones Cafeteria
The Residence Hall Chorus
formed last fall, now numbers
about fifty The choir, under the
direction of Dr Charles Schwartz,
Dean of the School of Music,
presenmted its first concert
December 8
The group offers an opportunity
to perform showtunes, seasonal
music, and other challenging
works both on and off campus
Give yourself a one hour break
from studying Come Monday
night. Jan 18, and join the fun!
ICE CREAM EATING
All campus organizations during
the halt time of our Pirate and
Lady Pirate basketball games on
January 14, 15. and 16th. Hearts
Delight, Subway, Sportsworid and
Pantana Bob's in coordination
with the ECU Athletic Dept will
sponsor an ice cream eating con
test with numerous 1st, 2nd, and
3rd place group prizes Call Pam
Hoi! at 757 6417 for more informa
tion
LSAT
The Law School Admission Test
will be offered at East Carolina
University on Saturday, February
20. 1982 Application blanks are to
be completed and mailed to
Educational Testing Service Box
966 R, Princeton. NJ 08540
Registration deadline is January
21. 1982 Registration postmarked
after this date must be accom
panied by a $15 non refundable
late registration fee
P,AGEANT
North Carolina Southern Beau
ty The search is on tor contestants
ages 4 22 years old, each age divi
sion limited, deadline March I
1982 Pageant will be held April 16
and 17 For information send a
stamped address envelope to N C
SOUTHERN BEAUTY
PAGEANT, P O Box 5432,
Greensboro, N C 27403
SGA
On Wednesday. Jan 20 at 5 30
p m the Screens and Appoint
ments Committee of the SGA will
met to screen candidates tor va
cant positions in the legislature
Five day representatives are
needed as are dorm represen
tatives from Garrett, Jarvis, Cle
ment. Fletcher, and Tyler Please
register m room 228. SGA office at
Mendenhall before 4pm jan 19
NEW YORK
The East Carolina Universit,
Student union Travel Committee
is offering a fantastic spring breaa
alternative at an unbeatable price
six days in New York City The
trip will run from March 5 thru
March 12 The cost of the trip is as
follows Single occupancy
$289 00. Double occupant
$185 00. Triple occupancy
$159 00. Quad ocupancy $U5 00
Included in the price are the
following roundtrip transport
tion via forty six passenger buse?,
ano hotel accommodations at the
Hotel Edison The registration
deadline is February 72 ano reser
vations can be made at the Centra
Ticket Office loca'ed m
Mendenhall Student Center
ART SHOW
The Seventh Annual Art Show
will be from Jan 26 to Feb 5 198
in the Greenville Museum ot Ar-
All ECU artists are encouraged to
prepare their best work 10 subm
Friday Jan 22. 1982 to the con
ference room in the office ot
Jenkins Fine Arts Center
Cash pr,zes, provided by the A"
and Jeffries Beer and Wine Co
will fange from $10 for Honorau �
Mentions to $100 for Best in Shov.
ATTENDANTS
Application are needed fron-
studenls who are interested
becoming PERSONAL CARE AT
TENDANTS to wheel cha.r
students We will employ thos�-
who have a desire to ass i�l
dividuais with their act.v
daily living
For details concerning
and compensation contact c C
Rowe Coordinator. Office of Ma-
dicapped Student Serv.ces 215
Wh,chard Building, Phon '
Data Bank Provided For Job Hunters
answer noi only lo ihe
inefficient
in I cain
NEW YORK (UP1) such a system as
� Job hunters now can
submil rjyen resumes to
prospective employers policies ol employers, Will
ICv.1 llil IIK'lll
president
CareerSvsiem, Inc
fir
ot
Li
anywhere in
ry ia
ata hank,
. the coun-
a new national
ank. brainchild
ol three former IBM
execu'h es.
"We saw a need for
policies ii employers,
which haven't chanced
much in 50 years, but
as a way to help
itindcd with
W '
Phi
111 hi. toi
ilium E. Bern and
alle iaie
uncmpl
hleni
help
our national
n ment pro-
said Dale H.
11 it' 1 I l L . I �V. I I
ilip I Morgan
c arecrSy si cm has
launched a $2 million
national advertising
campaign to attract
companies as potential
Protestors March
Continued From Page One
preceeding the march. At a rally
held after the march. Rev. W.W.
Finlator oastor of He Pullen
Memorial Baptist Church in
Raleigh, said, "We have made an
impact. We have come together,
and we intend to stay together
Finlator and other demonstrators
vowed to keep returning if
"injustice" continued.
The U.S. Committee in Solidarity
with the People of El Salvador
(C1SPES), organizers of the Fort
Bragg action, claimed that over 100
similar demonstrations took place
around the country, all of which
protested the U.S. Dartionation in
El Salvador.
Security around the Fort Bragg
demonstration was extremely tight.
Roads were blocked off, and
civilian and military police patrolled
closely.
A helicopter circled above the
march, keeping constant watch, and
a number of photographers, some in
military uniforms, took close-up
pictures of the demonstration.
Maddox called the gathering
peaceful. "It was handled very well,
both on the demonstrators' part and
all the law enforcement agencies
that were involved he said.
employers and in-
dividual job seekers
who ean file theii ap-
plications in a nation-
wide software system to
be accessed b com
panics seeking specilk
abilities and lalcnts.
The market is large.
1 earn said appi ox -
mutely S2.5 billion is
spent in personnel
recruit ment every yeai
b companies, ex
ecuiivc recruiters, a)
private and iu�vci ninciii
empli ivnii m ag�. ncies
"he current 9.X million
uncmplny men! Iigur�
enipl as! f s 1 lie lit v.d lot
such a nati mal system.
he sa,
C'y; Sy stem has tile
capabd: .it listing
937.0011 n'b set, kers and
can k expanded lo
hold ' � uglily the en-
lire population o the
United States As
main as 4 tO.ttoo com-
panies can use the
system simultaneously,
I earn said
The turn currently
has about two dozen .t
the country's largest
firms in banking, retail
me and manufacturing
signed up to inaugurate
the system and several
hundred charier
subscribe! s t hat it ob-
lained by selective
advertising.
It costs a company
SHK) a month plus
SI .50 pei minute lo use
i he s si em . u Inch
features a compute!
display terminal, and
about a ceni and a halt
per 'hit' or applicant H
selects, 1 earn said.
" I his is a significant
saving over what most
firms now . ,sfknd ' on
recruitment. '
A s eaich takes
seconds. It ean be
broad " all mechanical
engineers for example;
oi ean he narrowed
down io a specific
locality, salary level, or
even a degree from a
specific college.
I lie ob seeker fills
"in a standard form,
with room foi px i sonal
comment, w hich is pro-
grammed into ihe com-
puter. I In prisrvi live
em ploy ci dies in i nave
access to a iob sec kcr's
name unless Mu ni-
di v iduaI wishes.
Specific companies ean
be excluded.
Ihe job seeker, v ho
will be solicited in
advertisements in ma-
jor newspapers
throughout the coun-
try, is being charged
$49.50 for one year's
listing. The charge will
be $89.50 once the
svstem is expanded.
Dr. Martin L
King, Jr.
Birthday Celebration
Friday, January 15, 1982
beginning at 12:00 noon
I. Sit-In � Student Supply Store
II. March to Mendenhall Student Center
III. Services � Mendenhall Rm. 221
IV. Reception � Mendenhall Rm. 221
SPONSORED BY NAACP
EVERYONEPLEASE WEAR
BLACK ARM BANDS"
January Clearance
All Timber!and Boots
& Casual Shoes
112 PRICE
All Insulated Jackets
& Vests by
Browning & Duxbak
13 OFF
Lg. selection of Men's
& Ladies' Warm-Ups
12 PRICE
All Ski Clothing by
Aspen it
Pacific Trail
12 PRICE
Out of Season? Yes
and Reduced
75
Off
Ladies' tennis shorts & tops
by Court Casual, Adidas and More
ALL SALES FINAL!
H. L HODGES
DOWNTOWN
BOND'S SPORTING GOODS
ARLINGTON BLVD.
i
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mil
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El
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Sn
Atl
(
21
ONE





THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 14. 1982
Polish Rulers See Possible End To Martial Law
� -n.
WARSAW, Poland .Moscow visit 1 ta-sdav Deputy Prime
l 'll Poland's with praise few the Minister Jerzy ()-
military rulers said they Soviet Union's "full doski I old a news con-
want to end martial law understanding" and ef- ference 1 uesday mar-
a soon .in possible but Ions "to give us all lial law "is a sharp,
President Henryk possible aid until the painful period which
Jabloiiski warned the crisis si-nation is final!) should be as short as
liming depends on the removed possible
"favorable iransforma Me charged the Jablonski later told a
lion" of economic and I lined States was seek- gathering o' foreign
soei i, inereave inierna diplomats martial law
i ureig i liona icnsion b ex- "ls our internal af
the Polish fair Warsaw televi-
isis sion said.
V ! C k
.1
"Further decisions
by the Polish
authorities in this area
depend solely on the
tempo of the favorable
transformation of the
country's economy and
social life Poland's
head Ol state said.
A semoi Communist
Party official, Jerzy
I rbanski, said in a
speech released I ues-
day . future Polish trade
unions mus! be party-
controlled and purged
ol enemies of the
political structure.
Mai Hal law officials
dodged guest ions on
Solidarity union chief
I eel) alesa. held
undet house arrest
somewhere in the Wat
saw area.
Deputy Health
Minisiei Stanislaw
Mlekodoj said at least
10 people had died
one more than the
previous official toll �
in protests alter the
declaration of martial
law Dee. 13. rwo
security men were near
death, he said.
a i saw Radio
tepoi led more sum-
mary inals n Poles
charged ' ol lenses
undet martial law and
civil cimus h said $94
Egyptian Government Calls For Peace
eases had been brought
against 618 defendants.
Sentences included a
ihree-yeai tail term tor
an actiist comicted of
organizing and leading
a two (.lav strike at
Wroclaw immediately
aftei martial law was
imposed.
Anolhei Mian was
jailed lot lout years
.�nd lined loi livinj
break in'o an ex-
pli'so.es w igmi in a
null! ai convoy in
Kielce province, it'1'
radio said
Warsaw television
listed seven foi met high
provincial party and
government officials
indicted foi corruption
and dereliction �t uutv
But the govci iiiuenl's
attention centered on
Hoods sweeping over b2
square miles ol
farmland, threatening
Warsaw itself. Warsaw
Radio said the army
was helping flood vic-
tims with supplies ol
food, e U �I h i n li and
medical items and had
set up 10 field kitchens.
Giving more lime to
the floods than lo
politics, the radio said
the rampaging Vistula
River slill was blocked
bv a "mountain ol
broken ice even
though "work is going
on night and day" bv
thousands ol
volunteers
�i least live othet
i ivers were flooded, the
radio said.
CAIRO, I gypt (CPU
Secretary ol State Mexandet Han
� cpoi ledly blaming lack n
� . al will" bv Israel lot the stal
ed Palestinian autonomv talk
tian President Hosni Mubarak.
Haic and his chief Middle La
"Egypt will spare no effort to
keep the talks going until iIkv bnnu
brought new options in the dispute meeting that dealt exclusively will
to a meeting Wednesday with I gyp- Palestinian autonomy.
Snowstorm Interrupts
Atlanta Murder Trial
advisers met Tuesday with foreign about their desired results Ali told
Minisiei kamal Hassan li and Ins Haig on his anna! in Cairo I ues-
adviscrs foi nearly two hours in a J.iv. Palestinian autonomy is tailed foi a shuttle like the ones flown in
lor in the I97J Hgyptian-lsraeli the Middle East by former secretary
gave up the posi when loimei Presi-
dent Jimmy Carter left office.
Haig does not exclude joining t Ik
talks himself but there are no plans
peace treaty.
Ihc underlying problem, accoi
dmg to .in assessment just com-
pleted bv ihe Slate Department, is
"the lack of political will" on the
ol State Memv Kissinger, to bridge
the gap separating Egypt and Israel.
Haig's scheduled session with
Mubarak was ihcil hist encounter
since the funeral ol Anwat Sadat in
Ml I .1 I'll

make I he iransition to i eal
uui onomy foi the 1.2 million
whites the most park bench, prosecutoi Palestinians in the occupied Wesi
dramatic testimony the Jack Mallard asked hci Bank and Gaa Sirin
� iscculion has it she had seen . senioi I .S. official lold
presented in the live Williams before he reporters, "The problem is how to
days u has been setting began appearing on generate that political will
television news films. rhe siatc-coniroled Middle las'
Ma ii i arter. a "Yes, sir she said News gency reported Haig said he
stiuii. ii iddle-aged sottly. van s io "plav a role, peionallv
black vvi�man nervously "Where did you see and directly, in giving a push to the
dentures, him before you saw ne-oiiaUons and Mi wtUomcd
I atei and him on I V " tins.
: in a i I ng bi ought the i cmiI � : hat
housing "Sitting on that park Middle las' assessmcii il
iitinent ihc bench with Nathaniel p ions but "� ' raiuli m i
Catet C atcr she said, idi is I S. oil cial �anl
Several iniois exchang V ough Han I � reservations,
wney ed startled glances. om possibilnv a- naming a i
table to Bindei asked Mrs. I .S. hiuh-level icpi
part ol the Israeli government lo October, rhe Secretary of Stale wa�
to leave rhursday for a 24-houi v isit
to Israel.
1 he Cairo newspapei l Ahrani
s.ud Egypt wants autonomy to lead
io sell-detenuination for the Palesti-
nians a code-word foi an in-
dependent slate - and favors
"mutual recognition" between
Israel and the Palestinians.
The
Ebony Herald
needs an
advertising
s i u tI 11 u h e i
she saw
- IK.
disappeai ed
Defetisi ;
nut il)
ke het Cat let vv hen ('alei had
I n ad- quit dating het mei i.
Aag��n She said that rtmance
may ended ill 1M"1). n, S1C
continued to see him
frequently
'ie
Sol I
m
mm
STUDENT UNION
UST CJUKXJH UMVHKrn
salesperson.
Base salary and commission.
Experience helpful, but not necessary.
Apply with Media Board Secretary.
mail sll
!umho
. . lamei
In one
icn dnv -
ed the
icrd she
ai � Mind
"He come to the
house lo plav cards. I le
didn't slop vision' nisi
- a In same because ht broke up
ippcai ed to be with my nicv e
" Fliai's niet sigh
ed Bindei.
the 1 a:hei lestimony on
.i dav I hat seemed to eo
not an acme
Zb vouiig;
i in beast like
-pan be I n g i n g
v ams family.
; et establishing
eav ilv in I he prosecu-
� and I'oui la-
Mrs. Carter had known lion's favoi showed
c atei lot years, beginn- alei was a heavy
'� ' � lie tune he was drinkei who was seen
het niece, and alive as late as 3 p.m.
i him sittmu on a on lav 21.
ATTIC
��� No. 6 o Rock Nightclub
Thursday, January 14
Fri. & Sat.
Seaboard
Sun.
X-RAVES
Buccaneero
a MOVIESO
STARTS
TOMORROW!
12.45 2:50-4:55-7:00 9:05
From a place you never heard of
a story you'll never forget.
EflLLlPOLI
A Peler Weir Film iPGl
ONE OF THE BEST MOVIES THIS YEAR!
2:00 4 30 7:00 9:30
This school is
our home.
GEORGE C SCOTT
TWOTHYHCTTON
TAPS
FINAL WEEK!
1-3-5-7 9
3-D!
ITS BACK
COMIN
ATYA1
COMING SOON -
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
IT'S WAR!
BOOM! BOOM! BOOM!
To introduce you to our mouth watering styie of pizza, we re mak
ing two incredible otters With this coupon save $1 00 on a
medium or $2 00 on � large Godfather's Pizza
vVhat's holdin' ya9 The doors are open now!
Godfather's Pizza
Large
A OFF
Medium
Parties,
Monkegs9jOQ
Tua-kegs 900
Wed
j Get rid
of
the
turkey at
the Greenville
Athletic Club.
And all the pies, cakes, cookies and one-too-
many beers you had over the holidays, too.
College students now can afford to take oft extra
weight at the Athletic Club. Or, just come out to
have fun. Because, right now, we have a special
offer that can help you join the Athletic Club
without going broke.
No initiation fees at all for students.
If you join right now,there's no initiation fee as
long as you maintain your membership. What's
more, we'll pro-rate the $30 monthly dues
(at $1 per day) from the day you join. All that
means that here's an inexpensive way to find
out about our facility.
And with racquetball courts, Nautilus equipment.
aerobics classes and much more, there's bound
to be something for you.
So come on out to the Greenville Athletic Club.
And get rid of the turkey.
This ad entitles you to one free visit to the Club
as long as you bring the ad and come before
Jan. 31. (Call for racquetball reservations).
GREENVILLE ATHLETIC CLUB
140 Oakmont Drive (Right off Hy 43 S) 756-9175
r





$i?e �aat (Earolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins, �j�w�r�.
Jimmy Dupree, .������ ldm�
Ric Browning. ,wo,rfw,umf Charles Chandler. W(J&ttw
Chris L.chok. tows MoMm Tom Hall. �,�,Edltor
Alison Bartel. Steve Bachner. ��Bmr
Steve Moore. (�� m William Yelverton. so �,�,
January 14, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
EPA
Reagan's Cuts Hamper Effectiveness
Oh beautiful for spacious skies,
For amber waves of grain,
For purple mountains majesties,
A bove the fruited plain.
�from ' 'A merica the Beautiful
Or so it used to be. With the onset
of the industrial revolution and
modern techonology, however, the
United States has become better
known for its smoggy skies, its in-
secticide laced grain, its strip-mined
mountains and its asphalt plains.
Because of the deteriorating state
of the environment, the federal
government created the En-
vironmental Protection Agency.
And the EPA's success in the past
decade has been impressive. For ex-
ample particulates of soot and dust
emitted into the air were reduced
from 29,000 tons in 1972 to just 790
tons in 1979 in Massachusetts and
from 139,000 to 82,000 in once hazy
Detroit.
Also, under pressure from the
EPA, corporate dumping of toxic
waste into the Gulf of Mexico has
dropped from 1.4 million tons in
1973 to none today. The EPA had
made significant strides toward con-
trolling pollution. Until Ronald
Reagan became president that is.
Last February Reagan appointed
39-year-old Anne Gorsuch to head
the agency. As a state legislator in
Colorado she had led a successful
battle to block the state's participa-
tion in the EPA's hazardous-wastes
program and fought for less str-
ingent automobile emission stan-
dards in Colorado's clean-air law.
So environmentalists were
understandably shocked when the
president appointed her as the na-
tion's chief enforcer against pollu-
tion, and their worst fears have been
realized in her eight months in of-
fice.
Her critics say that the "Ice
Queen as she is called, has begun
to dismantle the agency and may
already have done irreparable harm.
Though she gives lip service to the
EPA's programs, she also argues
that the agency can do its job
'better and more efficiently
without the same commitment of
resources Consequently she has
volunteered reductions in EPA
spending from $1.36 billion a year
to less than $950 millin by 1983.
Furthermore, a ranking EPA of-
ficial said last week that Gorsuch is
preparing to fire at least 750 of the
agency's 4,200 Washington staff
and probably a similar percentage
of the 5,800 field workers. This
comes on top of the nearly 1,000
resignations received since Gorsuch
has taken over.
She has also cut spending on
every vital EPA program and urged
major retrenchment in the Clean
Air Act. Agency research scientists
now cannot release their findings
until they have been approved as
"appropriate" by four levels of the
bureaucracy; public information
programs require seven levels of ap-
proval.
But Gorsuch is only following
orders. As she says, "I work for the
president, and will continue to give
him my best appraisal of how his
environmental program can be car-
ried out
Therein lies the problem.
Reagan's environmental program is
geared more toward what is good
for industry than what is good for
this little blue planet of ours. The
record of Gorsuch and Secretary of
the Interior James Watt over the
last year is evidence of the ad-
ministration's insensitivity toward
environmental issues.
In an effort to get the economy
back on its feet, Reagan fails to
realize that we are in the process of
polluting ourselves right out of ex-
istence.
We can fill the sky with soot and
car exhaust. We can fill the oceans
with garbage and nuclear waste. We
can level the forests and pave the
great plains. But once we've done
all this it is likely that we will have
irreparably destroyed the planet.
This can be avoided by increas-
ing, not decreasing, funding and
support for the EPA and its pur-
pose. The administration should not
only increase the agency's budget
but support stricter anti-pollution
legislation.
We've got to take care of the
planet Earth, after all it's the only
home we've got.
Campus Forum �
j�� P
THE EA$T CAROLINIAN
-$,fcA(V
x�t-ftND
QUbttb
Education
By KIM ALBIN
I woke up this morning and found
myself in the hangover stage of a longtime
addiction. I was in Greenville, North
Carolina, the town in which 1 had built my
entire life around my habit � going to col-
lege.
It has taken me a long time to admit to
myself that my stay here has been an addic-
tion. I forced myself to admit it today
because I realized that another semester
was just what I needed to cure the pain of
last semester's hangover.
1 was starting a new semester � on an
empty stomach.
Experts tell us that one warning sign of
an addiction is the tendency to indulge
oneself without a conscious decision to do
so. This morning I realized that I could not
recall making a decision to return to ECU
this semester; my return was automatic.
That's scary.
And I feel kind of ashamed. Look at
what all this college has done to me: I do
not sleep or eat right, I am nervous most of
A Nasty Addiction
the time, my family worries about me, and
I have not been able to work for years. But
I just cannot stop.
It may be time to kick the habit, but I do
not think that I can quit. This is not just a
physical addiction to campus food that I
am fighting � it is also an intense
psychological need for little pink
schedules, Cepacol lozenges, lots of
sidewalks, the sight and sounds of ongoing
construction, Mendenhall Student Center,
and parking tickets.
Besides, I cannot remember what the
real world is like. A friend of mine who
just came back to school tells me that in
the real world the year begins in January
and is not divided up into semesters like
our years are. (I wonder how the people
know when to celebrate holidays?) Instead
of getting checks in the mail, people get
jobs. They buy books only when they feel
like it � if they have enough money.
And so, after all this time, I finally
uneanii this wierd predisposition for life
on this campus. Had I only discovered it
earlier, the last several years would have
been much more pleasant.
I guess the hangover will go away in a
week or so. It must have resulted from the
withdrawal that I went through during the
Christmas break. That was unbelievable �
cold chills, waking up in the middle of the
night craving a textbook, a sub sandwich
from Famous Pizza and a walk around
Wright Circle.
What really terrifies me, though, is not
knowing where to go to get help, or how
long this will last, or if this compulsive
"studenting" will be my demise. I wonder
what my life would have been like had I
not become addicted to college. I wonder
Whew, it's okay. Someone just inform-
ed me that they have found a cure for this
nasty addiction � it is a miraculous ai
proven phenomenon called graduation I
will certainly need a dose. Otherwise 1 maj
have to face the people who keep sending
those checks in the mail and leU them vvA
cannot find a job in the real world.
For Some People, No Free Lunch
By ART BUCHWALD
"Lunchtime, everyone. Class dismiss-
ed
"Elizabeth, what are you doing with
that tray?"
"Getting some lunch
"Your name isn't on the list. You are
not entitled to lunch
"How come my name is not on the
list?"
"Your parents did not fill out the cor-
rect forms. Under new government
guidelines, only those children whose
fathers and mothers make less than a cer-
tain salary each year are eligible for a free
lunch. You can't eat until your parents
prove you are entitled to the food
"Yes, ma'am. What should I do while
the other children are eating lunch?"
"You can read something?"
"What do you want me to read?"
"You can read the new government
regulations concerning free lunches. Then
you can explain it to your parents
"Yes, ma'am. Where should I sit while
I'm reading the thing that says I can't have
lunch
"You can sit with the children eating
their lunch, but you're not to touch their
food
"Watching other kids eating makes me
hungry. Could I go over to the corner by
myself and read this paper?"
"No, that would make you special, and
you can not have extra privileges just
because you're not eligible for the hot
lunch program
Original Yearbook Cover Not That Bad?
1 am writing about the 1981 Buccaneer
cover dispute I have seen the original
co,er, and I am one of quite a few peo-
ple who do not wholeheartedly agree
with the decision not to use it. 1 happen
to know the artist who did the original,
and not only is he a competent graphic
designer, but he also put in a substantial
amount of time for which he has been
rewarded with nothing but ridicule. He
certainly did nothing to deserve the
editorial comment in the Buccanneer
pertaining to the "Year That Almost
Wasn't To start with, the title was not
pink, it was lavender, which was intend-
ed to bring out the sophisticated colors
of the mannequin's dress. The manne-
quin was not "propped up" against the
'57 Chevy, it appeared to be standing in
front of it. The overall effect was
tasteful, with a New Wave undertone,
and it was certainly the more fitting
cover considering the theme of this
year's Buccaneer: "A new wave. Or
rather, new waves. In a world bustling
with tension and change, East Carolina
was not immune Certainly, it seems
that the Buccaneer staff was not only
immune, it was passed by. To Amy
Pickett and�Lisa Coleman 1 can only say
that I do not understand how anyone
could purposefully be so cruel as to rub
in a disappointment such as this in-
dividual was faced with. Mention was
also made that the original cover was
"inappropriate to the student body and
our work I suppose, then, that a year-
book designed almost totally in Carolina
Blue is appropriate? I rest my case.
To the Buccaneer staff I can only say,
get your act together, and by the way,
what about those 5,000 original covers
that you must have used student funds
to have printed and then never used?
Terry Smith
Junior, Graphic Design
Marvelous Music
In the fall of 1980 while on campus
with my daughter, I attended a trom-
bone concert (plus guitar, piano, and
bass � I think) in the Student Center.
The musicians were marvelous, their at-
titudes enthusiastic, and the whole at-
mosphere was nothing short of magic.
I will never forget what pleasure that
group gave me during those two hours.
(Maybe I am being dictatorial, but what
a shame the whole student body wasn't
required to witness this excellence!)
LIBBY GREENE
Prison Letters
My name's Joseph Beaman. I'm in
prison for possession of marijuana with
intent to sell. 1 was born in Greenville
and need someone to keep me informed
on what's going on at the Attic, Elbo
Room, Carolina Opry House, etc. After
my release, I plan to transfer credits to
ECU from another school. Please put
this letter in The East Carolinian so that
a pretty female Pirate may see it and
write.
JOSEPH E. BEAMAN
P.O. Box 58
McCain, N.C. 28361
My name is Larry Vaughn. I'm a
Federal Prisoner at Talladega,
Alabama. I been in Prison since 197L
I've lost contact with all friends and
family and it's very lonely in one of
these places. I started out with a four to
six year sentence, but in 1976 1 only had
a few months until I got out, and I was
put in a spot of either killing a man or
being killed. So I got a murder charge
and got a life sentence for it.
I am right now locked down in
segregation unit and being constantly
harassed by officers. For a charge of
posscsion of narcotics. Which I'm not
guilty of. They didn't get me with any
narcotics, it's just a beef to get my back
in a maximum security lock-down unit.
I am 29 years old. blond hair, blue
eyes, white, 5-11, 170 lbs. I'm very lone-
ly, and locked in a world of darkness,
with such unbelievable hatred all around
me. I'm lonely, and I'm reaching out to
touch someone in the free world. 1 want
to change my life, and I want friends
who will let me care about them and who
will care about me in return.
If you're interested in becoming a
friend and sharing a few minutes of your
time with me, I'll gladly answer any and
all letters and questions. I'm very open-
minded on all subjects and life. My ad-
dress js:
Larry Vaughn
Box P.M.B.
Talladega, Alabama 35160
Hi. I'm presently in prison here in
N.C. and have been for almost seven
years. I'm white, single, 26 years old and
lonely!
Only nine more months stand between
me and freedom, and I would very much
like to correspond with one of you lovely
young ladies.
Help me make my last nine months in
this cage a little more pleasant. 1 need a
friend!
RICHARD H.HITE
P.O. Box 58
McCain, N.C. 28361
"Teacher, I'm trying to read this thin
but I don't understand one word
"That's because you're not concen-
trating Elizabeth. You're daydreaming
aren't you?"
"Yes, ma'am
"What were you daydreaming about"?"
"Lunch. I was thinking how nice it
would be to have one
"Elizabeth, I know it's difficult for so-
meone in the sixth grade to understand
what is going on in the country. But Presi
dent Reagan doesn't have enough monev
to give everyone a school lunch. He can
only give it to poor children
"My father says we're poor
"Yes, but you're not poor enough. You
have to be very, very poor to get a free
lunch
"Does the President get a free lunch
"He gets an allowance, and his lunch
comes out of his allowance
"I don't get an allowance
"Perhaps someday when you grow up
and become President you will
"How am I going to grow up and be
President if I don't eat lunch?"
"There is no reason to get sassy,
Elizabeth. There are people in Washington
working day and night trying to cut the fat
out of the budget, and one of the areas
where they decided there was too much
waste wao in free school meals. Thev hope
to save $50 million In this program alone
"What are they going to do with the $M)
million?"
"They're going to give everyone a tax
cut so people will have more money to bu
lunches
"Will I get a tax cut so I can buv
lunch?"
"Of course not. You have to work to get
a tax cut. But your Daddy and Mommv
will
"My Daddy said he doesn't make
enough money to get a tax cut
"He may not get one directlv, but the
tax cuts other people get will trickle down
to him in time
"How?"
"It's all in the regulations, if vou would
just stop wasting your lunch hour, and
read them
"Who wrote this thing?"
"David Stockman. He's the man the
President has made responsible for seeing
that the wrong children don't get free lun-
ches
"He got any kids?"
"No, he happens to be a bachelor. Why
do you ask?"
"No reason I can think of
(O 12. Lo. Antrin Turn SyndK.it
(O
runninl
have i
I ye
wa
crashed
in the
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sub-frt
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handle;
during
the bnc
Jets
heavu
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tie the
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i
7:
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THEEASTCAROMNIAN JANUARY 14, 1982 5
I INI AN
l have
v in a
�m the
ng ihe
ible �
of the
dwich

had 1
. and
ition 1
I may
��ending
�m I hai I
XI-
:an
OU
his lunch
h up
ip and be
I the fat
f the areas
much
lis. The hope
teram alone
:th the $50
ii� a tax
dn buy
rk to get
Mommy
doesn't make
y, hut the
I! trickle down
if you would
h hour, and
he man the
le for seeing
net free lun-
achelor. Why
Presumed Dead
Continued From Page One
running out of runway. We didn't
have the speed
Eyewitness Arthur Coleman, who
was on the bridge when the plane
crashed into it, said, "1 looked over
in the water and I saw people scat-
tered all in the water
Rescue workers struggled with
sub-freezing temperatures in the
bone-chilling water, bathed in the
harsh light from lamps carried by
helicopters, a large white yacht and
emergency vehicles parked on the
bridge deck.
The plane crashed only seconds
after leaving the north end of the
main National Airport runway at 4
p.m. EST. The runway, which
handles one flight every 90 seconds
during peak hours, aims directly at
the bridge about a mile away.
Jets customarily roar over the
heavily used bridge at an altitude of
about 500 feet � low enough to rat-
tle the windows o passing cars.
The plane sheared the tops off
cars of commuters trving to get
home during the snowstorm.
Government employees had been
sent home early because of the
weather and the bridge was packed
when the plane hit.
Heroism and deep tragedy mark-
ed the minutes and hours after the
crash.
Salvation Army Major Harold
Anderson, who visited the crash
scene, said one man was seen under
the ice trying frantically to get out,
but by the time the ice was broken
he was dead.
A stewardess from the plane was
pulled from the water by a man who
shed his heavy coat and plunged in-
to the Potomac.
"She was hanging on to a rope
hanging down from a helicopter
said Lenny Skutnik, who was on the
bridge when the plane crashed.
"She grabbed ahold of it and then
she just gave out. I jerked my coat
off and dove in
"You couldn't last in that water
for more than 20 minutes said Dr.
William Fouty at Washington
Hospital Center, where one survivor
was taken.
Hundreds of onlookers gathered
along the river shore, standing in six
inches of snow. Temperatures
hovered in the mid-20s.
Families of possible victims of the
crash gathered at the suburban
Cystal City Marriott hotel near the
airport to learn the fate of loved
ones. Less than a year ago, other
families met at the same hotel to
welcome home the 52 Americans
who had been held hostage in Iran.
Two Catholic priests who talked
with family members said one man
had put his wife on the plane to visit
her grandmother who was suffering
from cancer. Another man ap
parently lost his elderly mother.
Two parents had a son on the
plane, another man had placed his
20-year-old wife aboard � and one
young woman had said goodbye to
her fiance at the boarding gate for
Flight 90.
A second tragedy struck tin- na
tion's capital within an hour of the
air crash. At least three people were
killed and several injured in the
derailment of a subway train near
the Smithsonian Institution station.
The D.C. fire department was bear-
ing the brunt of both rescue efforts.
Police spokesman Hankins said
officials hoped to resumed the
search for bodies in the air disaster
"at some point" Thursday.
"We're waiting for additional
equipment he said, especially
heated diving suits.
On the bridge, eerily illuminated
by flashing lights playing off the
swirling snow, officials tried to clear
the wreckage of a half-dozen
vehicles mangled by the plane as it
scraped across the road.
At Tampa, people waiting for
Flighl 90 were taken into a room
near the Air Florida office. A guard
was posted outside.
The National Transportation
Safety Board immediately launched
an investigation, including looking
for the crucial flight data recorder
which will give a picture of the final
seconds of the flight and the cockpit
voice recorded.
Immediate speculation focus on
the weather, but Frank Taylor, chief
of the NTSB accident investigation
division, said the board had no early
indication that icing was a problem
and had no idea now what caused
the crash.
However, he said investigators
had impounded the glycol solution
used to de-ice the aircraft as a
routine measure.
Ted Maher, a spokesman for the
Federal Aviation Administration,
said there was no indication that any
air traffic control error was involved
in Wednesday's crash.
"By all that it looks like, right
now, it had absolutely nothing to do
with the air traffic control. It was a
departure accident he said.
"The airplane looked like it lost
its sense of direction said
eyewitness Jerome Lancaster. "Its
nose was up. It was the bottom that
hit" the bridge.
"It happened instantly, just like a
movie or something said Lan
caster, an Air Force sergeant.
The injured were taken to several
hospitals in Washington and nearby
Virginia Health officials renewed
an urgent plea for Type O blood �
first issued Monday to replace
stocks used over the holiday � and
got an immediate, overwhelming
response.
Doctors and nurses were airlifted
to the crash site within minutes,
where they treated the few survivors
pulled to shore. A convoy of Aii
Force medical units arrived a few
hours later.
The multi-lane, twin-span, 14th
Street Bridge is a major artery bet
ween downtown Washington and
the Virginia suburbs.
Rescue vehicles had difficulty get
ting through the traffic-clogged
streets to the crash site. Fire engines,
sirens screaming, raced into a near-
gridlock traffic snarl on 14th Street
and Pennsylvania Avenue, two
blocks from the White House.
Zztandottie,
Zverblis End
Phone Book
M YORK (UPI)
� Mans people go
through life wishing
thcii names were dif-
ma be Fair-
� ks, Cab t, Lowell
or cv en 1 Scow Fit
zgerald.
Well,
� a v c
mudoi
the
'tie
es,
iii-
a
tie
ii1 he
'
en-��.�ned
reamtng. � e n i dif-
in
IS Is
Houston and Ralph
Zytk ends the book in
Philadelphia. And a
double-Z person - Zap
vne �has the distinc-
tion of being last in the
San I rancisco diret
lory.
And :t you think
y ur name isn't distinc-
tive enough, how
mid you like to ru
listed with the 505 pe ��
pie in Manhattan nam
ed Ng? Vnone the Ng's
alone, there are 1 2 pe i
pie named kvvok Ng
d nine named Chun

Or how about being
ol the approx
imatelv 3,240 people.
named Smith listed in
Manhattan? Hi a:
would be a bit humbl-
ing to be sure.
Even presidential
names do not insure ex-
clusive listings. In
Manhattan, there arc
10 Reagans, more than
160 Cai lets, about 500
I ords, more than s
Nixons, and about ?90
Kennedys. But take
hope, even though
there are tour George
V ash met ons listed,
;here is onl one
1 isenhowei.
ABORTIONS
I J"eei' termination
App't's. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1 800 321 0575
THE SHOE OUTLET
(Located beside Evans Seafood)
Featuring name brand shoes at bargain prices.
Up To 75 OFF regular prices
Bass Steward-McCiuire Brouse Abouts
201 W. Washington St. Within walking distance of campus.
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
AtVOBTlOMS FROM l�-H
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
�1IS 00 PrtVMMcy T�l Mrf
Control, ii Prttltm
Pr�nonv Counted�f Far fur
�tier information coil U1-0US
(Toll Fria Nvmbor
000 331 IMt! botWMH f A.M
� no J p M WHtlifl
RALEIOM WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
? It Wnt Moran St.
Roioiffk. N.C.

GREAT FOOD
?SUB
Famous Foot Long Sandwich?
&PET
VILLAGE
511 S. Evans St.
B.M.T.
(Ham- Pepperoni-Genoa- Bologna)
SUBWAY SPECIAL
Ham-Genoa-Bologna)
SPICY ITALIAN
(Genoa & Pepperoni)
ROAST BEEF
HAM
TURKEY BREAST
PASTRAMI
PEPPERONI
GENOA SALAMI
BOLOGNA
ALASKAN KING CRAB
SHRIMP
TUNA
ITALIAN EXPRESS
(Sausaqe & Meatballs)
SAUSAGE
MEATBALLS
CHEESE
VEGETARIAN
SALAD PLATE
t
(Across from Taff Furniture)
MonSat. 10a.m6p.m
ALL FRESH &
SALTWATER
FISH
12
OFF!
(Jan. 15-16)
Watch for the arrival of a large shipment of Fin
ches, Parrots, & other biros.
DISCOVER
"BROTHERHOOD
OF VALUE"
F
!
DOC
DOC
DOC
DOC
DOC
Srr4 with �' chalet of �Atrtt�� (Iwx
�Omoin �lnw� "rWI Pkfck �Tomsloc
�.r�� Hrppcr �BUrt OU�� �� 'Pepper mm! OU
COMING THIS FRIDAY
EARLY BIRD SPECIAL
AT 1:00
AND LADIES' NITE
ON TUESDAY
STARTING AT 6
208 E. 5th St 758-7979
M e've got more tasie!
PRESBYTERIAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
MEETING PLACES
International House, 306 East Ninth Si
Mendenhall Student Center
Stewart LaNeave, Campus Minister tor Presbyterians
752 7240 and 758 0145
TUESDAYS, 5:30 P.M International House
Planned program with give and take conversation.
Afterward we go nut to a local restaurant for dinner.
Students pay $2 00 and PCM pays the rest.
Programs, dates and meal locations are listed below
WEDNESDAYS, Noon, Mendenhall Student Center
Faculty and staff lunch time together m Mendenhall staff lunch
area.
THURSDAYS, Noon, Mendenhall Student Center
Students get their own lunch at Mendenhall snack bar and come
together for discussion at one of the round tables
PROGRAMS FOR THE SPRING TERM R SSTftV ftrNTS
Judiasm Szechuan Garden
Christianity Margaux's
Islam
Hinduism
Buddhism
Taoism, Confucianism and Shinto
Other Religious Sects
The Nature and Value of Human Life 1
The Nature and Value of Human Life 2
The Nature and Value of Human Life 3
The Nature and Value of Human Life 4
The Nature and Value of Human Life 5
DOF-5- God The Holy Spirit
DOF-6 The Word of God
DOF 7 The Christian Church
Parker's
Famous Pizza
Sweet Caroline's
Szechuan Garden
Margaux's
Parker's
Famous Pizza
Sweet Caroline's
Szechuan Garden
Margaux's
Parker's
Famous Pizza
Sweet Caroline's
COME
JOIN WITH US
FOR FOOD � FELLOWSHIP � DISCUSSION
AN OPPORTUNITY FOR COMMUNITY
IN THE UNIVERSITY
DOC
p���WC
DOC
DOC
DtXOC
DOC
508 W. 5th St. 758-7441
RUSH PARTY
Mon Tues Wed. Nights
9 until
Call for info andor ride






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 14. 1982
Page 6
N
' Hey Kid,
Wanna Be In
Show Biz?
(For A Day)
i��tr
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
MW Kditor
"We are auditioning the ad
read, "for over 200 singers,
dancers, musicians, variety artists
and technicians for The Old Coun-
try, Busch Gardens, 1982 Entertain-
ment SeasonAudition date:
Greenville, N.C Wednesday Jan.
13, 2-6 p.m. East Carolina Universi-
ty, A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
Carnegie Hall, it isn't. But then
again, on a wintery day in January,
it was.
Busch Gardens held auditions.
There was a touch of class on the
stage: a large, black grand piano,
complete with an accompanist.
Taped to the stage structure was a
large poster showing the pay rates
for the 1982 season: area supervisor.
S6.15; stage manager, $6.05; Per-
former I (Country, Italv,
Kaleidoscope), $5.80; Performer "ll
(Globe, Festhaus), $5.20; Musician,
$5.80; technician, $4.90; dresser,
$4.10; costume character, $3.65.
The accompanist played some
soft music, possibly to calm the con-
testants. And then the pav rate sign
fell.
Showtime, folks.
Situated behind the large piano
were the judges � three of them �
waiting for the first hopeful.
And at 2:20 p.m she appeared
� a lovely young lady, a dancer.
"Iftheycouldsee me now,
that little gang of mine she sang,
smiling always, with her hands on
her hips. The judges sat smiling,
nodding and tapping their toes.
"That's enough one of them said.
"Thank you she said politely.
"Thank you they added.
A young man � contestant
number two � very articulate and
polite, appeared on stage. A singer.
And did he sing. A song from
Cabaret.
"It's got to happenIt's got to
happenSometime. Mavbe this time
I'll win
A few will. But a lot more will be
disappointed.
Nervous?
"Well, I have been" the young
contestant said. ' 'But I 'm just going
to get up there and do it. A nd ij they
like me, they like me. If they don 7,
they don't She was dressed in a
western shirt and hat, holding a
record and a cassette tape.
She practiced her dance routine
while she sat, moving her feet con-
tinually. She also practiced her stret-
ching. Got down on the carpi'red
floor, and waited. And waited.
Then she was called.
"Hi, " she said, seeming very cer-
ium as to whether she would succeed
or not. She says she's a dancer, hut
she can sing, too. You have to he
versatile in this business.
"And all that jazz!
A nd. all that Jazz she sang.
And she always smiled, looking
right at the judges who relumed the
favor.
'Thank you they said.
' 'Okay she replied. ' 7 hope you
enjoyed it
Showtime, Folks
Last Carolina University played host to All That Jaz"(a scene from the motion picture is above! vednesda afternoon
as Busch Gardens held auditions for the 1982 Entertainment Season. There was plentv of dance, music, singing, all sorts
of entertainment ranging from juggling to fiddle plaing. There were man contestants, but onl a few were selected.
I hat s not to sa thai all weren't "stars for a dav
There was a five-minute wait
before the next contestant appeared.
He was an actor, clear and ar-
ticulate, and he recited Shakespeare.
"Do 1 dare? And do ! dare?"
A young man, a trumpet player
was next. The "head" judge, a
clean-cut, somewhat thirtiesh man,
seemed to favor musicians.
"Durwood he said, sounding as if
he wanted to make the young man
feel at home, "Please feel free to
blow a feu notes, play a scale.
Whatever Then Durwood walked
across the stage, his confidence
restored, and he grabbed a stand,
placing his sheet music on it. And
then he played some soft, swaying
music. Concert music. He had a
handkerchief wrapped around the
valve casing of his horn. Just like ol'
Satchmo. The lights flickered off his
silver horn as he moved to the beat
of the music
Something a little different,
almost refreshing, awaited the au-
dience next. A young man, wearing
a suit, complete with a top hat and
white gloves, appeared in blackface.
He did mime, something he called
"The Phases of Life He por-
trayed a baseball player as he slid
across the stage. And a bronco
rider, as he slapped his hat against
the back of his leg, jumping up and
down. He portrayed a young father
whose wife had jut given birth to a
boy. He gave the judges cigars
which seemed to relieve the tension
in the building.
i he young man was also a jug-
gler. He threw black and while balls
up in the air as he joked with the
judges.
This young man was special He
was clearly the best up until now.
And the audience knew it.
A dancer was next, dressed in
black, and she performed to 1 ia
Mmelli singing "City I ights Then
came anolher young dancer, and she
whirled and twirled to music from
"All That Jaz She even snapped
her fingers right on time. "Meet our
friendly, eager group the record
sang. "We onlv need to service
you
Then there was a change of pace.
A young lady, dressed ver neatly in
slacks and a white sweater, ap-
peared. Apparent 1 she had I
ten to put her age on the appl
lion. "Are you IK one ol
judges asked. "Yes she answt
quickly. She sang "Second H
Rose and seemed to add
of Broadway to the "show
then sang "Climb Every Mou
from The Sound qj fusic
Later on m the afternoon i
something surprisingly, un
different. A young lad) d
Pepsi commercial.
"Do you believe on
judges said, "that you're the '
one we've ever had to dan
Pepsi Cola commercial'1"
You have to be a little different in
this business. If you wan;
ceed.
Consider The Pet's
Size Before Choice
Roy Sch eider in "All That Jazz.
By TOM HALL
Nr�s tditor
Any dog is a major investment
but few investments become
members of the family. If chosen
carefully, your pet will reward you
many times over the initial cost in
terms of affection and happiness.
However, your dog can become an
endless source of heartbreak if you
buy it without considering its even
tual size, temperament and health
costs.
Your friends will be eager to offer
advice on the type of dog you
should buy, but ultimately the deci-
sion is yours. With purebreds, you
can choose a pet that conforms to
your tastes. You can predict a
pedigreed puppy's size, weight and
even its temperament when it is full-
grown. Mongrel admirers may tell
you that purebreds are inbred, but
at least with purebreds it is possible
to trace inherited diseases.
However, if you're buying a par-
ticular breed because it is in fashion
or you see it as a status symbol,
perhaps you'd rather have a teddy
bear in an Izod shirt.
Before you're set on buying a
purebred, think about the cost.
Prices often start around $75 and
average between $125 and $150.
This may sound like a great amount
of money, but added costs can be
kept to a minimum with little cau-
tion in selection and good health,
care of your purebred.
Most people buy a dog because
they like the way it looks. You
should also consider your lifestyle.
Some breeds don't get along well
with small children. A large dog
may adapt to city life, but can you
keep it from dragging you down the
sidewalk by its leash? Reading the
American Kennel Club's illustrated
Complete Dog Book is a good way
to learn about breeds and their
characteristics. Your local
veterinarian may also be willing to
suggest what kind of dog is right for
you.
When vou find the breed you
want, try to see an adult o that
breed. Your friends or veterinarian
may know someone who has one, or
you could visit a dog show. Watch
the dog closely. How does it
behave? How does it act toward
you? Every owner is certain to sav
that his breed is best, but if he says
his dog is having a bad day. check
and see if a bad temperament is
common in other dogs of that
breed.
Once you're convinced that a cer-
tain breed is for you, look for a
reputable breeder. Those sad-eyed
puppies in the pet store may pull at
your heart-strings, but they're more
likely to put a dent in your pocket-
book. Yu don't want a dog that's
already sick, and pet store pups
almost always cost more than those
from a breeder. Many buyers of
commercially sold puppies are sad
died with extra veterinary bills.
These puppies are expecially prone
to respiratory diseases as a result of
air conditioning and cramped, un-
sanitary cages, not to mention the
psychological problems that may
come from hours in harsh floures-
cent lights with many other howling
pups.
Breeders can be found through
classified ads, dog shows, and
veterinarians. The best way to judge
a breeder is by the number of ques-
tions he asks you. A good breeder
won't sell a puppy to someone who
won't give it proper care. If he asks
you about the time you spend at
home, your children, your ex-
perience with pets, your familia
with the breed and exact 1) who u
take care of the puppv, you
usually rest assured that he's a good
breeder.
Purebred breeders should present
certification of the puppv paren-
tage from the outset, rhis docun
tat ion is needed to register your pel
with the AKC. If the breeder
doesn't have certification papers.
leave. People are often shocked
�hen their uncertified "purebred"
grows to three times its expected
sie.
After you have the certification in
hand, ask to see the puppy's
ancestry charts before seeing the
puppy. It's hard to turn down that
adorable bit of fiuff in your hand
The charts may be confusing at
first, but take your time and ask
questions. It's your money and vour
sorrow if problems show up after
you buy a puppy. Check to see if the
same names appear more than once
on the chart. Just as in humans, if
the puppy is the product of close
relatives, genetic defects are much
more likely to emerge. Don't be im-
pressed by the number of cham-
pions on the pedigree. Champions
are otten bred for their looks alone,
and if the puppy has a champion as
a close ancestor, it mav have in-
herited problems in health or
temperament. Puppies with cham-
pion potential cost more, too, and
that's a needless exoense if vou're
not planning to show your dog
Some breeds are especially
susceptible to inherited health pro-
blems, but with careful breeding
these defects can be eliminated. If
the breed you want has high in-
See SOME, Page 8
Kv MK
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LINDA RONSTADT � ElO � DAN FOGELBERG � WILLIE NELSON � M0QPV8LU
J1MMX BuFFETT � CRUSADERS � NEIL DIAMOND �ELTON JOHN �OLIVIANEWT
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NIGHTHAWKS
THE KEYSTONE
RHYTHM BAND
TURDAY ATJJ'S
GLENN
Lb Lb I I �
BAND
Gre�nville,N.C.





THE EAS1 t -ROl INIAN JANUARY 14. 1982
LCMMIG A60VTColuZG TH� H��) ia)w
W�LLO, P4vf HO0O'rf�-
YOU TOpiy
BY Ptv;ip0oieni5
tac, meat's wo hctt
sta.tt�is
v.
xur ccr wo po that-
Restaurant
Offers Many
Popular Items
Early Teams Very 'Original'
Continued From Page 7
reason � players
greed. Certain
b a s c b a 11 e r s were
disatisfted with their
salaries in the A A or
National 1 eague and
sought to secure higher
compensation for their
efforts. A top-notch
player could expect a
contract for as much as
$2,500 a yeai in the
Players' 1 eague. But
the benefits, again,
were short-lived. The
league's lifespan was
also onlv one year, iust
as the Union Associa-
tion.
But if nothing else,
the Players' Associa-
tion boastea some of
the most original names
for their teams. Just
imagine a contest bet-
ween the Buffalo
Bisons and the Boston
Beaneaters. Or how
about the Brooklyn
Wonders against the
Pittsburgh Burghers0
Perhaps the reason for
the league's short
history is apparent.
Who in his right mind
would pay money to see
a Boston Beaneater?
The next organiza-
tion to appear on the
scene came in 1912.
The U .S. league,
founded b W illiam
Abbott Wit man of
Reading, Pennsylvania,
became the fourth such
league attempting to
move into baseball's
big tune. Beginning in
Ma 1912, The league
got into severe trouble
right from the start. In
the first game between
New York and
Reading, pitchers for
both teams had a few
"arm control" pro-
blems. s the dav pro-
gressed, nine baiters
were hit by wild pit-
ches; two suffered in-
juries which successful-
ly removed them from
the gameon stret-
chers. By 1913, the
league was abandoned.
But in that same
vear, another league
w as formed. The
Federal League, which
lasted until 1915, turn-
ed out to be another
terrific money loser,
dropping over $176,000
of investors' funds in
just two seasons.
Critics of the league
could not pinpoint the
Some Dogs Have
Genetic Diseases
Continued From Page 6
Some breeds are
especially susceptible to
inherited health pro-
blems, but with careful
breeding these defects
can be eliminated. If
the breed ou want has
high instances of
genetic diseases, be sure
to ask the breeder
specific questions.
Although the defective
puppy is to be pitied,
the buyer is the one
who must bear the
weight of the breeder's
mistakes. A good
breeder will keep pro-
geny records to note
how offspring turn out
and to improve his
breeding program.
Ask about hip
dvsplasia if you're
looking for a large
breed puppy. This is a
disease of the hip joints
that eventually causes
dislocation of the hip
socket. If you want a
miniature or toy breed,
ask about patellar luxa-
tion. That's the scien-
tific name for disloca-
tion of the kneecap that
may cripple a dog.
Epilepsy is found more
often in the dog than in
any other domestic
animal; be on the
lookout if you're buy-
ing a setter, retriever,
spaniel, dachshund oi
beagle. Progressive
blindness is also found
in main breeds, so be
sure to inquire aobul it.
Now ask the breeder
about a health
guarantee. Reputable
breeders shuld be will-
ing to exchange a dog
or give full refund it
problems crop up
within a year. 1 he best
guarantee is one in
which your money is
refunded and you gel to
keep the dog. You
won't want to give up
the pet you've grown to
love, and the refund
will help pa the
veterinarian bills.
If all these points
check out fine, you're
ready to see the litter.
Alwavs see one or both
parents; you'll see the
temperament you can
expect the puppies to
have when grown. Ag-
gressiveness in
shepherds, trembling in
Dobermans, and
hyperactiv itv in
poodles, setters and
schnauzers are just
samples of what you
can avoid by watching
a litter's parents close-
ly.
Let the puppies roam
around. Are t h e v
playful and active, or
do thev shrink back? A
good test for alertness
is to shake your car
keys while moving
them slowly from left
to right. A six- to eight-
week-old puppy should
be able to follow the
kevs with its eyes. A
puppv may seem long-
legged and awkward,
but make sure it's not
having trouble walking.
When the puppy isn't
looking, call it or clap
your hands; see if it
notices. Bright, atten-
tive eyes are usually a
sign of good health.
If a breeder of a litter
does not measure up to
vour standards, don't
buv. Main puppies are
bought from the first
bteeder visited. Don't
feel guilty if you want
to shop around. If it
makes you feel better,
tell the unsatisfactory
breeder that you'd like
to see some other
breeders before coming
back. Then don't come
back.
If you've found a
good breeder and a
healthy puppy, con-
gratulations! This can
be the start of a long
and happy friendship
with your pet.
THURSDAY - Jan. 14 (tonight)
We resume our weekly Thursday night
MIDNIGHT PARTY. Begins at midnight.
Mon Tues Wed. - Jan. 18, 19, 20 - RUSH
exact reason for the
organization's collapse.
But once again, the
question arises, who
would pay good money
to support a team call-
ed the Brooklyn Tip-
Tops (named after the
owner's bread com-
pany)? The Chicago
Whales? The Newark
Peppers? Needless to
say, even an admission
price drop to a dime
couldn't salvage this
league.
But these leagues
were not without their
great names and their
influence on modern
baseball. On a typical
Sunday near the turn of
the century, a fan could
sit at the ball park and
watch as such famed
players as Harrv
Wright, Charlie Com-
isky and Tony Mullane
battled it out on the
mound and at the plate.
But the players'
nicknames were pro-
bably the only aspect of
the league which was
worse than the team
nicknames.
QU
PfrxOePrkie
ByCHADBl'FFKIN
Situated among the numerous
fast-food restaurants on East 10th
Street is the Sechuan Garden
Chinese restaurant. When you go
in, no time is wasted in getting you
seated and taking your order.
Because of the smallness of the
place, the tables are situated close
together, making the noise level
rather high.
The menu offers almost 100 items
ranging in price from 65 cents for
egg drop soup to $15 for Peking
duck. The most popular item on the
menu, according to one waitress, is
the dinner combination platter
which offers a selection of main
dishes such as sweet and sour pork,
chicken chow mein, roast pork, egg
foo young or shrimp with lobster
sauce and includes hot tea, soup,
tried rice and egg roll. The prices of
the combinations are from S4.55 to
S5.95.
I was served a generous amount
ot sweet and sour pork which was
delicious. The soup was tasty also,
but the egg roll tasted like the froen
kind you get at the grocery.
The beverage menu listed a vane
l otahfornia and imported wines
and also several popular brands ol
beer � American and Oriental.
I he decor ot the Szechuan
Garden is "fast-Chinese The
Oriental lights and paintings are ex-
pected in Chinese restaurants, but
the red, white and blue wail paper
made me think ol the h�t dogs thai
used to be served there bv the
prev ious tenants.
I! you're planning an enchanting
evening with a friend and looking
for a quaint, romantic oriental
restaurant, this isn't the place lo go.
It you're just hungry for Chinese
food, however, th� vchuan
Garden offers good f J - .cepl
for the egg roll � fast servici and
reasonable prices
GREENVILLE'S NEWEST BANQUET
AND PARTY FACILITY
iFO�ME�CV SALLENTINE SeuFfE'
PITTPLAZACREENVILLEi
Winter & Spring
FORMALSC
MEETINGS
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SPECIALIZING IN OUTSIDE CATERING
Call BOB SAUTER
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VWMIMlm VI HIV Win I I'WMV
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WESTERN SIZZLIN'
The Family Steak House
MONDAY �
CHOPPED STEAK$1"
TUESDAY �
BEEF TIPSM"
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CUBED STEAKS18V
THURSDAY �
STEAK SANDWICHM69
FRIDAY �
U.S.D.A. RIB EVE379
SATURDAY �
BARBECUE RIBS$2"
SUNDAY �
STEAK ON A STICK$19Q
Famous Salad Bar Free Tea with ECU 1.0.
All meals are complete including baked potato or Pten.t
tries & Texas toast jj U. X llf
Take Out Service - 2�03 E 10th St � 7SJI17J Ajl I t?
74 Bypass � 7S 0040
Hours Ham :0pm Mon Thurs 10am -Hp.m Fn Sun
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Beautiful Fantastic UN BELIE VA BLE
Completely Remodeled
AND STILL MORE TO COME
1
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a
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WHERE;
University Dining Services
JONES CAFETERIA
� GALLEY SNACK BAR
!
(Located on ground floor � Jones Dormitory)
Come by and see us .
i
I
I
MEAL PLANS NOW
ON SALE.
A
i �
I
Wiln
j
i
ion
pla �
bu �
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tean
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EC!
tinu'oi
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thaw
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Shaw
i&�X:WrrWrw
&Si�S!�;S8i�0SSSm
5ieaiaiQfSSr:rWrft
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1S

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?x

t!
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JANUARY U, IW2
A Rivalry Revisited
Bucs vs. Seahawks
B CHARLES CHANDLER
Spi-rl, t tin1
The voting basketball rivalry bet
ween last Carolina and UNC-
Wilmington has blossomed in recent
years to the point that players on
both squads admit it is legitimate.
That young rivalry will be renewed
tonight (Thursday) in Minges Col-
iseum
Tip-off tune is 7:30 p.m. for the
game that will feature a pair of clubs
playing their best ball oi the year.
Both the Pirates and Seahawks have
won four of their last five.
If this year's game at Mmges is
anything like last year's, fans are in
foi a real show. A last-second
bucket last season b Edwin lim-
mons gave the Seahawks a 57-55 vic-
tory. ECl returned the favor at
Wilmington later m the year, winn-
ing 72-64.
rhe Seahawks, 7 - 6, ha e
historical!) brought a sizeable fan
gathering with them to Mmges. The
team itself always seem to be full of
enthusiasm, fins, said ECU head
coach Dave Odom, is something his
team must offset.
��We must counteract then emo-
tion early in the game he said.
" There's no doubt that they'll come
in here and be really ready for us.
Ihcy always are
Wilmington's enthusiasm. Odom
said, stems from the growing rivalry
between the two schools. That
rivalry, he soon added, is not one
filled with bad blood.
"We do have a neighborhood
rivalry, and I think that's good. But
it is not a heated rivalry, just very
competitive. I remember when we
went down there last year their fans
were really fired up for us. 1 hope
our fans will return the favor this
year
Odom agreed that the teams' re-
cent winning ways was evidence that
both clubs may be coming of age at
the same time.
"1 think the game is a very impor-
tant one for us he said.
"Certainly it is for them too. Our
immediate goal is to improve and
continue winning
Odom described the Seahawks'
zone defense a "traditionally one
of the best we face He said
penetrating inside that zone and hit-
ting from the outside will both be
objectives of the Pirates, who are
6-6.
ECU is enjoying one of its best
years ever from the floor, connec-
ting on 50.4 percent of its field goal
attempts. That figure is well above
last season's final 45.7 percentage.
The current average is also above
the school record of 49.6 percent,
set in 1979.
Balanced scoring has been the by-
word thus far for the Pirates. For-
ward Charles Green leads the way
with an 11.8 average. Point guard
Tony Byles is fractions behind,
tallying 11.7 points per game. For-
ward Morris Hargrove is also in
double figures at 10.8.
Shawn Williams, a 6-5 forward, is
the only Seahawk scoring in double
digits. He is averaging 17.4 points
and 5.7 rebounds per game. Point
guard Frankie Dickens is next,
averaging an even nine points.
ECU's Odom is impressed by
both of UNC-W's top scorers.
"Williams is a fine player. He has
traditionally been a thorn in my
side. And Dickens provides quality
at the point. I have great respect for
his abilities
ECU's Leading Scorer, Charles Creen (34), Puts Shot Cp
Jones Paces Lady Pirate Upset Of Tar Heels
ECU coach Cathy Andruzzi talks with Lady Pirates during a
timeout. The team upset arch-rival North Carolina Tuesday
night in Chapel Hill.
Wilmington's Williams
Returns 'Home' To
Face Pirates Tonight
B CHARLES CHANDLER
Sport, I iliiuf
Homecomings. Basketball players
have a special liking for them.
Tonight's East Carolina - UNC-
Wilmington will be one o sorts for
Seahawk forward Shawn Williams.
Williams hails from nearby
Washington and will be playing as
close to home as is possible, ECL
being the nearest university to his
hometwon. Washington is, of
course, the town that once raved
over their beloved "Pam Pack
which marched to two consecutive
state 3-A championships while
Williams was in high school.
1 hose W ashington teams are con-
sidered among the best ever in
Former Washington High star
Shawn Williams
North Carolina prep basketball
history. In addition to Williams, the
Pam Pack featured current college
stars Alvis Rogers of Wake Forest,
and AU-American Dominique
W ilk ins oi Georgia.
W illiams played in the shadow of
those two prep phenoms. That, he
now says, did not bother him.
"It wasn't frustrating for me at
all he said. "Everybody asks me
that. But I'd even catch myself wat-
ching them in practice or in the
games. It was like watching a
human highlights film
Many observers felt during
Williams' senior season at
Washington that he would surely
opt to go to East Carolina. His
mother was, and still is, an
employee Ol the university. A
scholarship offer from the Pirates
did not come, though, and he ended
up at UNC-Wilmington.
"I thought about East Carolina
some Williams admitted Wednes-
day via telephone. "But when 1
came to Wilmington I knew that it
was the place for me. I felt that I
could fit in here. I was probably
looking to get further from home
than Greenville anyway
The Seahawks traditionally play
ECU a tough game in Greenville.
Williams certainly is no exception.
He was a real demon on the boards
in last season's 57-55 win over the
Pirates.
"We all look forward to playing
East Carolina he said. "It has a
special effect on us. Only a few
other teams compare. When I first
got here I was told ECU was one of
our rivals. I know now that is true
CHAPEL HILL � East
Carolina's Sam Jones pumped in 19
points and Loletha Harrison held
North Carolina's Kathy Crawford
scoreless for the first time in her col-
lege career Tuesday night as the
Lady Pirates pulled off their second
straight upset of an Atlantic Coast
Conference team, dumping the Tar
Heels, 71-66.
Crawford, a 5-11 junior forward,
played only 15 frustrating minutes
in the game, and failed to score
from the floor. It was the first time
she had ever been scoreless during
her three-year career at North
Carolina.
North Carolina's Tresa Brown
tried to take up the slack, firing in
30 points on 14 of 20 field goal at-
tempts and two of two from the
line, but it wasn't enough to over-
come the pesky Pirates, now 6-7 on
the season.
North Carolina drops to 7-6 on
the year.
Early in the second half. East
Carolina, down 37-36 at intermis-
sion, ran off a string to take com-
mand. The Lady Pirates scored the
first six points on a pair of jumpers
by Jones sandwiched around a
basket by Mary Denkler. The Lady
Pirates never lost the lead again
UNC-W forward Shawn
Williams scores against ECU
during his freshman season.
The Seahawks stand 7-6 on the
season. That winning record is
largely thanks to increased output
and leadership from Williams.
The 6-5 junior forward is averag-
ing 17.4 points and 5.7 rebounds per
game. Williams says he came into
the season looking to improve his
game.
"This year it was a matter of me
saying, '1 can do and I am going to
do it 1 think I had a lot more deter-
mination coming into this year, and
I have developed a lot more con-
fidence than ever as the season has
progressed
When making his remarks about
the Seahawks this week, ECU coach
Dave Odom let it be known that he
had a great deal of respect for the
Washington native.
"Williams seems traditionally to
be a thorn in my side Odom said.
"He has always played extremely
well against us. We are going to
have to try to do something about
him Thursday night
No doubt Williams will be ready
for the Pirates' greeting. After all,
homecomings do not come along
everyday.
after that.
Jones, who scored 14 of her 19
points in the second half, paced the
way, while point guard Lorainne
Foster and Lillion Barnes helped
push the Lady Pirates out to as
much as a six-point lead, but
couldn't break away from ftorth
Carolina.
With 2:54 left and time running
out on the 30-second clock, Fran
Hooks hit a jumper from the key for
a 64-58 lead. From that point, the
Tar Heels had to resort to the foul,
and in the final minutes. East
Carolina connected on five of six
free throw tries to put the game
away.
In the first half. Brown scored 18
oi the first 20 Tar Heel points as the
Heels moved out front by as much
as four points, 32-28, in the late
stages of the period. Brown hit a
pair of free throws to set that
margin.
A Hooks jumper with seven
seconds left in the half pulled the
Pirates within one, 37-36, and set
the stage for the second half
takeover by East Carolina.
ECU's game plan, with Denkler
getting double-teamed, was to get
the ball to the off-side for the short
jumper, and it worked quite well ac-
cording to Coach Cathy Andruzzi,
as Jones, Barnes, Hooks and Foster
got 10-foot jumpers near the basket.
In the meantime. East Carolina's
defense made it tough on the Heels
to score inside. After shooting 56.7
percent in the first half, the Tar
Heels shot only 40 percent in the se-
cond. Crawford, Henrietta Walls
and Meredith W hite, who each have
seasonal averages in double figures,
contributed a total of eight points in
the game.
Turnovers also were a key factor,
as the Pirates forced 23 by the Tar
Heels while committing only 15 of
their own.
Despite a wide Tar Heel reboun-
ding edge. 48-31, Harrison ended
the game as the overall leader with
11. Carolina was paced by Ranti
Killian with 10 and Brown with
nine.
In addition to Jones' 19, Denkler
finished with 13. while Barnes had
12. No one besides Brown scored in
double figures for the Lady Heels.
"Our kids played an excellent, ex-
cellent basketball game Andrui
said. "The difference in the game
was that our kids played solid, fun-
damental basketball.
"Usually, when you are out-
rebounded like we were and
outscored from the floor, you lose,
but the kev was that our kids have
matured and took the hall ti
them. We had only 15 turnovers to
their 23 and we had II steals VV
had full control ol the game
Andruzzi said thai the P
defense keyed the win, maki
outstanding plavs hi keep Carol
from making a comeback after E '
had taken the lead. "Harrison
an outstanding job on Crawford in
the first half, and after they, tool
her out, we put her on Brown in
second half, and she did a good job
there too Andruzzi also noted
that Jones had eight rebounds and
five steals in leading the Pirates.
"Hooks plaved an excellent del
sive game, too she added.
� Iliis was the type oi game where
we had to be on the bali head-wise
because thev were making so ni
changes in the lineup. We had to
make a lot oi adjustments, and
Rosie (Thompson � now assisting
in coaching) did a great job oi gel
ting us on the right people
The 1 adv Pirates return to action
on Friday, hosting nationally rank-
ed Division II Campbell m tin S
p.m. game oi the Duke-Fast
Carolina doubleheadet in Mmges
Coliseum. Duke takes on lames
Madison at 6 p.m and the two host
teams switch opponents foi Samr-
dav nieht's action.
Denkler, Relay Team
Make National Lists
Noting the Pirates:
LADY PIRATE forward Mary
Denkler is the state's leading
women's scorer, averaging 21.7
points per game.
That figure also ranks Denkler
17th in the nation among Division I
players.
Her best performances of the
season came against Northwestern
and Miami (Ohio). She poured in 29
points in both contests.
FIVE OTHER Lady Pirates are
among the national leaders as well.
They are featured on the women's
track team.
The ECU women's 200-yard
freestyle relay team is ranked fourth
in the nation among Division I
schools by Swimming World
Publications. Making the honor
even more impressive is the fact that
the Lady Pirates are a Division II
team.
ECU's time of 1:40.59, recorded
in the Penn State Relays, stands as
the fourth best in the nation this
year.
The fivesome of Carol Shacklett,
Moria McHugh, Nancy James, Lori
McQueston and Nan George com-
bined for the time.
North Carolina's time of 1:37.29
tops the list. The remainder of the
top ten is, in order, West Virginia,
Pittsburgh, ECU, Houston,
Alabama, Michigan State, James
Madison, Virginia Tech and
Michigan.
Charles
Chandler
TONIGHT'S ECU HOME MAT-
CHUP with UNC-Wilmington br-
ings two players to Greenville that
could have been Pirates.
Forward Shawn Williams, the
Seahawks' leading scorer, hails
from nearby Washington and is said
to have been atfacted to ECU dur-
ing his high school days. He was
never offered a scholarship from the
Pirates, though.
The same can be said for UNC-W
point guard Frankie Dickens, the
team's second-leading scorer.
A Roxboro native, Dickens also
was interested in East Carolina but
later decided on Wilmington. The
Pirates ceased recruiting Dickens
when guard Herbert Gilchrist signed
on as a Buc.
Though the information may be
just picky, don't be surprised to see
good performances from both
Williams and Dickens.
IT WAS EVIDENT Wednesday
night what such feelings can do for
college players. UNC's Michael Jor-
dan scored 20 points to lead the top-
ranked Tar Heels to a 61-41 win
over N.C. State. Jordan says he
grew up a State fan but opted to go
to Chapel Hill because of the en-
vironment. He stated earlier in the
week that he was looking forward to
playing in the coliseum thai he once
thought would be his college basket-
ball home.
CHUCK BLSHBLCK. the E I
placekicker who battled Hodgkin's
disease to play for the Pirates this
past fall, has returned home to
Philadelphia.
Bushbeck has transferred back to
Villanova, his college home for
three years before the school drop-
ped its football program. Bushbeck
moved back and will graduate this
spring. If he had remained at ECU
he would have had to have forfeited
many of the academic hours he had
earned at Villanova.
His disease, by the wav. is in
remission and his chances for
recovery look bright.
ECU GUARD CHARLES
W ATKINS will rejoin his Pirate
teammates for tonight's game with
UNC-W. He had been on a volun-
tary leave of absence before return-
ing to practice Tuesday.
Wat kins missed four games dur-
ing the absence and, says Pirate
coach Dave Odom, will have to
work himself back into the ECU
lineup. He had been a regular before
taking the leave.
Mark McLaurin and Bill McNair
have shared time at the position
while Watkins has been out.
McLaurin will get the starting call
tonight.
�:�:�:
t
I





10
THE EASTCAROl INIAN
JANUARY 14, I9K2
IM Sign- Up Is Set
The ECU Intramural Department would like to
welcome back all students, faculty and staff
members from the holidays. Again, ue will offer
activities suited for every participant, no matter
his or her particular desire. So come out and en-
joy the fun. REMEMBhR. PARTICIPATE
RATHER THAN SPECTATE!
For all those who want to rid themselves of that
extra "Holiday Weight" or just get in shape, the
IM Department is offering "Aerobic "Belly
Dancing and "Self-Defense" classes. Registra-
tion is in Memorial Gym, Room 204 between the
hours of 8-12 and 1-5. Fees for the classes are $5
for 1 night per week or $10 for 2 nights per week.
Also $15 per couple will be charged for couples
classes held on Tuesday and Thursday from 5.15 -
6:15. Further information can be obtained at the
Intramural Office or by calling Sue Stanley at
757-6064. Remember these classes start the week
IMSports-N-Shorts
By GREGG MELTON
of Feb. 1st.
Finally. Bob Fox, assistant director of in-
tramurals at ECU would like to encourage any
students interested in officiating IM sports to
please come by his office at Memorial Gym, room
105-A. Officials aie needed in such sportas as
basketball, roller hocke) and Softball. Bob has all
the information concerning the various re-
quirements, experience, etc. Remember to get in
quickIv for training clinics are scheduled starting
next week.
Have a good semester from all of us at the IM
(ffice!
The drinks are on us!
Free Fountain Pepsi!
Order any 12" pizza
and get up to 2 free
cups of Pepsi' If you
order a 16" pizza
you can get up to 4
free cups of Pepsi1
No coupon necessary.
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1201 Charles Blvd
Telephone 758-6660
Our drivers carry less
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Limited de�very area
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1201 Charles Blvd.
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One coupon per pizza.
Expires. 21582
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ir
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One coupon per pizza.
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�M 6 5�
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One coupon per pizza
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1201 Charles Blvd
Telephone 758-6660
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Ray
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Ti
Home of Greenville's Best Meats'
1
PIRATE COUPON-5 DISCOUNT ON
Any Food Order Regardless of Size
Present this coupon and show
your ECU ID to cashier.
Coupon expires Jan 31, 1982
HEAVY WESTERN
SIRLOIN
STEAKS
$199
Lb. 1
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STEAKS
$009
Coca-Cola
2 Liter
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$"28
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Jug
Lb.
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98 C
32 Oz.
10-Oz.
DULANY FROZ.
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2$ oo
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48 $
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Limit one with $10.00 food order.
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7$00
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$128
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CUP THIS COUPON
I
PRICES GOOD FROM JAN. 14-JAN. 16 (THURSSAT.)
I
I
WHITE STAR
SUGAR
5-Lb. Bag
$100
1
with this coupon and $10 00 food order excluding specials
Without coupon Si.51. Limit one per customer. Expires 1 16 82






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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 14, 1982
11
Men Swimmers Need
Win Badly � Scharf
B THOMAS BKAMI
Mall Wnur
"The ECU men swimmers have
got to beat Navv to have a winning
season proclaimed Pirate Coach
Ray Scharf after a disappointing
loss to Maine.
The loss to Maine put the Pirate's
record to 3-2. The loss was due part-
!v to the absence of the ducts. " The
loss of the divers hurt our team both
psychologically and physically ex-
plained Pirate mentor Scharf, "we
lost 14 points due to then absence.
that hurts
Navy is a Formidable opponent
lot the Pirates with a record o 1-1.
1 hen only loss was a close one to a
g ixl Harvard team fhe meet with
the Pitates is set for 1 p.m. on
Saturday here at the Minges
Natatonum.
I he lads Pirate swimmers will
also meet Navy on Saturday. The
women are coming off a big win
against James Madison, lour na-
tional qualifying times were achiev-
ed in that victory. I he women are
doing well, ihen record standing at
2 I
I he women o' the Naval Academy
have a record of - thus far this
season.
This meet against Navy is the
toughest dual meet foi our swim-
mers thus tat in oui year said
I v I coach Scharf. " I his is also
the binges) for us thus far
Sports Writer
Needed
Person must
have avid interest
& experience in
Sports Journalism
Call 757-6366
or come by
East Carolinian
office.
Classifieds
FOR SALE
Tourney Tickets Available
lick ets to the
I CAC-South tourna-
ment, to be held March
4-6 at the Norfolk
Scope, will be given
awa at each remaining
ECU home came. Also,
tickets are available for
purchase at the Minges
ticket office.
Fen books of tickets
to the tourney will be
give to students for al!
of ECU's remaining
home dates. Students
can also buv as main
books of tickets as thev
want for $9 each. The
regular price is SI2.
The book ol tickets
will admit students to
each oi the tourney's
six games. Three first-
round games will be
played on rhursday,
March. 4; two semi-
final matchups on Fri-
day, Match 5; and the
championship game on
Saturday. March 6.
The tournament win-
ner will go on to play in
the NCAA Tourna-
ment.

ADVERTISING
PAYS OFF
WALKMAN MINI cJSifIW player.
Excellent stereo sound. Excellent
price. Call 757 3110
SUPERSCOPE C 10 por
tablecassette playerrecorder.t
single roll away bed. S cu It.
retng. Call 7S2 140
WATERBEOS! DON'T pay retail
tor your heated waterbed. buy
direct from mtg. and save. Buy a
complete 1st quality pine wood
heated waterbed with IS yr. war
ranty tor as low as �1OT (Queen)
tit (King). Lawaway available
Call Oavid for appointment
FW1BM,
DAN POST bullh.de boots I0D.
General Lee hat 7' silver. Must sell
HOC or best offer (New) Call
751 HOI or 757 MJ4 I
INDOOR YARD sale-Fn
through Sun All day. furniture
clothing, etc 1103 Glen Arthur
Ave . 757 80t
STEREO EQUIPMENT for
sale� 30 watt Fisher FM Stereo
with Quadrophonic
capability�its, Toshiba Cassette
deck (3 months old) with Dolby
NR�$100. Radio Shack's best
headphones by Koss� S30, must
sell (graduating this semester) so
all prices are negotiable. Ask for
David at 757 3107 or come by 110
E Tenth St. (two blocks from the
bottom of the Hill next to Beverly
Manor Apts.)
FOR RENT
ROMMATE WANTED: Available
immediately. One-half mile from
campus MO per month plus one
third utilities. Pool, tennis courts,
if interested call 714 Mt or
7 57 30�
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share Georgetolwn apt. (one block
from campus). Phone 750 171
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 1 bedroom trailer 50 per
month ptus one half utilities.
Prefer working student. Call
7S �0l after 4 p.m
ROOMMATE WANTED
SlOOmonth plus share utilities. 3
blocks from campus, ww carpel,
full house privileges, some very
nice extras. 7JI S04
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
140 per month plus one half
utilities. Private bedroom. Call
Laura at 7S1-M9S.
MALE ROOMMATE needed
171.00 rent, one third utilities.
Phone 355 415. )00A Juniper Lane
on the corner of 14th and Red
banks.
TWO ROOMMATES needed to
share large 4 bedroom houuse 1
blocks trom the Attic. Have own
bedroom. S7S plus ' utilities per
person Call 7SI 70
HELP
WANTED
EARN EXTRA cash CLommis
sion agents lor ECU dor
mitories Shiver Shoe Repair 472
Dickinson Ave. 7St 42 (day)
752 472 (night)
PERSONAL
TYPING
TERM.
thesis.
resumes, desserlations. etc. Pro
fessionel quality at lowest rates
Call Kempie Dunn anytime,
752733
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST wants
typing to do at home. Reasonable
rates Call 754 30
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST-lor
term, research, thesis papers, ar
tides tor publication, disserta
tions, etc Reasonable rates Call
757 I37t
ATTN WILSON commuters r.de
needed daily to and from ECU
Will share expenses Call im
mediately Sherry 243 30
(Wilson) Ride sharing option
NEED COMMUTERS from
Goldsboro to ECU daily 77t 3727
MIKE. JUNE 3 sounds great' I
can't think ol anything better tnn
to spend the rest o( my life with
you (and cheering the Baltimore
Colts to victory??) Beth
Ticket Pick-Up Set
In an attempt to
a oid congestion in
front of Minges Col-
iseum on game nights.
the ECU athletic
department is making
tickets to men's basket-
It was incorrectly
stated in Tuesday's edi-
tion of The Fast Caroli-
nian that pre-game
pick-up for women's
basketball games would
also be available. In-
USED
TIRES
$10.00
inquire at
Evans Seafood
Current undergraduate pre
medical student? moy now com
pete tor several hundred Air
Force scholarships These
icholorship are to be o-orded
to student accepted into
medical schools as freshmen or
at the beginning o their
sophomore year The scholar
ship provides (or tuition books
lab tees and equipment plus a
SS30 monthly ollowance In
vestigote this financial alter
native to the high cost of
medical education
Contact
I S VI III l 111
I'm it ssn�
KM Kl HIM.
Suite GL 1 1 lOONovoho Df
Raleigh M C 27689
Phone Collect 91 9)755-41 34
BOYD'S
BARBER &
HAIR
STYLING
By Appointments
1008 S. Evans
Greenville
Phone 758 4056
ball games available to stead, students will be
students prior to each up ticket stubs for Lad)
home contest. Pirate games just prior
to gametime.
lit
Shampoo,
Cut & Style
with conditioner
(reg. $14.50)
i
NOW
Spring RUSH
"efHTyCer
Carolina east mall Sgreenviile
EASTERN CAROLINA'S MOST
COMPLETE COSMETIC AND
FRAGRANCE STORE
A BIG OFFER
FROM
ESTEE LAUDER
s
803
Hooker
Rd.
For Rides call:
756-3540
Starts Monday, Jan. 18 - 8:30
Carolina East Mall 756 8694
THE QUILTFLOWER
BEAUTY BAG
FULL OF
PRETTY SECRETS

come join us
every Sunday
SURDKY
BUFFET
The
Kappa Sigma
Fraternity
invites you to
Rush
700th East 10th St.
Beside Darryl's 1907
Monday � Go Greek
Kappa Sig Style
Tuesday � Kappa Sig's
Famous Playboy
Bunny Nite
Starts at 8:30
for more info. caS
752-5543
A 28.00 value
and it
can be yours for
8.50 with any
Estee Lauder purchase
of 6.50 or more.
Zip open Estee Lauder's beauty bag and
you'll find: a Basic Cleaning Bar, Max-
imum Care Body Lotion, Azuree Sham-
poo, RE-NUTRIV Rich Rich Lipstick,
European Performing Creme and a
special hair comb. For your travel and
beauty life, a pretty, portable beauty bag
of makeup magic. All so you can look
your best always.





r�w
Welcomes
Copyright 1981
Kroger Sav on
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold to Dealers
Items and Prices
Effective thru Sat
Jan 16 1982
Back to the Books

V�
ADVERTISED ITEM
POLICY
Each of ihese advertised
items is required to be
readwy available for sale
in each Kroger Savon
except as specifically
noted in this ad It we do
run out of an item we will
offer you your choice of
a comparable item when
available reflecting the
samsavmgs or a ram
check which will entitle
you to purchase the
advertised item at the
advertised price within
30 days
-? s
-vyiYM

Stroh
STROH'S OR
Beer
12 Oz
Cans
PREMIUM
Michelob Beer
1202
N R
Btls
n
.
16-Oz.
N R
Btls
REFRESHING
f�a
C
-
T M.
W&
HI
CHABLIS. BURGUND
RHINE OR
"V
vft

"7'7
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(

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H

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Jm V rr-r Ji
Carlo Rossi
$
fe
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m

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: I
ill
ZK
y? C Bgftggpr K ROG E R
White Bread
U S GOVT INSPECTED
3 LB CHUB PACK
Ground Beef


Lb
PAPER
�.
Brawny Towels
Jumbo
Roll
NORTHERN
Bathroom Tissue
Roll
Pkq
"A
(

"J
ULTRA RICH OR CONDITIONER
Make L'Oreal Shampo
Kroger Sav-on . j
Your ONE Stffl 7 7i
STOP � � " '
SHOPPING
Headquarters
all through
the year!
16-Oz
Btl
Q
TJ
m
P
1 5-
Ltr.
24-Oz
Loaves
COUNTRY CLUB
Ice Milk
Gal
Ctn
YUBI OLD WORLD
ESPRIT OR
Kroger Yogurt
,0
V&L
6-8 Oz
Cups
FRESH
Nimpo
Mushrooms
-v
to
Lb


FLORIDA
INDIAN RIVER
Grapefi
FRESH IN STORE MADE
CHEESE OR
Pepperoni Pizza's


�r
rr
?l
j
40-Ct.
Size
.1
w. g
For
BEST-RITE
Filler Paper
ASSORTED
Blankets
200-Ct.
Size
BEST-RITE
Typing Paper
�&S Hit
EUJiRmPER
SHEETS
72" x 90'
Size
DISPOSABLE
Cricket Lighter
100-Ct.
Size
OPEN Mon. thru Sat. 8 AM TO MIDNIGHT�Sun. 9 AM TO 9 PM
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
3-Pack1
Size





4
H�h�ttiKv;v
I
POCKET THE !
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Start Saving Wrangler Stamps Today!
Just come into a participating Hardee's rest-
aurant and get a Wrangler stamp each time
you buy any Best Eatin'sandwich or breakfest
biscuit Collect five stamps on your Wrangler
,�? 1 CTr?3AlTVit fTn Ik W jf: 1 iTTiiT I STJ if :T
pair of first quality Wrangler Jeans!
. �
�: ���
ML'i'4'
nu �7" '�� MIV11
tSJ ��� � ��:�- �' �.��
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P.
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CaC3 "r. J i i i i vr 'f "JtA3LjrxL3cac
( oBed a rangier �.lamp from the cashier each time ynu buy any Best Kat in' sanilw ich or break
fact biscuit. Jlicn place the stamp in one of the .space below. I'oHect five stamps, am) yon can
i nier a great pair of first quality Wrangler Jeans. See other side for details.
MEN'S WRANGLER JEANS
KIDS' WRANGLER JEANS
(Plus �52 shipping & handling jut pain
l Plus 52 shipping handling hm pan
�j1
t
If f I ITTI I I I I I I TTTT'ia
'HardM's Food Systems. Inc 1981





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D Two Regular Roast Beef Sandwiches
Gtxxi at all participating Hardee's restaurants. Please present this
coupon tefore ordering. One coupon per customer please. Cus-
t nier must pay any sales tax due on the purchase price. This
coupon not gixxi in comhination with any other offers.
Good after 10:30 A.M. thru January 20,1982
2 Reg RB. 2 Less. Reg R B
Ho'Oees'ooaSrtierns .nc '98'
�ll
Q Two Hot Ham 'N' Cheese Sandwiches
Good at all participating Hardee's restaurants. Please present this
coupon before ordering. One coupon per customer please. Cus-
U mer must pay any sales tax due on the purchase price This
coupon not good in combinati( n with any ther (ffers.
Good January 21 - 27,1982
2HHNC.2 Less H H N C
as
(0CMb CO
nif) CMbo CM
NCJCM
1?CO CMif) CMX
IXCM CMCO CMz
EIV.CMCM CME
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09 UJ Nfb)is
00 l CO1 5 5CO CD U) ct o 0) to
ncrdee s kxxl Systems nc

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El Two Sausage and Egg Biscuits
(iood at all partiapatinK Haniee's restaurants. Please present this ctxspt n
stumer picas Customer must pay am
This(�mp.in n t ��� in ombinatin
liefore ordering, i me coupon percustomer please. Customer must paj any
sales tax due on the purchase price. �"
with an 'ther offers
Good during the hours breakfast is served
thru January 27,1982
20
2 Sausage E B 2 Less Egg Biscuit
Mordees'oocryV. ��
Ql Two Regular Roast Beef Sandwiches
GoodatallparucipaUngHardeerestauraiiUs Please present this coupon Jt
befi ire (mlennR. I hie o nip n per custi mer pleas t usU mer must pa any
sales tax due on the purchase price This coupon not good in combmaUon m
with any other offers. r
Good after 10:30 A.M.
January 28 - February 3,1982
1.79
2 Reg R B 2 Less Reg R B
narcJee s food Svstes
'wmmmmmm
3 TWo Hot Ham 'N' Cheese Sandwiches
Ckxxi at all participating Hardee's restaurants. Please present this
coupon before ordering. (ne a upon per cusfc mer please. Cus-
umer must pay any sales tax due (n the purchase price. This
coupon not gixni in combination with any other offers
Good February 4 10,1982
2NHNC.2 Less HHNC
5 MXX3 SvV�" " ' - : '
3 TWo Sausage and Egg Biscuits
(rtXKiatallpartieiaUnMHanlet'sivstaunuu Plea- pnnt thisupon
beforeonlering.(ne-ouponperiustonerpUas�- i usiomer must pay an
sales tax due on the pun-haM-pnee This coupon not iod in combination
with any other offers tf
Good during the hours breakfast is ser ed
January 28 - February 10,1982
2 Sausage E B 2 Less Egg Biscuit
Hoioeesoodbvs'es -v
20
�V-





Title
The East Carolinian, January 14, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 14, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.170
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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